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IN T HIS IS S UE

14 THE YEAR IN REVIEW

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INVESTIGATIONS: DONALD TRUMP IS A BOON TO THE CRIMINAL DEFENSE BAR Probes of the president and his campaign are keeping a lot of lawyers busy.

If the news in 2017 felt like a voyage into uncharted territory, that’s because much of it was.

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LEGAL SPOTLIGHT: THE COERCIVE DIPLOMACY OF ECONOMIC SANCTIONS Economic and other sanctions are often the weapon of choice in foreign policy.

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ON THE BENCH: IN TRUMP’S WORLD, JUDGES ARE THE ENEMIES

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SCOTUS: THE SUPREME COURT IS POISED TO REWRITE CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

SCOTUS: IN NEIL GORSUCH, CONSERVATIVES HAVE GOT THEIR MAN ON THE SUPREME COURT

The docket is full of hot-button issues, from race to sex to privacy.

Donald Trump’s first nominee to the high court is proving a reliable vote for the conservative majority.

The president has made it a point to attack the judiciary.

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COURT POLITICS: JEFF SESSIONS MAY BE HAVING THE LAST LAUGH Donald Trump’s attorney general endured bilious attacks from the president despite being among the first on Capitol Hill to endorse his agenda. THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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LEGAL SPOTLIGHT

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THE COERCIVE DIPLOMACY OF ECONOMIC SANCTIONS

SOUTH KOREAN SOLDIERS STAND GUARD BEFORE NORTH KOREA'S PANMON HALL AND THE MILITARY DEMARCATION LINE SEPARATING NORTH AND SOUTH KOREA AT PANMUNJOM.

Economic and other sanctions are often the weapon of choice in foreign policy. By Molly McCluskey e st r i c t i ng t r a d e a s a for m of statecraft, a waystation of sorts between warfare and traditional diplomacy, has been part of American history nearly since the country’s founding. When used efficiently, economic sanctions can bring rogue nations and their leaders to heel without the need to place troops on the ground; when used thoughtlessly, they can prop up unstable regimes, unnecessarily wound civilians, and undermine a nation’s standing on the world stage. For better or worse, however, sanctions might still be the

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best foreign policy tool around. Although used sparingly until World War I, the case for using economic sanctions as a coercive tool gained popularity following Rhodesia’s—now Zimbabwe—struggle for an internationally recognized independence in 1980. During the Cold War, sanctions were issued against the Soviet Union to prevent the bloc from amassing technological weaponry that could be used against the United States, and during the Yugoslav War, sanctions were used as a means to help end gross human rights violations, including genocide, in the Balkans. “The Cold War sanctions were a quite elaborate effort organized by NATO to impede Soviet access to technology, and it was the first example of a really systematic long-term multilateral effort to impede the progress of a hostile regime and do them harm,” says Michael Oppenheimer, professor at New York University’s School of Professional Studies Center for Global Affairs. “And with some success. The

Soviets had a powerful military, they were very good at finding workarounds, but the workarounds were not nearly as good at producing systems as ours.” More recently, sanctions have been imposed against Venezuela, North Korea, Iran, and Russia, among others. Perhaps ironically, as Russia has been sanctioned for its invasion of Ukraine and other offenses, it has also been an ally in imposing sanctions against North Korea and Iran. “When we brought Iran to the table to negotiate, getting Russia on board was key. You have to have all of the large countries coordinating,” says John Zindar, partner of transatlantic business development at the European–American Business Organization. “Even if you have effective sanctions, one country could still screw it up.” That coordination becomes increasingly important as globalization minimizes the impact any one country— even a superpower—can have on its own. During the Cold War, a mostly bipolar system


provided leverage over supply sources. Now, however, myriad countries are both supplier and recipient of everything from nuclear capability to cyber intelligence. As the number of suppliers has proliferated, so too has the need for cohesion among allies. “The political entities that are imposing sanctions now are more like coalitions of the wi l l i ng, a nd less l i ke for ma l alliances,” says Oppenheimer. “And they come together depending on whether their interests happen to coincide.” But what happens when the U.S. itself is a rogue player? Such is the case with Cuba, where U.S. sanctions have lingered for decades, despite many other countries ma i nta i ni ng reg ula r t rade relat ions with the island nation. The thawing of relations under the Obama administration and optimism that trade might become normalized is once again in question after the two nations expelled each other’s diplomats amid a mysterious sonic attack in Havana, after which Congress launched an investigation into Cuban airport security. “One of the criticisms against the use of sanctions is that it can provide an excuse for an authoritarian regime to stay in power, and it demonizes the country on the global stage,” Zindar says. “This was evidenced in Cuba. The embargo program has clearly bolstered the Castro regime, and in the end it was really only the U.S. that was participating.” While some might call to simply end the sanctions against Cuba, abruptly exiting any sanctions program without considering the long-term ramif ications and all of the players involved can be catastrophic. The issue is topical now with the U.S. seemingly intent on backing away from the multiparty agreement to rein in Iran’s nuclear program. “We’re walking away from the Iran deal, which I think is just disastrous. To me, the Iran deal was brilliantly conceived and executed,” Oppenheimer says. “And of course the immediate negative impact is on North Korea, because it just eliminates any incentive for North Korea to come to the table and agree to anything when the U.S. can walk away from any deal that it might make based on a whim.” That not only has consequences with targets of potential sanctions, if the threat

of sanctions loses heft, but with allies without whose support sanctions can’t truly be implemented and enforced. “You’re not going to get your allies to go along with you next time. You’re going to walk away from Iran and then you’re going to go back to the Europeans and the Russians and the Chinese in two more years and try to get multilateral sanctions on, you know, name your country,” Oppenheimer adds. “They’re going to look back at the Iran experience and say, ‘Why should I even pretend to sit down and talk about this when, in the end, if you don’t like the result, the United States is just going to walk away?’” O n e o f t h e l a r g e s t c r it i c i s m s o f sanctions is that while they aim to rein in the ruling class of an offending nation, they instead disproportionately af fect civilians. Whether such consequences are detrimental or beneficial to a sanctions scheme is widely debated. “The problem is, sanctions don’t affect the standard of living of the elites,” Zindar says. “They will always be able to get their luxury items, sanctions or no. But the people who are usually hurt the most are the common men and women who really have little to do with their country’s policies.” “In terms of whether you should hold back on sanctions because you fear you’ll hurt innocent people, in a sense you want to hurt innocent people because you want to create political backlash within that country,” Oppenheimer says. “So it’s not that you relish hurting innocent people, but you’re running the trade-off, and you’re asking, ‘Is it worth hurting some innocent people in order to generate the pressure on the regime to come to the bargaining table?’ “And the answer is yes. And I think that’s the right answer.” In the U. S., the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), housed in the Treasury, oversees enforcement of sanctions against individuals or groups listed on the Specially Designated Nationals list for terrorismrelated activities. The State Department’s Office of Economic Sanctions Policy and Implementation oversees foreign policyrelated sanctions adopted to counter threats to national security posed by particular activities and countries. The

One of the largest criticisms of sanctions is that while they aim to rein in the ruling class of an offending nation, they instead disproportionately affect civilians.

Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security sets the export controls and issues export licenses. It was the Department of Commerce that issued a $1.19 billion penalty against a Chinese telecommunications company in May for willingly and knowingly circumventing sanctions against North Korea and Iran. “There’s broad discretion in the agency to enforce the law in the way it sees fit, and there’s a strong incentive to those who are subject to it, to report a violation,” says David Brummond, a sanctions lawyer at Jacobson Burton Kelley in Washington. “The combination of those two things make it a very effective enforcement regime.” Brummond has firsthand experience of the effectiveness of sanction enforcement; before joining his current law firm, he spent eight years in OFAC, where he developed the incentive matrix for violation reporting. Not only is the enforcement effective, he says, but so too are the deterrents in place to prevent entities from conducting transactions with sanctioned countries. “The problem is, it’s gone too far. It has essentially created a fear that keeps banks and others from doing legitimate business transactions that are no longer prohibited,” Brummond says. “You can do the trade, but you can’t get the financing for it, because the banks are fearful that there might be a change or they might slip or it’s not worth their effort to do that.” Equally problematic are the unintended consequences of sanctions imposed to adva nce foreig n policy a nd nationa l security interests without consideration of existing treaties. One such conf lict arose when limiting Iran’s access to ref ined petroleum added restrictions to transport vessels that were already heavily restricted due to international agreements on a shared pollution liability scheme. Traditionally, insured vessels refused to assume the additional liability a nd del iver to I r a n . C on s e quent ly, black market and suspiciously f lagged vessels—like those from North Korea— delivered the petroleum outside the scope of the maritime protection treaty and endangered the very harbors the treaties were designed to protect. Similar conflicts can be found in nuclear and aviation agreements. “Just because you have a very valid strong policy interest in what you’re trying to do from a sanctions standpoint, do esn’t mea n it shou ld b e t he on ly exclusive consideration,” Brummond says. “Where possible, there should be equal consideration and a counterbalance between all of the applicable policies.”

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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SCOTUS

THE SUPREME COURT IS POISED TO REWRITE CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY The docket is full of hot-button issues, from race to sex to privacy. By Joseph P. Williams f the Supreme Court’s 2016–2017 term had been a Hollywood film, it would probably garner a middling review on Rotten Tomatoes, the crowdsourced movie rating website.

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Defined by drama beyond its control—a Machiavellian Senate power play to keep open the vacancy created by Antonin Scalia’s death, and the surprise-ending presidential election that determined who got to fill it—the court largely avoided

sinking its collective teeth into tough cases that might end in a 4–4 deadlock. There were important decisions on issues such as affirmative action and voting rights, but there weren’t any game-changing cases identifiable in a word or two, like Citizens United, Obergefell, Hobby Lobby, or Shelby County. Yet court analysts say the 2017–2018 term has the potential to be so action-packed it will look like an Arnold Schwarzenegger


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EQUIPMENT SET UP BY THE MEDIA SITS OUTSIDE THE SUPREME COURT.

movie by comparison. By s p r i n g , t h e h i g h c o u r t w i l l determine if gay rights supersede the First Amendment and religious freedom and whether hyperpartisan gerrymandering is a threat to American democracy. It will hear cases involving online sports gambling, privacy rights in the Internet age, and labor unions fighting for survival. It will almost certainly consider President Donald Trump’s decision to ban refugees from

Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., pitting the nation’s reputation as a safe haven for the oppressed against its national security plans. As it grapples with those heavyweight issues, the court will continue to adjust to its newest member, Justice Neil Gorsuch, who replaced Scalia in April. Yet it also will contend with speculation about the retirement plans of Justice Anthony Kennedy, a conservative jurist who helped

deliver big legal wins to liberals, and whether Trump will get to remake the bench with hardcore conservatives. “ There is only one prediction that is entirely safe about the upcoming term,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told a Georgetown University law class in September. “And that is, it will be momentous.” “ T here’s obv iously a lot at sta ke here,” says Susan Bloch, a Georgetown

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SCOTUS “There is only one prediction that is entirely safe about the upcoming term,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told a Georgetown University law class in September. “And that is, it will be momentous.” constitutional law professor and Supreme Court analyst. Writ large, she says, there’s an unintentional yet overarching theme among the marquee cases and other important ones that aren’t yet on the radar screen. This term, she says, could determine “our [national] sense of democracy and what our sense of equality is.” The fall term began in October with one of the most closely watched cases on the docket: Gill v. Whitford, a Wisconsin case accusing state Republicans of hyperpartisan gerrymandering of political districts drawn after the GOP seized power in the 2010 midterm elections. At issue is whether political parties can use powerful computer software to carve out highly favorable legislative districts that all but guarantee they’ll consistently win state legislative majorities. Though the high court has used a light hand on the issue—election winners get to make the rules—the plaintiffs argue that the GOP has manipulated the system so they’ll remain in power even if more people vote for Democrats. Paul Smith, an attorney and vice president of the nonpartisan Campaign L ega l Center, told the court that the situation is “gerrymandering on steroids,” and the judges must intervene. If they fail, he said, “the festival of extreme gerrymandering [unleashed] will be like nothing you’ve seen.” The Terminator himself agreed: action hero Arnold Schwarzenegger, California’s former Republican governor and an opponent of gerrymandering, was on hand for the arguments and spoke to a rally afterward. “Let’s say ‘Hasta la vista!’” to a rigged system, he said in October. The Gill case has an equally significant bookend: Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute , a challenge to Ohio’s policy of purging inactive voters from its rolls. At issue is the state’s decision to trim the lists “by reason of the person’s failure to vote”; their failure to respond to official notices or failing to vote during a four-year period. Proponents of the policy argue it’s vital

