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Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities

C O L L E G E O F E N V I R O N M E N TA L D E S I G N UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - BERKELEY

Disc *

2016

Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities

2016


“We need to view the fragility of the planet and its resources as an opportunity for speculative design innovations rather than as a form for technical legitimation for promoting conventional solutions. By extension, the problems confronting our cities and regions would then become opportunities to define a new approach.� Disc*2016

- Mohsen Mostafavi, Ecological Urbanism

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index* 1

overview

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faculty

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keynote lecturers + guests

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students

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calendar

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seminars

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workshops

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fieldwork

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studio

10 fabrication 11 final presentation 12 public presentation 13 credits

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overview

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overview* DISC is an immersive five-week program that explores an interdisciplinary and multi-scalar approach to design and analysis of the urban environment. Through a combination of design and digital fabrication, studio sessions, lectures and seminars, demos and workshops, field work and site visits, students engage in the discourse of urban innovation, while gaining hands on experience developing design proposals. The program is built upon four main platforms. The Urban Innovation Talk - Keynote Lecture Series introduces students to some of the most forward-thinking researchers and practitioners from the Bay Area design community. Fieldwork + Site Visits give students an opportunity to engage directly with the dynamic built and natural environment of the Bay Area, while meeting with expert guest speakers. The Global Cities/Global Challenges + Urban Innovation Seminars are meant to develop a theoretical framework for understanding the complex urban issues that face cities and strategies for design. The Studio + Digital Workshops are at the core of the program, building skills and offering a hands-on makerspace for creative work to take place. Working in teams, students develop a project from design conception to prototyping and present the final result of their work to instructors and guest critics. Upon completion of the DISC program, graduates have a strong understanding of urban processes and a broad toolkit with which to tackle its urgent demands, as well as compelling artifacts for their academic portfolio. Students develop the necessary skills and theory to effectively represent their design ideas and become the next thought shapers and game changers.

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overview

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Resilient San Francisco planning document - April, 2016

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overview

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Studio Project – SF@1Million San Francisco is facing pressure for growth and at the same is looking toward the future as it plans to create a more resilient and sustainable urban fabric. In a recent report titled Resilient San Francisco, the city unveiled its goal to accommodate a projected 1 million people by the year 2040, a significant growth from the current population of 837, 442 people. The report also focused on several interconnected challenges that are planning priorities including, infrastructure, climate change, social inequity, sea level rise, and unaffordability. Since San Francisco is on a peninsula, it cannot grow outwards and sprawl like many other cities, but must rather densify. How can this be accomplished while still retaining the traditional character of the city? Who will this new housing be for? There is a growing trend in San Francisco where low and middle-income residents are being priced out of the city as tech companies and employees continue to move in. What will or should San Francisco look like in 2040? Will people still be driving private automobiles or will there only be autonomous driving cars? How will this change the city streets and public space? Will housing become more flexible and communal like WeLive or AirBnB? Can the urban infrastructure become more resilient to climate change such as sea-level rise and drought? Can some infrastructure be more adaptable and decentralized to accommodate grey-water recycling and alternative energy harvesting? Can we harness the power of big data to better understand our city and how people use it? How do we design for increased livability, accessibility, and social equity? Through mapping, research, and design the focus of the DISC studio work is to envision the future of San Francisco’s built environment as a model for resilient and sustainable urban design. Building off of the city plan for a Resilient San Francisco, students worked in teams to propose solutions that address these urban issues. Each of the sites was chosen for their distinct characteristics, challenges, and opportunities for growth and redesign. Students were tasked with identifying the potential for adding new housing and innovative urban design solutions.

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faculty* Gabriel Kaprielian | Program Director Gabriel Kaprielian is a designer, urbanist, and artist based in the Bay Area. With degrees in both architecture and city planning, his creative work and research focus on resilient cities, sustainable design, emergent technologies, and digital fabrication. His professional experience includes traditional architecture practice with award-winning firms, social focused architecture as a Design Fellow for Architecture for Humanity, urban design in the public sector, and as an Artist-in-Resident at Autodesk’s Pier 9 Workshop in San Francisco. In addition to serving as the Program Director of DISC in the College of Environmental Design, Gabriel has served as a lecturer at a Cal Poly, California College of the Arts, and UC Berkeley. Gabriel holds a BArch from Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, CA, and a MArch and MCP from UC Berkeley.

