Issuu on Google+

A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

A2 Design& Technology    

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bertie Johnstone    Radley College 

  Candidate No. : 4201  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Centre No. : 62415  


Section A – Performance Analysis

(4 Marks) 2


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Client:   

 

My client is James Johnstone, he is a home owner who has asked me to design a storage device     for Books/DVDs, CDs and a small Hi‐fi system. He does not want a piece of furniture that looks     like a very standard stereo cabinet but a modern concept looking storage device with inventive   ideas  incorporated into it. My client has specified that the rooms the product may be used in     are not particularly large so the storage solution must be compact with contemporary styling     without being ultra modern.     The cabinet is aimed at the high end market and will be specifically tailored to meet the     requirements of his stereo which is a replacement for one that broke and he would like   to preserve the life of it as long as possible. He also specifically said that he doesn’t want it to     look like a flat pack item of furniture but a solid quality item.     

  Users: 

   This project can have a diverse range of users from home owners to students       and depending on the materials used it would appeal to many people who     like modern aesthetics and would suit their desired room they want the item     to be in. This products is designed to have a very varied target market to fit into a variety of   atmospheres. It does not have a unique use or need a unique user, it is for any person who owns a stereo and would like a dedicated place to store it alongside their    CD/DVD collection. This product is aimed at the high to middle end of the market. The product should have quality of a high end item of furniture but for a fraction    of the price of what one can pay for a top end stereo cabinet.    

  Project problem/need: 

   The problem is having a Hi‐fi system which is not used a huge amount and is taking up valuable surface space, solving this problem can be achieved by creating a    place to store the Hi‐fi as well as other items which could fit into cupboards/shelves/cabinets.    The project must be an item of furniture that has multiple uses to stow away a Hi‐fi system as well as being able to hold/display books and CDs. It must not be too    obtrusive or large in a medium sized room. It must have modern aesthetics with new unique features.    

Project location:   

    The project could be suitable for many different rooms depending on the finish colours/materials it is constructed from. A small item of furniture wouldn’t stand out    in a bedroom, study, kitchen or reception room. My client has specified that it is most likely to be used in a medium sized study/living room. Therefore it is important  that some degree of significance is taken into account when finalising maximum dimensions of the foot print of the product otherwise it will stand out too much in    the room making it an unattractive piece.     

  Design Brief: 

   I intend to design and build a one off prototype piece of furniture that will have unique features and modern looks that will house a small Hi‐fi system as well as    books/DVDs and CDs. It is not to be a large book shelf but at the larger end of cabinet design. This design will be built to meet my client’s criteria. 

KEY: 

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Section A: 

         

  All boxes with this  background colour are    conclusions that I have  drawn on individual  pages. 

  All text in these coloured  boxes is questions to the  client or feedback directly  from my client. 

 

3


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Interview: I carried out an interview with my client 14/5/11 on to  gain a clearer idea about the product he had in mind for me to make. 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

  

 

 

What sort of room will this product be used in – please estimate size?  o A sitting room/reception room.   The room is not modern but a modern piece of furniture would not look out of place and would be good change for the  ambience of the room.  Lighting is poor so internal lighting in the unit would definitely be required.  The room area is approximately 8sq m.  o The other room that may house the unit is bigger 5m x 4.5m but is similarly traditional in décor and is also quite dark.  Is there definite scarcity of storage in this room?  o Yes, there is little space specifically for DVDs and CD’s are just stacked in inconvenient places.  Is this product replacing one of a similar specification or a new product you would like to have?    o Replacing existing basic TV cabinet which is too small for the purpose and is not of an attractive design (80cm wide x 50cm high x 30cm deep).  What sort of things do you want to be able to store in this product?  o DVD’s, CD’s, Hi‐Fi, DVD player (only if a TV was mounted above it or sitting on top). May store some books but they are sometimes not attractive to look at.   The unit would not be appropriate for paperbacks and leather bound books while looking more attractive would not be appropriate for a contemporary  piece of furniture.  Books would have to be stored vertically to be practical and hardback books may be too large.  Roughly how many of these things would you like to have storage for?  o About 100 CD’s although not all of these CD’s are listened to regularly so space for 60 to 80 CD’s would be ample.   c. 20 DVD’s but room for up to 50 would  be optimal.  Both CD’s and DVD’s need to be stored vertically for ease of access.  Do you have a certain use in mind for the top surface?  o Possibly TV or photographs.  Are there any features that you unquestionably would like to have in the product?  o Lighting is important due to the dark nature of the room. Mood lighting might be attractive but it also would have to produce “practical” lighting to enable  the contents to be easily seen.  I would like doors to protect the Hi‐Fi from dust but a completely enclosed front may make the unit look too much like an  ordinary cupboard.  If the Hi‐Fi was enclosed behind doors it would useful to be able to use a remote control without having to open them.  Doors that  folded into the unit would make the unit more attractive to look at when the doors were open.  Are there any other features you might like to have but feel they might be too farfetched?  o A TV which rises out of the unit.  Glass shelves.  Possibly electric doors, especially if the doors would not allow a remote control signal to pass through.  Do you have any maximum dimensions that you would like to product to adhere to?  o No larger than 1m wide, I do not want it to be a high standing cabinet so a maximum 1m high would be best. A maximum depth is to be no more than 0.5m  deep as it will protrude too much into the space in the room but the stereo is quite deep and there must be space for ventilation and wires and maybe a  power extension. (1m W x 1m H x 0.5mm D)  What are the dimensions of your Hi‐Fi that you want this product for?  o The Dimensions of my stereo are: 130 H x 220 W x 310 D (mm)  o The dimensions of a speaker is (single): 280 H x 167 W x 230 D (mm)  Do you have a preference to the materials or certain finish you would like to have on the product?  o Preferably not white paint as it tends to discolour.  I would like a contemporary finish so possibly metal and glass.  Maybe matt black as white may fade.  o A wood finish would also be good but must be light in colour to maintain a contemporary feel so may be oak or ash.  The idea is for it not to look like a  traditional piece of furniture.  o Having the cabinet not made totally out of the same material would be nice; I would like to see some metal or glass integrated in the piece of furniture.  If there were similar products on the market, how much would you be willing to pay?  o I would normally be prepared to pay around £400 for a similar product from a shop but have in mind that this is going to be a unique product which will be  bespoke and therefore will be prepared to pay a premium. 

Any further comments?    Legs at the base would be practical so as not to allow damage when vacuuming although dust would accumulate underneath.  A lip at the top would allow a greater surface  area on the top of the unit but a flush top would look smarter.  Plastic replacing glass in doors would keep the cost down but I am unsure whether it might get scratched easily.  A power extension inside the unit would be preferable to avoid too many cables coming out of the unit. 

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Questions to Client:     

           

4

Conclusion from meeting with client and initial client:   From conducting this interview with my client I have learnt that the product is going in  medium sized room roughly 8m2, this allows the product to be quite big and not just solely  built around the size of a stereo. Although both the rooms are said to be traditional the  client is asking for a new modern piece of furniture which will change the feel of the room.    My client has specified the other items that he would like to store in the cabinet; mainly  DVD’s and CD’s which are small and easy to store as they have standard sizes for all of the  boxes which means any shelves dedicated to them do not have to be adjustable. Books are  less important but none the less a minor amount of storage can easily be provided for  books with adjustable shelves – this space could have other uses such as DVD players and  such like. He has also specified that all CD’s and DVD’s must be stored vertically for practical  use.  The top surface must be big enough and strong enough to support a large flat screen TV as  there is a possibility of one sitting on top otherwise it can be left clear for photos and  ornaments.  Lighting is emphasised twice during the interview so it seems to be a core feature of this  cabinet as he expresses that either of the rooms that the product may be used in are both  dark and some sort of lighting would be useful – by practical he means no strong colours  which will produce less light. He would prefer clear of only slightly tinted light.  Doors are a must, as he has expressed how dust is an issue in his house and it will preserve  the life if the Hi‐Fi – if the doors were to be opaque it would be inconvenient so best to  have them at least translucent and so that they have mechanisms that allow them to  retreat into the cabinet so not to hang open and be in the way.  The other features were just to see if there was anything he might like that he thought was  out of the question; having a motorised pop‐up TV or doors would not really be possible as  it would take too long to design and build the mechanism for this to happen, however  having glass shelves is very achievable.  It is useful to have an idea of size as I now know what sort of scale to design the cabinet to  when it comes to designing the initial ideas and investigating existing products on the  market. I also have the dimensions of the stereo that the cabinet is to be built around – it is  also important to note that space must be kept behind the stereo for wires and ventilation  and the stereo has an iPod dock on top so space must be left there too.  My client also has an idea towards what materials and finish he would like on the cabinet, it  is useful to have some sort of idea but I will return to material selection after having  designed the initial ideas to see what is going to work best.  Having stated a price of around £400, this gives me an idea towards the sort of products I  should be analysing when looking at existing products and where I should be aiming to keep  my costs around when designing and constructing the final product.  The further comments he has given which will all be useful when designing the initial ideas  such as raised legs or a lip around the top surface.  I now have a much more in depth knowledge about what my client wants which hopefully I  will meet when designing the aesthetics and features of the initial designs. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

• Bedroom • Office/study • Kitchen • Living room • Reception room • Lounge • Sizes of the rooms and the itens  of firniture it might be replacing

• Ply ‐ Lamination, Veneer • Oak / Ash ‐ Polished, Varnish • MDF ‐ Painted, Veneer • Chrome/Aluminium ‐ polished,  brushed • Glass/Acrylic

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

• Lighting Circuit • Electronics • TV/shelf secured to wall • Height of top shelf • Door mechanism ‐ the way  the door closes

Clients location Photos of the two possible rooms:

Features: • Cabinet doors • Adjustable/Fixed shelves • Floor standing/wall mounted • Built in power extension • Lip or flush top surface

Known Dimensions:

Safety:

Stereo  Storage

Environment:

Storage:

• All woods can be recycled and come from  a sustainable resource • Recycle of some plastices ‐ acrylic can be  used instead of glass for the doors • Recycling of glass ‐ can be melted down  inoreder to be recycled

• Hi‐fi • CD's ~100 • TV • Lighting • DVD's ~ 50 • Books ‐ similar height  to DVD's

• Fuirniture being replaced:  80cm W x 70cm H x30cm D • Stereo: 220mm W x  130mm H x 310mm D  • Speaker: 280mm H x  167mm W x 230mm D  • Room: ~5m2

Extra Features: • Legs • Glass Shelves • Translucent doors • Power extension • Pop‐up TV • Electric doors

                50cm                  Room 2,    measuring    4.5m x 5m               

120cm 

250cm  75cm 

4m 

 

Analysis Conclusion: 

 

From this spider diagram created from the first interview I had with my client, this highlights the various things I need look for when analysing existing    products and doing my further research. The main features such as the cabinet doors must be widely looked at as there as many different types. There are    also many different ways to mount shelves if they are wood; if they are to be glass the options are reduced, they are also heavier and will need strong    fixings if they are to be adjustable.     Knowing the dimensions of all the items that are going to be stored in the cabinet is very important such as the ranging sizes of power extensions, CD boxes  & how much space 100 CD’s will need and 50 DVD boxes require. Books are not as important for storage as they can also range hugely in size, the shelves    can be adjustable to cater for different book sizes or they can lie on their sides.    It is important to have a range of dimensions for TV’s, mainly the stand and the weight of the TV. Although I already have the dimensions of the stereo and      the speakers that the cabinet is being built for, it is necessary that I carry out research for a range of small Hi‐Fi devices so the cabinet could fit other similar      sizes of Hi‐Fi’s.  If the product were to be wall mounted it is vital to research the safety and capability of different wall brackets and fixings, the same research on the safety  of any electrical components, door mechanisms or the sturdiness of the design.  When analysing existing products it is important to assess the factor of sustainability in the design as it can range hugely with different materials.  Researching types of lighting is not important at these stages until it is known which general type of lights will be used instead of researching a wide range. 

Room 1, measuring 4.5m2 

Materials/Finish: Location Possibilities:

Candidate No. – 4201

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Analysis: 

5

300cm 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Research into existing products: Researching the 

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

designs and features on the current market similar to what my client  has specified 

Client opinion 1: I like the 

design in principle however I am  not keen on a white finish as it is  likely to "yellow" over time.  The  storage appears to be general  storage whereas I would like  different parts of the unit to be  dedicated to different items such  as CD's. There does not seem to  be internal lighting which is  necessary given the darkness of  its proposed location. 

1) Sustainability: Majority of  product of MDF,  this can be  recycled but  there are toxic  resins used in it  and the paint can  be harmful to the  environment

2) Strengths:  Has a strong structure   Can be built out of a  variety of materials  giving a wide range of  finishes   It is raised off the  ground   Can have multiple  uses, it is not designed  specifically for a TV 

2) Weaknesses:  The design does not  have any doors to  protect the stereo  etc.   The shelves are  designed to specific  sizes nor are they  adjustable   Very simple  construction  method

2) Manufacture:  This is probably a light  weight product made of  a honeycomb structure  material with a plastic  veneer (melamine  formaldehyde)  It uses standard  components – the  aluminium tubing  supports  Cheap, quick and easy to  produce 

1          1) Manufacture: This is a heavy product and is    constructed of MDF using standard wood joints    (butt joints). Can be machine cut, KD fittings are  used to hold together.        1) Strengths:  1) Weaknesses:  1) Other points:  1) Conclusion & why this is useful  or not to product:    Minimalist modern   Low and wide item of   60cm H x 185cm W x   This product has glass doors  furniture  56cm D  2) Other points: 2) Conclusion & why this is   design  allowing remote to pass through   60cm H x 170cm W x  useful or not for product:   Doors on each end are   Specifically designed as   Cost: £1,499   translucent   This product has no dedicated   Cheap materials are used,  45cm D – this product is  a TV stand   185cm wide – much    storage for DVD’s etc.  MDF with a glossy white  larger than the client   Can hold a TV   The majority of the  larger than required by  melamine formaldehyde or   It is larger and more expensive  has specified  finish is white paint  client      Raised off the ground  expensive solid walnut  than what the client wants but   Cost: £400 – product   Item weighs 86kg   Mainly wood with a    Contrasting colours  produced inside clients   has aesthetics and other   There is a large amount of  without TV  glossy painted finish    Multiple storage spaces  estimate  features the client wants  storage for many items   Aimed at an expensive   Glass used in doors is   Has integrated wire   There is not a wide range   management   The design is neutral to fit into  market  tempered  of process or materials    many different atmospheres   Sliding glass doors could be    used Client opinion 3:     I don't like the appearance and the idea of  Client opinion 2: 4  the secondary sliding glass door to access the    I like the design but in practical terms being so open will mean that dust will collect and  stereo.  Although very modern it looks too  the idea is to keep the CD's, Hi‐Fi etc. clean and dust free. It is also wider than I would    much like an office filing cabinet and too  have liked but it stops the TV being the centre piece when other things are being stored    in it.  I prefer the wood finish (don't like the white finish as discussed in #1) and do like  utilitarian.  I am not keen on the metal finish.   the look of the legs.  Although it has a very clean look it is not    appropriate for the proposed location. Also    this design is built not to stow the speakers.  4) Sustainability: Client opinion 4: Not keen on the design as    it has a cheap look about it and does not seem   Product uses few materials –  to have a style.  It is also white which I don't  3) Manufacture:    could be made out of solid wood  like.  As it is wall mounted there is no option  The entire cabinet is built of sheet aluminium     MDF with a matt white paint can  to place a TV on it.  The other down side of  3) Sustainability: This product is the least sustainable as it has  which has been bent and pressed into shape. It  wall mounting is that there is a limit to the  easily be recycled  no natural materials in it but it is possible to recycle the scrap  is fast to produce as CNC machines and jigs can  3   weight that can be stored inside and once it is  metal. The aluminium can be anodised of painted for a range   More expensive materials could  be used. All components are specifically made    installed it is difficult to move due to the  of finish colours.  for the product.  be used    damage caused to the wall.   3) Strengths:  3) Weaknesses:  3) Other points:  3) Conclusion & why this is     Design has integrated   Does not hold  4) Strengths: 4) Weaknesses: 4) Other points:   119cm H x 86cm W x  useful or not for product:     35cm H x 50m W x 35cm D ‐    Small but practical design    Has room to store about 40  ventilation for the  speakers   The item all metal, many  45cm D – this product    this product is much smaller  CD’s but one row is almost   Dedicated storage for CD’s –  stereo   Doors are in the way  jigs would be needed in  is also higher than the  than the client specified as a  inaccessible  enough space for two rows   Has 5 dedicated CD  when open  order to make this    client requires  max but it shows a range    Stereo is not covered by a   It has a door covering 2  shelves each side  product   Design id totally   Cost: £1700 – above     £149.99 – this product is at the  door but could be  adjustable shelves for other   Doors covering front  constructed form   It has many if the  what client said, but    other end of the market but is  things which the user may not   CD’s are such a snug fit it  and side storage with  metal  features that the client  shows the price of a  also cheap due to size      want to look at  would be very hard to get  glass front  specified, doors, glass   All shelves are fixed  large cabinet with   It is wall mounted which is an      them out if the shelf was   Has a very affordable price which  front, lighting   Has an optional   Design is bold and  lighting, doors and  internal lighting system  for £100 

would not fit in many  atmospheres 

lots of storage 

 Ventilation needs to  researched further 

could be reduced for what it is 

6

full   3 wall mounts needed

option and the speakers are  not contained in the design 

2

2) Sustainability:  Melamine formaldehyde  finish is not recyclable    Aluminium can be  reused   Walnut is an expensive  wood and must come  from a sustainable  source 

4) Manufacture:  Consists of two separate MDF boxes the same size  finished in matt white paint. Uses mitre joints all  round. The shelf clips in using KD fittings, the door  hinges at the top and sides towards the wall into the  body of the box. Small scale – cheap production 

4) Conclusion & why this is useful or not for  product:   This product shows on what sort of scale the  cabinet could be if re‐designed to be more  practical   Lightweight product with great ability to be wall  mounted   Wall mounted items such as this protrude quite  far out from the wall


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone Further Research: Researching dimensions and standards  for features which are definitely to be included in the product  which my client has specified. 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

142mm 

CD Dimensions: 

Hi‐Fi Dimensions:  The dimensions of the Hi‐Fi are vital as the cabinet is primarily being built to store the Hi‐Fi that my client owns. 

