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BETHANY

ABAN P O R T F O L I O

B.A. ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE ‘16


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DIRECTORY

I–PATTERN 8 - ANALYSIS : PAPER TEA HOUSE | hampshire college | fall 2014 14 - NAHABING BAHAY | hampshire college | fall 2014

II – C O N C E P T U A L 24 - SHELTER | amherst college | fall 2014 28 - LANDSCAPE | mount holyoke college | spring 2016 32 - OBJECT | mount holyoke college | spring 2016 36 - STRUCTURE | mount holyoke college | spring 2016

III – C O N N E C T I O N 42 - NITOBE MEMORIAL HALL | university of massachusetts, amherst | fall 2015

IV – p e r s o n a l 54 - HOTEL ADRIANO STUDY | watercolor | july 2014 56 - CARA DELEVINGNE | graphite | june 2015 58 - KEIRA KNIGHTLEY | graphite | july 2015

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welcome

The bodies of work included in this portfolio are a sample of the four years of experience in a liberal arts approach to architectural studies. Centered in the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, the works are influenced by various people, minds, and thought processes from five different colleges. Each project was created in vastly different creative environments depending on the college, professor, and students. Each experience brought new perspectives and an ever changing understanding of how design relates to people and place. As a whole, my work aims to create meaning and connection to the space the project occupies. Whether that may include a shelter from outdoor elements, two objects interlacing with one another, or a direct connection to an ancient scholar, the significance of connection and meaning have priority. I hope that the influence of the various spaces and people I have had the privilege of working with are evident in this story of a liberal arts experience.

Thank you

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I

PAT T E R N

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FALL 2014

PAPER TEA HOUSE

NAHABING BAHAY

TEA HOUSE DESIGN/BUILD

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FALL 2014

HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

NAOMI DARLING

A N A L Y S I S

PAPER TEA HOUSE

TEA HOUSE DESIGN/BUILD

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PHOTO CARLY RICHMAN


ANALYSIS SHIGERU BAN, PAPER TEA HOUSE,2008 Why would only one wall possess a scattered arrangement while the others were fairly uniform in their patterns? What was the reasoning behind a singular idiosyncrasy? METHOD To unveil Ban’s intent, the wall spaces were broken down by size and assigned a color for each unit. Distinguishing which sizes were repeated throughout the structure and which ones were contained to a single wall, became a much simpler process. The walls that displayed a strong sense of organization had one or two dominant colors, while the unique wall possessed an array of colors. CONCLUSION The outlier of the walls was a symbol for the natural view associated with a traditional tea house. The users of the tea house would be drawn to this wall just as users of a traditional tea house would be drawn to the view of a garden. Since Ban was lacking a permanent location for his portable tea house, the unique wall acted as his natural view for both the hosts and guests.

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PHOTO CARLY RICHMAN


DRAWING PLAN+ELEVATIONS+SECTION

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DRAWING AXONOMETRIC ANALYSIS

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FALL 2014

HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

NAOMI DARLING

NAHABING BAHAY WOVEN HOUSE

TEA HOUSE DESIGN/BUILD

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PHOTO AMELIA GUERVA


NAHABING BAHAY FEATURED IN GALLERY EXHIBITION HAROLD F. JOHNSON LIBRARY GALLERY JANUARY 9-30, 2015 I desired to create a structure that embraced the ideals of minimalism, but also included a layer of intricacy. Nahabing Bahay (“Woven House” in Tagalog) consists of two half arches, four wooden dowels, and one sheet of woven material. It was designed and built within 45 days on a $60 budget. There are no solid walls and the structure is designed to lean on any desired surface. The dowels allow the woven material to gently curve along the shape of the half arches, providing a layer of privacy for the users of the tea house. Minimalism is evident in the form, while the intricacy is apparent in the woven material. From a distance, the woven material is simply a rectangular sheet draped over a half arch, but upon closer inspection, the pattern of the weave appears to delicately transform the space. External lights are softened as they are filtered through the material as the weave becomes the roof and only wall of the structure. By simply resting the structure against a surface, a person can enjoy a private space to enjoy a cup of tea.