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to help ensure that elections are fair and as a check against voter fraud, but opponents argue it invites mistakes—40,000 people, mostly minorities, were improperly removed from rolls in just one Ohio county in 2015—and is a back-door method of voter suppression in a crucial battleground state. A not her h igh ly a nt icipate d c a se , Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil R ights Commission , pits an artisan baker’s right to practice his religion— and, he argues, his freedom of expression in crafting high-end cakes—against a same-sex couple’s protection against discrimination. The case stems from Jack Phillips’ refusal to create a specialty cake for the couple’s wedding reception in Denver. Phillips argues the union of two men violated his religious principles and forcing him to bake for them goes against his First Amendment protections. But the newlyweds sued and won, leading to Phillips’ appeal before the Supreme Court. The case and others like it prompted lawmakers in red states to pass “religious freedom” laws that would give merchants like Phillips the right to refuse service to people on faith grounds. The justices must decide “whether or not gays and lesbians are entitled to the same rights” as heterosexuals and if the law allows them to “live their lives free of discrimination,” says Bloch. The outcome, she says, will deliver a message to the gay community, signaling “what they can expect [from the courts] when their rights are challenged.” Perhaps the most significant case on the fall docket, despite receiving relatively little attention, is Carpenter v. United States , in which the court must decide whether data used to hone in on a cell phone user’s location is protected under the Fourth Amendment. It centers on an armed robbery suspect who gave FBI agents the cell numbers of his alleged accomplices. Instead of a search warrant outlining why they were suspects, agents got a court order requiring telecom companies to hand over cell tower data with dates and times of calls to and from those

numbers, along with the general location of where calls began and ended—information used to identify and capture the rest of the robbery crew. Lawyers for the suspects argue the FBI’s actions violated their constitutional right against illegal search and seizure of evidence, since the phone records carry an expectation of privacy. If the court rules for the government, it could give authorities broad access to records that reveal someone’s whereabouts or activities at any time, even in places where privacy is expected. That includes at home, behind closed doors. Though it’s impossible to predict how the court will rule on those cases and others, most court-watchers expect the justices will migrate to their ideological corners. Now that Gorsuch has replaced Scalia, the 5–4 conservative bloc is back at full strength—at least on paper. All eyes are on Justice Kennedy, who is considered a conservative but has drifted to the center during his decades on the court. As the decisive vote in cases that legalized gay marriage and upheld race-conscious college admissions, for example, Kennedy was lauded as a part-time liberal hero, a bulwark against full conservative control of government. But during the spring and summer, rumors swirled around Washington that Kennedy plans to retire in the near future. Trump himself fed the rumor mill shortly after taking office. If Kennedy does hang up his robe, it would trigger a worst-case scenario for liberals. Trump and the Republican-majority Senate would almost certainly replace Kennedy with a jurist like Gorsuch: a strict conservative handpicked by the Federalist Society, a far-right policy center. Outnumbered Senate Democrats, stripped of nearly all legislative tools, are powerless to stop the GOP, all but guaranteeing the court will anchor on the right for decades. L e ona r d L e o, Fe der a l i st S o ciet y executive vice president and the man who shepherded Gorsuch through the conf irmation process, says Trump “has an understanding of what’s at stake,” including the court’s need for another “originalist,” “someone who will embrace an ideal [of jurisprudence] based in limited government [power]” and dedicated to the freedom of the individual. By most accounts, Gorsuch, the most junior of the justices, hit the ground running. Having clerked for the court while he was in law school, Gorsuch has seemed engaged in oral arguments and has staked out a position to the right of Justice


JIM WATSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

FORMER CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR AND ACTOR ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER SPEAKS AGAINST GERRYMANDERING OUTSIDE THE SUPREME COURT.

Clarence Thomas, formerly the court’s most conservative member. Given that dynamic, Leo predicts that there’s “a good chance” the court will tilt to the right in most if not all of the marquee cases, including Janus v. AFSCME, a case to determine whether public sector employees who opt out of joining unions must pay “fair share” fees when labor leaders engage in collective bargaining. Even the court ’s libera l bloc has occasionally reached conclusions after viewing the Constitution through an originalist lens, Leo says. Though the Janus case deadlocked the short-handed

court last year, he says, Gorsuch likely will make the difference in the outcome—and influence other cases to come. Quoting a bon mot from Dale Carpenter,

a University of Minnesota law professor, Leo summed up his view of how the current session will unfold: “We’re all originalists now,” he said.

Outnumbered Senate Democrats, stripped of nearly all legislative tools, are powerless to stop the GOP, all but guaranteeing the court will anchor on the right for decades. THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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IN NEIL GORSUCH, CONSERVATIVES HAVE GOT THEIR MAN ON THE SUPREME COURT Donald Trump’s first nominee to the high court is proving a reliable vote for the conservative majority. 10

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By Joseph P. Williams n the time since President Donald Trump nominated him, Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch may have replaced Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the court’s most notorious member. Since his confirmation in April, Gorsuch has made headlines for speaking to deeppocketed conservatives in Trump’s luxury Washington hotel, raising questions about judicial ethics and impartiality. He’s taken

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what some saw as an in-your-face victory lap through Kentucky with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the powerful Republican who engineered his confirmation. Eschewing the traditional seen-butrarely-heard role of the new justice on the bench, Gorsuch has crossed swords with some of his eight colleagues during oral arguments and taken acerbic shots at them in written opinions. Behind the court’s closed doors, Gorsuch is reportedly


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U.S. SUPREME COURT ASSOCIATE JUSTICE NOMINEE NEIL GORSUCH WITH HIS WIFE MARIE LOUISE AFTER ARRIVING FOR THE SECOND DAY OF HIS CONFIRMATION HEARING BY THE SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE.

Eschewing the traditional seen but rarely heard role of the new justice on the bench, Gorsuch has crossed swords with some of his eight colleagues during oral arguments and taken acerbic shots at them in written opinions.

engaged in an epic intellectual battle with Justice Elena Kagan, a liberal stalwart. Linda Greenhouse, the venerable legal journalist, put a finer point on it in a July column analyzing the new justice’s first months. The former Colorado appellate judge who holds degrees from Columbia University, Harvard Law School, and the University of Oxford, wrote in The New York Times “Trump [is a] life tenured judicial avatar.”

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Yet as a far-right jurist handpicked by the Federalist Society to reinvigorate the court’s conservative bloc, Gorsuch has performed exactly as advertised. He’s planted his ideological f lag alongside Justice Clarence Thomas, heretofore the court’s most conservative member, and could help deliver big wins for the right on issues like aff irmative action, labor unions’ political activities and women’s reproductive rights. Leonard Leo, Federalist Society vice president, says he and Trump agree: Gorsuch is an outstanding justice, the new template for future Supreme Court nominations. The president, Leo says, “has a sense of independence and [doing] what’s right. He saw that in Neil Gorsuch.” Critics, however, say Gorsuch must adapt more quickly to the court’s long-held norms and work harder to engage rather than alienate his colleagues. “The signals aren’t so positive right now, but it is very, very early,” says C a rol i ne Fre d r ick s on , pre sident of the American Constitution Society, a progressive think tank specializing in national legal issues. “I’d like to think that there’s room for discussion [in cases] and that [justices] are not all knee-jerk in their decisions,” Fredrickson says. Reports of discord around Gorsuch, she says, “means that other justices have a better ability to kind of engage with their colleagues,” and he may have a harder time convincing others of his opinion. Case in point: in June, the Supreme Court reached a 5–3 decision in a major redistricting case out of North Carolina, a matter with broad political implications and a big win for the left. The liberals prevailed because, in an unexpected turn, Kagan persuaded the conservative Thomas to vote with her. Gorsuch was not on the court when the case was argued and didn’t cast a vote. The unlikely dynamic of Kagan and Thomas voting in sync on a case that benef its liberals could be an important portent for a court sitting in a tumultuous

Just weeks after his confirmation, Gorsuch, who pledged to view cases through a nonpartisan lens, accepted an invitation to address a convention of influential conservatives at the posh Trump International Hotel in Washington. era, with a series of divisive issues on its 2017–2018 docket. The benef iciary of McConnell’s bold political gambit that blocked former President Barack Obama from replacing the late Justice Antonin Scalia, Trump picked Gorsuch from a list provided to him by the Federalist Society, which flourished in the Reagan era but had been overshadowed in the Obama years. During Senate confirmation hearings, i r at e D em o c r at s to ok on m ajor it y Republicans in an acrimonious battle over Gorsuch that ended when McConnell, in a move deemed “the nuclear option,” permanently stripped the minority party of its right to filibuster all judicial nominations. Still, Gorsuch won confirmation by a mere nine votes—the narrowest approval margin for a justice in recent times, far lower than Kagan’s noteworthy 26-vote gap. Just weeks after his conf irmation, Gorsuch, who pledged to view cases through a nonpartisan lens, accepted an invitation to address a convention of inf luential conservatives at the posh Trump International Hotel in downtown Washington. Despite warnings that speaking to well-heeled partisans at a hotel owned by the president who nominated him might be bad optics, Gorsuch would not renege. In sticking to his guns, however, the justice also prompted speculation about a more practical matter: whether he will recuse himself when a conf lict-of-interest

Critics, however, say Gorsuch must adapt more quickly to the court’s long held norms and work harder to engage rather than alienate his colleagues.

lawsuit over Trump’s ownership of the hotel reaches the Supreme Court’s docket, as expected. Adding to Gorsuch’s image problems, just before that keynote speech, he joined McConnell, who represents Kentucky, for speeches at the University of Louisville and the law school at the University of Kentucky, the majority leader’s alma maters. Critics on the left, already fuming about the brassknuckle tactics McConnell employed to get Gorsuch on the bench, saw it as graceless, but supporters on the right said the justice and his patron were well within established Supreme Court decorum. But people—especially conservatives— may be wi lling to overlook the way Gorsuch has ruf f led feathers. In the 15 cases he’s heard so far, on issues ra ng i ng f rom t he deat h p ena lt y to same-sex marriage, Gorsuch “has sided with [Thomas], the court’s single most conservative member,” according to data journa lism website FiveThirtyEight. “ More t ha n t hat , he ’s joi ne d ever y concurring opinion that Thomas has issued so far. That is, he didn’t just agree with Thomas on the outcomes of the case but also with the reasoning by which those outcomes were reached.” Jeffrey Toobin, a veteran Supreme Court analyst for The New Yorker and CNN, believes the justice’s consistency will define Gorsuch’s tenure more than controversial speeches and internal court politics. Toobin argues that a reliable conservative vote, and Gorsuch’s presumed long future on the bench, is the only thing about him that really matters. “Gorsuch’s outside activities may draw a private word from the Chief Justice, but Roberts would never presume (or want) to change Gorsuch’s votes,” Toobin wrote in The New Yorker. “And the new Justice is casting those just as his sponsors had hoped and his opponents had feared.”

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20210717 2017 2017 Extreme weather continued to rock the globe, including in the United States. Centrist parties around the world wilted in the face of populist 2 0 1 7 revolts. And in the most extreme development of all, a real estate 2017 developer and reality TV star, entirely untested in the political arena,

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became president of the United States and leader of the free world.

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having previously served in political office or in the military. But there are many other more pedestrian firsts for this president, who at 70 is the oldest to take office. Trump, for instance, is the first president ever to have appeared in a Pizza Hut ad and on the cover of Playboy magazine. First lady Melania Trump also became the first non-native speaker and the

CHARLIE ARCHAMBAULT FOR USN&WR

n what was arguably the biggest upset in American presidential history, Donald Trump was elected the 45th president, losing the popular vote by more than 2 percent, or almost three million votes, but winning comfortably in the Electoral College. This was a moment like no other in modern American history. For the first time, a U.S. president took office without

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first third wife to ever serve in that role. The stark departures from tradition continued on inauguration day. While inaugural speeches generally veer toward soaring notes of idealism—think John F. Kennedy’s call to “ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country”—or stirring calls for bravery in the face of adversity—FDR’s “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself ”—this new president took another tack entirely. Trump delivered a blistering speech full of dark themes and isolationist rhetoric, vowing that “this American carnage stops right here and stops right now.” Even former President George W. Bush, himself no stranger to apocalyptic pronouncements, was heard to remark afterward “that was some weird [stuff].” As the administration commenced its work, it won a major victory, getting its nominee to the Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch, confirmed by the Senate. After that, it was mostly gridlock, highlighted by the epic battle over repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, the health care law also known as Obamacare (see page 21). But much of the failure wasn’t due to partisan or intraparty strife at all, but rather to a lack of action by the administration to populate its own ranks. According to a report compiled by the Partnership for Public Service, a nonpartisan organization, as of the end of July, the administration had nominated just 255 of the 1,100 top positions requiring Senate confirmation. And the Senate had confirmed just 51 of those, taking 46 days on average to do so, quite slow by historical standards.

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THE TRAVEL BAN

INTERNATIONAL TRAVELERS ARRIVE ON THE FIRST DAY OF THE PARTIAL REINSTATEMENT OF THE TRUMP TRAVEL BAN, WHICH TEMPORARILY BARRED TRAVELERS FROM SIX MUSLIM-MAJORITY NATIONS FROM ENTERING THE U.S.