 

130mm 

125mm 

  It is important to know the dimensions of a    However it is still necessary to have the dimensions of some other Hi‐Fi systems, getting the maximum dimensions  and the average for the height, width and depth. The dimensions of my clients Hi‐Fi are: 130 H x 220 W x 310 D    standard CD box as this is the main item the  cabinet will need to store excluding the stereo  [330] (mm), however these dimensions do not take into account the feature of having an iPod dock on top so more    itself. The dimensions of a standard CD box are:  space will be required – this research is carried out in the iPod section. From looking at other Hi‐Fi’s of a similar size,    142mm W x 125mm H x 10mm D. The amount of  sold in the same range, I Have found that the average size of the Hi‐Fi unit itself is 214 W x 111 H x 330 D (mm) and    space needed for 100 CD cases in a row is:  the largest dimensions from all of the units were 215 W x 140 h x 359 D (mm).  1000mm with the addition of about 10mm so the    iPod Dimensions:    CD’s are easy to get in and out of the shelf.  Having researched the sizes of iPods that can be used with the Hi‐Fi using the dock, I have found that the iPhone 4    is the largest of the Apple Mp3 products. The height of an iPhone is 115.2mm, this space plus an additional 30mm    DVD Dimensions:  (totalling 145.2mm) must be left as open space above the stereo to enable the user to take the device in and out of    There are is also the possibility of having a few  the dock. Stereo + iPod = 225mm, additional room for hand totals height to 260mm  135mm    DVD’s stored in the cabinet. It must be taken into  Speaker Dimensions:    account that there are two common types of  There are more options with the speakers as they do not need to be covered by a door, so they can be placed at  DVD’s, Blu‐ray™ DVD and standard DVD. These    have different box sizes to each other:   either end of the product. The speakers could either have designated place of their own or fit in a book/adjustable  shelf – hence the name of the speakers being bookshelf speakers so they can fit in among books. My client has    Standard DVD: 135mm W x 190mm H x 14mm D  given he the exact dimensions of the speakers he has; (single speaker) 280 H x 167 W x 230 D (mm). Having looked    Blu‐ray DVD™: 135mm W x 171mm H x 11mm D  at similar speakers, I have found that the average size of the speaker itself is 151 W x 243 H x 188 D (mm) and the    The space needed for 50 standard DVD cases in a  size of the largest unit was 180 W x 300 H x 188 D (mm). (Speakers can be used/installed on their side)  row is: 700mm with an additional 10mm for ease    of access, in this space, 63 Blu‐ray™ DVD’s could  Ventilation:    be stored.  From the two samples of information shown left and below, ventilation is very important so the unit does not  overheat. Therefore ample amounts of space must be left for cooling, some sort of opening would be good in the    The space needed for 50 Blu‐ray™ DVD cases in a  row is: 550mm with an additional 10mm for ease    of access, in this space, 39 Standard DVD’s could  back of the cabinet��for circulation – the space inside left for cables behind the unit is probably enough space  especially if there is air circulation. Depth required = 330mm.    be stored.  These two notifications and warnings (see below&     right) are from the user guide that came with my    clients stereo, they clearly state ventilation should not    be obstructed, especially as the stereo will heat up over    the time period that it is being used.  Other things to take note of from these directions is to    put the stereo in a place without dust, hence the    importance of having doors on the cabinet to protect it    from dust and not to store any CD collections too close    to the stereo as if it heats up too much it may damage  the CD’s.  135mm                     

220mm 

280mm 

 

171mm 

190mm 

 

7

167mm 

 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Door mechanisms/types: 

TV stands (& sizes): 

Doors have been requested as a definite feature by the client so it is necessary to  research the different types of door mechanisms available which could work with  the cabinet. I have researched 7 different types of door mechanisms which are all  possibilities but some more complex to make/install than others however it will be  down to the cost, practicality and finally the client’s opinion: 

310mm 

It is necessary to research the varying sizes of TV stands as there is a possibility the client    would like to put a TV on top of the cabinet. Through my research I found that the size of    stands for very similar sized TV’s can very hugely, on older TV’s the stand is often nearly as    wide as the TV itself and on newer TV’s the stand is very small in the middle. This information    is not that accurate of the varying sizes of TV stands as very few shops/webpages displayed  the dimensions of the stand itself so it was hard to gather a large amount of data. I thought    the best solution to this was to ask my client of the maximum dimensions of a TV stand that    he might be likely to place on top of the cabinet. The largest size stand he was likely to place    on the cabinet is: 535mm W x 310mm D.     

535mm

This is a flexible roll‐up garage  door mechanism, it is good as it  takes up very little space and is  stowed away when the door is  open. This door can easily be  scaled down to work with the  cabinet and the door could also  be made from either wood or  metal. This door can be used the  other way up as well. 

Speaker Dynamics (placement):   

From a performance and quality point of view it is essential to look at the best places to build    the speakers into the cabinet to achieve the best sound quality. To achieve this I have studied    speaker dynamics. From this research I have found out that the optimum spacing to have    between speakers is 7ft (2134mm) apart to get the best stereo effect; obviously the cabinet  isn’t going to be this wide so the next best option is to place the speakers as far apart from    each other as possible. There are also distances angles that are best specific to where the user    may be sitting when using the stereo, this information is displayed in the two diagrams [Right]    but this is entirely up to the client/user. I also found information about the optimum height to  have speakers for the user, it stated that they should be at the users eye level; my client has    stated that he is most likely to be sitting down when using the stereo, also taking into account    that the maximum height of the cabinet will be 7500mm the best place to have the speakers    is at the top of the cabinet alongside the stereo which is not to low so that the user can easily    reach the stereo controls.     

 

These doors open just as conventional doors  might, then the hinges of the doors are on  runners and the doors are able to retract on to  the product so they do not hang open and are not  This is solid/rigid type of garage  in the way as they hang open. These doors are  door. This too can easily be scaled  good as they give the user two options where  down to work with the cabinet;  both look neat. These hinges are special bought  runners for the door can easily be  components and may provide an extra cost. These  made in many materials using a CNC  doors are very versatile as they can be used in any  router. The only disadvantage with  orientation the client might want the doors to  this door is the space that is lost at  open  the top edge when it opens as it  cuts into the space. 

 

Power Extensions:   

If a power extensions is going to be included and built into the cabinet a space must be left for    it to fit, therefore it is vital for there to be a big enough space for the extension to fit into. My    client specified that he would like a 4x socket power extension included in the cabinet, the size  of the average extension is 270mm L x 60mm W x 27mm D. However this does not take into    account the space needed for the plugs and cables as well; so the dimensions for a power    extension in use is actually: 305mm L x 100mm W x 60mm D (the depth is for a standard plug,    not for a larger power adapter – these can vary massively). 

Sliding doors are very versatile; they  can be made from glass, plastic,  metal or wood. Simple runners can  be routed into the wood or bearings  can be used to give a smoother  action and higher quality finish.  These doors are low cost and do not  have problem of trying to hide  protruding doors when open. 

      Conclusion:          Research towards TV stands has shown that the cabinet is likely to have a big  enough top surface to hold a TV, if not it will be considered in the design, the  weight of the TV will also be taken into consideration.  Speaker placement has shown that optimum dynamics can’t be achieved but  the speakers will be situated in the next best place possible.  Power extensions can vary so I will build the cabinet area using the dimensions  of the power extension that is bought for the cabinet.  Researching door mechanisms has been useful to weigh up the pros and cons;  however the decisions about doors will be down the size of the door needed,  the cost of the mechanism and ultimately the clients’ opinion. 

This door mechanism is the  common swing open door with two  hinges. This is a simple and easy  type of door to use however it has  the problem of being in the way  when the door is open. This can be  avoided is the door is translucent so  when the stereo is being used the  door does not have to open. 

8

Sliding doors which roll‐up  are good as they also take  up little space, these are  similar the first garage  door mechanism, however  the garage door retracts  but does not roll‐up. With  both these door  mechanisms, either of  these methods can be  used. The amount the door  is open can be adjusted but  the remainder will still be  hidden in the cabinet. 

This is a modern type of  door mechanism which is  seen here used in a kitchen  which could easily be used  on a smaller scale in the  cabinet. This is a high quality  mechanism which may add  an extra cast and as a  slightly unconventional way  of opening in a modern way.  However the door is not  hidden inside the cabinet  when it is open 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage These two handles are used on a modern desk. Dimensions: 130 L x 10 H x 23 D (mm) Handles can be metal or plastic with many different finishes. They are easy to grip but could do with more space to get fingers behind and feel a bit thin.

Door Handle Research: There is a huge range of different door handles which all have different sizes which could be used. I have gone into more detail looking at different door handles by looking at the ergonomics of how easy they are to grip/hold and use as well as assessing their aesthetic value. The door handles range in size as they are from different appliances which are also different sizes so the size of the handle differs proportionately.

These handles are used on cupboards and drawers of contemporary kitchen units. Dimensions: 160 L x 25 H x 26 D (mm) Handles have a high quality feel and a brushed finish, made of chrome. They are large and easy to grip with plenty of space to get fingers around the back of the handle, they are quite large but ergonomically they are very good.

This handle is simply formed from the cut out of a drawer which would also be used on a cupboard door. Dimensions: 240mm L x 30mm D This type of handle is very easy to make at no extra cost as no handles need to be bought, they can easily be made in any different form or shape that the client might like.

These two handles are used on a modern TV stand. Dimensions: 50 L x 30 H x 17 D (mm) Handles can be metal or plastic; these specific ones are HIPS plastic. They are fitted to a cheap flat pack item of furniture are not of high quality. Up close they look cheap but from a distance they give a higher quality modern finish. The ergonomics are good as they are easy to grip and use for the average hand size.

These two handles are used on different appliances, one on a cabinet and the other on a 7ft cupboard – they can also be used on drawers. Dimensions: 35 L x 35 H x 35 D (mm) Handles are cheap to buy and can be screwed in, they make a product feel a bit cheap as they are very standard components. Ergonomically they are too small for the average hand but they are still easy enough to grip to open the door.

Conclusion: These two handles are used on a 80’s chest of drawers. Dimensions: 50 L x225 H x215 D (mm) Handles are made of aluminium with a polished finish. They have a simple design which works well, they can be used on cupboards or drawers and they are big enough to get your fingers behind, however they could be a bit wider.

From this research I have found that the size of door handles does vary a lot and that not all will be comfortable to use. It is better to have bigger door handles which are easy to grip and get your hand behind. Also it is best not compromise on the cost of the handles, they are not a very large of expensive component and metal is the best material to use as close up it looks better and has a much better feel to it. Handles which the user is more able to get their hand behind are much better instead of knobs; these handles need to have at least 20mm of space behind them to fit your hand behind. A thinner handle is better, especially on a smaller product so it does not stick out and does not look out of proportion on the product.

9


Section B – Product Specification

(6 Marks) 10


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Section B: Criteria  Point Number: Criteria point – explanation/justification 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Client specified from interview/input  Measureable point 

  1.

  Purpose    1.1. To store a small Hi‐Fi in a cabinet as well have storage for a large CD collection and a small DVD collection    1.2. Provide a modern piece of furniture which can be used for ornaments or a TV  2.   Form  2.1. The client has not specified much in detail about the form but it will be more apparent once the basic designs have been drawn up,    therefore the cabinet could have a wide variation of forms    2.2. The product can be solid, there is no need for it to be dismantled so no design necessary for flat pack/KD fittings  3.   Function & Performance    3.1. CD storage – must have storage space for at least 80 CD’s    3.2. DVD storage – must have storage space for at least 50 DVD’s  3.3. Store a small Hi‐FI behind closed door(s)    3.4. Also incorporate storage for speakers into the product – these must be as far away from each other as possible to give the best    stereo sound effect.    3.5. Must have some sort of lighting system – to illuminate the contents to help the user see the contents    3.6. Doors are important to protect the Hi‐Fi unit from damage from dust or spillages etc. – this would preserve the life of the stereo and  obstruct it from view when not in use    3.7. Provide auxiliary storage or other items a user may have the need to store    3.8. It must not exceed 50kg – most be moveable by 2 people  4.   Aesthetics    4.1. Must be designed to fit in to a traditional poorly lit room but must be modern – bringing a modern touch to the room    4.2. Wood finishes are most preferable, option of black finish – client has expressed dislike to white finishes  4.3. Aesthetics are the secondary concern [especially the lighting] – the quality and practicality are primary    5. Size    5.1. Max height: 1000mm – keeping the cabinet low, no taller especially if floor standing. (mitigates safety hazard)    5.2. Max width: 1000mm – maximum amount of space there is on each possible room    5.3. Max depth: 500mm – this gives ample room for the stereo unit, including ventilation and cables including space for a 4 socket  power extension    6. Ergonomics    6.1. Door handles must be the useable for the average adult hand size    6.2. The stereo must not be placed at the bottom of the cabinet as it is too low for the 95th percentile of the population  7.   Materials and Components    7.1. Multiple materials will be used in the design, the main material being wood – the addition of either glass of metal would add to the  variation in the design    7.2. High quality materials are used in the build of the product and the surface finish of the materials must have very few blemishes    7.3. Hard woods will last longer and the medium brown colour of the wood is preferred to the light colour of soft wood ‐  not as dark as    the colour of mahogany  7.4. Components must be high quality and long lasting but also weighing up the price of components such as lighting or door    mechanisms to the quality keeping the overall price within the desired price    8. Manufacture    8.1. Manufacturing techniques will be analysed against how much time they will take to carry out based on the complexity but still    giving a good finish and not compromising on quality – this will save time and also reduce costs if the product went into production    8.2. The amount of energy needed to carry out certain manufacturing techniques will be taken into account – this lowers costs and  reduces the amount of energy used in the production line      8.3. If this product were to be batch produced, jig(s) would be used during the manufacture where necessary – this reduces the time  taken to produce the product       

11

10. Maintenance 10.1. Standard materials/components will be used where possible – this will allow the user to replace parts such as door  hinges so the product doesn’t become obsolete.  10.2. If glass shelves are used it will be built around the standard sizes of glass shelves ‐ this saves having specific sheets cut  10.3. The only other component that might need replacing is the lighting system/bulbs which will be made easily accessible –  ensuring it doesn’t need specialist tools to change them  11. Market  11.1. This product would be sold to high end one‐off furniture dealers –It is not ruled out, but there is no need for it to be flat‐ pack  11.2. Likely customers for this product are homeowners with reasonably large rooms that the cabinet would suit and who  need this product for its specific needs and are looking to buy a high‐end piece of furniture  11.3. The RRP for this product would be between £350 ‐£600  12. Quality  12.1. Built to the highest quality achievable, it is the primary concern for such a high end product – tolerances should be  within ±3mm  12.2. Long‐lasting – see sustainability  13. Scale of Production  13.1. This product is being made as a one‐off custom item of furniture for a client who has requested it to be built around his  needs and stereo system  13.2. If this product were to be produced on a larger scale it would be best produced in small scale batch production in order  to maintain the quality of the design and the end product  14. Cost  14.1. Costs of materials will be kept to a minimum where possible  14.2. The overall cost to build the product must cost no more than £250 – allowing a profit to be made  14.3. Where there are options between certain components or material, the cost of the item will be taken into account if it is a  significant difference  15. Safety  15.1. All electrical cables must be obstructed from view ‐ which will increase the overall safety.  15.2. Lighting cables must be totally insulated ‐ having a built in power extension and only having one cable trailing from the  cabinet reduces any safety risk  15.3. The product must be designed to be very stable – keeping the maximum height low avoids the risk of the cabinet tipping  forwards  16. Packaging  16.1. It does not have to be flat‐packable unit but it would save a lot of money on packaging  16.2. It would be well packaged to avoid any sort of damage – packaging will be kept to a minimum and environmentally  friendly packaging solutions will be used  16.3. If retailers bought this product in batches it would be expensive to transport due inefficiency and size of the combined  units or even more costly if not flat‐pack  17. Sustainability  17.1. The source of the materials will be considered when finalising materials, ensuring wood comes from sustainable and  managed resource (FSC) – manufactured bards will be used where there is the option as they used recycled material  which is more environmentally friendly  17.2. When finishing the product, the paints or varnishes used will be analysed to ensure they are not harmful to the  environment/the most environmentally friendly is used  17.3. Long lasting product using durable materials so it will not need to be disposed of and replaced which would not be  environmentally friendly as it is a waste of materials 

 


Section C – Design & Development;  Design

(10Marks)

 Review

(4 Marks)

 Development

(10 Marks)

 Communication

(6Marks) 12


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Section C: Initial Idea Brainstorm 

Roof inspired  design with  floating shelf 

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Client Feedback:     Choosing from these proposed designs, I prefer designs 2, 5, 6 & 7.    However there are some features which have the potential to be    included into other designs, such as the floating shelf in design #3.      1.  I understand the concept but it’s probably not suitable for this house.     2. An interesting shape and good use of space as the top surfaces are  usable.  3. I like the idea of the floating shelf but the apex of the unit seems to  cause wasted space unless there is storage all the way up each side. 4. An interesting design but does not look space efficient in terms of its  storage capacity. 5. An interesting concept but would need space either side to allow the  units to slide out.  In the photo the front of the unit is too plain although  in your drawing there is something on the upper part. 6. Don’t think this would work in my house. The design concept and  products with same manufacture technique look quite whacky! 7. Interesting design, I like the ‘Z’ shape, but I am not sure how the  storage would work either side of the diagonal leg.  The tilted shape  would make storage awkward. 8. Not sure I want it wall mounted as it makes it difficult to move from  one room to another. Otherwise is quite a standard design. 9. Conventional but practical design in terms of both use and efficiency. 10. Another conventional but appealing design with a slight edge to it  with the different leg setup. 11. Prefer more symmetrical design but would work. Looks very wide. 12. Compact design but circular central cavity wastes space and makes  storage tricky.

Basic design with  possibilities of  different  orientations 

Modular/pod  design 

 

 

1   

Laminated curve  design 

4  Shelves reciprocate  back and forth in  main body 

Single metal  bar  constructing  Z shape 

8

12  11

10  Long flat designs accommodate TV’s well 

13


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Section C: Initial Ideas – No.1 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

This idea consists of three laminated boxes with one box dedicated to the stereo unit itself which will have a door on  it. These boxes can be arranged in many different formations which are shown by the diagram (right) which shows    all the possible set‐ups using the pre drilled holes. 

Multi use flat  top surface 

This idea was originally inspired by  looking at a set of stackable toy  boxes where different sizes would  fit together in a similar fashion. 

 

720mm 

Smaller box will  have door 

  1000mm 

       

500mm 

The process to make each box would be laminating all the corners of each box on the  same former in order to have the same radiused edge on all of the corners. Once all the  ply laminates have been formed into a square or rectangle, the ply ends would be fixed  together where they meet using a half lap joint. Here a darker strip of wood such as  mahogany would be stuck flush to the surface to hide the join and fuse the ply together. 

Box 1 

1200mm  Box 2 

Modular Design: This diagram  (left) shows where the pre  drilled holes would be on all of  the boxes which would allow the  user to arrange the boxes in their  own formation. They are all  drilled at standard distances in  and along so all of the boxes will  fit on top of each other in the  desired fashion. 

Client Feedback:   Like the simplicity of the design and the fact that it can be  constructed in a variety of different shapes.  Cost is an  important consideration and this design has the advantage of  low cost.  I like the large storage capacity, but the design  doesn’t really have any special features which give it an  advantage over any other design. I like the neat idea of only  having a door on the smallest cube that retracts into it. 

This the  standard and  most compact  set‐up 

Glass Shelf 

The three diagrams above show a connector bolt (male and  connector nut which would be supplied with the product and  used to connect each box together easily with two hex keys.  These come in many different sizes but the ones needed for this  use can be bought with both bolt and nut for £6 for a pack of 10.  The most connector screws a setup could need is 6. 

Highlighted Specification Points:  1.2, Purpose:  This is a minimalist design that can be  considered to be modern, unrelated to traditional design.  3.1/2, Function: There is a huge abundance of storage for  both CD’s and DVD’s.  3.8, Performance: The design uses very few materials due  to its minimalism which also ensures it is light and easy to  move  7.1, Materials:  Wood, Glass and plastic would be used in  this design.  8.3, Manufacture: A standard jig/former could be made to  produce this product making it quick and easy to  reproduce in batches.  13.2, Cost:  The total cost will be one of the lowest out  of the 4 designs again due to minimalism and structural  design. 

14

Materials & Justification:  The main materials used in the  design would be many thin layers  of laminated flexi ply which would  provide a strong structure once  dry. The large shelf would be made  from glass as it is structurally  strong in large sheets and can be  sourced 2nd hand cheaply, the  client also expressed desire to  include glass where possible. The  door of the cabinet can be made  from smoked Perspex which is  light and reusable and would allow  the remote of the stereo to still  work.

500mm 

This is a close up  diagram of the  square box which  will have a door  in it, the door  which is best  suited to the  minimalist design  is an ‘up and  over’ style door  which retracts  back into the box  when it is open so  it is not in the  way. This door  can be made of a  variety of  materials.  Sustainability:  Materials from a sustainable resource, ply  is a soft wood which is fast growing to be  replaced, the Perspex door can be  recycled and the glass shelf is likely to be  reused for the product or at the end of  the product life. 

No dedicated  place for the  speakers 

NB: Lighting  will be  designed in the  Development  section (D) for  the final  chosen design. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Section C: Initial Ideas – No.2 

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

This design works on the abnormality of the design, it has a heavy but sleek metal base with two box steel legs which hold the upper shelf at an opposing angle of 45o to the  base with no other supports – this gives it an unbalanced look which is remarkably sturdy. The extra storage capacity on the underside has been added in as an idea taken    from initial brainstorm #3 there the shelf unit is supposed to look like it were floating as it is only held in place by thin metal wire. 

MDF painted/veneer or  solid hard wood 

1100mm 

  Balanced wine  rack 

 

Washer 

Box steel  legs 

Suspension  cables x8 

45o

The storage unit will be constructed from  the same material as the top unit, the  corners will be joint using butt joints on the  90o corners and half mitre joints on the  acute angle joints. The lower right corner  will be at 45o which will match the angle of  the base. The box steel will be MIG welded  to the steel base also at 45o. 

800mm 

   

This idea was originally inspired by  a wine bottle holder which uses only  one leg as a stand and the weight  of the bottle to counter it. 

Wire Clamp 

The second storage unit is the selling point of the design, this feature was  lifted from design #3 which the client had displayed an interest in the  feature which now works well with this design to provide more storage but  retaining the ‘Z’ shape.  The upper left diagram shows where cables would go in order to keep this  unit hanging away from the main body of the design, the idea is to make it  look like it is floating beneath it. In total, 8 thin cables will be used to  suspend the unit. This is an ample amount when using steel cable.  The upper right diagram shows how the different parts used will be  assembled going from left to right as the cables are attached. The cable will  go through small holes in the wood/steel and then a washer will be  threaded on to the cable, after that a small wire clamp to hold it all in place  on both sides. 

