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RE I

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ZINE ISSUE 01 MODERN DAY FEMINISM

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EXPLORING MODERN DAY FEMINISM.

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feminism /fɛmɪnɪz(ə)m/ noun the advocacy of women’s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes. synonyms: the women’s movement, the feminist movement, women’s liberation, female emancipation, women’s rights.

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THE BAD FEMINIS 1. Contrary to popular belief, not all female friendships are bitchy and competitive. This is a myth – like the Loch Ness monster, created to slow the female race down. Embrace your girlfriends. 2. Keep an open mind and stay friendly (or at least try). 3. IT IS OKAY TO CONSIDER YOURSELF A FEMINIST AND STILL LIKE “GIRLY” THINGS. Love makeup. Love your shopping addiction and your excessive amount of clothes. Love your bags and heels. Most importantly – love yourself. 4. If you feel like it is hard to be friends with other women for one reason or another, have a think about that. Other women may not be the problem. Maybe the problem is you. 5. Do not let the words of others define who you are. 6. DO NOT believe in “you are what you eat”. That is an old wives’ tale made to deter women from the finer things in life. Just because you eat an alarming amount of Kit Kats does not in fact mean you resemble a chocolaty mound of Kit Kat goodness. 7. If you want to eat junk food and exercise only very, very occasionally that is also completely fine. 8. Remember girl code. Don’t get involved, physically or emotionally, in your friend’s current partner’s/ex partners/potential lovers. This shouldn’t need to be said, but it needs to be said.

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STS MANIFESTO 9. Don’t be jealous of your friends. Even if they are massively succeeding in their careers and you’ve been stuck in the same position for four years, or if they’ve rocked up to your door with the latest Gucci bag. Always want the best for them – or at least pretend. 10. Do not tear other women down. Even if they are not your friends and you have a mutual dislike. You are both women. This is important. There is enough hatred surrounding the female race in the world being spouted from misogynistic men. 11. Selflessly help your friends in any way you can. What comes around goes around and good WILL come back to you. Even if it takes a while. 12. Make an effort with your friends and/or close family’s kids. Even if you don’t like them that much. Again, just pretend. 13. Surround yourself with good people (and good food). Life is too short for fake friends (the same goes for fake food). 14. Don’t plaster your woes across social media. Or at least try and refrain from doing so. Also, when it is blatantly obvious that you are upset or in a bad mood and a friend and/or family member asks if you are alright, do not reply with “I’m fine”. They know you’re not. This just wastes time. If you’re having a hard time, TALK. This is so important. Your friends and family are there to confide in. 15. If you’re out wining and dining with friends, split the bill evenly. We are all adults now. Even better, if you’re balling with money at the time and living the champagne lifestyle then treat your friends. Like I said before, what comes around goes around. Karma is good.

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THE EMPRESS IS AN ARCHETYPE OF FEMININE POWER; SHE IS WATERY, HARD TO FATHOM, MYSTERIOUS, FERTILE AND SEXUAL. SHE AUGURS A NEED FOR US TO BE IN TOUCH WITH OUR FEMININE SIDE, TO LISTEN TO OUR INTUITION AND TO GIVE PRIORITY TO OUR EMOTIONS AND PASSIONS. SHE CAN SIGNIFY COMING ABUNDANCE.

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BIANCO PERRY A.K.A. JENNIE EYRE CROSS STITCH EXTRAORDINAIRE A mini interview with the North’s cheeriest Sheffield gal. Where did you get the name Bianco Perry from? Bianco Perry is my business name and it came from a long night of the “my name has no ring to it” saga. I tried thinking of my favourite things in the world and Lambrini was obviously at the top of the list. Bianco means white and Perry means fake wine. It’s my dream name. How did you get into cross stitching? I have always liked sewing and used to watch my mum doing it from an early age - she had a big machine with a clunky foot and she used to let me push the foot for her. I used to press it to the floor so it would go so fast it sounded like a car and then I would get told off. I sew by hand now so this can’t happen. My mum’s the coolest woman I know and if I could be anything like her I would be really happy. What are your views on feminism? I do believe women’s rights are really important. I don’t ever call myself a feminist as I see it as a normal thing being equal to a male, it shouldn’t have to have its own name it should be called being a normal human. I also call all the amazing people that are surrounding me, both male and female, friends instead of feminists. I’m generally not friends with mean people who would segregate others like that. Where do you see yourself in 5 years time? In five years I see myself laughing, being surrounded by Labrini and lots of colourful threads and eating halloumi. Describe yourself in 3 words? Fun, fluffy and positive!