Kent Wilson | Design Studio Lead Kent earned BArch (with a minor in Sustainable Design) and MArch degrees from UC Berkeley after a career in marketing, graphic design, print production and fabrication management. His work positions architectural production within broader social, economic, technological and ecological concerns while maintaining a strong focus on making, with models, drawings and photo renderings that convey social and political critique as integral to spatial concepts. As a studio instructor, he continues his research at the intersections of design, materiality, sustainability, and social change.

Ghigo DiTommaso | Global Cities Global Challenges Lecturer Ghigo DiTommaso was trained as an architect in Florence, learning the tools of the trade while feeding a strong interest in urban history and theory. After moving to Barcelona he worked with prominent Catalan architects on numerous award-winning projects while also conducting research at the EtsaB School of Architecture and teaching at the ESDi School of Design. Based in the Bay Area since 2010, he has been a core member of the Rebar Art & Design Studio and the new San Francisco offices of Gehl Studio. At the CED he has served as Program Director of Disc* and collaborated with the LAEP department as a lecturer and project researcher. Ghigo holds a BArch and an MArch from the FacoltĂ di Architettura di Firenze, and an MSArch and PhD from EtsaBarcelona. 8

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Katie Mcknight | Digital Lead GIS Katie earned her Masters of Landscape Architecture in Environmental Planning from UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design. Originally from North Carolina, Katie draws on her background in environmental science, planning and permaculture to conduct diverse research studies on resilient planning strategies. Through the use of spatial analysis software such as ArcGIS, FlamMap, FARSite and ENVI, Katie’s research focuses on a range of topics such as fire risk, land cover changes, flood dynamics, wildlife corridors and food access.As a current Berkeley Food Institute research fellow, Katie is working to optimize and expand the UC Gill Tract Community Farm’s food distribution network to better support students and communities experiencing food insecurity. She hopes to contribute to creative environmental planning efforts working towards a healthier and more just campus and community.

Jonah Merris | Graduate Student Instructor Jonah Merris is a graduate student of architecture at UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design. He received a BA in Architectural Studies and Political Science from Middlebury College. Jonah has explored issues of architecture, sustainability, and urbanism through work on the US Department of Energy Solar Decathlon, as well as internships with Kava Massih Architects in Berkeley, CA, and Vermont Integrated Architecture in Middlebury, VT. His current creative work investigates the changing spatial implications of place amidst the proliferation of personal digital branding.

Sonali Praharaj | Graduate Student Instructor Sonali has worked across various architectural, urban design, landscape and urban planning projects across cities in India, Europe, and San Francisco Bay Area. Some of her interest areas have been exploring adaptive and compact growth models to tackle issues of climate change and urban sprawl in our cities, Building resilient urban waterfronts and revitalizing underutilized post-industrial urban cores and infrastructures into healthier communities. Sonali has completed her architectural studies from Sir JJ College of Architecture, Mumbai and is currently pursuing her graduate program in Urban Design from University of California, Berkeley. Disc*2016

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keynote lecturers* Will Travis | Former Executive Director for BCDC

Antje Steinmuller | Assistant Professor of Architecture at California College of the Arts and a Principal at Studio URBIS

Victoria Salinas | Chief Resilience Officer, City of Oakland

Neeraj Bhatia | Assistant Professor of Architecture at California College of the Arts

Matthew Passmore | Founder at Morelab, LLC

10 keynote lecturers + guests

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guest speakers* Jennifer Wolch | Dean of the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley

Laura Tam | Sustainability Development Policy Director at SPUR

Susan Schwartzenberg | Senior Artist and Curator at the Exploratorium

Alison Sant | Urban Designer, Artist, Studio for Urban Projects

Lidia D’Amico | Wildlife Biologist, Artist

Nathaniel Kaufmann | Founder of LEAP and Director of Projects at Owlized

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keynote lecturers + guests 11