Client Feedback:  I like the “whacky” design of this one although it looks as though there  is less storage capacity than the design above.  No. 1 design has the  advantage that all of it can be used for storage whereas the bottom  and the right hand side of no.2 are not usable due to the design.  I like  the hanging section which is a clever feature but I am not sure how it  is going to hang.  I understand that there are 8 cables.  I can see that  the vertical cables will have tension provided by gravity but I do not  understand how the diagonal cables will work as there won’t be any  tension.  The door is a definite advantage to keep dust away from the  stereo unit however I wonder if an “up and over” door will look better  and more subtle. 

Steel cable for  suspending  storage unit 

Wire Clamp

4mm x 10m  £7.75

Double layer  storage 

750mm 

Door Type: Having carried out research on  different types of doors, I decided that a door  which comes out then up would work with  this particular design to cover the main stereo  unit, as it is an uncommon type of door  mechanism to have and would provide  another different feature to the product. It is  out of the way when it��is open and it could be  made from either wood or plastic with the  option of being opaque to allow the remote to  work. Highlighted Specification Points:  2.2, Form: This particular design is very solid due the main frame being made  out of box steel welded to heavy metal base.  3.8, Performance: This design could easily exceed the weight limit stated by the  client if the design is over engineered.  4.1, Aesthetics: The general shape of the design is traditional (boxy) but has a  modern design aspect.  6.2, Ergonomics: This design will easily meet ergonomic specifications as the  stereo unit is easily high enough for many people to reach but not for children  on a safety front.  8.3, Manufacture: To speed up the process a jig can be used for welding the  legs to the base to ensure it is at an angle of 45o. 

15

Materials & Justification:  Depending on weight and cost the two storage  units have the flexibility to be made from MDF and  be veneered/painted or if the cost and weight is  still kept low it could be made from a solid hard  wood with a better quality finish which is longer  lasting.  The base and the legs will be made from Steel  which is easy to work with and easily welded. The  high weight will be used to its advantage providing  a sturdy platform for the product.  The cupboard door can be made from either 

500mm 

Steel base  plate 

Sustainability:  MDF is a man‐made  recycled board made of  waste materials so it’s  more environmentally  friendly than cutting down  hard wood trees which  take a long time to grow  back however the resins  used for veneers are toxic  and if used will not last as  long.   Steel can be easily reused  as scrap or even melted  down to be moulded into a  new product. 

NB: Lighting will be  designed in the  Development section  (D) for the final chosen  design. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Section C: Initial Ideas – No.3 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

This is the most unique design due to the main feature of the storage unit not being in a fixed place but being able to move from side to side. To enable this to work, heavy duty runners  Glass protection  will be used both on top and underneath the main frame to allow it to move smoothly. There is a large amount of standard shelf storage, the stereo is high up and the speakers far apart  front over stereo  for improved stereo sound quality. However there is a slight flaw in the design; statistically the footprint on the product is very small, this is not true of its entire size as the whole product    is about 3 times the size of the footprint in width. Then, once installing this in the desired location it needs even more space either side of the cabinet as it reciprocates back and forth    needing space to be able to slide into.  

   

Client Feedback:  This is an intriguing and innovative design but I am  concerned about how it will look when in situ.   Although the contents on the shelves will be  protected when behind the “door” it seems that  when not covered they will be exposed to dust.  I  am impressed by the amount of storage space  which is huge and on this measure probably scores  the highest.  I presume that due to the design it can  be floor standing but will also have to be fixed to  the wall which means that it is not so easy to move  once installed. 

End View or runner and  frame joint 

Aluminium  front plate 

400mm

Runners/Rails 

Storage

Wood  frame

900mm 

The frame will need to be very strong to support the  entire weight of the storage unit so it will have to be  made out of solid wood, most likely oak or ash. The 90o  corners of the frame would be best to use a lap joint with  dovetail nailing or wood screws (right). Whereas to  reduce weight the main storage unit will be kept light  using materials such as MDF.    In total 4 rails will be needed to provide stability, not to  cope with the weight as the rails are capable of holding  91kg each so there is ample strength. These are designed  for suspending large French doors with thick glass that  weigh over 100kg. The rails will cost around £10/m of rail.  The diagram (right) shows how a rail might be fitted to  the top of the frame and to the storage unit.     Rails may not be needed on the underside if just 2 rails  will be able to suspend the weight, then just  runners/guides will be needed. 

Door Type: (below) This is an unconventional  door, there is no actual door but the frame  acts as a door. This is derived from the idea of  using flat panel sliding doors but instead the  whole front is covered by one large door.  When the storage unit is in the middle the  stereo unit is sealed off behind the frame but  is still visible behind a glass window. In order  to be able to touch the stereo or any CD/DVD  stored in the centre behind the frame the unit  can be pushed in either direction.

The entire design is one big door, the  idea derived from my door research  as the centre section which remains  stationary acting as a door as the  shelf unit slides through it.

Side walls  provide door  seal 

Main  stereo unit 

Foot print of  frame 

NB: The design of the runners  on the main picture are  incorrect, they do not need to  stretch to either end as the  unit would fall over. It only  needs to move far enough for  the stereo to be fully exposed. 

1250mm

NB: Lighting will be  designed in the  Development section (D)  for the final chosen design. 

Highlighted Specification Points:  1.1, Purpose: This is one of the best designs for storing the actual stereo with the most suited facilities.  3.6, Performance: It isn’t so much a door but a cover but as explained it is sealed and does the same as  any door would.  3.7, Performance: There is a very large amount of auxillary storage due to the length of the main  storage unit.  7.1, Materials: The main materials are all wood but sheet aluminium is used for aesthetics only.  7.4, Components: The rails used in the design are high quality and long lasting but as of this they are  quite expensive for individual ones as they are engineered for much larger doors.  13.2, Cost: The costs which are unavoidable is the use of solid oak and the rails.  14.3, Safety: Somehow the base must be made stable enough that when it is free standing the unit will  not fall over or lean to one side when pushed to the maximum length it will slide. 

16

Materials & Justification:  The size of the design may need to be scaled  down to keep the weight low as it is a large  product. The main storage unit will be made  from MDF or even chipboard which would  have to be veneered in the same wood as the  frame.  To maintain strength in the frame it would  have to be made from a solid wood which  would also provide extra weight which is  needed for stability.  A small amount of glass would be also be  used for the window in the frame. 

500mm

Sustainability:  Using solid hardwoods is  not as sustainable as using  soft woods but the wood  is supplied by a firm which  uses FSC sources for its  wood.  The bulk of the materials  are man‐made boards,  either fibre or chip board  which reuse waste  material to make other  useful products.  Materials would be kept to  a minimum so not to  waste any unnecessary  materials. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Section C: Initial Ideas – No.4 

This design is focused on the flowing aesthetics that is all one long length of ply with smoothly  radiused corners. Like the inspirational design pictured, it is probably not necessary to have so      many substantial legs but they have multiple uses also incorporating the lighting system which is  unique to this idea which as far as I know are my own initiative. This is the only tall thin design and  it might need to be higher than the client specified so it is in proportion. This also has ample  storage for CD/DVD’s and more auxiliary storage for larger items.  The aluminium legs have two purposes in this design.  1) They are providing extra structural strength to  the unit as the laminated ply may not be able to  support the weight of the Hi‐Fi etc. or the  possibility of a TV on top.  2) Tubes will have a gap cut in them on one side  and an LED strip light inside, this will provide a  light source illuminating the contents of the  shelves. (Shown left) The strip lights will cost  £37 for 10m. 

Inspirational  idea 

Top 

This idea is similar to other products  alike but they stood alone with strong  enough laminate structure to not need  legs, here the legs are multifunctional  acting as the lighting source. 

Aluminium end disc  flush to surface on  top of leg 

Flat useable top  surface 

LED strip  lights/tape 

LED strip lights/tape 

Tube 

this product is a large amount of  lamination of many thin sheets of flexi  ply which once finished would have a  strong structure. The aim would be to  make the whole product out of as few  lengths of ply as possible; so buying ply  sheets in the longest length they come  but this would still be hard to achieve  having to mould each corner separately  on the same former. Using a standard  former for each corner would shorten  the production process.

Bottom

Polished tubular  aluminium legs 

>1000mm 

Aluminium tube 

Processes: The main process to make 

Aluminium 

Left side of unit 

Light 

The aluminium tube will cost £37 for 10m.  The polished aluminium will provide a good finish.  Aluminium tube 

Tall  auxiliary  storage 

Door Type: Form the research, there is 

Client Feedback:  This is an interesting design but possibly not that  appropriate for the proposed location – it would  actually be too tall and thin as I am looking for a  design with a wider ratio like the other 3.  The  lighting design is very innovative and would work  well; I think this type of lighting could be used  across different ideas.  I like the retracting door  which is a tidy feature. I don’t imagine it is possible  to make the whole frame out of one length of  wood. Surely you can’t use the depth of the  shelves as CD’s and other stuff alike will topple out  of the open ends. 

possibility to use a variety of different doors,  the client may have an opinion but I felt that a  door that also retracted into the unit was best.  Here the door only covers the main stereo unit  and opens horizontally to then retract between  the stereo and the left speaker.  This door would best be made out of wood or  Perspex but not glass as sourcing the right size  door mechanism/braces for glass would be time  consuming and expensive.   Highlighted Specification Points:  1.1, Purpose: This is designed to be the perfect width for the Hi‐Fi unit.  2.1, Form: This is one of the largest variants in the form of the design being a different shape and very different  production process.  3.5, Function: The lighting system is unique and when directed in the correct direction will illuminate the spins of  the CD/DVD’s very well and is very efficient.  3.8, Performance: This is one of the lightest designs not using dense materials and light aluminium save large  amounts of weight.  6.2, Ergonomics: The ratio of the design would work better with added height; the stereo would be at the best  height for the user.  8.2, Manufacture: The only energy large amount of energy needed to make this product is the electricity for the  vacuum during the lamination process.  13.1, Cost: This design would be one of the cheapest to produce due the simplicity of the design and the lack of  lots of materials. 

17

750mm  Bottom of leg  goes through  to act as foot 

Materials & Justification:  There is not a huge range of materials  used as there are few other substitute  materials which are workable in the  same processes or give the desired sort  of finish. Flexi ply would be used for  the main body of the storage unit as it  can be easily laminated.  Aluminium is inexpensive and easy to  work as well as providing a good finish  when polished which will work well for  this purpose and it is light.  The shelf in the large storage area  could be made from MDF finished with  white paint.  

500mm 

Sustainability:  Flexi ply is a sustainable  material to use as it is soft  wood which is fast growing  and cut down in controlled  plantations where the  supply is monitored by the  FSC.  Aluminium is a common  metal which is easy to  extract with little energy  and can be easily recycled.  MDF is also sustainable as  it is recycled wood as  opposed to forested use  for the purpose where  hard woods could be used.


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Preliminary Review of Initial Ideas  Specification heading 

Idea  1   

Idea  2 

Idea  3

Idea  4 

 It has ample storage to store the necessary small Hi‐Fi,  CD’s and DVD’s that have been specified.   Depending on the modular design that the user  chooses, they may or may not be able to place a TV on  top of the unit.   The client has expressed that he likes the simple design  but looks for individual features on each design.   The product comes in three different parts/boxes but  these cannot be reduced in size any more.   There is no specific location for CD’s but there is storage  for over 80.   There is also large capacity for over 50 DVD’s.   There is one smaller dedicated box for the Hi‐Fi with a  door.   It is the users’ choice where to place the speakers but  there is no ‘incorporated storage’ for them.   No lighting system has been designed to work with this  design.   There is auxillary storage in multiple places.   This is a light product and would probably weigh in at  around 25kg  

 It fulfills all the required purposes to store a small Hi‐Fi, a  large CD collection, a small DVD collection and the ability  to have a TV places on top   It is also a modern design as stated on the original  specification.   My client thinks this product has the most unusual design  which is one of its best assts.   The product cannot be separated at all and the metal base  gives a very strong structure   There is plenty of storage for CD’s in the top main section  of the cabinet   There is just enough space in the secondary storage area  for a small DVD collection   There are more detailed designs which show how the door  covering the stereo would work   It is recommended to place the speakers at either end of  the unit for best stereo quality   No lighting system is yet to be designed   The auxiliary storage is limited by the acute angle in the  secondary storage are writing off some of the storage   With a heavy base and light material used elsewhere this  unit would weigh in the region of 40‐45kg   This does have a modern aspect to the design with the  unusual angles and ‘floating storage’ facilities   The majority of the finish could be wood or paint and the  mild steel replaced with stainless steel giving a brighter  finish for a poorly lit room 

 This design has the most storage capacity for CD’s,  DVD’s and any other miscellaneous items.   It has dedicated storage for the stereo  incorporated into a modern design which still  leaves a flat top surface where a TV could stand.   My client expressed that he liked the innovation  that went into the design.   Base of structure may be a little unstable but  could be attached to a wall to stabilise it.   This product provides the most storage for CD’s,  DVD’s and other auxillary items than any other of  the proposed designs due to the width of the  design   There is no typical door but there is a sealed  section specifically for the stereo unit   It is recommended to place the speakers at either  end of the unit for best stereo quality   No lighting system is yet to be designed   It would be possible to split this unit into 2  sections but in total it would weigh over 50kg but  the design could be scaled down 

 It fulfills all the required purposes to store a small  Hi‐Fi, a large CD collection and a small DVD  collection.   A TV could be placed on top but it would be too  high to be at a comfortable viewing angle.   The client said the design was ‘interesting’ but was  not what he is looking for.   This is a solid structure and it has aluminium legs  far added support.   There are three different shelves that can be split  up into CD storage, DVD storage and auxillary  storage or overflow, this fulfils the storage  requirements.   There is dedicated stereo storage but it could be  improved for better speaker dynamics   An innovative lighting system has been unique  designed for this product   This is one of the lightest units that have been  designed due to the materials and the size of it, it  would weigh in the region of 20‐25kg; well within  the required weight 

 The unit has a traditional shape to the main  design but the features and mixture of aluminium  and glass with light wood colours will bring a  modern and enlightening feel to a dark room.   This is the most practical design 

 This unit may look a little out of place in a  traditional room with polished aluminium and a  very light wood colour but there are options for  the finish.   With a lighting system the unit would not be too  dark in a black finish   The width and depth is comfortable within the  boundaries specified, 750mm wide by 500mm  deep   The height would need to be over the specified  1000mm   Door handles have not been chosen at this point  in the design.   The stereo is high up in the design and would be  the easiest to reach for an adult and is out of the  reach of small children 

1.  

Purpose 

2.

Form 

3.

Function/  Performance 

4.

Aesthetics 

 Minimalist is the new modern design and the product  can be finished in a variety of ways in order to suit  many different environments.   It would be a very large area to paint so it would have  to be a wood finish. 

5.

Size 

 In the setup shown in the picture above the height is  1000mm, the width is 1200mm and a depth of 500mm.  These dimensions are within the specified dimensions  given by the client. 

  The width is 1100mm at its widest and 800mm tall and a  standard 500mm deep, these dimensions are well within  the specified maximum dimensions 

 The width of the unit is on the maximum limit of  1250mm, the height is 100mm below the  maximum (900mm)   Depth is 500mm 

6.

Ergonomics 

 Door handles have not been chosen at this point in the  design.   It is the users decision where to place the stereo but  the square box is dedicated to it but it depends where  the box is. 

 The stereo is placed high up in the unit which is easily in  reach for all percentiles of the population.   Door handles have not been chosen at this point in the  design. 

 The stereo is easily high enough so not to have to  bend over but the unit must be able to slide with  minimum effort   Door handles have not been chosen at this point  in the design. 

18


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  7.

Materials/  Components 

8.

Manufacture 

9.

Maintenance 

10. Market 

11. Quality  12. Scale of Production  13. Cost 

14. Safety  15. Packaging  16. Sustainability 

 

 The main structure of the design is all wood but glass  has been used for the main shelf.   This design must be made of soft wood in order to  laminate it; 3mm sheets of flexi ply will be used. This  will either have to have a wood or painted finish but is  cheaper and more sustainable   This design would take a long time to construct as all  the corners need laminating which takes time. It will be  complex where the ends of the laminate have to be  joined.   This design is too large to use a vacuum bag to laminate  it so cramps would be used which require no energy.   Small components like the connector bolts can be  supplied with spares, however the door is a standard  component but not easily replaceable.   The glass shelf is very long and is not a standard size.   The product can be separated into three sections but  there is no possibility if being flat packed.   There should easily be a profit margin if sold for £550 or  more (see 13. cost section)   This product is to be used inside and if finished well will  last a long time. 

 The design uses MDF, which is a material that uses waste  material that would otherwise be discarded.   Mild steel is used through much of the product – this can  be very easily recycled.   The door mechanism is designed for much larger doors so  should last a long time.   To reduce time, jigs could be used in the manufacture for  all the welding to make sure the correct angles are  achieved. Also for the secondary storage box which has  the same 45o angle in the corner.   The main storage compartment has relatively few complex  joints and is easy to construct.   There should be no need for any maintenance on this  design as it’s not separable. Only the door mechanism  might need replacing but it will be easy to get hold of.   The lighting system may well be built in; LED’s should not  need replacing.   This design would be easily constructed for under the  specified £200 as the materials are cheap and there are  few auxillary components.   At £350 a profit should still be made on the product   Welding certain parts of this design will mean that it will  be much longer‐lasting than some wood joints 

 If more of this product were to me made the same  formers could be used.   There is no possibility of using manufactured boards;  flexi ply is the only option.   The large shelf could cost anywhere in the region of £20  if standard of £100 if custom   The flexi ply for this product may cost around £150.   The majority of the different modular set ups are very  stable and have a low centre of gravity but some not so  much.   As stated the product has the ability to be split up into 3  sections but no smaller than the 3 boxes. 

 In batch production the same jig for all the welding jobs  could be used.   The strength of the design is in the base so weaker  manufactured boards can be used on the remainder of the  product.   The metal would cost about £20 in total   The wood would cost about £60 in total   With a heavy base and strong joints it will be a very stable  product with the ability to hold a lot more weight 

 Design will come apart easily to aid materials  separation and thus recycling. 

 All of the materials used on the product are recyclable  when it comes to the end of its life. 

 This product would be very large to package and transport  which would add a lot more cost 

 Hard woods are less sustainable and more  expensive, 18mm ply will be used all round with  the possibility of using hard wood veneers.   High quality heavy weight runners will be used   Small amounts of glass and aluminium will be  used for aesthetic purposes.   There are no processes in the construction of his  design which require a large amount of energy.   The construction is simple but will take a long  time due to the scale of the product.   If the shelves are adjustable, jigs can be used for  where the holes are drilled for the shelves.   The size of the window in the frame will be built  around standard sizes of glass so it is cheap to  replace or transparent acrylic could be used.   The runners may well be cut to a custom length  but should not break on such a small product.   This is a very large product and may have a  smaller market as it needs quite a big room.   It will be near £200 to make  (expensive aux.  components) so RRP would be over £400   High quality runners will be used capable of  holding a lot of weight which will mean they last  longer   To speed up any production line, jigs can be set to  help cut materials to the correct size.   The frame would cost in the region of £50 for  fairly substantial ply wood   The remainder of the wood would cost about £45   The small sheet of glass could cost anywhere in  the region of £10‐£40   There is a possibility of attaching the unit to the  wall to stop it falling over but if the base is heavy  enough it should stay upright.   This product can be separated into two parts but  this could make packaging even more expensive  as the main section would not be smaller   All of the materials are either recyclable or  reusable. 

  I have decided to take ideas 2 and 3 into the next  stage for the detailed review as my client likes  these two ideas the most and they both comply  closely to the original design specification. 