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

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PHOTO AMELIA GUERVA


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DRAWING PLAN+ELEVATIONS

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DRAWING PEGGED JOINT

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PHOTO BILL L I

M A T E R I A L S birch dowels, birch hardwood plywood, university of massachusetts canvas laundry bags, duck cloth

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I I

CONCE P T UA L

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FALL 2014

SPRING 2016

SHELTER

LANDSCAPE

OBJECT

STRUCTURE

DIGITAL CONSTRUCTIONS

DIGITAL DESIGN AND THEORY

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FALL 2014

AMHERST COLLEGE

T H O M LO N G

SHELTER

I N T E R M E D I A T E A R C H I T E C T U R A L D E S I G N: DIGITAL CONSTRUCTIONS

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a design progression based on the work of diller + scofidio’s slow house

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SLOW PROGRESSION The development of the “Conceptual Shelter” began with research on Diller + Scofidio’s “Slow House.” The aim was to decipher the overall essence of the structure and break down those perceptions into a visual descriptor. This research was translated into a Photoshop visual analysis that highlighted the idea of the “view” and notions of natural vs. manmade views. The Photoshop analysis progressed into a vector project utilizing Illustrator to showcase the main themes taken from the Photoshop project. This Conceptual Shelter is the third part to the Slow House analysis, where the two-dimensional spheres of the previous projects were left behind in order to explore the three-dimensional world of Rhino. The Conceptual Shelter represents the different angular views that are captured through, between or outside of the paneled system. The shape mimics the tunneled corridor of the Slow House, while the panels and layers are taken directly from the first and second stages.

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PHOTOSHOP

ILLUSTRATOR

RHINOCEROS

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SPRING 2016

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

JEAN JAMINET

LANDSCAPE

DIGITAL DESIGN AND THEORY

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DESIGN COLLABORATION ANH LUU

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GREG LYNN-FAMILIES The “Conceptual Landscape” derives its characteristics from Gregg Lynn’s essays on design families. The Family that was most closely researched and represented in the design is “Family 1.” Family 1 focuses on surface generation and the characteristics associated with that process. For example, undulation, crease, bulging, pinching, sweeping, etc all fall under Family 1. Greg Lynn stated, “a family is not just a group of designed singularities, it is also the array or constellation of construction elements in a whole building.” The landscape that Anh Luu and I designed incorporates characteristics such as: undulation, pinching, folding in order to create a tiered landscape that flows from varying heights. We looked to Issey Miyake’s Spring Collection 2016 for inspiration in direction and flow.

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RENDER VARYING ANGLES

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SPRING 2016

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

OBJECT

DIGITAL DESIGN AND THEORY

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JEAN JAMINET


DESIGN COLLABORATION ANH LUU

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LANDSCAPE

OBJECT

This 3D printed object was the next stage in the three-part design series of Digital Design and Theory. The objective in this design was to exploit the main attributes of the previous design (Landscape) and translate those attributes to either compliment or contrast the previous design. With either decision, the designs had to be coherent with one another in terms of visual language. The “Object” would have to fit in a 5”x5” plot on the landscape and would work to serve as an extension of the landscape and its design properties. The design of the object began with a focus on the curvature of the landscape. Anh Luu and I desired to contrast the natural attributes of the landscape with a more synthetic design, but the curvatures would act as visual link between the two entities. Placing the object at the intersection of the vertical and horizontal planes in the landscape, visually showcases how the curves of the landscape flow into the object and how the two different entities are a part of the same series.

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RENDER OBJECT PLACEMENT

OBJECT/LANDSCAPE CONNECTION

3D PRINTED MODEL

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SPRING 2016

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

JEAN JAMINET

STRUCTURE

DIGITAL DESIGN AND THEORY

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DESIGN COLLABORATION ANH LUU

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MESHING TOGETHER The final project for Digital Design and Theory required the utilization of the skills and terminology acquired in the previous designs. Rather than create within the same parameters of the last two designs, we were tasked to create meshes of a landscape and object. They were designed in tandem to allow for a fluidity between the design techniques and the terminology. This design project was also a departure from the familiar Rhino design process, due to the introduction to meshes. Implementing characteristics such as crease, tessellate, panelize, ripple, etc. on this new surface was simplified in order to accommodate for the surface limitations. Our design began from the base up in order to unify the two entities. We wanted to create the feeling that the object grew out of the base - following the lines and the angles. The base became a dynamic, pinwheel in which every angle created a multifaceted visual. The object consists of two interconnected masses that have been “cut” or “carved” in order to carry the same dynamic nature of the base into the structure.