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GIRL BOSS COLLEGE STUDENT

IMOGEN

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So, what are you doing with yourself right now? I’m studying Classics, Pschology, English Literature and Art at A-Level. I’m working really hard; exam season is coming up and I really need good grades to get into university. I’m learning Spanish right now too - I just love the sound of the language. What are you hoping to study at university? Classics. It’s the study of ancient romans and the Greeks, like the Spartans. Spartan women were bad ass. What are your hobbies? Reading, writing and playing on my PlayStation 4. I’m really into sci-fi, romance and action and adventure. Any games you could recommend? Overwatch, definitely. Its got a really diverse cast of “heroes” and it never gets old, boring or repetitive. What are your views on feminism? Femisim is obviously a good thing, although I think the name alienates a lot of people. It stands for equality for all genders, however the name makes it sound like women are trying to dominate which isn’t the case. Where do you see yourself in 5 year’s time? I see myself hopefully finishing university with a decent grade and starting either a teaching course or a PGCE. I’d also love to have visited Spain or Italy, the sights and the scenery over there look amazing. Favourite song right now? Alarm by Anne-Marie. What’s your favourite food? A Japanese prawn noodle soup that my mam makes. Finally, if you could be any animal in the world, what would you be and why? My favourite animal is a cat, but if I could be any animal I would be a tortoise. I could get away with doing nothing and nothing would be expected of me which means no stress!

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THE BEAUTY MEMOIR The beauty mixtape to my life. My earliest memory of makeup is being twelve years of age, sitting on my mam’s bedroom floor, silently attempting to rifle through her makeup bag whilst she pottered round downstairs. She only had a few items: two lipsticks, a L’Oreal powder foundation with a brush attachment, a Collection 2000 concealer stick, a sample sized Clinique mascara and a Rimmel London rose brown lip pencil and black kohl eyeliner. Monday to Friday, before school without fail, I would slather the chalk white concealer stick on my face and pass it off as foundation. Unbeknown was I to the difference between the two. A blot on the chin, one stripe down the nose, two on either cheek, and one straight across the forehead. Then, I would rub HARD. I would make every attempt, although more than often to no avail, to try and blend it into my milky, pre-teenage skin. The consistency was thick and heavy. The texture slightly resembled tacky wallpaper paste. My fingertips patted against my skin created the faintest suction noise. Of course, it was my camouflage during school hours. I didn’t need it, but I stuck out like a sore thumb if I didn’t wear it. Lashings of mascara and a scribble of jet black eye kohl later and I considered myself ready. It’s amusing and yet slightly horrifying looking back at high school photos.

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As soon as I turned 16 I landed my first job at a retailer’s in Newcastle’s Eldon Square. I felt like I’d hit the jackpot with my first ever pay packet, £164. I spent it ALL within the week. It burnt the biggest hole in my pocket. My first ever makeup purchase was a bottle of MAC Studio Fix foundation. The sweet girl at the MAC counter in Fenwick’s took one look at me and enthusiastically told me that we both “definitely had the same skin colour”. Although, we blatantly were most definitely NOT the same skin colour (she had beautiful tanned, olive skin. I was very pale. Oh so pale). I bought into it anyway. It was easily at least five shades too dark for me and had a very strong yellow undertone to it. I must have looked like an extra from The Simpson’s. When I turned 19 and switched to a vegetarian diet, I chose to make more of a conscious effort of buying only cruelty free makeup. Still to this day I’ll walk past the MAC counter and lust after the products and the beautifully crafted makeup brushes, but you know, animal rights and all that. Makeup to me now isn’t just a set of products. It’s became a lifestyle and a regime. It’s something over the years I’ve incorporated into my day to day routine and is no longer a camouflage, it’s an art form. An expression of myself.

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GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! GO CRUELTY FREE! 27


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“I BELIEVE THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN AND GIRLS IS THE UNFINISHED BUSINESS OF THE 21ST CENTURY.” - HILLARY CLINTON

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V O T E

F O R

8th November 2016 – ELECTION DAY What about the women?! Dear Diary, Well isn’t that just a load of bollocks. I’ve never really understood politics; I don’t feel like I know enough surrounding the matter to sufficiently contribute in a conversation or a discussion. However, I have always had a keen interest in it. My first memory of politics is when I was around 11-years-old. I vividly remember the election (and demise) of Gordon Brown and how joyous my mam was that the Labour party succeeded to reign for another four years. As a woman, I did become a lot more aware of politics, not just in the UK but around the world, when I turned 18 and had the right to vote. One aspect I’ve never understood is the taboo surrounding women working in politics. Society and the media pretend it isn’t there, but it is. It’s the same with women working what are traditionally “men’s” jobs. It’s 2016 and yet its still completely dumbfounding for some to have a boiler suit clad female plumber turn up at their door. I’ve experienced this sort of discrimination myself. When choosing my A-Levels, I was so adamant I wanted to go on to university to study Law and train in the industry as a barrister. When my uncle learnt of my ambitions, he laughed and told me that the Law industry was a man’s world and unsuitable for someone like myself. Like myself?! His crude comments still piss me off five years later. My boyfriend studies aeronautical engineering at university and across all three year groups, there is only one female student. I’ve always wondered, why is that? Of course it would be historic to have a female president in the White House. I think that’s why I’m so pro-Hillary. I wanted a woman in the white house. I feel the same about Theresa May.