19

 Hard woods are also not a possibility for this  design; sheets of 1.5mm flexi ply will be used for  the laminating wood which will make the product  light weight.   The Aluminium legs are a contrasting material  which gives a high quality look.   This product is too big to fit in a vacuum bag so  cramps would be used on former; this requires  little energy but will take a long time.   Jigs can be used to show where holes must be  drilled for the aluminium legs to save time  measuring it out each time.   There is very little maintenance that can be  carried out on this product, there is no glass and  the lighting system is built in.   It is only the door mechanism that might break  and this will be made readily available.   This is the smallest of the products and may  appeal to a wider range of customers.   This could be constructed for under £100 so when  sold for £50 or more there is a large profit margin   There are few joints in this design and therefore  little which is liable to breaking   If more of this product were to me made the same  formers could be used.   Due to the whole product being made out of flexi  ply, it would cost about £50 for all the wood   The aluminium tubing for the legs would cost  about  £15 in total   This quite a stable design as it has the aluminium  legs which double up as feet raising it off the  ground.   This product is not separable but this is stated as  not being necessary in the design specification   Depending on which glue or resin is used for  laminating the wood it may or may not be  recyclable. Aluminium is easily recyclable. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Detailed Review of Preferred Ideas  Idea 2: (Diagonal) 

Idea 3: (Slider)  

 A solid non‐separable piece of furniture designed to be used for storing a small Hi‐Fi system.   A sturdy base and legs welded at 45o made out of mild/stainless steel to support the storage areas.  o Designed at angles to give the design some flare and a different feature.   One small primary storage compartment on top and a secondary larger storage compartment  hanging below, both made out of light weight wood. 

Form  

 To store a small Hi‐Fi system behind a close door in order to protect it from dust, spillages or other  damage.   It has just enough storage space for 80 CD’s and 50 DVD’s   There are dedicated places for the speakers.   There will be a lighting system of some description. 

Function  

 This product has a modern design using different materials but at the same time is not finished in a  way which narrows its customer base.   It is a light weight multipurpose storage facility to have in many different sorts of rooms. 

User requirements  

 The whole unit must weigh less than 50kg so it is easy to move by 2 people – this unit will weigh  about 30kg.   It has a small footprint of 750mm x 500mm and a larger top section which is 1100mm x 500mm. It  is 800mm high which separates it from being at table height.   It has a long width to ensure the best stereo sound effect which is achievable. 

Performance requirements  

 The use of steel for the base and legs means that that the base of the product is very strong and  cheap to make.   MDF is used for all the wood sections which means it too is cheap to make and it is a light weight  material which compensates for the weight of the steel   Steel cables are used to suspend the secondary storage box, these cables have a high strength to  weight ratio and the thinnest are undoubtedly substantial for this job. 

Material and component  requirements   

 This product is designed as a one‐off piece of furniture but jigs could easily be made to cater for  batch production – a jig for welding the correct angles of base to legs would drastically speed up  production time.   It is estimated that this product would cost in the region of £150‐175 for all the materials and the  components which allows for a large profit margin.   Components:   o Door mechanism  o Steel cables and clamps 

Scale of production and cost  

20

 A non‐flat pack item of furniture which can be separated into 2 pieces (which would not  reduce the size of it by much) which is marketed as a piece of furniture used primarily for  storing a small Hi‐Fi. This rectangular design provides practical space with spare capacity for  larger objects.   The frame around the main shelves and the main storage shelves are all made from light  weight wood to compensate for the size of the product.   It has the ability to store a small Hi‐Fi system in a sealed area which protects the unit from  dust, spillages and other damage.   It has more than ample storage for more than 100 CD’s and over 75 DVD’s, more than most  people require.   It still has storage capacity left over for larger auxillary items such as books or magazines.   There are dedicated locations for the speakers at either end of the unit.   There will be a lighting system of some description.   This design takes a conventional design shape and adds a unique feature allowing it to  reciprocate from one side to the other which is its main selling point.   The design changes are kept to a minimum with simple aesthetics so to have a wide potential  market.   It has an increased amount if storage and therefore increased practicality.   The whole unit must weigh less than 50kg so it is easy to move by 2 people – this product  would currently be over that limit nearing 60kg.    It has a very small footprint of 400mm x 500mm and a much larger main section (true  minimum amount of space needed) which is 1250mm x 500mm. It is 900mm high which keeps  it to scale with the length of the unit.   Its wide ratio ensures the best stereo sound performance.   The product would be made out of solid 18mm ply wood as wood with enough structural  strength must be used as it is the main material though it is a soft wood which is a light wood  which is relatively cheap.   Aluminium is only used for aesthetic values and there is very little of it.   Glass is used to allow the stereo remote to work while the door is shut.    The runners are designed for large glass doors so should be able to run smoothly even when  the storage is full and it is very heavy though they are not assisted.   This product is designed as a one‐off piece of furniture but jigs could easily be used to  speed up the production time. They can be used to aid cutting the materials to the right  length and a different jig guiding where the shelves should be placed at the correct height.   It is estimated that this product would cost in the region of £200‐250 for all the materials  and the components which allows for a profit margin it was sold at the upper end of the  RRP boundary   Components:   o Runners 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

 

 From user group feedback, they concluded that the design was retro but in a contemporary fashion  – reminiscent of the 1970’s. The raw combination of wood and metal together would improve the  aesthetics.   Overall they liked the design but commented that it has too many sharp corners – as a safety point  of view and if veneered as a finish it would be liable to peeling – A glossy finish would look good.   It was pointed out that the storage space is limited and is less than there looks to be due to the  angles of the design; however it was good to add the second storage box below and if a user has  even more items that don’t fit in; magazines etc. can be stored on the base.   They recommended that the cables for the stereo and maybe an extension are run down the legs.   They liked the size of the product and assuming a high quality finish would be prepared to pay  about £650‐700 for this sort of product.   They were worried about how sturdy the cables for the other storage area were if they were  knocked; maybe thin solid metal bar (studding) may be a better replacement.   As another feature that was not mentioned, they would like to have a built in power socket  extension which is accessible for the use of laptops or phone chargers. 

User Group Feedback

I like the “whacky” design of this one although it looks as though there is less storage capacity than  the design above.  No. 1 design has the advantage that all of it can be used for storage whereas the  bottom and the right hand side of no.2 are not usable due to the design.  I like the hanging section  which is a clever feature but I am not sure how it is going to hang.  I understand that there are 8  cables.  I can see that the vertical cables will have tension provided by gravity but I do not understand  how the diagonal cables will work as there won’t be any tension.  The door is a definite advantage to  keep dust away from the stereo unit however I wonder if an “up and over” door will look better and  more subtle. 

Client Feedback    

 This Product is easily recyclable as the wood simply needs to be detached from the metal and both  materials are widely recycled. It is most likely to be screws holding the different sections together.   Wood will be MDF which is sustainable as it a man‐made manufactured board which reuses scrap  wood to made it.   The only significant amount of energy used in the manufacture of this product is the electricity  needed for MIG welding. 

Issues of sustainability    

 The feedback from the focus group was that the design was a unique concept that they had  not seen before and they liked. They said that if they were to have it in their house, it would  stand out as an item of furniture – in a good way meaning it may almost be a centre piece, not  just an auxillary stereo cabinet.   They liked the sleek contrast using glass, aluminium and wood on the front of the product.   They commented on the conventional and simple layout/shape which they liked as it  increased the actual storage capacity.   They would prefer not to see the runners and only have them on the bottom; if the idea works  smoothly they would be prepared to pay up to £850 for the product (also due to larger size).   However it was noticed out that extra space would be needed either side for the slider to  work and again worried that too much weight in the shelves may create too much resistance  to push the unit.   This them provoked worries that the unit would not be stable and would need good ground  clearance. Also due to the small footprint and large weight it would damage carpet floors. 

This is an intriguing and innovative design but I am concerned about how it will look when in  situ.  Although the contents on the shelves will be protected when behind the “door” it seems  that when not covered they will be exposed to dust.  I am impressed by the amount of storage  space which is huge and on this measure probably scores the highest.  I presume that due to the  design it can be floor standing but will also have to be fixed to the wall which means that it is  not so easy to move once installed. 

 This product is almost entirely constructed from wood which means that the majority of it is  easy to recycle.   Parts like the aluminium font plate and the glass are less easy to separate but the runners are  likely to be screwed on so it takes few tools to take them off.   There are no processes throughout the construction of this design which need a considerable  amount of energy. 

  Justification of Idea selected for Development:  My client has decided to take idea number 3 into development, it is not perfect and does not  totally adhere to the original specification but it came out on top of the idea number 2 having  completed the detailed review that is what development is for. From both my client feedback  and user group feedback they used the words innovative, unique and intriguing which shows  they have not seen any other products like this which makes it good design to produce. There  is a lot more storage on a similar size design due to its efficiency which is a primary concern  being one of the main functions. Also due to the longer width of the unit it has better stereo  dynamics as the speakers are placed further apart.  Having discussed the two designs with my client he said he liked this idea more but hope fully  it would be scaled down in development in order to adhere to the specification however there  could be room for variation. I feel that there is a great deal of potential and scope for this  design to be improved in the development process. 

21


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Section D: Development 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

My Client would like to see this idea taken further into the development stages and see how it develops  further to his liking. My preference was to take Idea 3 further into the development stages but This design has    plenty of scope and could change dramatically and many flaws in the design which will have to be re‐worked in      order for it to be constructed. My client has already expressed his desire for practicality and efficient use of  space; to any sweeping curves added to the design are likely to impede on the storage capacity.

Main faults in the design to be focussed on:  The door mechanism and movement   Addition of lighting   Shape of main body   Scale of entire unit 

Shape of main body:  Although square/rectangular shapes are obviously preferred I still felt that I could explore some other main shapes  to see is they could match the efficiency of the original design and maybe my client may just take a liking towards  some of them. The designs that follow might present more of a challenge but would also determine the materials  which will be required to build the main body of the unit.   The first 6 drawings are in plan view; the  last 2 are looking from front on: 

All these designs would result in having to design  and construct my own rail mechanism as none are  made like this that can be bought off the shelf 

Client Feedback: Interesting designs but none the most practical, I like number 3 due to its quirkiness with  the pivoting door. However, storage would be difficult due to the shape but the speakers  would work well. Idea number 6 would work well in the corner position of a room  although the unit would be very deep for storage purposes. I like the attempt at changing  the front on design for idea’s 6 & 7 but as you have said the top surfaces are made  defunct. However I still prefer the original shape. 

Conclusion: Most of the designs have complex curves in which would make the manufacture stages  much more difficult especially designing how the door will move. Designs 6 & 7 would  change the dynamic of the cabinet as it would not fir in to as many varied environments.  My favourite design is number 3 as it will take up a small space and still have ample  storage which is curved, less material would be needed as there are no sides. The door  would be easy to manufacture as it does not require a rail but just pivots from the centre.  The speakers would have a wide range but if they were positioned badly the dynamics  would not be good as there would be a blank area in the middle.  I am going to stick with the original basic shape where smaller aspects and finer details  need to be modified.  

22


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

 

 

Sliding door mechanism:

Client Feedback:  

There are many methods of enabling the door to slide, the aim is to  find a solution which is not too bulky but sleek and out of sight which  will provide a smooth and simple motion. Also the weighting/balance  of the whole unit needs to be assessed as it moves through the  centre. 

I am sorry to see the design move away from the original idea  but practical considerations dictated that a��more conventional  approach was appropriate. I can see how the weighting would  be a problem but the use of rails would be unsightly. I would  be good if there was an illusion of the door wrapping around  the whole cabinet.

Here the drawings are looking  at how the main cabinet will  move through the centre unit.  Either there can be runners on  the top or the centre unit  takes all the weight or wheels  on the bottom of the cabinet  which just moves through the  stationary centre unit  Runner on the top taking  all the weight and a self‐ lubricating material on  the bottom which the  cabinet can slide on Reciprocating flexible cable  organiser that could be used  as unit moves through the  centre unit 

I decided it would be better  if the centre unit remained  stationary and the main  cabinet moved through it. In  this design the cabinet is  running on a pair of  manufactured rails which  are placed beneath it. This  makes it bulky and lowers  the aesthetic quality 

23

In the designs below there is a  new possibility of the centre unit  moving which does not surround  the whole cabinet. Wheels could  be fitted into the bottom of the  centre unit to allow it to move or  it could be hooked over and hang  on top of the cabinet.  However if the centre/door unit is  not going to surround the cabinet  it could be mounted on rails  inside the front of the cabinet. 

Conclusion:  Taking a holistic view of these designs, it would be better  if the centre unit became more of a door and was  mounted inside the main cabinet but still had a  reciprocating movement. This would have many  advantages such as reducing the weight and materials  and eliminating the problem of the weight distribution. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Early research and early CAD:   Having decided how the door mechanism will work I   carried out some research to see if there was a    possibility of buying a pre‐fabricated rail/runner for  the door instead of having to make my own. The  products from Screwfix® were the best I could find but  they are not the best as mainly they are the wrong  length for the design and will probably work out more  expensive overall and be more complex than a design I  could create.  I also drew the current design similar to the initial idea  to gain an idea of the proportions of the design to see  if it will work well and a definite design to work off as  a base. 

There is a window on the door so that the  remote will work even when the door is in  the way of the stereo. 

This sliding ball race is  914mm long costing  £29.99. It is designed to  convert hinged internal  doors to sliding doors.  Highly durable and smooth  running ball race type for  heavy use. Requires no  rebates or bottom track.  Includes all parts. Quick  and easy to fit. Max.  weight 35kg. Min. door  thickness 22mm. 

This wardrobe gear  wheel set is  designed to Allows  3 doors to be fitted  as sliding wardrobe  doors when used  with Wardrobe  Door Gear (only  one door is needed  to move in this  situation). It costs  £7.75. 

There is a space left at the rear for the power  extension so there is only one cable trailing from  the cabinet.  The cupboards on the sides are another use of  the extra space which can be used for storing  smaller accessories such as remote controls. 

24

This wardrobe door gear is  1830mm long. Ii costs  £21.99. For 2 doors to  bypass each other (wheel  set allows 3 doors to be  fitted). Nylon wheels run in  strong aluminium track  which can be cut to size.  Quick and easy to fit.  Includes all parts. Max.  weight 20kg. Door  thickness min. 16mm, max.  door height 2190mm. 

The door is mounted on runners inside the cabinet but  runs in front of the cabinet as if it were on the outside.  There is an extension over the top to give the impression  that the door surrounds the whole cabinet.  The strip at the rear on the top is a self‐lubricating  material with a low coefficient of friction to help the  door slide and support the extension. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

 

Early CAD:

 

These CAD aspects show a front on view and all the dimensions in detail from  the initial design and the necessary heights required for the shelves to fit the  minimum size of contents in such as DVDs/CDs. 

Client Feedback:  

Conclusion:

I feel the side cupboards would spoil the lines of the design  and are unnecessary. Also I don’t feel comfortable with the  current design of the top especially how it does not overlap  the sides as it usually would on a cabinet or table top. 

This is still the very early stages and is only a projection of what the final  design might look like. The edges of the top can easily be extended to  overlap the sides and the doors excluded form and future designs; they  will only create more problems during manufacture as they are so small. 

25


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Early Model:  This is evidence of the very simple model created using masking tape on a wall just to     

The picture here shows me sitting next  to the model for scale to show how in a  reception room the cabinet would be  below shoulder height. A standard  cabinet/bookshelf is normally either  1000 mm high or below 750mm so it is  supposed to be a much smaller unit but  at 850mm it looks between the two. 

visualise the dimensions. As you can see here the width has remained the same but the  height has been reduced from that of the CAD above. This still gives the designs the same  proportions but ergonomically the design is not high enough. Although my client  mentioned scaling the design down I do not think it would be a good idea as it feels a bit  odd when it is so low as seen in the pictures.  Here you can see that the model makes  the dimensions look too small as  ergonomically it is not at a  comfortable height.    This model is 850mm high by 1250mm  wide.    When standing next to the model it is  below waist height which is too low  and it does not seem like a full size  piece of furniture.    If one were to lean over the cabinet;  again it is too low and you have to  bend over to put an arm on it.    I ‘m proposing that if the dimensions  are reduced the cabinet becomes too  small which justifies the larger size that  my client was unsure about.    Also due to the reduced height it  makes some of the shelves become  quite small and be little use for storage  towards the bottom due to lack of  height.    The top shelf in this is also bigger than  required at 290mm high in order to  make it easier to place in iPod in a dock  on top of the stereo but this extra  height is needed more lower down to  increase the height of the other shelves  so will be reduced but still allow  enough space to easily place a device  in the dock. 

1250mm

Client Feedback:  

290mm

140mm

210mm

210mm

26

I do not want to reduce the dimensions any more as it  changes the type of cabinet which is made. I am reluctant to  make keep the original dimensions but the proposed  reduced height now looks too low and almost  uncomfortable especially if it was a ‘centre piece’ of  furniture in a room. However I would still like to keep the  proportions of a rectangle. 

Conclusion:  The quick and inexpensive method of constructing a full  scale model was a good thing to do as it gave both me and  my client a good idea of the full scale of the proposed  reduced dimensions. Having assessed this model my client  has decided to increase e the size of the cabinet he would  like; the specified dimensions to meet are 1250mm wide x  100mm high x 500mm deep. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Door design:

     

How the door design has  developed and become  more of a design feature  and not so much a door.  Also in detail of how the  door mechanism will  work which I intend to  construct myself.

 

Araldite (Resin) 

The drawings in the top right display  how the door could be attached to the  top of the cabinet as the top extension  hooks over the rear of the cabinet. One  design uses a runner on the rear and a  self‐lubricating material such as nylon  on the top to support the weight of the  door. The other design uses  overlapped nylon on the rear to take  the stress of the door and a runner on  the top to take the weight and allow it  to move. 

Top Extension 

The window in the door was originally designed to be square and only show the stereo through it,  but due to the small availability of pre‐cut glass the optimum size of glass I can buy is 360mm x  260mm which means the window will have to be in a portrait orientation and the user will be able  to see half of the CD shelf contents through the window. 

Top securing  block 

The early designs for the door had an extension of  the door across the top of the cabinet to give the  impression the door is wrapping around the  cabinet but this has been subtracted for the  following reasons: there were problems in the  design of how to support it, the product would not  be able to be flat packed & the weight distribution  is offset when attempting to remove the door. 

FINAL DOOR  DESIGN 

These drawings show how  the wheel will be attached  to the door and the  possibilities of different  runners which could be  used for the runner, Also  the design of the top  securing block used to fit  into the top runner. 

I have designed my own solution which would  allow the door to reciprocate as I was unable to  find a pre manufactured runner from a retailer  which as compact enough and the correct length.  The top securing block is also able to be adjusted  vertically which means the door is not permanently  fixed in, it can be removed for moving around and  enables the product to be flat packed or doesn’t  have to be used at all. 

27

Client Feedback: With the very first designs there would be a lot of upwards load on the runner on the rear side, it  is better with the ‘overlapped’ nylon. I like the idea of not being able to see the  wheels/mechanism. The extension of the door covering the top would not be practical for  packaging/transport and also renders the top storage space redundant. I see there being too  much stress in the top join if unsupported and is likely to break. The runners which require a  grooved wheel would be more complex to manufacture. Therefore the squared rail would be  preferable. The best way fixing the securing block would be using wing nuts to allow it to be  loosened using fingers not tools. As regards to the window, it would be better if the whole CD  was visible or none at all i.e. being mounted landscape. 

Conclusion: The first designs to attach the door to the cabinet would not have worked due the lateral  stresses placed on the components and many construction problems were solved by  removing the top extensions for justified reasons which my client has agreed and added  to.  The door design has changed dramatically to a much more simplified unit which should  work well with a simple mechanism and adjustable securing method. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Full scale door (height only):  This is the quick manufacture of a full scale door to test the dimensions and see how easy the sliding mechanism is to manufacture and how well it works. The results were    positive with the manufacture being much simpler than I had expected and the mechanism running very smoothly – with increased weight the mechanism will improve and with    more width on the door it will not topple and get caught so easily.      START 

I cut down two damaged off cuts of MDF and used some 20 x 20  pine to make the model door as well as fitting the correct M6  bolts to the inner facing side of the door which are for the wheels  and securing blocks. 

From a cylinder of nylon I then turned the two  wheels to the desired size (9mm wide) on the metal  lathe and drilled centre holes in them before fitting  them to the door. 

I had to make two sets  of wheels as the 1st pair  were too small and did  not give the door  enough clearance 

I cut channels into some scrap MDF oak veneer and fitted 12mm  alloy channels with an inside width of 9mm which I fitted the wheels  into, the wheels with the bolts through them (see right for how they  are fitted to the wood) and sitting in the runners with enough space  for them to rotate easily. 

The top securing block  finished and attached  to the door by two  standard nuts so it can  be easily  loosened/tightened  and adjusted.  

Conclusion: With the smaller wheels in the  runners not even the bolts alone  have very much clearance over  the wood.  

A side on view of how it is  all assembled  

I have not decided  what the top securing  block will be made out  of but for the purpose  of a model I used some  8mm scrap wood  which fitted well into  the runner and worked  well.  