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RENDER VARYING ANGLES

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I I I

CON N E CTION

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FALL 2015

NITOBE MEMORIAL

DESIGN V

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FALL 2015

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST

NITOBE MEMORIAL

DESIGN V

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RAY MANN


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NITOBE MEMORIAL HALL EAST 4 CHOME, SOUTH 4 JYO, CHUO-KU SAPPORO, JAPAN CONCEPT Connecting the building structure to Inazo Nitobe’s work on Bushido by creating a sectional layout inspired by Bushido’s calligraphic symbols. BUSHIDO Among many of Nitobe’s work was his writings on Bushido, which engaged in an enquiry into the ethos of Japanese culture. As a man who felt connected to both Japan and the United States, Nitobe strove to seek connections between the two cultures. The eight virtues of Bushido are: rectitude, courage, benevolence, politeness, sincerity, honor loyalty, and self-control. From the calligraphic symbols of benevolence and sincerity, I was inspired to form a sectional organization that roughly follows the bold brushstrokes. This translation between Nitobe’s work and the sectional layout allows for a symbolic connection between Nitobe’s ideals and the physical layout of the Memorial Hall.

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MAKOTO (SINCERITY)

JIN (BENEVOLENCE)

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EAST 4 CHOME, SOUTH 4 JYO, CHUO-KU SAPPORO, JAPAN

Light played a major factor in deciding the final position of the memorial hall. Since the site was located in a dense, urban area with several high-rise apartments, access to natural lighting became priority. The North East Corner proved to be the best candidate for the building’s location - with its proximity to the street and optimal position for natural lighting throughout the year.

In addition to natural lighting, the form of the structure needed to adhere to the sectional organization of my concept. The entire memorial needed to have elements of the “see-sawing” derived from the Japanese calligraphic symbol. With that in mind, a butterfly roof allowed for the internal structuring to carry-through to the exterior facade.

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WINTER SOLSTICE

EQUINOX

SUMMER SOLSTICE

LIGHT/SHADOW STUDY

10:00AM 4:00PM

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GROUND + LEVEL 1 3

1 - GENKAN (ENTRY) 2 - INDOOR COURTYARD 3 - EXHIBITION HALL 4 - CLASSROOM 5 - KITCHENETTE / NURSERY 6 - BATHROOM

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SECTION A

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LEVEL 2 + LEVEL 3 7

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6 - BATHROOM 7 - LIBRARY STORAGE 8 - LIBRARY 9 - STUDY ROOM / MEETING ROOM

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SECTION B

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SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

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SOUTHEAST VIEW(SUMMER)

SOUTHEAST VIEW (WINTER)

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PERS ON A L

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JULY 2014

JULY 2015

HOTEL ADRIANO

CARA DELEVINGNE

KEIRA KNIGHTLEY

WATERCOLOR

GRAPHITE

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HOTEL ADRIANO

MEDIUM WATERCOLOR D AT E JULY 2014 DIMENSIONS 5 ” x 7” 54


Gh ibl i S t udy The original was by background designer for Studio Ghibli, Kazuo Oga. The environments he fabricated were always done with such care and love that they became just as powerful as the beautiful storylines of the famed films. This specific scene is from Miyazaki’s 1992 “Porco Rosso” that follows the story of an unusual pilot in the Adriatic Sea. In my study, I attempted to understand Oga’s talent with color and how small details make all the difference in an otherwise simple composition. This study acted as my first attempt in working in the watercolor medium and stands as my first watercolor project.

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CARA DELEVINGNE

MEDIUM GRAPHITE D AT E JULY 2015 DIMENSIONS 7” x 5.5” 56


FA CI A L U N DE RS TAN DING For years, my main line of artistic work has been drawing people. As a young girl, I began with cartoon characters in order to understand facial structures and also because I wanted to draw my favorite tv show characters. Over time my interests grew towards a more realistic rendering of humans and taking the basics I had learned from cartoon drawings to something more three-dimensional. This particular piece was chosen because it represents my return to drawing people after a long hiatus. Before the hiatus, my drawings were s till dependent on the 2D practices I was used to. I could not get away from dominant outlines and hard lines. During my hiatus I began to observe and see. I understood how different faces worked on different people and the unique lines everyone carries. It was with that understanding and after 3 years, that my first drawing captured the essence of what I was looking for in the past.

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KEIRA KNIGHTLEY

MEDIUM GRAPHITE D AT E JULY 2015 DIMENSIONS 3.5” x 5.5” 58


F URT HER ING T H E S T U D Y Continuing the breakthrough from “Cara Delevingne�, I desired to see what else I could accomplish in portraiture drawing. Restricting/challenging myself by using a small canvas, I wanted to see how realistic I could make small details of a different texture in contrast to the structure of a face. While the eyes are always the focus in any por traiture drawing I do, I put just as much effort into the detailing of the other features, like Keira’s cap. I introduced different textures into my drawing and gained a better understanding of how gravity affects a larger range of inanimate objects. This became the latest in my line of portraiture drawing and represents the second stage of my breakthrough in realistic drawing.

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THANK YOU FOR YOUR

TIME

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Bethany Aban Undergraduate Architectural Studies Portfolio