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erhaps nothing exemplified the chaos East and Africa, placing the onus on refugees and improvisational amateurism of the and other would-be immigrants to prove they early Trump administration as much have a credible connection to a person or entity as the hastily constructed travel ban, first in the U.S. The order also flatly banned all announced by the president as Executive immigrants from Syria, indefinitely. Order 13769, just days after he took office. The abrupt decision, ostensibly aimed SATIt temporarily halted immigration SUNfrom buying time to enhance immigration MON at TUE SUN W MON THU TUE W EDvetting ED FR I seven Muslim-majority countries in the Middle prompted SAT THU procedures, immediately

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deep confusion at entry points and touched of f massive protests at airports and other venues. Federal courts in multiple jurisdictions quickly dismissed the order as an unconstitutional attack on a particular religion, in part because Trump had made plain during his campaign that he intended to ban Muslim immigration. A federal judge in Washington State issued a restraining order on the ban, which other federal courts refused to lift. But the Trump administration didn’t back down. Instead, its lawyers revisited the ban, more narrowly tailoring it to pass judicial approval. In March, Trump signed a revised travel ban, this one giving federal agencies a week to prepare for the new regime. Only hours before a revised travel ban was set to take effect in mid-March, a federal judge in Hawaii suspended the ban nationwide. The standoff continued to ricochet through the American judicial system for months. The White House issued a third plan in September, this time adding North Korea and Venezuela to the list of targeted countries whose immigrants would be restricted. But in October, U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson in Hawaii ruled that the revised restrictions suffered from the same fatal flaws as the previous plans. His ruling at least temporarily blocked the plan from taking effect nationwide. The administration eventually appealed the case to the highest court. In October, the U. S. Supreme Court declined to hear one of two challenges to the travel restrictions, ruling that a case arising from Maryland was moot in light of the White House’s revised plan. But the case from Hawaii remains before the court—for now, at least. The White House is seeking an SUNappeal. MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT expedited SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

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THE YEAR IN REVIEW

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he Justice Department’s special of his presidential campaign. counsel investigation of the Trump Former FBI director Robert Mueller was campaign’s possible ties to Russia appointed to the job, and he immediately has all the makings of a Cold War spy novel. put together en elite team of seasoned Every element for a gripping tale is there: career investigators with deep experience international intrigue between East and in the disciplines required to decode such West, alleged honey pots, and shadowy a complicated case. And the team used dossiers f illed with explosive material. tactics—like dawn raids on one time Except this is real life. Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort’s The semi-independent inquiry was house—that reminded some observers of launched because Attorney General Jeff Mafia probes. Sessions sided with Justice Department While the investigation immediately ethics officials and formally recused himself gave rise to comparisons with Ken Starr’s from overseeing any case involving probes Whitewater investigation of President of the Trump campaign, since his role in the Bill Clinton, which ultimately led to his campaign represented a conflict of interest. impeachment trial in Congress (though not That decision would later lead his boss, his conviction), the standards governing the president, to bitterly denounce him in such investigations have changed. humiliating fashion, even though Sessions In part due to criticisms of Starr’s SAT FR I THU TUE W ED in the Clinton investigation, was among the first prominent supporters MONoverreaching N

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FORMER FBI DIRECTOR ROBERT MUELLER, THE SPECIAL COUNSEL PROBING RUSSIAN INTERFERENCE IN THE 2016 ELECTION, DEPARTS CAPITOL HILL FOLLOWING A CLOSED-DOOR MEETING.

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Congress let the Independent Prosecutor statute, first passed in 1978 in the wake of Watergate, lapse in 1999. Now, Mueller’s powers are more closely circumscribed, and he can be removed from the investigation for cause—though some in Congress are trying to erect legislative hurdles to better insulate from White House pressure. The investigation has metastasized in several directions, thus making it harder to put the genie back in the bottle. In August, it was learned that Mueller had impaneled a federal grand jury in Washington, which would allow him to gather testimony and issue subpoenas and/or indictments. In September, Mueller’s team enlisted the IRS’ elite investigative unit to help sift through financial information about some of his targets, including Manafort and former National MON Security Adviser Michael FRI THU TUE WED SUN Flynn. Then in October, Mueller pounced, indicting Manafort and a close associate, SAT FRI on money-laundering and THU TUE WED MON Gates, SUN Rick conspiracy charges. A third individual, George Papadopoulos, who had advised Trump on national security matters, pleaded guilty to lying to the feds and is cooperating with the investigation. The powerful U.S. Attorney’s off ice in the Southern District of New York is also collaborating with the Mueller team in pursuing possible money laundering charges against Manafort. The special counsel has also teamed up with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman on part of the probe, prompting speculation that he did so in part to outflank a possible pardon of some targets, by f iltering a portion of the investigation down paths that are immune from presidential pardons governing only federal actions. All of this is unfolding even while five parallel Congressional probes are being pursued into possible collusion between the Trump team and Russia.

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he past year saw an assault on the news media—even the very notion of objective truth—unprecedented in modern American political history. If Richard Nixon’s Vice President Spiro Agnew famously bated the media by calling them “nattering nabobs of negativism,” Trump’s constant assault on any reporting he doesn’t like by labeling it “fake news” (at one point even taking credit for coining the term) presented something of an existential crisis for the press. The presidency is a uniquely powerful bully pulpit, and his critical drumbeat reverberated across the count ry, even across the globe. Authoritarian leaders in Turkey soon began W ED THterm U using the criticism. FRto I deflect SAT Perhaps most ominously, this hostility to publ ic scr ut i ny b ega n spread i ng throughout the federa l government. P r e sident i a l pr e s s s e cr et a r y S a r a h

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scrutiny with uncommonly aggressive ramp up their activities. Richard Spencer, means. Just days after Trump’s inauguration, an avowed white supremacist, is a case the Environmental Protection Agency and in point. This year, he became the face F R I Departments of Agriculture, Interior, the of what ’s been called the alt-right, a SAT and Health and Human Services were loosely organized group that developed ordered to halt external communication— in response to mainstream conservatism SUN including even routine website and socialMONa ndTUEhas been associated with white

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JULY 1 2 T 3 AUGUS WED ED JULY TUE W 8 9 THU MON FR I SUN SAT 10 FR I SAT THU D WE E TU MON SUN August 25—30 3 4 5 A U 2 1 G 5 U 1 S Hurricane Harvey strikes as 16 17 J T the United States SAT 2 3 1 2 a Category 4 hurricane, causing1catastrophic ULY 1 1 1 SU 4 5 0metropolitan damage toN theM area, mostly ON 1 9Houston 232 23 TU E W ED 6 7 due to8 record-breaking floods. THU 7 SUN 24 6 MON 8 TUE WED 9 7 8 AUGUST 19 FRI SAT 0FRI 116SAT 1 THU 15 8 1 4 3 7 1 2 6 2 13 1 1 91030 5 1 1 FRI SAT 2 3 14 THU 16 17 13 14 15 4 15 SUN MON TUE 13 WED 12 25 2 6 4 5 1 11 8 4 10 2 1 6 9 19 20 3 2 7 17 20 221 322 4 85 9 10 11 12 2 3 4 5 2361824 1925 20 21 2221 22 1 7 17 13 2914 3105 31 8 2 6 27 16 2 2 3 24 8 7 0 2 9 10 11 12 1325 311426 27 28 29 29 6 7 8 9 2810 11 12 16 17 18 19 July 723 24 15 0 21 22 2 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons is 16 17The 13 14 15 162717 18 19 3 24 25 26 voted 122 of the 193 U.N. member states. 18for30by19 3120 21 22 28 2 9 30 23 24 25 26 27 25 26 31 24 23 22 21 20 28 29 T H E 2 0 1 8 L E G A L I S S U E 19 30 31 27 28 29 30 31

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Then, things began to build in waves. In fact, it’s since become known as the Kaepernick effect. The sympathetic protest initially spread to other teams in the NFL, and then to high school and college games and even some middle SAT FR I THU Then schools. it filtered into other sports, ED W E TU ON first with WNBA players and then to such SUN M AT S sports as soccer. FR I THU As the new NFL season commenced in D E W TUE the fall, Trump did what he generally does: MON SUN inserted himself more forcefully into the drama, thereby upping the ante. By Week 3 of the season, Trump had bullied the NFL SAT saying into taking a stand, TH with FR I league U the E W ED stand but not actually TU N players should O SUN M forcing them to do so. Some owners SAT I R F suggested players might be benched or THU SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS OUTSIDE LINEBACKER EDELI HAROLD, QUARTERBACK COLIN KAEPERNICK, E W fired if they did not stand. AND SAFETY ERIC REID KNEEL DURINGTUTHE NATIONAL ANTHEM.

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country in response to the enduring drumbeat of instances of questionable dead ly force used by pol ice aga i nst minority individuals. But the development

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football game to draw attention to police violence and other forms of oppression against people of color. But since he was injured and wasn’t

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The Caribbean and United States are struck by Hurricane Irma, a Category 5 hurricane that is the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic basin outside the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. The storm causes at least 134 deaths and at least $63 billion in damage.

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quick response to Hurricane Harvey, which hammered Texas and the Gulf Coast. Critics suggested that Trump SAT did not know FR I TH Puerto Ricans areU Americans. ED TUE W

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enact comprehensive nationa l midnight vote, Arizona Senator John coverage to low-i ncome i nd iv idua ls health care coverage since the McCain, newly diagnosed with brain cancer, and families, a key provision of the law. days of Harry Truman. cast the deciding “no” vote to bury his own And he took action to make it easier In 1945, just months after he became party’s proposal. Subsequent attempts by the for providers to offer the kind of cutpresident upon the death of Franklin Senate leadership to find a compromise that rate coverage plans that could easily Roosevelt, Truman told Congress that could pass the chamber all failed. undermine the entire system, perhaps “millions of our citizens do not now have So in October, taking a page from his even leading it to implode. All the while, a full measure of opportunity to achieve predecessor, President Trump embarked he publicly berated the law and suggested and enjoy good health. Millions do not on shorter-term fixes, doing so through the program was at death’s door. now have protection or security against the executive order. The president ordered an “There is no such thing as Obamacare,” SAT economic effects of sickness. The time has end to subsidies to health care providers Trump flatly told FR I his cabinet in October. THU arrived for action to help them attain that ED W FRI TUE SAT MON opportunity and that protection.” SUN MON TUE WED SUN THU FRI SAT T But it would take more than half a I SA FR THU ED FRI THU TUE WED MON SUN century to accomplish. TUE W ON SUN M In 2010 it finally happened, with passage of the landmark Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which came to be popularly known as Obamacare. While it fell short of the lofty hopes of some proponents, who clamored for a singlepayer form of universal coverage, it did sig ni f ica nt ly cha nge the la ndscap e, ushering in coverage for an additional 22 million Americans. T he leg i slat ion wa s t he resu lt of a n exqu i site s er ie s of c omprom i s e s and patiently negotiated buy-in from interests representing nearly one-fifth of the American economy. But it attracted no Republicans votes, and the pa rty seethed for years, promising to “repeal and replace” the legislation when it got the chance. That chance came in November 2016, when Republicans captured the White House and majority control of both houses SAT of Congress. But despite the leadership’s I FR A MAN RECEIVES DENTAL ATTENTION AT THE REMOTE AREA MEDICAL (RAM) MOBILE CLINIC U repeated best efforts, it couldn’t get the AT THE RIVERVIEW SCHOOL IN GRUNDY, VIRGINIA. RAM PROVIDED FREE TH DENTAL, VISION, AND WED AREAS OF THE UNITED STATES. GENERAL HEALTH SERVICES TO HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE IN REMOTE votes to overturn President Barack Obama’s E SAT TU FRI

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INVESTIGATIONS

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP WALKS TO MARINE ONE FOR HIS FIRST TRIP AS PRESIDENT.

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DONALD TRUMP IS A BOON TO THE CRIMINAL DEFENSE BAR Probes of the president and his campaign are keeping a lot of lawyers busy. BY NOREEN MARCUS If all the lawyers in Trump World started a law firm it would be a pricey boutique: TrumpLaw LLC. At least two dozen attorneys are trying to guide President Donald Trump, his children, cabinet and staffers through congressional and special counsel probes of the administration’s alleged ties to Russia. Seven big-time lawyers work for former national security adviser Michael Flynn alone. The number spikes if you add all those lawyers’ partners and associates at high-powered firms that provide billable support. And the total rises whenever special counsel Robert Mueller’s team summon a surprise witness in their ongoing efforts to target enablers of Russian “kompromat” that may have influenced the 2016 election. Even the lawyers have lawyers. Michael Cohen, a former Trump Organization in-house counsel and still a West Wing insider, had Stephen Ryan of McDermott Will & Emery at his side when he appeared before the House Intelligence Committee in October. Also, a onetime attorney for the Trump campaign’s former chairman Paul Manafort, Melissa Laurenza of Akin Gump, was subpoenaed in August by

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All the legal advising and handholding do not come cheap. A top-rated white-collar defense lawyer in the District of Columbia can charge $750 to $900 per hour. Mueller’s office. She’s too smart to enter that arena alone. Just as Trump entered the White House with a record as a litigious businessman, his administration is the most lawyered up, according to Allan Lichtman, an American University history professor who famously predicted Trump’s election. “ We ’r e r e a c h i n g l e ve l s t h at a r e unheard of this early in an investigation,” says Lichtman, author of The Case for Impeachment . “ Now that the Special Counsel has issued two indictments and scored one guilty plea, you can expect a further explosion of lawyers.” The law firm analogy is limited because the lawyers, especially the colorful crew surrounding Trump, do not seem to work as a team. John Dowd, Trump’s lead lawyer in the Russia probe, complained to his colleague Ty Cobb that White House counsel Donald McGahn was holding back documents, New York Times reporter Kenneth Vogel wrote after overhearing them at a Washington steakhouse. Vogel says he recognized Cobb ’s signature handlebar mustache. Cohen, also known as “Trump’s pit bull,” and Marc Kasowitz, another longtime Trump lawyer, have publicly displayed fits of rage that violate professional decorum. “This is like you went shopping for all your lawyers at the ‘before’ section of the anger management commercial,” MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow said during a report about Kasowitz’s profane email eruption at a stranger. Kasowitz soon disappeared from public view, and his position relative to Dowd and the others is unclear. Former U.S. attorney Kendall Coffey briefly represented then-Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski in March 2016, when Lewandowski was accused of grabbing a reporter’s arm. The Palm Beach County state attorney ultimately decided against filing a battery charge. Representing people like the Trump insiders brings special challenges, says

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Coffey, now with the Coffey Burlington f irm in Miami. “The usual rules don’t apply.” “In contrast to civil litigation, in a federal investigation the prosecutors are holding all the cards and it requires a strategy of active lawyering combined with a strategy of patience, because individuals who are being examined cannot control the process,” he says. “That is intensely frustrating for high-powered, activist individuals who are used to being proactive rather than reactive.” “Suddenly they're engulfed in a situation where they have a sense of helplessness and extreme frustration, and their attorneys are encouraging them to say as little as possible and do as little as possible and let us work through this with the prosecutors and try to be patient and let the process go forward,” Coffey says. “What complicates this all the more is the accelerated press attention to everything that involves President Trump.” All the legal advising and handholding do not come cheap. A top-rated white-collar defense lawyer in the District of Columbia can charge $750 to $900 per hour. Former President Bill Clinton has said he left office after his scandal-plagued second term, which resulted in his impeachment by the House and acquittal by the Senate, owing attorneys nearly $2.3 million. Some of his aides paid a big price for their government service. “I had a lot of friends back in the Clinton era who came away with quite a bit of debt because they had to hire private lawyers— and they’re not ExxonMobil,” says Andy Wright, a former associate counsel to President Barack Obama and a professor at Savannah Law School. How officials like Vice President Mike Pence, who is not wealthy, will pay their legal fees is anybody’s guess. Trump and his oldest son, Donald Jr., need not worry: The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee are picking up at least some of their defense

DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

INVESTIGATIONS

DON MCGAHN, LAWYER FOR DONALD TRUMP AND HIS CAMPAIGN, LEAVES THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL AFTER A MEETING WITH TRUMP AND REPUBLICAN DONORS.

costs. Trump’s campaign paid $1.1 million for legal services from July to September, up from $677,827 in the second quarter and $249,344 in the f irst, according to campaign disclosures. The RNC paid Dowd and Jay Sekulow, another lawyer for the president. That’s legal, as is using campaign funds, because Trump didn’t accept public f inancing. Under federal election law, the RNC can raise money from donors in amounts up to $101,700 for a special account to pay legal expenses. However, Trump’s announcement that he will spend at least $430,000 of his own money to fund his aides’ legal defense has set off alarms. “It raises all sorts of ethical concerns,” says Larry Noble, general counsel to the watchdog group Campaign Legal Center. “If you’re an employee and he’s paying your legal bills, are you going to want to say something that will get him in trouble?” The attorneys involved may also have qualms, Noble says. “You want to make sure


HERE ARE THE LAWYERS who have been publicly linked to the Trump administration or presidential campaign and the clients they represent:

Donald Trump

White House counsel Donald McGahn, John Dowd, Ty Cobb, Michael Cohen, Jay Sekulow, American Center for Law and Justice; Marc Kasowitz and Michael Bowe, Kasowitz Benson Torres

Donald Trump, Jr. Alan Futerfas, Karina Lynch, Williams & Jensen

Paul Manafort Kevin Downing, Miller & Chevalier

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump Abbe Lowell, Norton Rose Fulbright

Donald McGahn

William Burck, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan

Reince Priebus

that the person being represented is the witness in question, not Donald Trump.” Is counseling someone in Trump’s orbit good or bad for a lawyer’s résumé? “In a normal world, if you’re making your reputation as someone who handles the most sensitive matters, why wouldn’t you want to work for the president?” Wright asks. He worked for Clinton’s lead counsel William Bennett during Clinton’s impeachment battle —“an honorif ic,” Wright calls it. But Trump upends the normal lawyer– client dynamic. Wright describes the president as “resistant to taking legal advice and operating in a news cycle mindset that doesn't think across time about consistency. It's terrible in a legal context.” Wright suggests Trump - controlled lawyers might get less respect than i ndependent , Belt way establishment defenders of lower-level clients. “I don’t think there will be any tarnishing to Bill Burck’s career,” says Wright, referring to a Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan

partner who is advising both McGahn and former chief of staff Reince Priebus. Veteran white-collar criminal defense attorney Joel Hirschhorn tells a different story. S ome of his col leag ues reject the TrumpLaw brand categorically. Hirschhorn says when he proposed a Trump insider for membership in the exclusive American Board of Criminal Lawyers, “one of the most respected lawyers in the group said, ‘I wouldn’t vote for him.’” “I’m saying, ‘What the heck, we represent mass murderers,’” retorted Hirschhorn, a shareholder at GrayRobinson in Miami. “Trump has so politicized even the criminal defense bar, it’s shocking,” he says. A p a s t - p r e s i d e nt o f t h e A B C L , Hirschhorn has switched into lobbying mode for his candidate. He says he believes no defense lawyer should be penalized for his client’s unpopularity. “I would like to think that in our profession there’s admiration for the courage to do the best we can for someone who is held in such low esteem.”

William Burck, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan

Michael Cohen Stephen Ryan, McDermott Will & Emery

Mike Pence

Richard Cullen, McGuireWoods

Jeff Sessions Charles Cooper, Cooper & Kirk

Hope Hicks

Robert Trout, Trout Cacheris & Janis

Roger Stone Grant Smith; Robert Buschel, Buschel & Gibbons

Michael Flynn

Robert Kelner and others, Covington & Burling

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ON THE BENCH

IN TRUMP’S WORLD, UDGES ARE THE ENEMIES The president has made it a point to attack the judiciary. By Susan Milligan In Donald Trump’s world, judges have no business interfering with his business—or his politics. U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, Trump said, could not fairly judge the then-candidate’s eponymous university because Curiel is of Mexican descent and Trump wanted to build a wall with Mexico.

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The famously liberal 9th Circuit Court of Appeals should be broken apart, he said. A court challenge to Trump’s travel ban on immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries? Not reviewable, Trump’s Justice Department lawyers argued. Trump labeled U.S. District Judge James L. Robart merely a “so-called judge” because he wrote

an opinion blocking the travel ban. Even on a criminal matter—typically one where the judicial branch has the last word— the president delivered his unique trump card: he pardoned former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was convicted of willfully violating a court order banning Arpaio from de facto immigration raids.


GETTY IMAGES

But the new president has taken the battle to a new level, legal experts say, turning what has historically been a mostly respectful turf war into an outright assault on the very integrity of the judicial branch, its officers and even the rule of law.

AN INTERIOR VIEW OF THE SUPREME COURT OF ILLINOIS.

Judges are used to being the targets of criticism, and not just by the people they sentence to jail. Presidents in the past have made their frustration with the judicial branch known, whether it’s been by openly criticizing their decisions or attempting (as Franklin Roosevelt unsuccessfully did) to dilute any Supreme Court justice’s

individual power. But the new president has taken the battle to a new level, legal experts say, turning what has historically been a mostly-respectful turf war into an outright assault on the very integrity of the judicial branch, its officers, and even the rule of law. “It ’s always happened, because it ’s politically expedient. It’s easy to attack a

branch that can’t really protect itself,” since judges’ rulings are supposed to stand for themselves and jurists are not supposed to engage in back-and-forth political arguments with people about cases, says former U.S. District Court Judge Kevin Sharp, now managing partner of Sanford Heisler Sharp’s Nashville office. But the current attacks on the judicial branch, he says, are undermining not only the authority of judges to interpret the law but the public’s faith in those rulings. “When you attack individual [judges], when you call them names, when you’re attacking their legitimacy, when you challenge someone’s ability to be fit and impartial because of their national origin— it challenges the legitimacy of the judiciary” as a whole, Sharp says. “When the president is attacking one of the branches of government, it undermines the whole system of checks and balances. He is diminishing and degrading one of those branches,” says Notre Dame Law professor Jimmy Gurulé, a former federal prosecutor and assistant attorney general in the George H.W. Bush administration. “People are listening; people are paying attention” to Trump’s comments, “and they are going to be using this to their advantage,” Gurulé adds. If the chief executive does not respect the rulings of the judicial branch, “they will say, why should we comply? Why should we respect the decisions of the judiciary? I think it’s dangerous,” the former Bush

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administration of f icia l adds. “ When you start eroding these fundamental institutions, there’s a risk of the erosion of democracy and respect for both democracy and the rule of law. It sets a very bad precedent.” Other elected officials have criticized or sought to politicize the judiary as well. Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz is among those who have suggested breaking up the 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing that California’s judges are dominating more conservative jurists from the western states circuit. North Ca rolina’s GOP legislature recently required that candidates for judgeships list their party affiliations on the ballot. The North Carolina General Assembly reduced the size of the state Court of Appeals, depriving the new Democratic governor, Roy Cooper, from naming replacements for GOP picks. Legal scholars and historians note that Trump is hardly the first president to criticize judicial decisions or express his frustration with the judicial branch. Presidents and Legislative Branch Members, after all, have to face elections and are accountable to the public on a regular basis, while federal judges are appointed for life. That frees jurists from some political pressure, ideally making them more devoted to the rule of law than their own job security. But it can be agitating to elected officials who watch their policy agendas limited or undone by judges whose decisions are generally the last word. FDR famously proposed expanding the Supreme Court to as many as 15 justices, a 1937 idea that grew out of his frustration that the high court had declared elements of his New Deal unconstitutional. The socalled “court-packing plan” (it would have added an additional associate justice when sitting justices 70 and older refused to retire) was defeated overwhelmingly in the Senate. Roosevelt was able to make appointments to fill vacancies during his presidency and ironically, by 1942, all but two members of the high court were his appointees. Harry S. Truman tangled with the high court as well, notes William and Mary Law School professor Neal E. Devins, director of the school’s Institute of Bill of Rights Law. Truman had inherited some of FDR’s court and was incensed that the justices struck down as unconstitutional Truman’s effort to seize the U.S. steel industry as a wartime emergency move (though the Korean War had not actually been declared a war). Truman took it personally, later saying, “I don’t see how a court made up of so-called ‘Liberals’ could do what that

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CHIP SOMODEVILLA – GETTY IMAGES

ON THE BENCH

INTERIOR VIEW OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

court did to me.” Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 Supreme Court ruling striking down segregated schools, also had a political ripple effect, notes University of San Francisco Law School dean John Trasviña, leading to the 1956 Southern Manifesto of regional lawmakers declaring Brown v. Board of Education as an abuse of judicial power that squelched states’ rights. President Barack Obama, meanwhile, openly criticized the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling that struck down key elements of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. And he did so in the most public of ways, making his remarks at a State of the Union address attended by six members of the high court. All of the justices remained expressionless during Obama’s criticism except Justice Samuel Alito, who could be viewed mouthing the words “not true.” Meanwhile, the court appointments themselves have become more political and partisan—at least in the eyes of voters and elected officials, who openly discuss having “liberal” or “conservative” allies on the bench. That impression is amplified by attention to high-profile, closely-decided cases such as the ruling making samesex marriage the law of the land, experts say. Most cases are decided unanimously or near-unanimously by the high court, Devins says, but “elected officials are seeing the court in more partisan terms than they ever have before.” Trump, meanwhile, has escalated the conflict from a sort of rock-paper-scissors game, where each branch of government triumphs at different times, to an all-out war

on the very integrity of the judicial branch, critics say. The undermining has been as brazen as Trump’s public statements and tweets—as was the case with his attack on Curiel—and as subtle as a legal argument to the federal court of appeals. In February, during 2017 arguments before the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, for example, the Justice Department claimed that the court did not have the right to review the executive order. That was startling to legal experts, who say that the administration could have argued, with precedent, that the courts are supposed to give deference to the executive on matters involving national security. “Even with that [traditional] deference, the administration’s position was, judges shouldn’t decide it,” says Trasviña, who is also former counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee. “It wasn’t even a matter of saying, ‘Give us great deference.’ It was, ‘Don’t even look at us.’” Trump’s pardon of Arpaio, too, might not have the cable news appeal of brandishing insults at judges, experts say, and on its face, was a limited-impact executive decision. But because Arpaio had been convicted of defying a court ruling, Trump’s official forgiveness was a way of saying that judges don’t really count and that the president can do (or undo) their work, say critics. “The pardon is not legally significant,” in that people generally agree that Trump had the constitutional power to pardon the former sheriff, says Arizona attorney James Goodnow, a partner at the law firm Fennemore Craig. “But it was symbolic, in how Joe Arpaio thumbed his nose at the rule of law. Using his pardon power on Joe Arpaio was really encouraging and


Most cases are decided unanimously or near-unanimously by the high court, Devins says, but “elected officials are seeing the court in more partisan terms than they ever have before.” supporting that kind of conduct. We live in a world of checks and balances,” Goodnow adds. “Donald Trump doesn’t like checks. And he certainly doesn’t like balances.” Jurists should expect to be aggressively questioned and criticized—if for no other reason than that they are protected by lifetime terms, say Washington, D.C., attorney Ilan Wurman, who served as general counsel on Republican Rand Paul’s presidential campaign. And while jurists may see their rulings as academic—even arcane—matters of law, elected officials, and voters are feeling the real-life impact “in some respects. Judges bear at least some responsibility for the political attacks that

are brought upon them, because judging is seen as political today, whereas historically, even if it was political, it wasn’t considered political,” Wurman says. So while the high court might have upheld Obamacare or same-sex marriage on the justices’ majority interpretation of the Constitution, “rightly or wrongly, half of the country thinks they have been robbed of a fair fight,” Wurman says. The attacks on the judiciary come as public support for the country’s institutions is waning—an average of 32 percent overall, a 2016 Gallup poll found, with the Supreme Court clocking in at 36 percent. The problem, Gurulé says, is that not only will

judicial decisions have less power if elected officials or the pubic see no need to adhere to them, but that the U.S.’ influence over other nations is in peril. Democracy “is supposed to be based on [the U.S.] model, Gurulé says. “So it is a big deal. He needs to be called out on this as it being serious and dangerous to the rule of law and to democracy. It’s really setting a bad precedent for other countries that are working and sacrificing and trying to set up a democracy.” But given political tensions in the U.S.— and the political dividends elected officials receive by blaming a branch of government that is, by definition, supposed to be above politics—such aggressive challenges are likely to continue, experts say. “Attacking the independence of the judiciary is nothing new. We have a long, if not proud, tradition of this in the United States,” says Kansas University School of Law professor Lumen N. Mulligan, author of four books on legal jurisdiction and procedure. “In part, it is the job of the judiciary to take it and stand firm. All that said, attacking the judiciary comes at a cost,” he adds.

standing left to right: Dennis R. Smith, Chelsea A. Horowitz Robert A. Miklos, Marianne C. Burke Michael Lauterborn, Alexandria Awad, James Y. Kim, Robyn L. Rothman

seated left to right

James E. Baker, Joseph Miklos, Joseph P. Awad, Daniel P. Miklos

SILBERSTEIN, AWAD & MIKLOS, P.C. If Silberstein, Awad & Miklos’ approach to the practice of law were summed up in a closing argument in court, it might be: “Let the people decide.” Joseph Awad, a leading partner, is confident that the people—the jury—will always get it right. Holding true to this trust in the jury, the firm has successfully prosecuted thousands of serious

personal injury and medical malpractice cases, earning a Tier 1 ranking in New York City for Medical Malpractice Law – Plaintiffs and a Tier 2 ranking in New York City for Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs by U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms” for 2018. As trial attorneys and appellate advocates, Awad and partner Joseph Miklos—who are included

in The Best Lawyers in America© —view their law firm’s work as improving safety in numerous enterprises, from hospitals to construction sites, while providing clients with excellent lawyering, financing for meritorious cases, and consultation with the finest medical and scientific minds. “Unfortunately,” Miklos says, “a victim seeking redress will get nowhere on his or her own.” Only in a civil court of law with the representation of experienced counsel can an individual find a level playing field. Trials reveal the common safety concerns shared by the injured and the jury.