Once the larger wheels had been  attached there was a small gap  between the door and the base  but it is enough clearance for it  to run smoothly. 

Due to the model being so thin  and light it got caught in the  runner very easily but with  added weight and a wider stance  it became sturdier. This proved  that the mechanism I have  designed will work with the final  product without being complex.  The door will be a good size and  both the wheels and the top  securing block have been made  to the actual size required. 

A rough diagram of the top  securing block to work out the  dimensions before it is made.  

The finished door  fitted into the rails  which are the same as  what will be used in  the production of the  cabinet. The motion  was smooth with little  resistance.  

Finished overview  of the door, it is  the same depth as  the real door will  be, the only  dimension which  is different is the  width (the model  is 100mm  thinner). 

FINISH

28


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Joints solutions and feet:    These drawings show how the shelves    will be joined to the sides and how the  corners of the main unit will be joined  when using the MDF veneer.  Also a solution to the feet, the cabinet  will stand on the two sides which are  strong enough to take the weight of it.  However the ends need to be  protected as the veneer will splinter  off if the cabinet is slid along any  surface; either a metal or hard wood  strip will be used. 

On the bottom of the foot the best way to  hold the cherry strip on is with glue and  nails, by using dovetail nailing it will be  the most secure and then use a centre  punch to sink the nails so there isn’t the  possibility that they will protrude and  scratch the floor they it is on 

Foot Solutions: 

Shelf Joints: 

Main Joints: 

The shelves could be fixed in permanently  which would enable more possibilities for  the lighting or they could be free and  removable which would be better as it  would mean the unit could be flat‐packed  reducing transport costs and would reduce  the weight of the unit once assembled as  the shelves don’t have to be in when  moving the unit which would make a  considerable difference to the net weight.  The dovetail housing is a strong joint to use  but is unnecessary as although it looks good  it would not be seen as the shelves would  be inserted from the rear.  Using a screwed butt joint would not be the  best solution as the screws would be seen  on the outside of the cabinet and this would  reduce the overall aesthetic quality.  However using a butt joint with batons is a  strong possibility as it is not complex to  make and would not be seen. It is secured  from the inside but the shelf does not have  to be screwed down allowing it to be taken  out.  A housing joint is also simple to  manufacture and would hold the shelf well.  Although due to the tightness of the joint it  may damage the shelf as it is being  assembled. 

29

For the main joints (shown above) the lap joint  and the butt joint are both joints that would hold the cabinet  together well but they are unsuitable for the purpose due to the material being used. These joints are good for  solid wood as they show the end grain but since I am going to use MDF which has no grain. The butt joint could  be used with a cherry baton fixed to the perimeter but the joint itself would need screws or nails from the top  which would not look good and would split the MDF which as no grain.  The only other suitable joint is to use  20x20 pine batons on the inside of the joint and a 20x20 cherry baton on the outside to cover the MDF. Although  to improve the aesthetics of the cabinet my client has said he would like there to be a lip over the edges of the  top so the cherry baton should overlap the edge. 

Client Feedback: My preferred joints would be either dovetail or butt joint with batons because it is permanent fixing  without having screws visible in the side panel and if the dovetail joint was visible the aesthetics  would be good. The adjustable shelf pins and the housing joints could mean that the shelf would be  susceptible to falling out.  Looking at the butt/lap joint for the corner there is a danger of the nails piercing the outside edge of  the side panel and evidence of the nails on top would not look good. The baton joint is a neater  fixing as the nails are invisible.  The foot with the flat U shape would not work because of the restriction of the height of the bottom  shelf. A wooden foot would be better as I am likely to have it on a wooden floor. Shelf Pins are a possibility as  they are cheap to use and fit  also giving plenty of flexibility  to the user of the shelf  positions. However this can  make the product look cheap  and drilling all the holes for  the shelf pins is very time  consuming. If the holes are  not at the same heights the  there is a high chance of the  shelves being unstable. 

Conclusion:  Batons used but without screws on the underside into the shelf so the shelf can be taken out when the unit is being moved in order to make it lighter.  


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage Lighting solutions: There are two main types of lights which I could use which would fit in the cabinet and be small enough so not to be seen. There is one design using traditional tubular fluorescent lights and two involving LED strip lights.

For the first LED design it involves using two sheets of wood for the outside of the cabinet and fitting a copper strip between the two sheets. Then holes would be drilled on the inside sheet of wood down to the copper strip, in the hole a shelf pin is placed which will be in contact with the LED strip which is on the bottom of the shelf when it’s fitted. This is done on either side to make a complete circuit. This is a good design as there are no wires visible and is simple for the user. However some of the problems with it are if it goes wrong it will be hard to fix it. It will also be very complex to make and a large amount of scope for it to go wrong. Using two different sheets of wood is unnecessary and unsustainable. For the second LED design there will be aluminium tubes at the front of the shelves both for aesthetic qualities and to support the front of the shelves; the LEDs are place inside the tubes which have slits/holes cut out of them which direct the light towards the contents of the shelves instead of there being a general light. The wires are only on one side and go under the shelves to the rear. The 1” tube is counter sunk into both sides; it is held by friction and is able to be twisted to direct the beam of light. LED tape is good to use as it’s cheap and efficient. It can also be cut into many varied lengths.

Fluorescent tube lights:

If tubular lights were used they would be fixed to the bottom of the shelves on their side edge to reduce their height. However they would still take up a large amount of space due to the size of the fittings. These lights are old technology and for this reason would not be in keeping with the aim of being modern and also consume large amounts of electricity. If there are left on for a long time they produce a lot of heat; as they would be so close to the contents of the shelves they might damage the contents. They are also expensive to use as it costs £10.99 for one 600mm light fitting excluding the bulb which is £4.99. I would need 6 of these fittings for the whole unit. The fittings do come in varied sizes but unlike the LED tape the lengths can’t be customised to fit your job. For these reasons I am ruling out using tubular light as a suitable option.

Using LED’s:

30

Client Feedback:

Conclusion:

I do not like using fluorescent tube lights because the fittings are too big. I like the internally wired design as there are no visible wires but the design is too complex. The in-tube lighting is very clever but there is a danger that too much light would be lost inside the tube and the width of the beam would be restricted. Cutting a groove out of the tube could be very difficult but the advantage is that the light beam can be aimed at the contents of the shelf.

The tubular lights have been ruled out both by my client and me. Both of the LED light designs are possible to do but due to time constraints the internally wired design would take too long to manufacture and there would be an added cost for the use of extra materials. I am going to attempt to make the design where the LED’s are placed inside the tube which hides them from view and enables the light to be directed in the desired place.


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Lighting solutions cont’d:    Here is further development of designs using the LED strip lights however having carried out a test in the workshop    none of the options available to cut the slits in the aluminium did not work leading to 3rd final solution. 

Alternative next best solution: 

This was the original design was to  cut slits in the aluminium tube which  would reduce the amount of light  emitted from the LED’s, it would also  all the beam to be directed as the  LED’s were inserted inside the  aluminium tube on a long piece of  plastic to keep them rigid. However  the process to cut the slits out of the  tube was questioned so I attempted  to make a test light which was full  scale to see if it was possible.  To my disappointment as I really liked  the original design I’m not able to  manufacture this design. The  problems are explained in the next  stage.  There is no method available to me which will allow me to cut the slits out of the tube which  will direct the light. The two ways available to me are to either use a milling machine or a  grinder.  Using the milling machine does not work as the job must be held tightly in the vice as it is  worked. Therefore the tube would collapse in as the milling machine cuts away the  necessary segments.  Then I tried using a grinder to take away a segment of the aluminium tube but as shown in  the pictures below this did not work; mainly due to aluminium being a soft metal and it  would not grind cleanly 

I modified the chosen design in an  attempt to keep it as similar as  possible to the original.  Still using the aluminium tube below  the shelves the upside down diagram  shows how the LED tape will be stuck  directly onto the shelf behind the  aluminium tube which will hide the  actual LED’s from sight to the glare  can’t be seen from the individual  LED’s.  Once the shelves have been oiled the  adhesive on the back of the LED tape  should stick very well to the clean  surface.  The shelf is at no point attached to  the aluminium shelf; the aluminium  tube is held at each end in the sides  of the unit and the shelves are  supported at the front by the  aluminium tubes. 

This is a diagram (right)  of how all the lights had  to be connected through  a connection block as  between the 3 LED strips  measuring 1160mm they  required 2 power supplies  in order to achieve their  full brightness and  incorporate a switch. 

Conclusion: Although I have had to test many methods of manufacture which to my disappointment have not  been successful, the final solution cuts out a lot of processes and therefore reducing the overall  manufacture time. The final solution will also give a very similar affect to the original design but is  much simpler.  One advantage of the finalised design is that if the LED’s were to brake under any circumstances  they can be easily accessed in order to be replaced although LED’s have a very long life time (much  longer than filament or fluorescent lights. 

31


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Material research & Justification  Wood for main Cabinet: 

There are few alternative materials for the main body of the    cabinet. Woods are also the most cost effective. It is easier to cut      by both hand and machine. There are many more options for  different types of finishes.    MDF with veneer:  It is good to use as it is considerably cheaper that solid wood and  being a manufactured board comes in many large sizes which will  save time. Can be bought in different densities and will be lighter  than the other substitutes. There is a large variation in the  different veneer finishes that are available such as oak, cherry or  ash – solid woods which my client would consider. However the  edges would have to covered/protected.    Standard 5mm MDF will be used for the backboards which will be  painted black and are out of view.    Plywood:  Also a manufactured board, which comes in many large sheet  sizes. It comes in thicknesses of 12mm, 15mm, 20mm and greater  which would work for the cabinet. It is engineered to have high  structural strength and is relatively cheap. It can be painted or  have clear finish but it does not have an intricate grain.    Solid Wood:  It would have the same aesthetic qualities as MDF veneer but  much more dense and expensive due to it being the least  sustainable. It also only come in long plank lengths 150mm x  16/19/25mm wide so would have to joined together which would  take a long time.    Evaluation:  Using MDF with a veneer is the obvious solution as it will have  high aesthetic qualities with a low price and high sustainability.  MDF veneer only comes in 19mm thickness which is 1mm less  than designed which will not make a difference. The open edges  on the front and sides will have to be covered by a solid wood  baton 20x20 (sanded to 19mm) of the same solid wood. 

MDF with Cherry veneer which will have a red colour when finished.

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Wood for Door: 

Metal for Tubes: 

Plastic for wheels/securing block: 

The door will either be painted or made out of a different  wood to the main cabinet so that it stands out as individual  feature.    MDF:  Standard MDF boards could be used either 12/15mm thick.  This would be the cheapest option and then it could be  painted however there is little time to surround the MDF  with a solid wood to stop the edges splaying so it is not the  best material to use. Also if the edges of the door are  rounded it is not very competent and would not finish well  having been radiused using a router.    Plywood:  Can easily be painted a different colour and is very easy to  work with and doesn’t have any of the problems faced with  when using MDF. Is still cheap and comes in the necessary  thicknesses. Plywood edges do not need to be protected  and can be radiused using a router. It has a medium  density, less than solid wood still providing enough weight  for a smooth mechanism.    Solid Wood:  Again the same problems are encountered as with the main  cabinet, solid wood is much heavier, and expensive – an  unnecessary cost. Would also need joining together as they  are supplied in long plank lengths 150 mm wide. If a wood  grain look is desired MDF with a veneer could be used.    Evaluation:  The best wood to use with a smaller part than the main  unit is plywood with low costs and high strength which can  easily be painted a variety of colours. The best colours  would be a contrasting white or black – an eggshell finish  would be best, not too shiny and not a matt finish which  would accumulate dirt as the door is used over time. 

Although the lights are no longer able to be fitted inside  the tubes they will still be seen as an aesthetic feature and  will be supporting the fronts of the shelves. There are lots  of metals which can be bought in tubes.    Stainless Steel:  It is quite a hard metal therefore not very easy to work  with but is widely available. It can scratch quite easily but  needs little polishing/finishing with high aesthetic  qualities. It is quite expensive at £16.25/metre so it’s  probably not the best to use as >3.5m is required.    Aluminium:  Aluminium is a very malleable metal and very easy to  work with the tools available in the workshop. Due to it  being quite a soft metal so it can be scratched easily but is  also very easy finish with sandpaper and metal polish or  could be sand blasted. It is the cheapest of the metals that  are available for the tubing at £5.25/metre it would only  cost about £20 for all 3.5m.    Brass:  It is a very soft alloy and easy to work. It would give a very  different finish to the other metals matching the colour  similar to the cherry (orange/gold). However it is not  widely supplied and is very expensive at £25.25/metre  which is an excessive cost for its use.    Evaluation:  Considering the very minor use of the tube and it needing  very little work due to changes in the design; aluminium is  clearly the best choice of metal to use for the tubes as it is  well stocked by most suppliers and cheaper than the  others by large amount. 

Plastics have changed dramatically as the technology  supporting them has evolved. They are available in  many sizes/thicknesses/forms.  Soft plastics are preferable for use as they are much  easier to work and cut and have a lower coefficient of  friction than harder plastics i.e. acrylic.   

7‐ply plywood used to make door

Aluminium tube

32

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) ‐ Teflon:  It is the most expensive of the plastics that could be  used but this is mainly due to it having such a low  coefficient of friction – 0.015. Similar to Nylon, it can  only be bought in thicknesses of 8mm, 12mm or  greater. 3mmm of the plastic would be wasted and this  could be quite expensive due to the high price of Teflon.    Nylon:  Nylon is an affordable plastic which is easy to work and  still has a low coefficient of friction of 0.1. It can be  bought in small sheets but comes in thicknesses of  8mm, 12mm or greater. This can still be used but there  would be some waste material having faced it off the  correct thickness. It is good for low to medium levels of  stress and is quite resistance.    Acrylic:  Would be very hard to work when it has to be so thick –  9mm block. It is better when used in thin sheets. Both  Teflon and nylon are self‐lubricating whereas acrylic is  not with a coefficient of friction of 0.4 – it would not  produce such a smooth motion but is the cheapest of  the three options.    Evaluation:  The best material would obviously be Teflon but it’s the  most expensive by some margin and is the least  resistant when looking at longevity. Acrylic will not the  most workable on machines that I have planned to carry  out the processes on, therefore nylon is the optimum  material to use. 

A section of Nylon bar


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  From the wood supplies catalogue, a list of the possible veneers available on MDF. My client chose Crown Cut Cherry:

 

 

Client Feedback (materials):   I like the idea of being able to  use the MDF with a wood  veneer on it as it would reduce  the cost. When looking at the  different woods I am concerned  about both the colour and the  grain. I would like a clear but  subtle grain in the wood; I  would consider the steamed  beech, the cherry, both of the  oak and the sapele. However I  don’t like the look of the texture  of the sapele and would like to  avoid traditional oak furniture.  Therefore between the beech  and the cherry I prefer the  redness of the cherry wood and  the slightly more defined grain.     For the door I have little  preference for the material but I  think a black paint which is not  matt would be good especially  as it will be handled a lot.    For the metal tubes I would not  have chosen brass anyway as I  think it is better to have a  contrasting colour of metal. I  would think using stainless steel  would be less work but  aluminium would keep the  overall cost down.    As for the plastic for the wheels,  again I have little preference.  Clearly which one works best  and is reasonably priced. I think  nylon was the right choice to  make but will it not wear down  quickly over time?

33


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Further research & Justification  Finish: 

    There are 3 possible wood finishes that  could be used on the main unit. All 3  cost in the same region and it will cost  about £25 to cover the whole area.  Varnish: Would give a clear and shiny  look to the unit while also providing a  thin hard protective layer over the  wood. This would be a long lasting  finish and would not need any further  maintenance of need to be reapplied.  Wood oil/stain: Wood oil would give a  clear but dull finish and depending on  the type would bring out the colour of  the cherry to a much redder colour.  It is the easiest to apply and would also  not need to be reapplied if the item is  only used inside.  Polish: Giving a clear and shiny finish  but would have to be worked hard to  give it a shiny finished effect which  would be desired. It would also need to  be reapplied over time as it fades which  makes it high maintenance for the  consumer.  Conclusion: The best finish to use is a  wood oil/stain which will give the  cabinet the most colour and is the  easiest to apply in large quantities  when about 13m2 is in question.  Having tested two types of oil/stain  (Sadolin & Danish rustic oil – see  picture below) the Danish oil brought  the most colour out of the cherry and I  think is the better one to use. 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Shelves:  There is the option of using glass for the  shelves, not only is it hard to find in the desired  dimensions it is also very expensive and the  stronger it is the more the price rises. However  would mean the  shelves would have to held in  using shelf pins which means a significantly less  amount of wood work is needed to hols un the  shelves. Although it would present a lot more  problems associated with the lighting; the  wires would be very easily visible and due the  original light design been scrapped there are  few options of where to attach the lights.  Using wood for the shelves avoids all these  problems and they are not as delicate and  overall a much cheaper option which would  not be a determining factor of the overall  dimensions.  Therefore the MDF veneer will be used to  make the shelves.  Window:  For such a small sheet of glass it is much cheaper to  find a pre‐cut sheet as getting glass cut and finished  to custom dimensions is very costly until the point  where you are making a very large order for a  batch.   Having spent a lot of time researching suppliers  which sell standard size sheets of glass at  affordable prices, I came across IKEA selling glass  for furniture ranges as replacement shelves. I found  a sheet of glass for a furniture range called ‘Billy’, it  was designed to be a shelf but measures 360mm x  260mm costing only £4 so this was the obvious  solution. 

Switches:  There is a range of 3 possible  switches I can use which are  stocked in the department and  are easy to wire. They are all  similar prices (30p) but as seen  from the pictures (right) the white  one is the least protruding and  has the ability to be fitted flush to  the wood making it the most  aesthetically pleasing.  Therefore I believe the white  switch is the best one to use. 

Further research into different  possibilities for components ad finishes: 

Runner:  Due to the specific length of the door  runners I have to make my own  mechanism to allow the door to  reciprocate back and forth. From the  development designs previously  shown it is clear that a strip of metal  is needed on the top and bottom for  the wheel to run in and the securing  block to fit into. Aluminium is the  most easily available metal in the  form of an alloy channel. It is also  cheap and light making it good for  the use as a runner.

34

Client Feedback: I like to look of the Danish oil and would agree that the best  finish is the one which brings out the most colour.  I don’t want to have both a glass window and glass shelves;  since we have decided on a glass window in the door I  would agree with your decision to have Cherry veneer  shelves.  The first switch (black) looks cheap and is often found on  electronic products which are made of cheap plastics and  will not be seen.  The metal flick switch looks as if it is a switch one would find  on a homemade electronic product and not a large quality  cabinet so I do not want to use this one.  I like the white plastic switch the most as it looks good and  will be almost flush to the wood.  I do not think using tubular lights will be good as they get  very hot when they are used for a long time and would be  very close to the contents of the shelves which could  damage. Since the LED’s come in a range of colours I think a  warmer white is better than an artificial white LED light. 

Lights:  There are two possible types of lights  that can be used now the original design  idea associated with the lights can’t be  made.  Tubular lights:  Short traditional tube lights could be  used but they would be larger and much  less energy efficient making it much less  sustainable if the lights are on for a long  length of time. I thought they might be  cheaper but they are much larger units  and aren’t the cheapest solution at  £12.50/metre when just less than 3.5m  are needed.  LED Strips:  LED tape worked out much cheaper at  £7/metre. They will need to be cut and  soldered together to get the right length  but that is there advantage how their  length can be so easily altered. They are  also very efficient and use little electricity  and produce very little if any heat. They  are also self‐adhesive sticky‐back tape  making them easy to fit and are only a  fraction of the size of tubular lights. They  also come in many different light colours  including a warm luminescent white like  a standard bulb which my client has said  he would prefer instead of the standard  LED white.


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Final Design:  This is the final design having had all the changes in development applied to the    design before it is made into the computer model for 3rd party manufacture.  These designs are drawn to scale and with all major design features 

Evaluation of final design:   The main shape of the cabinet has remained the  same having explored other possibilities but  there have been some significant alterations to  the design either because my client has not  taken to the original design proposed or as the  design would not actually work/be constructible.  I have made an effort to reduce the cost by  carrying detailed research into the components  and materials used. I also paid attention to the  overall weight by using manufactured boards of  wood instead of solid wood. The majority of the  cabinet is made of out of MDF which is  considerably lighter than solid woods such as  cherry. The shelves are also removable so if the  unit had a need to be moved once constructed  the shelves can be removed to reduce the  weight.  There is a large amount of storage space as my  client has requested and on the dedicated  CD/DVD shelves alone there is well over the  required amount of space.  The top space also has the option to be utilised  for all ornaments or a TV. 