12 faculty

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students*

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faculty 13


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11 disciplines

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North America Spenser Atlas - USA Andres Cueva-Robles - USA Hannah Farley - USA Kristen Lee - USA Caroline Lindquist - USA Eduardo Lopez - CAN Natalie Manukian - USA Caroline Shoeller - USA Divya Sundar - USA Hei Wai Tse - CAN 16 Jesserica Westervelt - USA Savannah Wu - USA Hannah Yi - USA

South America Maria Suescun - COL

Europe Disc*2016 Lucas Zarzoso - NLD


12 countries

Oceania Marcella Palma - AUS

Asia

Middle East Sai Narayan - OMN Bushra Rajab - BHR

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Albrecht Arevalo - PHL Linhan Fu - CHN Chujun Luo - CHN Shu Pan - CHN Phoemphol Sinchai - THA Lujia Wang - CHN Ting Wang - CHN Ruijiao Wang - CHN Yimeng Wang - CHN Nikita Stepanyuk - RUS Sunan Xiang - CHN Takeshi Yamamoto - JPN Wenyue Zhang - CHN

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home university enrollment

100,000

80,000

60,000

40,000

20,000 Colorado College Colorado Springs, CO

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2,000

4,000

miles from uc b 18 faculty

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4,000

26 universities

Sun Yat-sen University Guangdong, China

6,000

8,000

10,000

from uc berkeley Disc*2016

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- “a regional capital

- “Schaumburg’s po Chicago’s northw

Calgary - YYC

My Home City

Shenzhen, China 深圳,中国

1970- year of succession Eduardo Lopez  

CONCORD MASSACHUESETTES

Caroline Schoeller

My Home City

Shanghai

XI’AN,old but young

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S A C R A M E N TO

Waxhaw, North   Carolina  

Ting Wang

Amsterdam The Netherlands

Hannah Farley   7/11/16  

History

3000 years 800 years

A Look Into the Nation’s Capital

Morphology WASHINGTON, D.C.

DISC* 2016—Natalie Manukian

strictly planned symmetrical

Tokyo - 東京 grid

the Forbidden City

central axis


30 Chapel Hill and Carrboro, hometowns North Carolina Kristen Lee

Hangzhou · CHINA Landscape City Shu Pan 07/11/16

B E I J I N G

I’m from Melbourne, Australia... A long way away from anything

Bogotá POPULATION

⾹香港 HONG KONG

2016 1985

1 697 311

1938

325 650

me to Thailand! 1538

613 SQMI

7 980 001

4 236 490

1964

ious food dly locals card-perfect tropical islands is convenient p!

北 京

Bad • • • • •

WINNIE WENYUE ZHANG 张文悦

LANZHOU·CHINA 兰州

Mosquitoes Bangkok Traffic Politics! (corruption) Exploitation, Scams Animal Cruelty

HULUDAO By Sherry Fu

los angeles

Thank you

california


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calendar* DISC 2016 // UC Berkeley

JULY AUGUST S

M

4

3

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5

(Regional + City)

Holiday

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First Day of DISC Introductions

Research + Mapping

10 (City + Neighborhood) Research + Mapping Initial Design Proposal

11 Urban Seminar 1 Home City Presentations

W

12 Keynote 1: Will Travis GIS Workshop 2

7

Fieldwork 1 Mt. Tamalpais Bay Model Bay Observatory (Susan Swartzenburg)

13 Fieldwork 2 SPUR (Laura Tam) Visit Sites Field Work

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18

19

20

(Neighborhood + Human)