140 Broadway | New York, NY 10005 | phone 212. 233.6600 | w w w.ask4sam.com 600 Old Countr y Road | Garden Cit y, NY 11530 | phone 516.832.7777

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COURT POLITICS

EFF SESSIONS MAY BE HAVING THE LAST LAUGH

Donald Trump’s attorney general endured bilious attacks from the president despite being among the first on Capitol Hill to endorse pursuing his agenda. By Alan Neuhauser If there was any question why Attorney G e ne r al J ef f S e s sions — a re sp e c te d Alabama senator for 20 years—allowed himself to be turned into the president’s d o o r m a t t h i s s u m m e r, t h e a n s w e r appeared to come in September. That was when Sessions announced that the administration would end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, a program dating to the administration of Barack Obama, which had granted temporary legal status to some 800,000 young immigrants illegally brought to the U.S. as children. It was a vic tor y for a man who, as a senator, had of ten stood out as an immigration hardliner, and as attorney general, had recently endured withering public and private attacks from a president whom he was among the first on Capitol Hill to endorse. Af ter years in which he and others castigated DACA for circumventing the nation’s legal immigration system, Sessions got to sound its death knell. And while his tone when he delivered his remarks was serious, a New York Times photographer caught him smiling offstage, just before

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taking the podium. It was a win for President Donald Trump as well: By having Sessions announce the end of DACA, Trump distanced himself from the political fallout of ending a program that’s generally popular on both the left and the right. Just two months earlier, Trump had lambasted Sessions during an interview with The New York Times, lacing into his attorney general for deciding to recuse himself from the Justice Department’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, an inquiry that may also be examining potential collusion between the Kremlin and members of the Trump campaign team. “Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job, and I would have picked somebody else,” Trump said. Through the nex t t wo week s, the president continued to treat his attorney general like a punching bag. On Twitter, he questioned why Sessions didn’t replace a top FBI official who had helped oversee the investigation into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email

server, appeared to blame the attorney general for supposed “illegal leaks” to news outlets, and harangued Sessions for supposedly taking “a VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes.” The attacks behind closed doors were reportedly even worse: In May, President Trump “berated” Sessions in an Oval Office meeting, accusing him of “disloyalty” as he “unleashed a string of insults on his attorney general” after learning that the Justice Department was appointing a special counsel to oversee the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to The New York Times. Sessions repor tedly said he would resign, an offer Trump ultimately refused to accept. The attacks would resume two months later. Throughout, the at torney gener al publicly maintained that he still enjoyed the “honor of serving as attorney general,” and that he intended “to continue to do so as long as that is appropriate.” His strongest response to the president’s remarks was that they were “hurtful.” Springing to Sessions’ defense were hardline immigration groups and Sessions’ former Republican colleagues


in the Senate, who saw Sessions as an instrumental par t of carr ying out conservative priorities. Sessions, meanwhile, appeared to attempt to win his way back into Trump’s affections. In addressing the president’s remarks, Sessions called Trump a “strong” le a de r, a n d h e a nn o un c e d in e a r l y August—barely a week after the Twitter attacks—that leak investigations by the Justice Department had tripled under the new administration. Trump eventually focused on other targets—from the NFL and its players to Clinton and the news media. The attorney general, meanwhile, has taken steps to reinstitute tough prison sentences and reinvigorate the war on drugs, crack down on so-called sanctuary cities that do not fully comply with federal immigration enforcement, and reduce federal oversight of local police departments. In the end, the president’s anger over the Russia investigation and Sessions’ recusal has not prevented the attorney general from carrying out the work he’d spent two decades trying to accomplish in Congress. And for Sessions, achieving his agenda may be worth a little public humiliation.

BRETT ZIEGLER FOR USN&WR

After years in which he and others castigated DACA for circumventing the nation’s legal immigration system, Sessions got to sound its death knell.

ATTORNEY GENERAL JEFF SESSIONS TESTIFIES BEFORE THE SENATE SELECT COMMITTEE ON INTELLIGENCE ON CAPITOL HILL.

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law firms of the year 2018 U.S. News – Best Lawyers

“Best Law Firms” Law Firms of the Year

ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW HOLLAND & KNIGHT

CORPORATE LAW SULLIVAN & CROMWELL

ADVERTISING LAW VENABLE

DERIVATIVES AND FUTURES LAW CADWALADER, WICKERSHAM & TAFT

ANTITRUST LAW GIBSON, DUNN & CRUTCHER

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (ERISA) LAW PROSKAUER ROSE

APPELLATE PRACTICE GIBSON, DUNN & CRUTCHER

EMPLOYMENT LAW - MANAGEMENT FISHER PHILLIPS

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW SULLIVAN & CROMWELL BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW JONES DAY BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW GOODWIN PROCTER COMMERCIAL LITIGATION PAUL, WEISS, RIFKIND, WHARTON & GARRISON COMMUNICATIONS LAW WILKINSON BARKER KNAUER

ENERGY LAW VINSON & ELKINS ENTERTAINMENT LAW - MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION DAVIS WRIGHT TREMAINE ENTERTAINMENT LAW - MUSIC MANATT, PHELPS & PHILLIPS

“We have been ranking law firms for seven years now,” says Steven Naifeh, CEO and co-founder of Best Lawyers. “We are proud that we have undertaken this challenging and impor tant task so diligently and with such care that the legal profession has come to view our tens of thousands of rankings each year with widespread respect.”

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW BEVERIDGE & DIAMOND

HEALTH CARE LAW POLSINELLI

EQUIPMENT FINANCE LAW NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT

IMMIGRATION LAW FRAGOMEN, DEL REY, BERNSEN AND LOEWY

FDA LAW KING & SPALDING

CONSTRUCTION LAW BRADLEY ARANT BOULT CUMMINGS

FINANCIAL SERVICES REGULATION LAW MORRISON & FOERSTER

COPYRIGHT LAW THOMPSON COBURN

FRANCHISE LAW DLA PIPER

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U.S. NEWS AND BEST LAW YERS have again awarded “Law Firm of the Year” honors to a single firm in each of 74 practice areas recognized in the 2018 rankings. These firms have demonstrated exceptional performance in our research, a combination of client feedback, reviews by other attorneys within the same practice area, the firm’s collective contribution to each practice area and input received by the industry’s firm leaders.

U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW MORRISON & FOERSTER INSURANCE LAW COVINGTON & BURLING

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION COMMERCIAL WHITE & CASE INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION GOVERNMENTAL KING & SPALDING INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE LAW HOGAN LOVELLS US LABOR LAW - MANAGEMENT JACKSON LEWIS


ISTOCK.COM/BLUEJAYPHOTO

LAND USE & ZONING LAW COX, CASTLE & NICHOLSON LEVERAGED BUYOUTS AND PRIVATE EQUITY LAW KIRKLAND & ELLIS LITIGATION - ANTITRUST JONES DAY LITIGATION - BANKING & FINANCE CLEARY GOTTLIEB STEEN & HAMILTON LITIGATION - BANKRUPTCY AKIN GUMP STRAUSS HAUER & FELD LITIGATION - CONSTRUCTION PECKAR & ABRAMSON LITIGATION - ENVIRONMENTAL K&L GATES LITIGATION - ERISA ALSTON & BIRD LITIGATION - FIRST AMENDMENT BALLARD SPAHR

*AWARDED TO LEVINE SULLIVAN KOCH & SCHULZ, WHICH HAS SINCE MERGED

LITIGATION - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY WILMER CUTLER PICKERING HALE AND DORR

LITIGATION - LABOR & EMPLOYMENT OGLETREE, DEAKINS, NASH, SMOAK & STEWART LITIGATION - MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS SKADDEN, ARPS, SLATE, MEAGHER & FLOM LITIGATION - PATENT AKIN GUMP STRAUSS HAUER & FELD LITIGATION - REAL ESTATE AKERMAN LITIGATION - REGULATORY ENFORCEMENT (SEC, TELECOM, ENERGY) SKADDEN, ARPS, SLATE, MEAGHER & FLOM LITIGATION - SECURITIES SIDLEY AUSTIN LITIGATION - TAX MCDERMOTT WILL & EMERY MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS - DEFENDANTS GORDON REES SCULLY MANSUKHANI MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS - PLAINTIFFS SIMMONS HANLY CONROY

MEDIA LAW BALLARD SPAHR

*AWARDED TO LEVINE SULLIVAN KOCH & SCHULZ, WHICH HAS SINCE MERGED

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW CRAVATH, SWAINE & MOORE MINING LAW DINSMORE & SHOHL MUTUAL FUNDS LAW ROPES & GRAY NATIVE AMERICAN LAW VAN NESS FELDMAN NATURAL RESOURCES LAW THOMPSON & KNIGHT OIL & GAS LAW BAKER BOTTS

REAL ESTATE LAW GREENBERG TRAURIG SECURITIES / CAPITAL MARKETS LAW LATHAM & WATKINS SECURITIES REGULATION WEIL, GOTSHAL & MANGES SECURITIZATION AND STRUCTURED FINANCE LAW MORGAN, LEWIS & BOCKIUS SPORTS LAW WINSTON & STRAWN TAX LAW MAYER BROWN TECHNOLOGY LAW COOLEY

PATENT LAW PERKINS COIE

TIMBER LAW SCHWABE, WILLIAMSON & WYATT

PRIVATE FUNDS / HEDGE FUNDS LAW SIDLEY AUSTIN

TRADEMARK LAW NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT

PROJECT FINANCE LAW WHITE & CASE

TRANSPORTATION LAW HOLLAND & KNIGHT

PUBLIC FINANCE LAW SQUIRE PATTON BOGGS

TRUSTS & ESTATES LAW MCGUIREWOODS

RAILROAD LAW THOMPSON COBURN

VENTURE CAPITAL LAW COOLEY

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The U.S. News – Best Law yers “Best Law Firms” rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes the collection of client and lawyer evaluations, peer review from leading attorneys in their f ield, and review of additional information provided by law firms as par t of the formal submission process. To be eligible for a ranking in a particular practice area and metro region, a law firm must have at least one lawyer who is currently recognized in Best Lawyers in that practice area and metro. For more information on Best Lawyers, please visit www.bestlawyers.com. For the 2018 “Best Law Firms” list, the methodology for the initiative remained the same as in the previous seven years. Clients were asked to provide feedback on firm pr ac tice groups, addres sing expertise, responsiveness, understanding of a business and it s needs, cost- eff ectiveness, civilit y, and whether they would refer another client to the firm. Clients also had the option to write in the names of law firms with which they’ve worked on other mat ters and within practice areas beyond those on which they were asked by the submitting firm to comment. Some clients chose to write comments about their experiences with the law firms. These comments are for reference only and were not used as data points in the formal evaluation process. L aw ye r s a ls o vote d o n e x p e r tis e, r e s p o n s i v e n e s s , i n t e g r i t y, c o s t- e ff ectiveness, whether they would refer a mat ter to a firm, and whether they consider a firm a worthy competitor. We asked this group to vote on law firms that

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have preeminent national presence within specified legal practice area(s) they know well. For the fourth year, a Law Firm Leaders Sur vey was implemented to provide personal insight on the legal landscape surrounding the nationally ranked practice areas. In addition to information from these surveys, the rankings incorporate the 7.3 million evaluations of 55,000 individual leading lawyers collected by Best Lawyers in its most recent annual survey. In addition to lawyer and client feedback, law firms were asked to provide us with general demographic and background information on the law firm and attorneys and other data that speaks to the strengths of a law firm’s practice areas. All of the quantitative and qualitative dat a were combined into an over all “Best Law Firms” score for each firm. This data was then compared to other firms within the same metropolitan area and at the national level. Because firms were often separated by small or insignificant diff erences in overall score, we use a tiering system rather than ranking law firms sequentially. The first tier in each metropolitan area includes those firms that scored within a certain percentage of the highest scoring firm(s); the second tier, those firms that scored within a certain percentage of the next highest scoring firm(s), and so on. The national rankings were based on metropolitan rankings as well as on the number of offi ces each firm had with a metropolitan ranking and on the level of legal activity in each metropolitan area. The number of tiers included in each practice area or metropolitan area ranking varies. Of the 13,745 firms that were eligible to submit information for the ranking process, 13,372 firms, including

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BEHIND THE RANKINGS METHODOLOGY a large number of one -person firms, received rankings, and 8,914 of those firms received first tier national and/or metropolitan rankings. Metropolitan areas are def ined by assessing the population of eligible law firms geographically to guarantee enough comparative data to produce accurate results. There are eight states that had high percentages of eligible law firms located in one large metropolitan area. Because there were also eligible law firms outside of those metropolitan areas, but not enough to create accurate results for separate metropolitan rankings, results were produced for the entire state. The states that fall into this category are: Alaska, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Utah. Practice area rankings were produced b oth n atio n all y an d within 186 metropolitan areas across the United States. Bec ause some prac tice areas have minimal presence in particular legal markets, or because there was not enough data garnered for proper evaluation, some practice areas that are covered in our research are not represented in the national rankings or various metropolitan rankings. The 2018 “Best Law Firms” national rankings cover 75 practice areas, while as many as 122 practice areas are covered on the metropolitan lists. For the seventh year, one law firm in 74 practice areas will receive the prestigious 2018 “Law Firm of the Year” recognition. Law firms receiving the “Law Firm of the Year” designation have an impressive overall performance in our research of a given practice area, representing a significant showing in the 2018 U.S. News – Best Lawyers “Best Law Firms” initiative.