Client Feedback (finished design):

Conclusion:

As my first impression I had expected a sleeker design but I’m sure once  I see the cabinet in the flesh and with the correct colour finishes it will  look very good.  I like the contrast which will be created between the materials by having  the aluminium tube against the wood and the then the jet black door on  the front.  The door design having being heavily modified now allows the top to be  used which would have been a large waste of available space if this  weren’t the case.  I like the��addition of an accessible switch on the side which will not spoil  the aesthetic qualities and means the lights are not permanently on  when any appliances in the cabinet are being used.  I am not so content with the shape of the window; it seems an odd  shape as it allows half of the second shelf to be seen through it. 

I am with the final design and believe I can manufacture it to a high finished  standard which will allow it to be suited to many different environments.  However in personal preference there are two aspects of the design I would like  to have changed; I prefer a design not to be so square but as my client has  stressed compromise on efficiency of storage space if you want to experiment  with the design. Also it would increase to overall cost of the unit as the  production processes are much more complex and time consuming. Secondly I  would like to have continued to develop the design of the door as I now feel that  the door has little purpose and does not protect the contents of the cabinet.  While it is a nice design feature it has become obsolete during development and  further solutions could be explored which would make more use of the door or  the door could be changed it does more to serve its primary function as a door. 

35


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  CAD Model:  CAD model (with rendering) which has been constructed to have an accurate design on the cabinet before it  rd      party manufacture.  goes in to manufacture. There are also dimensional drawings for 3

36


Bertie Johnstone B Knox

18.10.11 20.10.11

Radley College Design & Technology Department 37

Stereo Storage 2.9


Bertie Johnstone B Knox

24.10.11 25.10.11

Radley College Design & Technology Department 38

Side of Unit v1.2


Bertie Johnstone B Knox

20.09.11 20.09.11

Radley College Design & Technology Department 39

Door Unit v2.2


Bertie Johnstone B Knox

22.10.11 23.10.11

Radley College Design & Technology Department 40

Top securing block & Wheel v1


Section D – Planning

(6 Marks) 41


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  A Gantt chart showing the timescale that my project will be constructed according to my time plan seen over the next few pages: 

       

 

Cutting templates made before any  stages of the manufacture went ahead  to ensure the material was cut up as  efficiently as possible:

Estimated  prices before  manufacture: 

Material  MDF Cherry veneer  Aluminium Tubes  Nylon  Alloy Channel  Pine Batons  Cherry Batons  MDF (5mm)  Plywood  CUMULATIVE:  TOTAL: 

Price  £100.00  £12.00  £10.00  £5.00  £20.00  £20.00  £5.00  £10.00  £182.00 

Component  Glass  Lights  Power supplies  Screws  Bolts  Nuts & washers  KD fittings  Switch   

Price  Other  £4.00  Nails  £28.00  Wood glue  £8.00  Araldite  £4.00  Primer  £2.00  Paint  £2.00  Danish oil  £2.50  Brushes  £.30  Wiring  £50.80    £298.90 

Price  £1.00  £5.00  £5.00  £15.00  £20.00  £6.00  £4.00  £10.00  £66.00 

This pricing is an estimate  pre‐production; however  it is important to take note  that the estimated price is  over the £250 which was  stated in the original  specification. Cost of  minor components and  materials will be taken  into account at every  stage of production.  42


Production  Plan No. 1

2

3

Part  Name

Manufacture  of  model  to   test  mechanism  and   dimensions

Cutting  up  all  MDF  veneer  to   size

Pine  batons  for  joints  and   shelves

Task   No

Task  Description

Materials

Equipment

Quality  Control

Health  and  Safety Batch/Mass  Production

1.1

Making  Nylon  wheels  x4

Nylon

Metal  Lathe,  6mm  drill  piece

Continuously  check  the  dimensions  of  the  wheel   using  digital  vernier  calliper

Eye  protection  is  very   importan  whe  using  lathe

1.2

Make  top  secureing  block

Wood  (test)

Band  saw,  hand  drill

Set  saw  fence  accurately

Only  quailified  personnel  may   Could  be  cut  using  CNC  laser  cutter use  band  saw.

1.3

Bore  channels  for  runners  in  base   MDF  board and  top  piece

Hand  router

1.4

Cut  aluminium  runners  to  size

1.5

Comment

30

85

Had  to  make  another  set  of  wheels   as  1st  pair  were  too  small

20

25

Nylon  will  be  used  for  the  actual   door

Hand  router  can  only  be  used   CNC  router  can  be  used  to  cut  much   After  initial  cut,  slowly  widden  channel  1mm  at  a   under  supervision  of  qualified   longer  chnnel  sections  to  the  correct   time  so  not  to  make  the  channel  to  wide  for  runners adult width

20

20

Hack  saw,  metal  file

Cut  the  alloy  2mm  too  long  then  file  back  the  sharp   Wear  eye  protection,  be   ends  to  length aware  of  sharp  ends  on  metal

10

10

Cut  wood  to  fill  void  between  two   20x20  pine sides  of  door

Tenon  saw

Ensure  all  cuts  are  prpendicular  to  wood  so  they  fit   Apron together

A  jig  and  bad  saw  can  be  used  to   speed  up  process

25

15

1.6

Cut  MDF  boards  for  front  and  back   15mm  MDF of  door

Wood  saw

Place  scrap  wood  beneath  job  to  keep  edges  along   Apron cut  smooth

Use  band  saw

20

25

1.7

Assemble  and  test

x2  6mm  spanners,  hand  drill,  8x1  wood   screws

Ensure  all  edges  are  flush  and  the  bolts  on  wheels   are  not  done  up  too  tight

15

30

The  more  weight  added  to  the  door,   the  smoothr  the  mechanism  worked

2.1

Check  sheets  od  MDF  cherry   veneer  for  any  damage

Lasers  con  be  used  to  pick  up  any   signs  of  damage

5

15

2  corners  showed  slight  damage  on   one  board  but  they  can  be  avoided

2.2

Calculate  most  efficient  way  to  cut   19mm  MDF  cherry   up  borads veneer

CAD

Have  5mm  between  each  cut  out  to  account  fo  the   width  of  the  blade

Use  automated  CAD

20

35

Took  longer  than  thought  o  to  find   best  fit

2.3

Mark  out  on  boards  wher  to  cu  t   wood

19mm  MDF  cherry   veneer

Pencil,  tape  measure,  set  square

Measure  each  dimension  twice  to  be  sure  of  no   error

15

15

2.4

Cut  out  all  MDF  veneer  to  size   (shelves  x3,  sides  x2,  top  &   bottom)

19mm  MDF  cherry   veneer

Circular  table  saw,  jigsaw

Set  Saw  fence  to  ensure  accurate  lengths.

Only  quailified  personnel  may   CNC  router  can  be  used  to  cut  many   use  table  saw.  Ensure  the   out  of  one  large  sheet safety  guard's  in  place

60

90

Some  cut  outs  had  to  planed  down   to  size  -­‐  taking  off  mm  to  increase   accuracy

3.1

Cut  out  all  lengths  of  pine  batons   20x20  pine needed

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook,  set  square,  tape   measure

Sand  the  ends  of  each  baton  for  clean  finish

Eye  protection,  apron

15

35

Had  misjudged  the  amount  of   batons  needed

3.2

Mark  out  on  sides,  top  and  bottom   MDF  Cherry  veneer Pencil,  tape  measure,  set  square where  the  batons  wil  be

10

15

3.3

Drill  clearance,  pilot  and  counter   MDF  Cherry  veneer,   Hand  drill,  wood  drill  pieces,  counter  sink   Place  scrap  wood  beneath  pine  when  drilling   sink  holes  in  pine  and  MDF  veneer 20x20  pine drill  piece,  hand  clamps clearance  holes.

Eye  protection,  secure  job  to   CNC  drill  used work  bench

25

40

3.4

Screw  pine  batons  on  to  sides,  top   Side,  top  and   Electric  drill,  hand  clamps,  wood  screws and  bottom bottom  MDF  boards

Eye  protection,  secure  job  to   work  bench

15

20

3.5

Screw  top  and  bottom  boards  to   either  side

Side,  top  and   Phillips  screw  driver,  wood  screws,  hand   bottom  MDF  boards lamps

10

25

3.6

Temporary  structural  assembly

All  4  sides,  MDF   back  board

20

60

3.7

Check  shelevs  also  fit

3x  MDF  cherry   veneer  shelves

5

15

4.1

Cut  ply  wood  for  inner  and  outer   side  of  door

12/15mm  ply

30

20

Aluminium  alloy   channel

19mm  MDF  cherry   veneer

Check  for  any  signs  of  damage  on  corners  or  the   veneer  peeling  off

Electric  drill,  hand  clamps,  wood  drill  piece,   counter  sink  drill  bit,  wood  screws

Table  saw

Be  aware  of  splinters  and   sharp  edges

Measure  each  dimension  twice  to  be  sure  of  no   error

Check  the  unit  stands  square

Set  fence  on  table  saw

43

CNC  lathes  can  be  used  to  speed  up   the  production  process

Time   Time   (Min) Taken

A  jig  and  bad  saw  can  be  used  to   speed  up  process No  need  to  mark  out  if  robots  are   used

Secure  job  and  wear  eye   protection

Wear  eye  and  ear  protection

No  need  to  experiment  if  all  fits   together

Fence  would  be  constsntly  set  for   continous  process

Had  little  lateral  strength  so  was   hard  to  assemble  fully  at  such  an   early  stage.


4

5

Door  unit

4.2

Cut  wood  to  fill  void  between  two   20x20  &  20x40  pine Tenon  saw,  bench  hook sides  of  door  and  glass  surround

Ensure  all  cuts  are  prpendicular  to  wood  so  they  fit   Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   A  jig  and  band  saw  can  be  used  to   together of  way,  wear  an  apron speed  up  process

30

30

4.3

Drill  clearance,  pilot  and  couter   sink  holes  in  pine  and  plywood   front  and  back

20x20  &  20x40  pine   Hand  drill,  3mm  drill  bit,  6mm  drill  bit,   and  plywood counter  sink  drill  bit

Take  care  not  to  drill  throught  the  front  side  of  the   Eye  protection plywoood

40

30

4.19

Mark  out  holes  for  M6  bolys  for   nylon  securing  block

12/15mm  ply

Ruler,  set  square,  pencil

10

20

4.6

Drill  holes  for  bolts  top  and   bottom  and  fit  with  nylock  nuts

12/15mm  ply

Hand  drill,  6mm  drill  bit

10

30

4.7

Mark  out  and  cut  hole  for  window   12/15mm  ply front  and  back

Ruler,  set  square,  pencil

Mark  out  very  carefully  on  both  sides

30

30

4.8

Router  plywood  around  perimetre   12mm  ply of  hole  for  the  glass  to  be  recessed

Hand  held  router

Make  temporary  fence  with  scrap  wood  to  get  best   Only  use  under  suervision  of   CNC  router cut qualified  adult,  eye  protetion

10

10

4.1

Make  corners  square  to  fit  glass   and  inner  frame

Chisel

Square  to  rounded  corners

Keep  hands  behind  the  blade   of  the  chisel  at  all  times

5

5

4.11

Cut  out  inner  frame  and  cut  mitre   15x10  pine joints

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook

Ensure  the  saw  if  set  to  45o

Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   of  way,  wear  an  apron

20

20

4.12

Fit  inner  frame  to  inside  of  window   15x10  pine hole

Glue,  25mm  pins,  hammer

Ensure  pins  go  in  vertically  and  do  not  pertrude  out   Apron of  either  sied  of  plywood

Unecessary  with  clearner  cut

20

20

4.13

Put  filler  in  gaps  along  cut  of  jigsaw   15x10  pine and  inner  frame

Wood  filler,  marking  knife

Apron

Unecessary  with  clearner  cut

10

10

4.14

Sand  down  the  frame  and  the  filler   15x10  pine so  flush  with  pine  door  front

Air  disc  sander

Ensure  it  is  totally  flush

Eye  and  ear  protection,   ensure  extraction  is  on  in   sanding  rrom

Unecessary  with  clearner  cut

15

15

4.17

Paint  inner  facing  edges  of  pine   black

20x40  pine

Paint,  brush

Paint  with  the  diretion  of  the  grain

Apron

5

5

4.21

Assemble  door  for  further   productoin

All  door  materials

Hand  drill

Make  sure  it  all  all  fits  torether  easily

Eye  protection

20

20

4.24

Router  all  edges  of  door  to  give   rounded  ergonomic  finish

Finished  Door

Hand  held  router

Go  slowly  around  the  edges  so  the  router  dies  not   jump  ang  ruin  the  edge

Only  use  under  suervision  of   Use  table  router qualified  adult,  eye  protetion

10

10

4.25

Sand  all  sides  of  door  before   painting

Finished  Door

Air  disc  sander

Sand  smooth  and  flush,  especialy  the  sides

Eye  and  ear  protection,   ensure  extraction  is  on  in   sanding  room

20

30

4.27

Dis-­‐assemble  and  fit  glass  into   door

Glass  window

Hand  drill

Eye  protection

20

20

4.28

Secure  glass  with  pine  batons  in   void

20x40  pine

Hand  drill

Eye  protection

10

10

4.29

Re-­‐assemble  door  and  fill  screw   holes  on  rear  &  sand

Finished  Door

Wood  filler,  marking  knife,  hand  drill,   sanding  block

Eye  protection,  apron

35

40

5.1

Mark  out  depth  and  height  of   channel  known  from  model  onto   base  and  top

MDF  cherry  veneer

5

15

5.2

Set  up  hand  router  and  carry  out   test

Scrap  wood

5

10

12mm  ply

Pencil,  ruler,  tape  measure,  set  square

Hand  router

Eye  protection

Tighten  well  for  the  final  time  as  the  door  is  sealed

CNC  drill

CNC  drill

Measure  each  dimension  twice  to  be  sure  of  no   error

Check  the  hand  router  is  not  cutting  too  deep

Door  Runners

44

Hand  router  can  only  be  used   No  need  to  set  up  router  after   under  supervision  of  qualified   another  job adult

Had  to  plane  toe  20x40  pine  to   20x30  as  there  was  not  enough   room  for  the  bolts  at  the  top

The  more  weight  added  to  the  door,   the  smoother  the  mechanism   worked


5

6

7

8

5.3

Bore  channels  for  runners  in   base/bottom  shelf  and  top  piece

MDF  cherry  veneer

Hand  router

Hand  router  can  only  be  used   CNC  router  can  be  used  to  cut  much   After  initial  cut,  slowly  widden  channel  1mm  at  a   under  supervision  of  qualified   longer  chnnel  sections  to  the  correct   time  so  not  to  make  the  channel  to  wide  for  runners adult width

20

35

5.4

Cut  aluminium  runners  to  size

Aluminium  alloy   channel

Hack  saw,  metal  file

Cut  the  alloy  2mm  too  long  then  file  back  the  sharp   Wear  eye  protection,  be   ends  to  length aware  of  sharp  ends  on  metal

15

15

5.5

Glue  and  clamp  in  to  place

Araldite,  G  Clamps

Clean  off  any  excess  glue  and  ensure  rails  sit  flush

Do  not  get  glue  on  clothes  or   skin

10

30

6.1

Mark  out  all  lengths  of  Cherry   needed

Tape  measure,  set  square,  pencil

Measure  each  dimension  twice  to  be  sure  of  no   error

15

15

6.2

Cut  all  9  lengths  of  cherry  and  sand   20x20  cherry  (x9) ends

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook

30

30

6.3

Cut  mitre  joints  on  necessary   corners

Angle  saw

Ensure  the  saw  is  acctually  set  to  45o

10

10

6.4

Cut  biscuit  joints  in  all  batons  and   20x20  cherry  (x9) MDF  veneer

Buscuit  machine,  G  cramps

Ensure  the  blade  is  set  to  correct  depth  and  height  -­‐   Ear  defenders,  eye  protection carry  out  test

60

45

6.5

Join  top  batons  with  mitre  joins

20x20  cherry  (x3)

Framing/mitre  clamp,  glue,  biscuits

Ensure  mitre  join  is  flush  on  each  side

20

30

6.6

Glue  and  cramp  all  batons

20x20  cherry  (x9)

Glue,  Sash  cramps,  biscuits

Wipe  off  excess  glue  and  use  newspaper  to  stop  it   sticking  to  the  desk

60

50

6.7

Chisel  off  excess  glue  and  sand   20x20  cherry  (x9) flush  sides,  shelves,  Top  &  Bottom

Chisel,  sanding  block  and  paper   (100,180,240)

Careful  not  to  chip  the  wood  too  deep  or  sand   through  the  veneer

Keep  hands  behind  the  blade   of  the  chisel  at  all  times

180

380

6.7

Cut  cherry  batons  for  feet

20x20  cherry

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook

Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   Use  of  table  saw of  way

10

10

6.7

Plane  to  10mm  thick

20x10  cherry

Electric  plane

Accurately  check  height  of  blade

Ear  defenders,  eye  protection Plane  already  set  at  correct  height

10

10

6.8

Glue  and  dovetail  nail  to  bottom

20x10  cherry

Hammer,  25mm  pins,  glue,  centre  punch

Use  dovetail  nailing  and  use  centre  puch  to  sink  the   mails  well  in  so  not  to  scratch  floor

20

20

7.1

Cut  aluminium  tubes  to  length  and   Aluminium  Tube file  ends

Circular  drop  saw,  metal  file

Check  length  with  tape  measure

Eye  protection

35

30

7.2

Parallel  turm  one  end  in  lathe

Aluminium  Tube

Metal  lathe

Take  off  small  amounts  at  a  time  to  test  fit

Eye  protection

Correct   size drill  bit  will  be  available

45

35

7.3

Test  holes  sizes  in  gash  wood

Gash  wood

Electirc  hand  drill,  25  &  26mm  forstner  drill   bit

Continous  testing  not  needed

20

10

7.4

Drill  holes  in  sides

MDF  veneer  sides

Electirc  hand  drill,  25  &  26mm  forstner  drill   Drill  from  both  sides  to  stop  one  side  splaying  or   bit splitting  veneer

Process  not  required

45

30

7.5

Test  to  see  if  tubes  fit

Aluminium  Tube

Loose  fit  on  one  side  and  friction  fir  on  the  opposite   side

10

10

7.6

Clean/sand  tubes

Aluminium  Tube

Wet  &  dry  sand  paper  (320/600)

Use  wire  brush  to  get  rid  of  any  deep  scratches

60

40

7.7

Polish  tubes

Aluminium  Tube

Metal  polish

Wash  hands  well  having  used   polish

60

15

8.1

Cut  wood  for  CD  stop

MDF  veneer

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook

Measure  out  and  mark  clearly

Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   Cut  using  jig  with  table  saw of  way

10

10

8.2

Drill  holes  in  sides  and  on  CD  Stop Sides  and  CD  Stop

Electric  hand  drill,  2mm  drill  bit

Ensure  not  to  go  all  the  way  throught  the  wood

Eye  protection

20

20

8.3

Attach  x4  corner  braces

x4  KD  fitting  corner   x8  1/4"  screws,  phillips  screw  driver braces

5

5

8.4

Cut  Cherry  baton  to  1170mm

20x20  cherry

Tenon  saw,  bench  hook

Measure  out  and  mark  clearly

Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   Cut  using  jig  with  table  saw of  way

10

10

8.5

Plane  top  light  guard  to  10mm

20x20  cherry

Electric  plane

Accurately  check  height  of  blade

Ear  defenders,  eye  protection

20

10

Door  Runners

Cherry  Edge  Batons  and  Feet

Aluminiun  Tubes  (x3)

CD  Stop  &  Top  light  Guard

20x20  cherry

20x20  cherry  (x3)

Cut  using  jig  with  table  saw Ensure  clothes  and  fingers  out   Use  of  table  saw of  way

45

Eye  protection

CNC  drill

Cut  whole  length  of  baton  at  one   time

Hand  router  must  be  used  very   slowly

Araldite  must  be  mixed  well

Test  was  much  quicker  than  thought

To  sand  flush  and  get  rid  of  glue   took  a  very  long  time

Took  time  to  ensure  CD  stop  was   vertical

Using  table  saw  would  waste  less   wood,  option  of  10mm  or  7mm


8

9

10

11

12

CD  Stop  &  Top  light  Guard

Back  Boards  (x2)

8.6

Nail  and  glue  to  underside  of  top

20x10  cherry

Hammer,  25mm  pins,  glue

Clear  off  all  excess  glue

15

10

9.1

Check  material  from  store  and   mark  out  dimensions

5mm  MDF

Tape  measure,  ruler,  pencil

Measure  out  and  mark  clearly

15

15

9.2

Cut  on  table  saw

5mm  MDF

Table  saw

Set  saw  fence  accurately

9.3

Drill  holes  around  edges  and  in   rear  of  cabinet

5mm  MDF  (x2)

9.4

Sand  smooth

9.5

Only  trained  personnel  may   use  the  table  saw

Cut  in  large  batches  without  need  to   set  up  saw  fence

10

10

Electric  drill,  2mm  drill  bit,  countersink  drill   Use  centre  puch  to  mark  hole,  ensure  it  goes  into   bit pine  batons  on  rear

Eye  protection

CNC  drill

25

25

5mm  MDF  (x2)

Air  disc  sander  (180)

Extraction  on  in  sanding  room,   eye  &  ear  protection

10

30

Paint  with  primer  ten  black

5mm  MDF  (x2)

Primer  and  black  paint,  paint  roller

Apply  in  many  thin  coats  for  best  finish

Apron  to  be  worn

Spray  painted

60

90

10.1

Make  Nylon  wheels  x2

Nylon

Metal  Lathe,  6mm  drill  piece

Continuously  check  the  dimensions  of  the  wheel   using  digital  vernier  calliper

Eye  protection  is  very   importan  whe  using  lathe

CNC  lathes  can  be  used  to  speed  up   the  production  process

30

55

10.2

Mark  out  dimensions  on  sheet  of   Nylon  Board Nylon

Pen,  ruler,  set  square

Carry  out  measurements  twice  for  assurance

No  need  to  be  carried  out,  use  of   CNC  milling  machine

10

10

10.3

Cut  top  securing  nylon  block  x2

Nylon  Board

Band  saw

Set  saw  fence  accurately

Only  quailified  personnel  may   Also  carried  out  by  Milling  machine use  band  saw.