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H I l L A R Y Although I strongly disagree with what she stands for, it gives me pleasure knowing a woman is the prime minister. Hillary has been running for presidency for a quarter of a century now and is one of the most qualified candidates out there. She lost out most recently to Trump, a business man turned politician, although her lead in the popular vote neared two million. It’s the fifth time the winner of the popular vote has lost out on the election. One article that I really enjoyed reading was one which shone the spotlight on Hillary’s quest to presidency. It was published in Vanity Fair back in 1992. The article was titled “What Hillary Wants” and had a subheading of “The most controversial figure of the election year so far has been a woman, Hillary Clinton, and she isn’t even running for office. Or is she?” She’s famously quoted in the article as saying “I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had tea”. Personally, it’s shocking to look at figures of women in power, not just in the UK but across the world. Men outnumber women 4 to 1 in Westminster. Women’s exclusion from access to power in politics is evidently echoed across the nation, through women in business and in justice. As well as women within the arts and media professions. In the highest three ranks of the Army, the RAF and the Navy, there are no women. The lack of women in power angers me to no end. If I could do even the smallest thing to change that, I’d be happy. Signing off now.

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V O T E

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E Q U A L I T Y

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GLUTEN FREE PEANUT BUTTER COOKIES INGREDIENTS: - 200G OF SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER - 175G OF GOLDEN CASTER SUGAR - 1 LARGE EGG - LARGE HANDFUL OF CHOCOLATE CHIPS (OPTIONAL)

Heat oven to 180C/160C fan/gas 4 and line 2 large baking trays with baking parchment. Measure the peanut butter and sugar into a bowl. Add ¼ tsp fine table salt and mix well with a wooden spoon. Add the egg and mix again until the mixture forms a dough.

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Break off cherry tomato sized chunks of dough and place, well spaced apart, on the trays. Press the cookies down with the back of a fork to squash them a little. The cookies can now be frozen for 2 months, cook from frozen adding an extra min or 2 to the cooking time. Bake for 12 mins, until golden around the edges and paler in the centre. Cool on the trays for 10 mins, then transfer to a wire rack and cool completely. Store in a cookie jar for up to 3 days.

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THE TRAVEL DIARIES

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IBIZA

THE WHITE ISLAND

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IBIZA TOWN

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IBIZA TOWN


CALA GRACIO

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WHY GO? Although it is renowned for having some of the best nightclubs in the world, the island also has one of the world’s most beautiful coastlines with dozens of tiny coves to discover, not to mention some of the most stylish hotels in the Mediterranean. Exploring in autumn and winter, you get much more of an idea of real life in Ibiza, particularly if you delve into the island’s rich history too. WHERE TO GO? For a week of wild partying, stay in the lively resorts of Playa d’en Bossa or San Antonio. Santa Eulalia is more laidback with plenty of waterfront bars and restaurants and good shops. For a cultural fix, explore the hilltop Dalt Vila in Ibiza Town, then slide into a pavement café to soak up the boho vibe. Both coast and countryside are beautiful in spring and autumn, when you might want to get a more natural high with a walking or cycling holiday.

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WHAT TO SEE? Let’s go to the beach, beach... As convenient as it might be to lounge around Playa d’en Bossa, Ibiza rewards those who take a short drive with far more intriguing shores. For softer sands, Aguas Blancas and Cala Llenya remain family favourites. Boat charters. Skip the party cruises advertising champagne showers and topless “DJanes”. For roughly the price of admission, larger groups can charter a boat and sail to less accessible, sugar-sand beaches. Stop by S’Espalmador, a nearby uninhabited island, or the starkly beautiful Es Migjorn on Formentera. Let’s go SHOPPING! Visitors in search of hidden treasures among the touristy knickknacks can scour the hippy markets at Las Dalias. Ibiza town also boasts high street retailers such as Zara, Pull & Bear, Stradivarius, Massimo Duty, MAC and KIKO Cosmetics. Boutique stores include Kurru Kurru, Emonk Ibiza, Mirage Beachwear and Oliver Decoracion.

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SAN ANTONIO MARINA

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REINE  

The first issue of Reine, a zine exploring modern day feminism. Hand picked creative females feature inside, alongside editorials on beauty,...

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