Urban Seminar 1

Fieldwork 3 Walkabout (Ali Sant) Eastern Waterfront Heron’s Head Park

Rhino Workshop 1

Digital Modeling Design Development

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Studio Work

25 Urban Seminar 3

Digital Fabrication Design Production

Rhino Workshop 2

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DFab Orientation

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F 1

2

8

9

GIS Workshop 1

GCGC Lecture 1

Bay Area Research

Bay Area Presentations

14 Keynote 2: Antje Steinmuller GIS Workshop 3

21 Keynote 3: Victoria Salinas

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16

GCGC Lecture 2 Mapping Review

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23

Mid Review

Adobe Workshop

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29

30

Keynote 4: Neeraj Bhatia

Reality Computing Workshop

Keynote 5: Matthew Passmore

Studio Work

Studio Work

Studio Work

Studio Work

Final Presentation

Work Documentation

Exploratorium Presentation

DISC Portfolio

Party!

Final Review Mockup

31 Studio Work Presentation

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24 seminars

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seminars* Global Cities | Global Challenges Seminar - Ghigo DiTommaso Global Cities/Global Challenges is a series of lectures addressing some of the most pressing challenges our cities are facing today. The series focuses on issues of social and environmental justice while exploring a variety of strategies and tactics for good city-making. Students learn about some of the causes of the ‘wicked problems’ we are tackling and discuss what is at stake if we don’t find viable solutions soon, while also hearing about several recent success stories that show how things can really change for the better. The class looks at case studies from across the world to illustrate what environmental design can do to make our urban regions more resilient, livable and equitable.

Urban Innovation Seminar - Gabriel Kaprielian The Urban Innovation Seminar is meant to supplement the studio with theory and lively discourse. Students are active participants in the learning process. Weekly assigned readings and writing that in addition to a seminar presentation by the Program Director provide a framework to discuss and contextualize the program goals and studio work. The Urban Innovation Seminar is comprised of three modules: Urban Place, Urban Form, and Urban Futures. Urban Place focuses on understanding the transformations of the built and natural environment of cities and how this can be used to inform future design decisions. Topics include the use of mapping to geo-reference and layer past, present, and potential future urban and natural conditions to develop a narrative of place. Urban Form explores precedents of city block and housing typologies around the world and the factors and urban theory that shaped it. Examples include built urban form from various time periods and the speculative urban form proposals and theory that influenced it. Urban Futures looks at the continually evolving nature of cities, which are ever changing based on economic, social, environmental, and technological factors. Topics include smart cities, big data, autonomous driving vehicles, ecoblocks, sustainability initiatives, resilience cities, and the role of science fiction and speculative design.

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GIS Workshops | Katie McKnight – Digital Lead GIS The GIS workshops cover the basics of digital Geographic Information System mapping and directly support the studio project work. GIS Workshop One includes geo-referencing historic maps, creating thematic maps, and visualizing data geospatially. GIS Workshop Two focuses on topics that assist students in creating a past, present, future narrative of their assigned team site in San Francisco. Students use historic maps to understand the urban morphology and historic ecology, while layering current and projected future maps to see areas of intersection and transformation. Additionally, each team creates scaled base maps to use as reference during Field Work. GIS Workshop Three explorea higher level mapping functions such as 3D visualization with ArcScene, while paying particular attention to mapping as an art to achieve compelling and informative graphics.

26 workshops

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28 workshops

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Rhino Workshops | Kent Wilson – Studio Lead The Rhino workshops demonstrate digital 3D modeling and 2D drafting techniques, rendering with the VRay plug-in, graphic exporting, and digital fabrication file processing. Topics in the workshops directly support the studio project work. Rhino Workshop One focuses on digital modeling and drafting to develop students’ urban design proposals, in addition to exporting 2D graphics for Adobe software and presentations. Rhino Workshop Two focuses on creating perspective renderings with VRay and digital fabrication output for lasercutting, 3D printing, and CNC milling.

Adobe Workshop | Kent Wilson – Studio Lead The Adobe workshop includes instruction with Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. The workshop links the workflow from Rhino 2D graphic exports, digital rendering, and generally focuses on creating high quality presentation materials from design work. Photoshop includes instruction on rendering techniques. Illustrator is used primarily to create 2D vector graphics. InDesign is used for presentation board layouts.