20

10

10.4

Reduce  Nylon  sheet  to  correct   thickness  for  runner

Nylon  Board

Milling  machine

Eye  protection

CNC  Milling  machine

30

90

10.5

Make  slots  in  nylon

Nylon  Board

Milling  machine

Eye  protection

CNC  Milling  machine

60

60

10.6

Assemble  on  door  and  test

Blocks  and  wheels

x2  6mm  spanners,  hand  drill,  8x1  wood   screws

Ensure  all  edges  are  flush  and  the  bolts  on  wheels   are  not  done  up  too  tight

15

25

11.1

Apply  3  coats  of  oil  to  sides,   shelves,  CD  stop  and  Top  &   Bottom

Cherry  Veneer

Danish  Rustic  Oil

Wipe  on  in  thick  layers,  final  layer  is  thin

200

240

11.2

Cover  glass  on  door

Door

Masking  tape  and  newspaper

Cover  the  perimeter  of  the  glass  very  carefully  to   avoid  getting  any  paint  on  glass

20

45

11.3

Paint  door

Door  &  back  boards Primer  &  eggshell  black  paint

160

160

12.1

Mark  out  where  to  attach  lights

12.2

Fit  sticky  back  lights

LED  stip  lights

12.3

Test  hole  size  for  switch

Gash  wood

Drill,  20mm  forstner  drill  bit

Use  scrap  to  protect  rear  side  of  hole

12.4

Drill  hole  for  switch  and  fit

Left  side

Drill,  20mm  forstner  drill  bit

Use  scrap  to  protect  rear  side  of  hole

12.5

Secure  all  wiring

Cable  ties

Ensure  all  wires  are  out  of  sight

12.6

Wire  switch  and  lights  into   connecting  block  and  test

Connecting  block

Wire  strippers,  flat  head  screw  driver

Ensure  it  is  wired  the  correct  way  round

13.1

Final  assembly

All  parts

Clamps  (x2),  Phillips  screw  driver  /  drill

13.2

Test  with  client  in  situ  and   photograph

Whole  Unit

Camera,  Tripod

Securing  Blocks  &  Wheels

Oil  &  Paint

Fitting  Lights  &  Switch

Use  of  digital  dimensions  read  out  on  machine  to   .00  mm (300x more accurate than 3mm tolerance) Use  of  digital  dimensions  read  out  on  machine  to   .00  mm (300x more accurate than 3mm tolerance)

2  coats  of  primer  followed  by  3  layers  of  black  paint

Avoid  getting  in  eyes  and   mouth

Avoid  getting  in  eyes  and   mouth

Pencil,  ruler,  clamps  (x2)

Nails  not  needed  but  quicker  than   clamping

Was  painted  with  high  gloss  black   first  time  round  and  had  to  be   sanded  back  to  primer

Use  of  auto  feed  on  the  lathe  gave  a   much  better  finish

Had  to  make  new  parallels  for  the   vice  of  the  milling  machine

The  more  weight  added  to  the  door,   the  smoothr  the  mechanism  worked

15

15

15

15

Eye  protection

10

10

Eye  protection

10

10

15

15

Some  wires  are  hard  to  access

Ensure  lights  are  not  plugged   in  when  wiring

20

30

It  is  quite  complex  wiring  due  to  use   of  two  power  supplies

Min  people  required  =  2

60

90

Requires  two  people

120

150

Experimenting  with  lighting  and   filling  unit  was  time  consuming.

Use  ruler  to  ensure  light  are  straight

Product  Testing 13

Testing

Total  Time  =

46

Estimated:  2445   mins

Total:  3090  mins


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  An example of two flow charts showing the construction process  in detail of the wheels and top securing blocks:       

Final cutting list of all the material:  Name of Part  Main:  Inner door  Outer door  Back board (small)  Back board (Large)  Sides L+R  Top  Bottom shelf  CD Stop  Shelves  Batons:  Top support  Lower 2 shelves  Top shelf  Bottom shelf  Rear top+bottom  L+R rear sides  Door void sides  Door void T+B  Glass surround sides Glass surround T+B  T+B window  surround  L+R window  surround  Bottom +3 shelves  Top sides  top front  Feet  Side L+R edge  Top light shield  Other:  Tubes  Nylon securing  block  Nylon wheels  Glass (pre‐cut) 

The flow diagrams show the intricate process of making the  wheels and securing blocks where constant checking of the  dimensions is very important to ensure the final product is  correct and not wasting materials by going too far past the  required dimensions that the unit becomes useless and has to  be re‐made. Many decisions had to be made throughout  production in order to assure the top quality of the end product.  For many stages where a decision had to be made there were  two options, often if the part had been cut too small and was  not good for the use or could not continue to be worked more  than one step back in the process had to be taken. However if  the part was still too big it could be continued to be worked  until it was the correct size, 

47

Dimensions  (mm) 

Quantity 

Summary 

‐  Birch faced ply (12mm)  Birch faced ply (15mm)  Ply (5mm)  Ply (5mm)  Cherry veneer MDF  (19mm)  Cherry veneer MDF  (19mm)  Cherry veneer MDF  (19mm)  Cherry veneer MDF  (19mm)  Cherry veneer MDF  (19mm)  mm  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20)  Pine (20x20) 

‐  85x400  950x400  290x1170  500x1170 

‐  1  1  1  1 

‐  1x board of 12mm ply  1x board of 15mm ply 

480x955 

480x1210 

480x1170 

160x1170 

380x1170 

‐  400  400  150  400  1170  845  850  360  340  360 

‐  2  4  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  2 

Pine (10x12) 

340 

Pine (10x12) 

235 

Cherry (20x20)  Cherry (20x20)  Cherry (20x20)  Cherry (20x10)  Cherry (20x20)  Cherry (20x10)  ‐  Aluminium tube (1"D) 

1170  500  1250  500  955  1170  ‐  1190 

4  2  1  2  2  1  ‐  3 

Nylon sheet (12mm) 

80x50 

Nylon cylinder  Glass (5mm) 

9mm  360x260 

2  1 

Material 

1x board of 5mm ply 

2x board of 19mm  MDF cherry veneer 

‐ 

11100mm of 20x20  pine 

10010mm of 20x20  cherry 

‐ 

  Ikea 


Section E– Making;  Tools & Equipment

(9 Marks)

 Quality

(16 Marks)

 Complexity

(9 Marks)

48


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Manufacture Diary:  (In chronological order) 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

     

 

I started by checking the material when it was delivered to the workshop to check the quality and ensure there were no blemishes on the material. It was all ok apart from one corner of the MDF with veneer which  had been damaged and was splayed. Luckily I did not need all of the material so could avoid using that corner. I than marked out all the main pieces the MDF boards had to be cut up into in order to reduce the size of  all my material. This was cut out using a table saw or a jigsaw (shown above) when the boards were too big to be cut using the table saw. The edges which were cut using the jigsaw were not as straight as those using  the table saw so I left a little extra to the edge could be planed smooth so the boards would join together well. Having cut out all the main pieces I marked out and cut up all the 20x20 pine which was required in the  necessary lengths. I then marked out where the pine was attached to the cherry veneer MDF and screwed them on. 

Here is an image of the two sides having had all the line attached which will support the sides of the shelves when they are added. Having  completed the top pieces and cut out the shelves I was able to put them together and see for the first time the full scale of the cabinet at  such an early stage in the manufacture. Then I moved on to adding the pine batons which the backboard will be attached too as it can’t be  screwed into the MDF as it has no end grain. The last picture in this section shows how the pine batons act as large modesty block KD fittings  but are stronger, spread the load more and are more aesthetically pleasing. 

I then moved on to making the door as it is a major component of the  cabinet. I cut the front and rear out of 12mm birch faced ply and then  attached a surround of 20x20 pine batons which act as spacers for the void in  the door. Then I removed the pine batons in order to mark out and cut out  the hole for the window using the jigsaw. 

I drilled holes in each corner to start the cut and give the corners a rounded edge. Having cut the window out I used a hand held router to cut around the window in order to make a recessed edge which the glass will sit in to it is  flush on the inside edge and can easily be secured. Then I made to surround for the glass using 20x20 & 40x20 pine (above). This would stop the glass falling out or slipping.  Due the window hole being cut using a jigsaw the edge was nit as straight as I would like it so I made a frame to fit on the inside of the widow hole out of pine which I attached using glue and pins. Any gas would be filler using  wood filler. 

49


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

 

 

Here I am sanding the frame I fitted inside the window flush with the front           surface as the pine I used was thicker than the 12mm ply wood and the places where filler was used needed to be  sanded down. All major sanding jobs were carried out in the sanding room           with extraction facilities and a vacuum table. The second picture is the finished article with the frame sanded flush to  the edge front surface. Next I made the wheels for the bottom of the door out of nylon which I turned on the metal lathe and drilled a centre hole using a 6mm drill bit in the tail stock of the lathe before parting off the finished  wheel 9mm in. The wheels were then attached to the rear side of the door which I had already drilled holes for the M6 bolts. Nylock nuts were used to secure the wheels as there is no need to take them off. 

Before drilling the holes for the M6 bolts at the top which the top securing blocks would be attached to I had to plane down the 20x20 pine around the perimeter of         the door and the top of the glass  support as there wasn’t enough space between them to fit the bolts in. Having done this I drilled to the holes in the rear side of the door using a hand drill. Before I         was able to make the top securing  blocks on the milling machine I had to make some new parallels for the vice of the milling machine as I was going to machine such a small job there weren’t enough to make it sit high enough. I took the nylon down to the correct  height and width before taking 3mm off the thickness as it was 12mm thick nylon board which needed to be 9mm. The two nylon securing fitted well on the top of the door and moved up and down with ease. The door is now  complete and I removed all the nylon components and taped up the bolts before applying the first two layers of primer. 

st

The 1  paint I used was a high gloss black which  was too shiny so I had to sand the door down to  the primer and apply an eggshell black 

In this stage of production I used a hand held router to cut a channel into the top and bottom which I then fitted a length of alloy channel  which was stuck in with araldite. The 2nd picture also shows how bent the length of 20x20 cherry was before using biscuit joints. I cut the  biscuit joints in the middle of the cherry. The cherry on the top was attached using mitre joints so I cut the ends off at 45o with an angle  saw. 50


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

   

 

I used a mitre clamp to join the cherry on the top panel to join the cherry on the three sides of the top panel. I used sash cramps to hold the other sherry strips  

 

 

 

 

onto the sides while the glue set. 

The third picture shows the excess glue that comes out of the joint when pressure is applied. Once dry all the excess glue had to be taken off first using a chisel and then sanding the edge totally flush so it blends well with the  rest of the wood. The 5th picture shows the alternate dovetail nailing that I did to fix the foot to the bottom of the sides. Then I used a nail punch to ensure none of the pins were sticking out and in danger of damaging the floor.  The final picture shows some test runs with a router for the decorative edge I will apply around the top panel. 

I moved on to making the aluminium tubes to support the front of the shelves. I cut them to the desired length using the circular drop saw and then filed the ends to get rid of any sharp edges.  Since the tube was 1” diameter and the forstner drill bits available were in metric units I had to take 1mm off one end of each tube so they would fit in a 25mm hole on one side and 26mm on the  other. I fitted the switch into a 2mm diameter hole and wired ensuring to insulate the connections with shrink wrap. The LED tape was easily cut to the desired lengths using scissors.

The LED tape only came in 500mm lengths so I had to join each length     together. Once in the desired length I also had to solder on the correct wires   self‐adhesive side and stuck the lights down with the guide of a ruler. The   into and then sticky back pads which hold the wires in place. 

     

     

   

together by making a u‐shape section of wire and soldering them  for the application and then peeled back the tape protecting the  next photo shows the connecting block that all the lights are wired  The finished cabinet without the shelves in. 51


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Quality of Manufacture:    This page looks at the accuracy of my construction processes which    have led to a very high quality end product.           

  These photos show the high quality of the bottom channel and the door wheels.   The door overlaps the top and the bottom as it reciprocates from side to side. The cherry baton is perfectly flush 

The top securing block was made using a milling machine with a digital readout to aid accuracy. The 

with the rest of the shelf. The alloy channel is also countersunk flush to the surface so the contents do not get 

readout was accurate to 3 decimal places which meant that the accuracy was 3000x my tolerance. 

caught on it. 

Both of the top securing blocks are almost exactly the same and fit perfectly into the top channel and  guides the door as it slides very smoothly along the channel.  The switch is  countersunk into  a 20mm diameter  hole so it is flush  with the surface 

All the wiring the cabinet has been tied together and secured out of view of the 

and less 

user. There is no wiring that needs to be done by the user on assembly. The right 

obtrusive. 

hand picture show the 2nd shelf and the CD stop which join tightly together. 

  View from the  rear of the  cabinet as the  backboards are 

I cut the cherry baton for the front of the sides 2mm too short 

also finished to a 

so had to neatly fit a small chock into the gap and sand it flush. 

high standard and 

I also took 1mm off one end of all the aluminium tubes so they 

well secured. 

would fit better in the 25mm hole as they are 1” tubes. For the 

These pictures show the quality of the decorative routered edge on the top panel and 

foot I used a piece of 10x20 cherry and joined it using dovetail 

the inside top corner where the pine batons meet and the backboard is attached. You 

nailing. 

are able to see how white the pine batons look in contrast to the black backboard. 

52


Section F – Evaluation & Testing

(10 Marks) 53


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Testing:  rd   I carried out my testing in three parts; firstly I asked a 3  party user the following questions of what they thought of the product having had no input into the design. Secondly I placed the cabinet in a likely location where it might   be used and filled it with all the necessary/relevant items associated with the product. Having done this I assessed the cabinet’s ability to store all the items and its practicality. Thirdly I carried out a tolerance test where I measured    all the major dimensions and highlighted any incorrect dimensions with justification for why this has happened. Having competed testing I carried out an evaluation of the product by seeing if it adhered to all the spec points. 

 

Test Area

Test Question

Purpose Form Function & Performance Aesthetics Ergonomics Materials & Components Manufacture/Quality

Result/Comment

What's your first impression of the unit, does it fulfill its  On first impressions the unit looks very impressive. It will work  purpose as a stereo cabinet with auxillary storage? well for my stereo and also to store CD's/DVD's/books. Would the fact that the product is sold as flat‐packed unit for  It might deter me as I am slow assembling flat‐packs but usually  self‐assembly deter you? have someone to help me! Does the cabinet cope with your requirements for capacity  Yes, the capacity is sufficient and the lighting helps to see titles  to store CD/DVD's? How would you rate the usefulness of  etc.  It is also an attractive feature the lighting? How versatile do you think the product is for use in many  I think it will fit well in different rooms in my house.  The colour  different environments? scheme is quite neutral which means it is easier to position.  The unit is quite big but has been well considered so the stereo  Do you feel comfortabe with the ergonomics of the unit? is in easy reach from both standing and sitting positions. Do you have any comments about the materials or  The materials appear hardwearing and of high quality and I think  components from a longevity perspective? will stand the test of time What do you think of the overall quality of the unit?

The finish of the unit and all the details are of superb quality

Are there any problems that you see occuring in maintaining  the cabinet? What do you think is the target market group for this  product? At a cost price of £221.78 (excluding labour), how much  would you be willing to pay for such a bespoke product?

There could be problems with dust accumulating in the running  track at the base of the unit The target market is for 30‐70 age group with larger living spaces

Safety

Are there any areas to you where safety might be an issue?

No assuming the lighting is insulated and fitted correctly

Packaging

Do you have any preference to how this product should be  packaged?

With minimal shrink wrap and using recyclable materials

Sustainability

How long do think this product would last?

I think the design will not date and the construction and finish is  of a very high standard so I would expect it to last for ever!

Maintenance Market Cost

   

 

54

User Rating  (out of 10)

9 8 9 9 8 10 10 7

I would pay up to £600

10

 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Testing cont’d: 

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

The cabinet looked very good in its testing location and immediately looked like part of the room as if it had always been  there. With its soft colours and calm design it made a subtle statement in the room as a centre piece.        One of the main aspects I needed to test was the cabinet’s capacity to store 80 CD’s and 50 DVD’s. As part of my testing I  filled the dedicated CD shelf to full capacity and it comfortably stored 110 CD’s. I also filled the dedicated DVD shelf to full  capacity which managed to store 80 DVD’s. Both of these were well over the required amount.    Overall testing went very well, however there were a few small things which were spotted by my client and a third party  user;   The back stop on the CD shelf had been fitted too far forward and therefore the lighting was not effective and was  lighting up the tops on the CD’s. This is a very easy fix; the CD stop has three places it can be fixed in. I moved the  CD stop 40mm further back and the lights now work very well to light up the contents of the shelf, especially the  CD’s and DVD’s.     It was mentioned to me that the light coloured pine batons on the rear which the backboard is screwed to look to  be white against the black of the backboard. In order to fix this I painted the pine batons which were visible with a  dark Sadolin wood stain so they now look the same colour as the cherry. (See Improvements for picture of fix  fix)   The top strip of LED’s can be seen when sitting down or standing at a distance; there is nothing in front of them to  stop the user seeing the glare from the LED’s [there is no aluminium tube beneath the top as it does not need  supporting]. In order to prevent this from happening I will install a 10mmx20mm cherry strip in front of the lights to  block them from view. The strip will be hardly noticeable as it will be part of a cherry baton. (See Improvements for  picture of fix)   My client drew to my attention the bottom shelf which currently has no support beneath it was bowing under the  weight of the contents. It was hardly noticeable but it was affecting the movement of the door. In order to fix this I  will make a centre foot which will support the bottom shelf from the middle but will not be visible from the front.  (See Improvements for picture of fix) 

Tolerance Testing:  Part Name 

Dimension  on drawing  (mm) 

Actual  Dimension  (mm) 

Variation  (Set  Tolerance =  ±3mm) 

Depth of sides 

500 

501 

1mm 

Door Height 

950 

955 

5mm 

Window Height 

320 

318 

2mm 

Window Width 

215 

217 

2mm 

Justification/Comments  This is a very small amount out on such a  large piece, this is due to the multiple times  the side was altered having not calculated  the additional 20mm cherry strip  5mm is above the set tolerances but does  not affect the movement of the door – there  is a smaller gap between the top t=of the  cabinet and the door.  The window is smaller on the actual door  than on the designs as I had not accounted  for the need of a frame inside the window  cut out in order to have a smooth edge  running all the way around as using a jigsaw  does not give a perfect cut. 