National Tier 1 Rankings 2018 U.S. News – Best Lawyers

“Best Law Firms” Tier 1 National Rankings ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW Burke & Parsons Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP Cozen O'Connor Freehill Hogan & Mahar LLP Friedman, James & Buchsbaum LLP Gilmartin, Poster & Shafto LLP Goodwin Hill Rivkins LLP Hill, Betts & Nash LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman Keesal, Young & Logan Law Offices of David L. Mazaroli Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin, P.C. McLaughlin & Stern, LLP Nicoletti Hornig & Sweeney Royston, Rayzor, Vickery & Williams, LLP (Tier 2) Seward & Kissel LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Vedder Price P.C. Watson Farley & Williams LLP

ADVERTISING LAW Crowell & Moring LLP Davis & Gilbert LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, PC Keller and Heckman LLP Kelley Drye & Warren LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mayer Brown LLP Olshan Frome Wolosky LLP Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP Perkins Coie LLP

Proskauer Rose LLP Reed Smith LLP Venable LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

ANTITRUST LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider LLP Boies Schiller Flexner LLP Bryan Cave LLP Constantine Cannon LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dechert LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Hausfeld LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP O'Melveny & Myers LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC

THE 546 U.S. LAW FIRMS that received national Tier 1 rankings in the 2018 Edition of “Best Law Firms” are featured below. Across all tiers, a total of 1,991 firms received national rankings. In addition, a single law firm in 74 national practice areas was designated “Law Firm of the Year,” a measure of the exceptional feedback each of these firms received and their impressive overall performances in the evaluations of a given practice area. These firms have been listed in red throughout the national rankings section. Visit bestlawfirms.usnews.com to view nationally ranked firms in all tiers.

Winston & Strawn LLP

APPELLATE PRACTICE Akerman LLP Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alexander Dubose Jefferson & Townsend LLP Altshuler Berzon LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker McKenzie LLP Bancroft, McGavin, Horvath & Judkins, P.C. Beck Redden LLP Bennett & Secrest, PLLC Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Carlton Fields Cooper & Kirk, PLLC Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dechert LLP Dennis A. Fischer Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Duane Morris LLP Edward J. Horowitz Eric S. Multhaup Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Farella Braun + Martel LLP Forde Law Offices, LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin GrayRobinson, P.A. Greenberg Traurig, LLP Greene Smith & Associates, P.A. Greines, Martin, Stein & Richland LLP Hall Prangle and Schoonveld LLC Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Hicks, Porter, Ebenfeld & Stein, P.A. Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP Hogan & Hogan LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

Jenner & Block LLP Joel S. Perwin P.A. Jones Day Keker & Van Nest LLP Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick, P.L.L.C. Kendall Brill & Kelly LLP Kenny Nachwalter, P.A. Kerr & Wagstaffe LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Law Office of Barry Fischer PLC Law Office of Robert S. Gerstein Law Offices of Joel B. Rudin, P.C. Law Offices of Michael T. Reagan Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Lightfoot Steingard & Sadowsky LLP Locke Lord LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mayer Brown LLP MoloLamken LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Podhurst Orseck, P.A. Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Riordan & Horgan Robbins, Russell, Englert, Orseck, Untereiner & Sauber LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Rosen Bien Galvan & Grunfeld LLP Ross & Girten PA Russo Appellate Firm P.A.

Russo Appellate Firm, P.A. Russo Appellate Firm P.A.

305.666.4660 www.russoappeals.com

Schiff Hardin LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Schonbrun Seplow Harris & Hoffman, LLP Severson & Werson, P.C. Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP SmithAmundsen LLC Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP The Appellate Practice of Robert S. Glazier Vinson & Elkins LLP

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Weiss Serota Helfman Cole & Bierman, P.L. White & Case LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Wright & Close, LLP Yetter Coleman LLP Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW Alston & Bird LLP Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Blank Rome LLP Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchalter PC Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP Duane Morris LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Jones Day K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Luskin, Stern & Eisler LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Otterbourg, P.C. Paul Hastings LLP Porter Wright Morris & Arthur LLP Reed Smith LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Vedder Price P.C. Venable LLP

U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Williams Mullen, PC Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Arent Fox LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Blank Rome LLP Brown Rudnick LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchalter PC Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cole Schotz P.C. Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Duane Morris LLP Dykema Gossett PLLC Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP

LeClairRyan Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP McKool Smith PC Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Pachulski Stang Ziehl & Jones LLP Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Robins Kaplan LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Venable LLP Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Cooley LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Foley Hoag LLP Goodwin Procter Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morrison & Foerster LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

GOODWIN PROCTER “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW

The Goodwin firm has fabulous knowledge and follow-through. It doesn't get better than this firm.


Perkins Coie LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sidley Austin LLP Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox P.L.L.C. Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION Adams and Reese LLP Akerman LLP Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker McKenzie LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Blank Rome LLP Boies Schiller Flexner LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cozen O'Connor Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP Dentons Dickinson Wright PLLC Dinsmore & Shohl LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP

Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP LeClairRyan Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP Locke Lord LLP Mayer Brown LLP McCarter & English, LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP McKool Smith PC Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP

Sullivan & Worcester LLP Susman Godfrey LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

COMMUNICATIONS LAW Baker Botts L.L.P. Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Covington & Burling LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

WILKINSON BARKER KNAUER “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” COMMUNICATIONS LAW

Wilson Barker Knauer is a fantastic law firm. They are excellent on the legal and policy issues in the telecommunications marketplace. They have excellent relationships throughout the FCC and the industry. Their strategic advice is thoughtful and spot-on. I thoroughly enjoy working with the whole firm. Wilkinson Barker Knauer is clearly an outstanding communications law firm. They are extremely knowledgeable, service-oriented, and move mountains to get the job done in your time frame.

Alston & Bird LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP Coats Rose A Professional Corporation Dickinson Wright PLLC DLA Piper LLP Duane Morris LLP Gallet Dreyer & Berkey, LLP Goetz Fitzpatrick LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP Holland & Knight LLP Ice Miller LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kraftson Caudle Lane Law Services Levy Tolman, LLP McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter, LLP Moore & Lee, LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Peckar & Abramson, P.C. Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Smith, Currie & Hancock LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Stoel Rives LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, L.L.P. Weinberg Wheeler Hudgins Gunn & Dial LLC Williams Mullen, PC Zetlin & De Chiara LLP

COPYRIGHT LAW Baker & Hostetler LLP

Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon L.L.P. Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

DLA Piper LLP Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jenner & Block LLP Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick, P.L.L.C. Latham & Watkins LLP Lawler, Metzger, Keeney & Logan, LLC Lerman Senter PLLC Levine, Blaszak, Block & Boothby, LLP Mayer Brown LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Sidley Austin LLP Telecommunications Law Professionals PLLC Wiley Rein LLP Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP

CONSTRUCTION LAW Akerman LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Covington & Burling LLP Cowan Liebowitz & Latman, P.C. Davis Wright Tremaine LLP DLA Piper LLP Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, PC Fross Zelnick Lehrman & Zissu, P.C. Greenberg Traurig, LLP K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Merchant & Gould Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

CLIENT COMMENTS

BRADLEY ARANT BOULT CUMMINGS “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” CONSTRUCTION LAW

I thoroughly enjoy working with the attorneys at Bradley Arant. They are attentive, professional, and responsive. More importantly, they know their stuff and get the job done!

Norton Rose Fulbright Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Thompson Coburn LLP

CORPORATE LAW Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker McKenzie LLP

Bradley has top-flight lawyers who combine total command of the law with good practical advice and experience. I would trust them with any type of construction or government contracts case. There is no better value in large construction legal practice. I have used lawyers all over the U.S. and the world, and Bradley Arant Boult Cummings consistently outperforms others in more expensive markets. They have a strong, talented bench and have elite lawyers at the top, which makes them an easy choice for these types of disputes. It is also nice to have a full service firm with subject matter experts in virtually every area of the law. At the end of the day, they have a large national/international practice in a midsized market, which offers unparalleled value for exceptional legal services. This is my go-to law firm. Ralph Germany at Bradley Arant is the most responsive and efficient attorney I have ever worked with. He knows construction law, and he provides solid advice and service without involving a bunch of associates and extra fees. Bradley has a unique specialty in construction law. In matters both domestic and international, the lawyers in the firm have routinely provided us with the expertise that we need in order to be able to handle our transactional matters, as well as the day-to-day legal requirements of our construction and engineering practice. Being in the construction field myself, I appreciate dealing with folks who understand the industry and know what they are doing. Bradley exemplifies that. I highly recommend to any and all that have this need! The Construction Law team at Bradley is not only strong at what they do; they are huge advocates for and supporters of the design and construction industry.

ISTOCK.COM/SHIRONOSOV

Bradley Arant stands out, and we enjoy working with them because they work as a team with our business people and in-house lawyers. Although they are open with advice and pull no punches, the Bradley Arant team always looks for a creative solution rather than providing the easy, ‘No, it’s not possible,’ response.

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U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP Choate Hall & Stewart LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP Dentons Dinsmore & Shohl LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Duane Morris LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve Franklin & Hachigian, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Lowenstein Sandler LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP

McGuireWoods LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Murphy & McGonigle Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson, P.A. Ropes & Gray LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stoel Rives LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE-COLLAR Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Boies Schiller Flexner LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cozen O'Connor Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP DLA Piper LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP


King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP O'Melveny & Myers LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Williams & Connolly LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP

EMPLOYMENT LAW - MANAGEMENT Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Barnes & Thornburg LLP Blank Rome LLP Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP Cozen O'Connor

CLIENT COMMENTS

FISHER PHILLIPS

“LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” EMPLOYMENT LAW – MANAGEMENT

DERIVATIVES AND FUTURES LAW

I have found Fisher Phillips to be zealous and diligent advocates for us in everything that they do. They have had some complex arbitration cases and litigation but have always made every effort to make us successful. Their advice is always timely and very helpful. They are a good group to work with and to resolve issues with.

Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Foley & Lardner LLP K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Paul Hastings LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

The attorneys at Fisher Phillips are first rate and consistently give practical advice to complex employment-related issues. Fisher Phillips is by far the best firm I have dealt with in my 15 years of human capital management. Fisher Phillips is extremely strong, and we have been very pleased with their representation of our company in all NLRB and union related matters. Their advice is sound and results have been excellent in the 20 years we have worked with them.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (ERISA) LAW

We rely on Fisher Phillips to assist us in guiding our members in employment and labor matters. They have an excellent knowledge base, provide timely response[s], and treat clients professionally. The breadth and depth of their attorneys’ experience is of the highest level. Fisher Phillips is extremely cost effective, skilled, effective, and easy to work with.

ISTOCK.COM/SHIRONOSOV

Alston & Bird LLP Baker McKenzie LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Conner & Winters, LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dechert LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Jones Day K&L Gates

Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

Davis Wright Tremaine LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Fisher Phillips LLP Foley & Lardner LLP FordHarrison LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Jackson Lewis P.C. Jones Day K&L Gates Littler Mendelson P.C. Locke Lord LLP McGuireWoods LLP Michael Best & Friedrich LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

ENERGY LAW Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Bracewell LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Day Pitney LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Jennings, Strouss & Salmon, PLC Jones Day K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Mayer Brown LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Sidley Austin LLP

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

CLIENT COMMENTS

VINSON & ELKINS “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” ENERGY LAW

Vinson & Elkins is elite when it comes to handling oil and gas disputes. Vinson & Elkins lawyers provide outstanding services. Jo Ann Biggs especially goes the extra mile to ensure team success. Unlike most firms and practice areas, I don't view Vinson & Elkins as providing a service that is essentially a commodity. Texas utility regulation legal services require unique expertise. The market for these services is finite in general, and V&E is the clear leader. There are other good lawyers in the space, but V&E has the most premium lawyers of any firm. Oncor is very fortunate to have access to them.