Clockwise from top  left: CD stop to far  forward and the  lights shining on the  top of the CD’s.     Pine batons at the  rear looking white  in contrast with the  black.     Space at rear  behind CD stop for  power extension.     My client using the  cabinet.     My third part user  using the cabinet. 

Conclusion: Photos showing the versatility of the stereo cabinet; can be purely used for stereo and other ornaments on  top (left) or can be used as a TV stand with capacity for a DVD player as well as for the stereo (right). 

Overall the testing went very well as both my client and user liked the product. They also gave me some very useful  feedback of some small problems which could be easily fixed. The photos show how well the neutral colour schemes fit  into the desired location of my client. Two bits of info which should be highlighted are that the user felt that the product  being flat‐packed may deter buyers but she would still be willing to pay £600 without seeing my clients estimate. 

55


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Point Number: Criteria point – explanation/justification  point    1.

2.

Client specified from interview/input  Measureable 

   Purpose   1.1. To store a small Hi‐Fi in a cabinet as well have storage for a large CD collection and a small DVD collection  1.2. Provide a modern piece of furniture which can be used for ornaments or a TV     

Form  2.1. The client has not specified much in detail about the form but it will be more apparent once the basic designs have been  drawn up, therefore the cabinet could have a wide variation of forms  2.2. The product can be solid, there is no need for it to be dismantled so no design necessary for flat pack/KD fittings  Function & Performance  3.1. CD storage – must have storage space for at least 80 CD’s  3.2. DVD storage – must have storage space for at least 50 DVD’s  3.3. Store a small Hi‐FI behind closed door(s)  3.4. Also incorporate storage for speakers into the product – these must be as far away from each other as possible to give the  best stereo sound effect.  3.5. Must have some sort of lighting system – to illuminate the contents to help the user see the contents  3.6. Doors are important to protect the Hi‐Fi unit from damage from dust or spillages etc. – this would preserve the life of the  stereo and obstruct it from view when not in use  3.7. Provide auxiliary storage or other items a user may have the need to store  3.8. It must not exceed 50kg – most be moveable by 2 people  Aesthetics  4.1. Must be designed to fit in to a traditional poorly lit room but must be modern – bringing a modern touch to the room  4.2. Wood finishes are most preferable, option of black finish – client has expressed dislike to white finishes  4.3. Aesthetics are the secondary concern [especially the lighting] – the quality and practicality are primary  Size  5.1. Max height: 1000mm – keeping the cabinet low, no taller especially if floor standing. (mitigates safety hazard)  5.2. Max width: 1000mm – maximum amount of space there is on each possible room  5.3. Max depth: 500mm – this gives ample room for the stereo unit, including ventilation and cables including space for a 4 socket  power extension  Ergonomics  6.1. Door handles must be the useable for the average adult hand size  6.2. The stereo must not be placed at the bottom of the cabinet as it is too low for the 95th percentile of the population  Materials and Components  7.1. Multiple materials will be used in the design, the main material being wood – the addition of either glass of metal would add  to the variation in the design  7.2. High quality materials are used in the build of the product and the surface finish of the materials must have very few  blemishes  7.3. Hard woods will last longer and the medium brown colour of the wood is preferred to the light colour of soft wood ‐  not as  dark as the colour of mahogany  7.4. Components must be high quality and long lasting but also weighing up the price of components such as lighting or door  mechanisms to the quality keeping the overall price within the desired price  Manufacture  8.1. Manufacturing techniques will be analysed against how much time they will take to carry out based on the complexity but  still giving a good finish and not compromising on quality – this will save time and also reduce costs if the product went into  production  8.2. The amount of energy needed to carry out certain manufacturing techniques will be taken into account – this lowers costs  and reduces the amount of energy used in the production line  8.3. If this product were to be batch produced, jig(s) would be used during the manufacture where necessary – this reduces the  time taken to produce the product 

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Point Number: Criteria point – explanation/justification      1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

56

Purpose  1.1. The cabinet does have storage for a small Hi‐Fi as well as plenty for CD/DVD’s  1.2. The design is neutral but with a modern side having a sleek profile with no add‐ons. The top can be used for TV/ornaments.  Form  2.1. The function is definitely put in front of form as the design has created the maximum capacity for any items the user wishes to  store in it.  2.2. The cabinet looks to be a very solid unit but is bought as flat‐pack for home assembly – this was the most practical solution to  transport.  Function & Performance  3.1. The cabinet can hold 110 CD’s on the dedicated shelf  3.2. The cabinet can hold 80 DVD’s on the dedicated shelf.  3.3. The Hi‐fi unit is behind a door but it is not totally sealed like it would be in a cupboard.  3.4. The speakers can be stored in multiple places and either landscape or portrait; but are best in on the top shelf and as far from each  other as possible >1000mm.  3.5. The lighting system is very bright and works very well lighting up the contents of the shelves.  3.6. The Hi‐Fi unit is protected from any sort of spillages but is not totally protected from dust but the amount of dust settling on it will  be massively reduced.  3.7. There are two additional shelves with no dedicated purpose where other items can be stored.  3.8. Without the door on the cabinet’s net weight is less than 50kg (door is taken off when moved). If it is still too heavy the shelves can  also be removed which will dramatically reduce the weight further.  Aesthetics  4.1. The design certainly isn’t traditional and the colours aren’t too loud.  4.2. The cherry is finished with clear Danish oil which expresses the colours of the wood.  4.3. The aesthetics have been compromised, the quality is very high and design is very as practical as possible.  Size  5.1. The max height is 985mm  5.2. The max width is  1250mm, my client agreed with this increase having discussed the ratios in development  5.3. The depth of the cabinet is 500mm but when the door is fitted it increases the width to 515mm. This isn’t over the whole cabinet  and does not cause any problems.  Ergonomics  6.1. There are no door handles on the door as it slides, the door can be gripped anywhere on the sides.  6.2. There is dedicated place for the stereo but it is recommended it is at the top.  Materials and Components  7.1. There are many materials used in the construction but there are 3 main ones which can be seen; cherry, glass window and  aluminium tubes.  7.2. All the materials have been finished to a very high quality with natural oil  7.3. Hardwoods have not been used in the product as they are expensive, heavy and take longer to work. MDF with a high quality  cherry veneer has been used as a substitute  7.4. The LED’s are high quality products with a lifetime warrantee and the door components I made myself out of durable nylon  Manufacture  8.1. Processes such as using hardwoods would increase the production time as the wood only cones in thin planks unlike manufactured  boards which come in large sheets and don’t need to be joined together  8.2. Many of the processes that could be done without the use of power tools were carried out by hand to reduce energy but with a  larger scale of production more processes would have to be automated/carried out with power tools  8.3. I used a jig in production when making the wheel to ensure that they were both the same size. Jigs could be used for other  processes such as cutting out the hole for the window as this took a long time to mark out. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  9.

Maintenance    9.1. Standard materials/components will be used where possible – this will allow the user to replace parts such as door    hinges so the product doesn’t become obsolete.  9.2. If glass shelves are used it will be built around the standard sizes of glass shelves ‐ this saves having specific sheets cut  9.3. The only other component that might need replacing is the lighting system/bulbs which will be made easily accessible  – ensuring it doesn’t need specialist tools to change them  10. Market  10.1. This product would be sold to high end one‐off furniture dealers –It is not ruled out, but there is no need for it to be  flat‐pack  10.2. Likely customers for this product are homeowners with reasonably large rooms that the cabinet would suit and who  need this product for its specific needs and are looking to buy a high‐end piece of furniture  10.3. The RRP for this product would be between £350 ‐£600  11. Quality  11.1. Built to the highest quality achievable, it is the primary concern for such a high end product – tolerances should be 

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

9.

9.1. A standard component could not be sourced to enable the door to move so I can to make the sliding component myself.  The glass used was a standard size sheet costing only £4  9.2. Glass was not used as a material for the shelves.  9.3. The lights should not ever need to be replaced but if there was a fault causing them to be replaced it can easily be done  10. Market  10.1. The cabinet can still be sold as a high‐end product but is also transported flat‐pack to save costs  10.2. The cabinet can be used in quite small rooms but it may take up too much space of dominate the environment.  10.3. With a cost price of £221.78 the cabinet can easily be sold at this price level with a big enough margin  11. Quality  11.1. All the tolerances were with one exception were within 3mm  11.2. My 3rd party user believed this product should never break unless handled without due care as it is quite a robust design 

within ±3mm  11.2. Long‐lasting – see sustainability  Scale of Production  12.1. This product is being made as a one‐off custom item of furniture for a client who has requested it to be built around  his needs and stereo system  12.2. If this product were to be produced on a larger scale it would be best produced in small scale batch production in  order to maintain the quality of the design and the end product  Cost  13.1. Costs of materials will be kept to a minimum where possible  13.2. The overall cost to build the product must cost no more than £250 – allowing a profit to be made  13.3. Where there are options between certain components or material, the cost of the item will be taken into account if it  is a significant difference  Safety  14.1. All electrical cables must be obstructed from view ‐ which will increase the overall safety.  14.2. Lighting cables must be totally insulated ‐ having a built in power extension and only having one cable trailing from the  cabinet reduces any safety risk  14.3. The product must be designed to be very stable – keeping the maximum height low avoids the risk of the cabinet  tipping forwards  Packaging  15.1. It does not have to be flat‐packable unit but it would save a lot of money on packaging  15.2. It would be well packaged to avoid any sort of damage – packaging will be kept to a minimum and environmentally  friendly packaging solutions will be used  15.3. If retailers bought this product in batches it would be expensive to transport due inefficiency and size of the combined  units or even more costly if not flat‐pack  Sustainability  16.1. The source of the materials will be considered when finalising materials, ensuring wood comes from sustainable and  managed resource (FSC) – manufactured bards will be used where there is the option as they used recycled material  which is more environmentally friendly  16.2. When finishing the product, the paints or varnishes used will be analysed to ensure they are not harmful to the  environment/the most environmentally friendly is used  16.3. Long lasting product using durable materials so it will not need to be disposed of and replaced which would not be  environmentally friendly as it is a waste of materials 

12. Scale of Production  12.1. The cabinet was made as a one off prototype but the construction process was easy enough to be carried out on a larger  scale  12.2. When working with wood and high quality materials the production process is slowed and in order to retain quality the  product could only be produced in batches.  13. Cost  13.1. As a substitute for using large amounts of solid wood, manufactured boards with veneers were used which greatly reduced  the price  13.2. The overall cost to build the product was £221.78 excluding labour  13.3. There were many supplier of LED tape so I had to carry out research to find the best deal from suppliers, managing to  source the lights at £7/m  14. Safety  14.1. All the lighting cables are secured out of view on the bottom of the shelves.  14.2. The cables are all insulated and the circuit is joined together using a connecting block at the rear. There is a standard switch  to operate the lights which is very safe.  14.3. The feet of the cabinet are located on the edges running the depth of the whole cabinet to provide maximum stability  15. Packaging  15.1. The cabinet has the ability to be flat‐packed  15.2. Packaging has not been designed but is were to be sold on the market it would be securely packed to cope with all the  weight  15.3. A flat‐packed product is much more efficient to be transported as many can be shipped at the same time  16. Sustainability  16.1. All of the scrap wood/off‐cuts produced were recycled, the supplier of the wood was FSC certified.  16.2. The Danish oil used is a natural oil so does not harm the environment  16.3. The materials will last a long time and since this is an indoor product there will be no problems of the wood degrading. 

 

 

Maintenance

57


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Final Evaluation:    To evaluate my product I broke down the individual costs of the cabinet to see which areas could be analysed further to reduce the      cost. I also got feedback from my client about the whole design and manufacture process which he has witnessed and got comments  reviewing my cabinet from a potential user and a 3rd party craftsman. Potential user ‐ Caroline Mathias (home owner):  I think that this stereo storage unit is very attractive  and would look good in both contemporary and  traditional homes.  It has a lot of storage space which  has been well thought out and the lighting adds an  extra dimension.  I like the contrast of the black  sliding door with the mellow colour of the wood, and  also the glass window to allow a remote control to 

3rd party ‐ Graham Baxter (professional carpenter by trade):  I was very impressed when I first saw the cabinet, I had  underestimated the quality of the end product which has been  produced for an A level product. I thought it looked very professional  and well finished with some good construction techniques. Bertie  obviously has a good knowledge of the skills required to build this  sort of product. 

I am very pleased with the end product and it is great to see such positive feedback from my client, a potential user and especially  a professional carpenter.  During the construction process I had never fully calculated the costs. My estimate pre‐production was over the guideline cost set  by my client in the specification so I was satisfied to see that the overall cost of making the cabinet came in under the guide price  by £30 so there is still money which could be spent to add to the cabinet. If I had used hardwoods as the main material there  would have been no way of keeping the cost below £250. 

58

Component  Glass  Lights  Power supplies  Screws  Bolts  Nuts & washers  KD fittings  Switch   

Price  Other  £4.00  Nails  £28.00  Wood glue  £8.00  Araldite  £2.40  Primer  £.66  Paint  £.92  Danish oil  £.52  Brushes  £.30  Wiring  £34.80    £221.78 

Price  £.10  £2.00  £2.00  £7.00  £14.53  £16.66  £3.99  £.50  £46.78 

 

Conclusion: 

Price  £80.91  £6.72  £5.05  £5.70  £8.92  £21.60  £6.52  £4.78  £140.20 

My client with the  cabinet which he has  guided through the  design process and  watch develop and be  constructed. Now with  the cabinet in situ. 

Client Feedback:   I am pleased that despite the many refinements to the original design the final product has not seen any  significant change.  The door which is now only over the front of the cabinet as opposed to wrapped round the  whole unit is far more practical as it frees up the top for storage purposes.  The craftsmanship and build quality is  extremely good with a lot of attention to detail not only on the components but also the finish such as the  decorative edge on the top panel.  I am impressed that the project came in under the budget as it certainly does  not appear that any compromises were made in production.  I would be willing to pay £450 on the market.   Although the original plan was not for a flat‐packed design I am pleased that it has turned out that way as it will  be more flexible.  However if the product was sold on the commercial market assembling it might be a problem  for some less practical consumers.  I like the mixture of materials with the contrast of the cherry and aluminium  and the black door.  The lighting has worked out very well although the design has changed.  The spines of the  CD’s are very well lit and the light source is not visible.  My initial fears that the LED light would be too “cold”  were unfounded.    The cabinet fits in very well in its intended location and performs all the required functions beyond expectations.   

Material  MDF Cherry veneer  Aluminium Tubes  Nylon  Alloy Channel  Pine Batons  Cherry Batons  MDF (5mm)  Plywood  CUMULATIVE:  TOTAL: 

Potential user  ‐ Caroline  Mathias:  Using the  cabinet in  situ. 


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage  Life Cycle Assessment of sustainability: 

     

Raw Materials:   

MDF is quite a sustainable resource to use as it is made of reused wood shavings and other small wood particles which are compacted and stuck together  using a synthetic resin but is used in such small quantities it is not harmful to the environment. The veneer of the MDF is of a high quality and will be durable  over a long period of time; its life span can be enhanced if it is well looked after and finished with quality oil to high standard. Pine is also a sustainable wood  to use because as a soft wood it is fast growing and all the wood I have used was supplied from a certified FSC resource. Aluminium was a good metal to use as  it is a very abundant resource on earth and if there is and waste it can be melted down in the workshop and used to cast other products.   

Manufacture:  The MDF cherry veneer boards were cut up as accurately as possible with as little wastage as possible; evidence of this was displayed in the planning section  with the cutting template for all the wood material. All of the offcuts were either used as gash wood for testing of processes or dry runs, if they were not of  any use they were reused by others in the workshop and any smaller pieces were recycled. The nylon used came in much larger cylinders or sheets than were  required so once I had the components I needed the material was placed where others were able to use it.  All the materials used in testing for models were dismantled completely and the materials that were in good condition could be reused for smaller items by  other people. All the screws used were placed in back in the boxes to be reused.   

Distribution:  When the product is fully constructed it is quite large but fortunately as the design progressed the unit is able to be full flat‐packed for easy transportation.  This also means more of the product can be shipped in bulk at the same time which as an economy of scale it will reduce shipping costs and require less loads  therefore saving fuel/energy. However it would have to be packed into multiple boxes of different sizes; if it was all packed into a single box it would be very  heavy and require a minimum of 2 people to lift it at all and there is a high risk that the box would split due to the cumulative weight.   

Use:  The product needs little maintenance throughout its life such as oiling as it is an indoor  product. However it does require the use of electricity of the light are to be used.  Although the LED’s require a very small amount of electricity it can be counted as a  negative impact on the environment as 78% of the UK energy mix is made up from  burning fossil fuels to generate electricity.   

End‐of ‐Life:  My product will have an extended life cycle due to the lack of maintenance, the quality of  materials and the strong construction; however when the product reaches the end of its  life it can be easily dismantled, separated and recycled. All the wood can be reused  immediately or recycled to make other manufactured woods. The aluminium can also be  reused in its current form or melted down and recycled to make other products. Similarly  with the glass it can be melted down and recycled. Although all the electrical components  will have to be disposed of in the most environmentally method available. 

59


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage Improvements and review: 1.

As with any prototype product there will always be tweaks which can be made to the design once it has been manufactured which will improve the product. Between my client and myself we have come up with some problems which were made after testing as they were only apparent in the testing stages and some more major changes to the design that would be applied if it was to go into production.

Original hole the tubes are fitted into.

2.

The new hook which the tubes slides into only on one side as the opposite side remains in a hole.

5. Changes made after testing: 1. A foot had to be constructed to go underneath the centre of the bottom shelf as it was bowing under the weight of the load when the cabinet is fully laden with items. 2. The 3rd party client pointed out to me the pine at the rear of the unit on the inside which can be seen when in use appears to be white in contrast with the black backboard so I added a wood stain to make the colour closer to the colour of the cherry. 3. The top set of lights could be seen when sitting down and produced a glaring light. Therefore the addition of a cherry strip to obstruct them from view was necessary.

Original

New

3.

Future improvements to be made: 4. The size of the window needs to be reduced, the glass would need to be sourced/cut to size so the window is more square and only the stereo can be seen and not half of the CD’s. 5. The construction process needs to be simplified if it is going to be supplied as a flat-pack item for home assembly. It is especially hard to get all three of the aluminium tubes in place while holding the sides in which secure them. It would be best if they could be fitted once assembled. 6. The current LED’s only provide a warm white light; it is possible to fit a single LED tape which can provide many different colours of light. 7. The door is currently present as a feature with little function but returning to earlier versions of the design the shelves could come to the front of the unit and two walls either side of the stereo would mean the stereo space is sealed when the door is in the centre position. 8. The door assemble process needs to be reworked as the door is totally sealed before it is painted; therefore the glass has to inserted before it is painted and it requires great care to avoid getting paint on the glass. The door should not be sealed on the rear so the glass can be inserted afterwards or replaced if broken.

Tube fixed at one end slides into opposite side after full assembly.

7. 4.

Walls placed either side of the stereo cavity

8.

A small amount of paint which got on to the glass

Shelves come all the way to the front

60


A2 Commercial Design – Bertie Johnstone

Centre no. – 62415

Candidate No. – 4201

Design Unit 4 : Commercial Design

Unit 4 A2 Commercial Design – Stereo Storage 

Bibliography: 

                                             

Research:  o  Pictures of stereo and speakers from Richersounds.co.uk  Existing Products:  o http://www.furniturebycsn.co.uk/BDI‐8729‐White‐OPB1138.html  o http://www.yousharez.com/2009/11/14/modern‐fuerniture‐tv‐stand‐design‐of‐furniture‐entertainment‐ space/furniture‐tv‐stand‐modern‐white‐lacquer‐tv‐stand/  o http://themagazine.info/products/‐/489.html  o http://www.furniturefashion.org/the‐marina‐modern‐home‐theater‐tv‐stand‐from‐bdi  o http://furniturestocks.com/modern‐furniture‐tv‐stand‐in‐walnut‐color‐design.html  o http://themagazine.info/products/‐/489.html  Further Research:   o Pictures of stereo and speakers from Richersounds.co.uk  o CD/DVD boxes from Wikipedia.org  o Apple iPhone & dimensions: Apple.com  o Speaker dynamics: richersounds.co.uk  o TV picture: LG.com   Sliding door  o Types of doors:   Garage Door 1  Garage door 2  Kitchen unit  Retractable cabinet  Standard cabinet  Roll up sliding cabinet  Development:  o Possible door runners: www.screwfix.co.uk  o Fluorescent tube lights:    amzon.co.uk / lightingstyle.co.uk 

 

 

61


A2 Product Design Project 2011-12