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Stoel Rives LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

ENTERTAINMENT LAW - MOTION PICTURES & TELEVISION Bloom Hergott Diemer Rosenthal LaViolette Feldman Schenkman & Goodman Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Del, Shaw, Moonves, Tanaka, Finkelstein & Lezcano Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, PC Franklin, Weinrib, Rudell & Vassallo, P.C. Gang, Tyre, Ramer & Brown Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hansen, Jacobson, Teller, Hoberman, Newman, Warren, Richman, Rush & Kaller, L.L.P. Holland & Knight LLP Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kinsella Weitzman Iser Kump & Aldisert LLP Law Offices of George Sheanshang Levine Plotkin & Menin, LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP O'Melveny & Myers LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Rosenberg & Giger P.C. Schreck Rose Dapello & Adams LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

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Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Ziffren Brittenham LLP

ENTERTAINMENT LAW - MUSIC Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Eastman & Eastman Franklin, Weinrib, Rudell & Vassallo, P.C. Greenberg Traurig, LLP Grubman Shire & Meiselas, P.C. Leavens, Strand, & Glover, LLC Loeb & Loeb LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Schreck Rose Dapello & Adams LLP Sukin Law Group

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Akerman LLP Allen & Overy LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dentons Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibbons P.C. Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Hart LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP K&L Gates Kazmarek Mowrey Cloud Laseter LLP Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Lathrop Gage LLP Manko, Gold, Katcher & Fox LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Nossaman LLP O'Melveny & Myers LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Saul Ewing LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Sive, Paget & Riesel, P.C. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stoel Rives LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Williams Mullen, PC Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

EQUIPMENT FINANCE LAW

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP Beveridge & Diamond PC Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP

U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

Clifford Chance LLC Duane Morris LLP Goldberg Kohn Ltd. Holland & Knight LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Vedder Price P.C. White & Case LLP

FDA LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Covington & Burling LLP

Hyman, Phelps & McNamara, P.C. King & Spalding LLP Sidley Austin LLP Williams & Connolly LLP

FINANCIAL SERVICES REGULATION LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Bracewell LLP Buckley Sandler LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Covington & Burling LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP White & Case LLP

FRANCHISE LAW Barack Ferrazzano Kirschbaum & Nagelberg LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cheng Cohen LLC Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Genovese Joblove & Battista, P.A. Gray Plant Mooty Greenberg Traurig, LLP Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. Kaufmann Gildin & Robbins LLP Mayer Brown LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Plave Koch PLC Polsinelli PC Quarles & Brady LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Tannenbaum Helpern Syracuse & Hirschtritt LLP Zarco Einhorn Salkowski & Brito, P.A.

HEALTH CARE LAW Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arent Fox LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Bricker & Eckler LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Covington & Burling LLP Crowell & Moring LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dentons Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Duane Morris LLP


CLIENT COMMENTS

POLSINELLI

“LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” HEALTH CARE LAW Polsinelli is an excellent partner in all aspects.

Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, P.C. Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hooper, Lundy & Bookman, P.C. Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP King & Spalding LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP

IMMIGRATION LAW Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP Bretz & Coven, LLP Clark Hill PLC Cyrus D. Mehta & Partners PLLC Duane Morris LLP Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen and Loewy, LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibney, Anthony & Flaherty, LLP Glinsmann Immigration Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hammond Young Immigration Law LLC

Klasko Immigration Law Partners, LLP 215.825.8600 www.klaskolaw.com

Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Laura Kelsey Rhodes, LLC Maggio Kattar Nahajzer + Alexander, P.C. Mayer Brown LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Odin, Feldman & Pittleman, P.C. Pryor Cashman LLP Reina & Bates Satterlee Stephens Burke & Burke Seyfarth Shaw LLP The Law Office of Cheryl R. David The Law Office of Matthew L. Guadagno The Masliah Firm The Seltzer Firm, PLLC Trow & Rahal, P.C. Waxlaw Wolfsdorf Rosenthal LLP Wormser, Kiely, Galef & Jacobs LLP

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cowan Liebowitz & Latman, P.C. DLA Piper LLP Fenwick & West LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Locke Lord LLP Mayer Brown LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Moses & Singer LLP Perkins Coie LLP Peter Brown & Associates PLLC Ropes & Gray LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

INSURANCE LAW Anderson Kill, P.C. Barnes & Thornburg LLP Blank Rome LLP Clyde & Co LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cozen O'Connor Crowell & Moring LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Duane Morris LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani, LLP Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP

Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Perkins Coie LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Reed Smith LLP Robins Kaplan LLP Sedgwick LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Thompson, Coe, Cousins & Irons, LLP Troutman Sanders LLP White and Williams LLP

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION - COMMERCIAL Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker McKenzie LLP Chaffetz Lindsey LLP Covington & Burling LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Mark A. Kantor Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP

INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION - GOVERNMENTAL Baker McKenzie LLP Chaffetz Lindsey LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP King & Spalding LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP White & Case LLP

INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE LAW Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Perkins Coie LLP

Shearman & Sterling LLP Sidley Austin LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP White & Case LLP

LABOR LAW - MANAGEMENT Allen, Norton & Blue, P.A. Baker & Hostetler LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP Blank Rome LLP Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP Cooley LLP Cozen O'Connor Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Fisher Phillips LLP FordHarrison LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Isler Dare PC Jackson Lewis P.C. Jones Day K&L Gates Littler Mendelson P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Saul Ewing LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

CLIENT COMMENTS

JACKSON LEWIS “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” LABOR LAW – MANAGEMENT

Jim Prozzi of the Jackson Lewis Pittsburgh office has the most in-depth traditional labor law experience of any lawyer I have dealt with in this area. His advice is practical and strategic and supported by the law. He has been ultraresponsive, accessible, and supportive of my company in the course of important negotiations over the past several months. He has my complete confidence. I recommend Jackson Lewis for any labor issue that you might face, from education, training programs, organizing, union campaigns, and any practice before the NLRB. They respect the direction you request and deliver the exact amount of attention to the issue. In the employment law area, the vision and strategic direction Jackson Lewis can provide is incomparable. They demonstrate the ability to balance results and business risk. I never hesitate to turn one of my HR clients over to them directly. They deliver a great result for a fair price. I give this firm my highest recommendation. I have worked with Phil Rosen for several years now on complicated public sector union issues, and I trust his judgment and work product. I would highly recommend him and Jackson Lewis without reservation.

LAND USE & ZONING LAW Akerman LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Briscoe Ivester & Bazel LLP Coblentz, Patch, Duffy & Bass LLP Cohen & Perfetto, LLP Cooley LLP Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP DLA Piper LLP Dykema Gossett PLLC Farella Braun + Martel LLP Filippini Law Firm Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP GoldmanHarris LLC Goodwin Goulston & Storrs PC Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP

42

K&L Gates Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Lerch, Early & Brewer, Chartered Linowes and Blocher LLP McGuireWoods LLP Meltzer, Purtill & Stelle LLC Miller Canfield Paddock and Stone PLC Morrison & Foerster LLP Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Perkins Coie LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP The Sohagi Law Group, PLC Troutman Sanders LLP Walsh, Colucci, Lubeley & Walsh, PC Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

LEVERAGED BUYOUTS AND PRIVATE EQUITY LAW Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP DLA Piper LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Goodwin

U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

K&L Gates Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Lowenstein Sandler LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

LITIGATION - ANTITRUST Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider LLP Baker & Miller PLLC Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker McKenzie LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Bryan Cave LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Constantine Cannon LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dechert LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Haug Partners LLP Hausfeld LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Susman Godfrey LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

LITIGATION - BANKING & FINANCE Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Buckley Sandler LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart, P.A. Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP McGuireWoods LLP McKool Smith PC Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morrison & Foerster LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Webster Book LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

LITIGATION - BANKRUPTCY Akerman LLP Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Blank Rome LLP Brown Rudnick LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchalter PC


Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Caplin & Drysdale, Chartered Cole Schotz P.C. Cooley LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Duane Morris LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kirkland & Ellis LLP LeClairRyan McKool Smith PC Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Reed Smith LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

Jones Day Jones Walker LLP K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kraftson Caudle Laurie & Brennan LLP LeClairRyan Levy Tolman, LLP Lyman & Nielsen, LLC McGuireWoods LLP Moore & Lee, LLP Murtha Cullina LLP Nexsen Pruet, LLC Peckar & Abramson, P.C. Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Riordan-McKee, LLC Schiff Hardin LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Stein Ray LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stites & Harbison, PLLC Stoel Rives LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, L.L.P. Weinberg Wheeler Hudgins Gunn & Dial LLC Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Williams Mullen, PC Winstead PC Zetlin & De Chiara LLP

LITIGATION - ENVIRONMENTAL Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

LITIGATION - ERISA

LITIGATION - CONSTRUCTION Akerman LLP Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC BrigliaMcLaughlin, PLLC Carlton Fields Coats Rose A Professional Corporation Cokinos | Young, P.C. Conway & Mrowiec DLA Piper LLP Duane Morris LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Frost Brown Todd LLC Goetz Fitzpatrick LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Harris Winick Harris LLP Hinckley Allen Holland & Knight LLP Ice Miller LLP

Bryan Cave LLP Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP Covington & Burling LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Greenwood Environmental Counsel PLLC Haynes and Boone, LLP Holland & Hart LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Ice Miller LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kazmarek Mowrey Cloud Laseter LLP King & Spalding LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Lathrop Gage LLP Marten Law PLLC Marzulla Law, LLC McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr, P.C. Norton Rose Fulbright Nossaman LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Saul Ewing LLP Sidley Austin LLP Sive, Paget & Riesel, P.C. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stoel Rives LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. Beveridge & Diamond PC

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arent Fox LLP Bailey & Ehrenberg PLLC Baker Botts L.L.P. Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

K&L GATES

“LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” LITIGATION – ENVIRONMENTAL The lawyers at K&L Gates are very responsive, client-oriented, and very knowledgeable in environmental law.

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Groom Law Group, Chartered Harkins Cunningham LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. O'Melveny & Myers LLP Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs LLP Roland G. Simpson, LC Seyfarth Shaw LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Trucker Huss, APC Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

LITIGATION - FIRST AMENDMENT

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Bostwick Law Bryan Cave LLP Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dechert LLP Dentons Hangley Aronchick Segal Pudlin & Schiller Jackson Walker L.L.P. Jassy Vick Carolan LLP Jenner & Block LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP MDR Law, LLC Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Pepper Hamilton LLP Perkins Coie LLP Prince Lobel Tye LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Sidley Austin LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

LITIGATION - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Banner & Witcoff, Ltd. Barnes & Thornburg LLP Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP Brinks Gilson & Lione Bryan Cave LLP Carlton Fields Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Duane Morris LLP Fenwick & West LLP Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Fish & Richardson P.C. Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP

Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP Locke Lord LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McKool Smith PC Michael Best & Friedrich LLP Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Robins Kaplan LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Susman Godfrey LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

WILMER CUTLER PICKERING HALE AND DORR

“LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” LITIGATION – INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY WilmerHale is a leader when it comes to intellectual property litigation and is my first port-of-call when it is challenging or important litigation. There is a deep bench of talent as well as a significant amount of trial and appellate experience all the way up to the Supreme Court. David Cavanaugh is an excellent, careful lawyer who works hard to understand our business and act accordingly. The work is always top-notch and timely, and I trust David implicitly, something rare in this business. He is a credit to WilmerHale and the profession. Michael Summersgill of WilmerHale has long been a close trusted advisor. He has a deep understanding of patent law, along with a trial lawyer's practical view and strong, sound judgment combined with a terrific, highly responsive bedside manner.

44

U.S.NE WS & WORLD REPORT / BES T L AW YERS

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

LITIGATION - LABOR & EMPLOYMENT Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Blank Rome LLP Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete, LLP Cozen O'Connor Curley, Hurtgen & Johnsrud LLP Davis & Gilbert LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Epstein Becker & Green, P.C. Fisher Phillips LLP Foley & Lardner LLP FordHarrison LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Gladstein, Reif & Meginniss, LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Isler Dare PC Jackson Lewis P.C. Jackson Walker L.L.P. Jones Day K&L Gates Kraus & Zuchlewski Littler Mendelson P.C. McGuireWoods LLP Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Outten & Golden LLP Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Ritz Clark & Ben-Asher LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Sidley Austin LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Venable LLP Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

LITIGATION - MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS Baker Botts L.L.P. Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Forman & Shapiro LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Jones Day Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Piliero & Associates, PLLC Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

LITIGATION - PATENT Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Banner & Witcoff, Ltd. Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Dechert LLP Dentons Desmarais LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Duane Morris LLP Fenwick & West LLP Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Fish & Richardson P.C. Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto Foley & Lardner LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Jones Day K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Knobbe Martens Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP


McKool Smith PC Michael Best & Friedrich LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Susman Godfrey LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

Jackson & Campbell, P.C. Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Kranjac, Tripodi & Partners LLP Lerch, Early & Brewer, Chartered Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP Linowes and Blocher LLP McKool Smith PC Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Richman Greer, P.A. Schiff Hardin LLP Sherman & Howard L.L.C. Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stites & Harbison, PLLC Venable LLP Walsh, Colucci, Lubeley & Walsh, PC Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

LITIGATION - REGULATORY ENFORCEMENT (SEC, TELECOM, ENERGY)

LITIGATION - REAL ESTATE Adams and Reese LLP Akerman LLP Baker Botts L.L.P

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Blankingship & Keith, PC Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Carlton Fields Cozen O'Connor Dentons Dickinson Wright PLLC DLA Piper LLP Dykema Gossett PLLC Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Fennemore Craig, P.C. Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Greenspoon Marder Holland & Knight LLP

Baker Botts L.L.P. Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Holland & Knight LLP Jones Day Kirkland & Ellis LLP Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Law Office of Stephen L. Braga, PLLC Locke Lord LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz William D. Dolan, III, PC

CLIENT COMMENTS

AKERMAN

“LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” LITIGATION – REAL ESTATE Akerman attorneys get fantastic results. They have great teamwork and tactical litigation planning.

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

LITIGATION - SECURITIES Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

LITIGATION - TAX Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Caplin & Drysdale, Chartered Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Aughtry Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

MCDERMOTT WILL & EMERY “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” LITIGATION – TAX

McDermott Will & Emery attorneys have great expertise in federal and state tax matters. Their team of lawyers brings different skill sets but certainly complement each other.

Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP DLA Piper LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McCarter & English, LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP McKool Smith PC Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Murphy & McGonigle Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Susman Godfrey LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP

Fox Rothschild LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Hochman, Salkin, Rettig, Toscher & Perez, P.C. Holland & Knight LLP Ivins, Phillips & Barker, Chartered Jones Day K&L Gates Kostelanetz & Fink, LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Miller & Chevalier Chartered Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Musick, Peeler & Garrett LLP Paul Hastings LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Roberts & Holland LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Stein Sperling Bennett De Jong Driscoll PC Steptoe & Johnson LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Venable LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS DEFENDANTS Adams and Reese LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Balch & Bingham LLP Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP Bryan Cave LLP Darger Errante Yavitz & Blau LLP Dechert LLP DeMoura Smith LLP Dentons Dinsmore & Shohl LLP DLA Piper LLP Duane Morris LLP Farella Braun + Martel LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodell, DeVries, Leech & Dann, LLP Goodwin Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani, LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Harris Beach PLLC Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Jones Day K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Latham & Watkins LLP LeClairRyan Liskow & Lewis Lynch Daskal Emery LLP Manion Gaynor & Manning LLP Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Nixon Peabody LLP O'Hare Parnagian LLP Phillips Lytle LLP Pierce Atwood LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Riley Safer Holmes & Cancila LLP Rubin and Rudman LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Sedgwick LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon L.L.P. Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Tucker Ellis LLP Venable LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS - PLAINTIFFS Aaron M. Levine & Associates Anapol Weiss Ashcraft & Gerel, LLP Belluck & Fox, LLP Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh & Jardine, P.C. Cohen, Placitella & Roth, PC Cooney & Conway Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, LLP Dana B. Taschner David B. Baum Early, Lucarelli, Sweeney & Meisenkothen

46

Feldman Shepherd Wohlgelernter Tanner Weinstock & Dodig LLP Gair, Gair, Conason, Rubinowitz, Bloom, Hershenhorn, Steigman & Mackauf Girardi Keese Hill & Robbins, P.C. Kline & Specter, P.C. Kreindler & Kreindler LLP Levin Sedran & Berman Levy Konigsberg LLP Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP Motley Rice LLC NastLaw LLC Power Rogers & Smith, L.L.P. Purvis Gray Thomson, LLP Quadra & Coll, LLP Rodman, Rodman & Sandman, P.C. Seeger Weiss LLP Shein Law Center, LTD Simmons Hanly Conroy LLC Strange & Butler The Brandi Law Firm The Lanier Law Firm The Locks Law Firm Thornton Law Firm LLP Weitz & Luxenberg P.C. Wilentz, Goldman & Spitzer P.A.

MEDIA LAW

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Jassy Vick Carolan LLP Jenner & Block LLP Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, LLP Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Sidley Austin LLP Wiley Rein LLP Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP Williams & Connolly LLP

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Blank Rome LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP

U. S . N E W S & W O R L D R EP O R T / B ES T L AW Y ER S

Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Dechert LLP DLA Piper LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Lowenstein Sandler LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Paul Hastings LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Venable LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP White & Case LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

MINING LAW Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Crowell & Moring LLP Davis Graham & Stubbs LLP Dinsmore & Shohl LLP Fennemore Craig, P.C. Jackson Kelly PLLC Jerry L. Haggard, P.C. Nossaman LLP Steptoe & Johnson PLLC

MUTUAL FUNDS LAW Dechert LLP Goodwin K&L Gates Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sidley Austin LLP Stradley Ronon Stevens & Young, LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

NATIVE AMERICAN LAW Arlinda F. Locklear Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP Dentons Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Law Offices of Bruce R. Greene & Associates, LLC Perkins Coie LLP Poust Law Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC Resch Polster & Berger LLP Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry, LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP

CLIENT COMMENTS

VAN NESS FELDMAN “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” NATIVE AMERICAN LAW

My office and I have been extremely pleased with the knowledge and professionalism shown by Ed Gehres and his partners at Van Ness Feldman, LLP. Everyone I have met so far is so pleasant and knowledgeable in their specific area of expertise. Due to the amount of workload my office has, Mr. Gehres has taken it upon himself to help train one of his associates to assist him in the area of Native American Law and Tribal Governmental Operations, and so far, he has taken this project on with open eyes. I appreciate this firm’s lawyers and look forward to several years of solid representation.


NATURAL RESOURCES LAW Baker Botts L.L.P. Beck Redden LLP Bracewell LLP Bruchez, Goss, Thornton, Meronoff & Briers, P.C. Crowell & Moring LLP Dinsmore & Shohl LLP Jackson Kelly PLLC Jackson Walker L.L.P. Jay Donald Kelley Latham & Watkins LLP McCollam Law Firm, PC Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Nossaman LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Sidley Austin LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Stoel Rives LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Watt Thompson Frank & Carver LLP

OIL & GAS LAW Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Bracewell LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Hicks Thomas LLP Jackson Walker L.L.P. Latham & Watkins LLP Liskow & Lewis Locke Lord LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Pierce & O'Neill, LLP Porter Hedges LLP Reed Smith LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Thompson & Knight LLP Van Ness Feldman LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Watt Thompson Frank & Carver LLP

PATENT LAW Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Banner & Witcoff, Ltd. Barnes & Thornburg LLP Brinks Gilson & Lione Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP DLA Piper LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Fenwick & West LLP Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Fish & Richardson P.C. Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP K&L Gates Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Knobbe Martens Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP Leydig, Voit & Mayer, LTD. Locke Lord LLP Mayer Brown LLP McAndrews, Held & Malloy, Ltd. McDermott Will & Emery LLP Michael Best & Friedrich LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morrison & Foerster LLP Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Norton Rose Fulbright O'Melveny & Myers LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sidley Austin LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

PRIVATE FUNDS / HEDGE FUNDS LAW Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Seward & Kissel LLP

Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

PROJECT FINANCE LAW Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Bracewell LLP Clifford Chance LLC DLA Piper LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP K&L Gates Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Office of Nancy Wodka O'Melveny & Myers LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP White & Case LLP

PUBLIC FINANCE LAW

Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Polsinelli PC Squire Patton Boggs LLP

RAILROAD LAW Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Boyle Brasher LLC Buckley & Buckley, LLC Burns White LLC Burr & Forman LLP Cabaniss, Johnston, Gardner, Dumas & O'Neal, LLP Donna Law Firm, P.C. Gray, Ritter & Graham, P.C. Groves Powers LLC Harkins Cunningham LLP Jackson Walker L.L.P. Landman Corsi Ballaine & Ford P.C. Law Offices of H. Daniel Spain Mayer Brown LLP Schlichter Bogard & Denton, LLP Sidley Austin LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Sweeney Law Firm, P.A. The Law Offices of McLeod, Alexander, Powel & Apffel, PC Thompson Coburn LLP Williams Venker & Sanders LLC

Andrews Kurth Kenyon LLP Arent Fox LLP

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP Bracewell LLP Bryant Miller Olive P.A. Butler Snow LLP Chapman and Cutler LLP Dentons Dinsmore & Shohl LLP DLA Piper LLP Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Foley & Lardner LLP Gilmore & Bell, PC Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hawkins Delafield & Wood LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Ice Miller LLP K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kutak Rock LLP Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Miller Canfield Paddock and Stone PLC

Yaeger & Jungbauer Barristers, PLC 651.288.9500 www.yjblaw.com

Yaeger & Weiner, PLC

REAL ESTATE LAW Akerman LLP Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP Alston & Bird LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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NATIONAL TIER 1 RANKINGS 2018 “BEST LAW FIRMS”

Blank Rome LLP Bryan Cave LLP Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Burr & Forman LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cooley LLP Cox, Castle & Nicholson LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dechert LLP Dentons Dickinson Wright PLLC DLA Piper LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Dykema Gossett PLLC Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Goulston & Storrs PC GrayRobinson, P.A. Greenberg Traurig, LLP Haynes and Boone, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kelley Drye & Warren LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mayer Brown LLP McCarter & English, LLP McGuireWoods LLP Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP

Pircher, Nichols & Meeks LLP 310.201.8900 www.pircher.com

Polsinelli PC Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Reno & Cavanaugh PLLC Ropes & Gray LLP

48

Saul Ewing LLP Seyfarth Shaw LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Shutts & Bowen LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. Squire Patton Boggs LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Stoel Rives LLP Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson Hine LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Winstead PC Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

SECURITIES / CAPITAL MARKETS LAW Alston & Bird LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dechert LLP DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jenner & Block LLP Jones Day K&L Gates King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP

U. S . N E W S & W O R L D R EP O R T / B ES T L AW Y ER S

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Olshan Frome Wolosky LLP O'Melveny & Myers LLP Patomak Global Partners, LLC Paul Hastings LLP Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Squire Patton Boggs LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC Winston & Strawn LLP

SECURITIES REGULATION Akerman LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Bryan Cave LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Cooley LLP Covington & Burling LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Crowell & Moring LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hogan Lovells US LLP Holland & Knight LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kellogg, Hansen, Todd, Figel & Frederick, P.L.L.C. King & Spalding LLP Lawrence, Kamin, Saunders & Uhlenhop LLC Mayer Brown LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Murphy & McGonigle Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Perkins Coie LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Shearman & Sterling LLP Sidley Austin LLP

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

SECURITIZATION AND STRUCTURED FINANCE LAW Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Chapman and Cutler LLP Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP Dechert LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Holland & Knight LLP K&L Gates Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP Sidley Austin LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

SPORTS LAW ALL Counsel P.C. Covington & Burling LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Mayer Brown LLP Meister Sports Management Ltd Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Williams & Connolly LLP Winston & Strawn LLP

TAX LAW Akerman LLP Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Alston & Bird LLP Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P. Baker McKenzie LLP Ballard Spahr LLP Blank Rome LLP Bracewell LLP Bryan Cave LLP Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Aughtry Cooley LLP Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP Dentons Dickinson Wright PLLC DLA Piper LLP


CLIENT COMMENTS

WINSTON & STRAWN “LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR” SPORTS LAW

Winston & Strawn attorney Jeffrey Kessler is the pre-eminent lawyer in the field of sports law in the United States. His list of clients (NBA, NFL Players Associations) attests to his expertise in all areas of sports law, especially in the application of the antitrust laws to sports issues. We have retained Jeff in several matters involving antitrust issues, and he has always produced a successful result for us.

Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP EY LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Husch Blackwell LLP Jones Day K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP King & Spalding LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Kostelanetz & Fink, LLP KPMG, LLP Latham & Watkins LLP Locke Lord LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Paul Hastings LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Sidley Austin LLP Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Venable LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Winston & Strawn LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

TECHNOLOGY LAW Baker & Hostetler LLP

Baker McKenzie LLP Bryan Cave LLP Bunsow De Mory Smith & Allison LLP Cooley LLP Dentons Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Hart LLP Irell & Manella LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Kirkland & Ellis LLP Loeb & Loeb LLP Mayer Brown LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Perkins Coie LLP Peter Brown & Associates PLLC Proskauer Rose LLP Sidley Austin LLP Tensegrity Law Group LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Venable LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

TIMBER LAW Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Perkins Coie LLP Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt Stoel Rives LLP

TRADEMARK LAW Alston & Bird LLP Arent Fox LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Baker Botts L.L.P.

Birch, Stewart, Kolasch & Birch, LLP Bracewell LLP Brinks Gilson & Lione Covington & Burling LLP Cowan Liebowitz & Latman, P.C. Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dentons DLA Piper LLP Dorsey & Whitney LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Fish & Richardson P.C. Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scinto Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, PC Fross Zelnick Lehrman & Zissu, P.C. Greenberg Traurig, LLP Harness, Dickey & Pierce, P.L.C. Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP King & Spalding LLP Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP Leydig, Voit & Mayer, LTD. Loeb & Loeb LLP McAndrews, Held & Malloy, Ltd. McDermott Will & Emery LLP McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff LLP Merchant & Gould Michael Best & Friedrich LLP Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Pattishall, McAuliffe, Newbury, Hilliard & Geraldson LLP Perkins Coie LLP Polsinelli PC Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Rothwell, Figg, Ernst & Manbeck, P.C. Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Stites & Harbison, PLLC Troutman Sanders LLP Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP Young Basile Hanlon & MacFarlane P.C.

TRANSPORTATION LAW Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff LLP Covington & Burling LLP Harkins Cunningham LLP Holland & Knight LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Sidley Austin LLP Slover & Loftus LLP Steptoe & Johnson LLP Thompson Hine LLP

TRUSTS & ESTATES LAW Ballard Spahr LLP medialaw@ballardspahr.com www.ballardspahr.com

Barnes & Thornburg LLP

Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP Baker & Hostetler LLP Bryan Cave LLP Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Aughtry Cooley LLP Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Day Pitney LLP

Dentons DLA Piper LLP Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP Eversheds Sutherland (US) LLP Foley & Lardner LLP Fox Rothschild LLP Greenberg Traurig, LLP Holland & Knight LLP Husch Blackwell LLP K&L Gates Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP Kozusko Harris Vetter Wareh Duncan Loeb & Loeb LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP McGuireWoods LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Nixon Peabody LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Quarles & Brady LLP Reed Smith LLP Ropes & Gray LLP Schiff Hardin LLP Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP Stinson Leonard Street LLP Sullivan & Worcester LLP Thompson Coburn LLP Thompson Hine LLP Venable LLP White & Case LLP Williams Mullen, PC Withers Bergman, LLP

VENTURE CAPITAL LAW Choate Hall & Stewart LLP Cooley LLP DLA Piper LLP Faegre Baker Daniels LLP Fenwick & West LLP Foley Hoag LLP Goodwin Greenberg Traurig, LLP Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve Franklin & Hachigian, LLP K&L Gates Latham & Watkins LLP Mayer Brown LLP McDermott Will & Emery LLP Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Morrison & Foerster LLP Norton Rose Fulbright Perkins Coie LLP Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Pryor Cashman LLP Robinson Bradshaw & Hinson, P.A. Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP Thompson Hine LLP Vinson & Elkins LLP Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

THE 2018 LEGAL ISSUE

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P U R E LY P E E R R E V I E W T M

B e h e a rd and nominate th e best law yers today at w w w. b es t l aw ye r s .co m/n o m i n a te

Profile for Best Lawyers

The Legal Issue 2018  

The Legal Issue 2018