Reality Computing Workshop | Gabriel Kaprielian – Program Director The Reality Computing workshop demonstrates an alternative process to design and digital fabrication that utilizes the Autodesk software 123D Catch, 123D Make, and Meshmixer. Through the use of the 3D scanning technology of photogrammetry, students learn how to digitize physical objects, edit their mesh facsimile, and create a digitally fabricated re-materialization. The process allows for haptic hand modeling in place of digital modeling to achieve a desired form, which can be transformed through a metamorphosis traversing physical and digital worlds. Sensing the City Workshop | Matthew Passmore Led by artist, urban explorer, and public space advocate Matthew Passmore, “Sensing the City” is a hands on workshop that asks students to design and fabricate wearable objects that augment, dampen, or focus the senses. This workshop builds off of Passmore’s recent work at SPUR’s “Sound and the City” exhibition and interactive workshop “The Fastest Way to Superhuman Hearing” where the public was asked to build personal listening devices and then join a guided tour of the neighborhood. In a similar approach, the “Sensing the City” workshop has students rapidly prototype a variety of wearable devices that are tested in public space. Disc*2016

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fieldwork* regional + city city + neighborhood walkabout

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regional + city Field Trip 1 | July 6th Mt. Tamalpais – Bay Model – Exploratorium Fisher Bay Observatory Our first field trip focused on the dynamic interplay between the built and natural environments of the Bay Area. Students learned about the historical transformations that have shaped the region into the place that you see today. We began at the top of Mt. Tamalpais, one of the highest peaks in the area, which offers a panoramic view of the entire San Francisco Bay and surrounding cities. We were joined by LEAP founder Nathaniel Kaufmann and Wildlife Biologist Lidia D’Amico as they led an interpretive tour. Next, we visited the Bay Model in Sausalito, constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a working hydraulic scale model of the San Francisco Bay. A Park Ranger guided us through the exhibit and talked about the pivotal history of the models construction and the Save the Bay movement. We then traveled via ferry to the Exploratorium’s Fisher Bay Observatory in San Francisco where we were joined by Senior Artist and Curator Susan Schwartzenberg to explore the scientific exhibits and maps that allow us to understand the functioning of the Bay ecology and urban morphology of San Francisco. Guest Speakers: Lidia D’Amico (AECOM), Nate Kauffman (LEAP), Susan Schwartzenburg (Exploratorium)

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city + neighborhood Field Trip 2 | July 13th SPUR – San Francisco Site Visits The second field trip explored the city of San Francisco and its neighborhoods as we investigated the studio sites, which would later become a living laboratory for speculative design proposals. To put our site visits and fieldwork in perspective, we began by visiting SPUR, the San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association. Sustainability Development Policy Director Laura Tam joined us to talk about the work of SPUR and the urban challenges and opportunities that San Francisco is facing. Afterwards we visited each of the studio sites and conducted fieldwork through on-site analysis and observation. Students were expected to document notes in sketchbooks, geo-reference site elements on their base maps, and take relevant photographs. Guest Speaker: Laura Tam (SPUR)

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walkabout Field Trip 3 | Walkabout | July 13th Eastern Waterfront – Heron’s Head Park The walkabout curated by Alison Sant and Ghigo DiTommaso was an exploration of San Francisco’s Eastern Waterfront. This area, on the verge of massive change, represents, perhaps more than any other in the city, the complexity and contradiction that characterize contemporary urban process. Remnants of its industrial past and longtime residential communities here coexist with the first signs of a series of transformations that will reshape the urban form and the ecology of the area in radical ways. Throughout the walk we heard from Stephanie Kiriakopolos, from the Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies and Jeremy Lowe from the San Francisco Estuary Institute about the experimental practices for climate change mitigation that are taking place there; talk with Philip Vitale from the Trust of Public Land about the future of green public space and discuss with John Bela from Gehl Studio about the ambitious projects for new development that are currently underway. Guest Speaker: Ali Sant - Walkabout tourguide (Studio for Urban Projects), Jermey Lowe (SFEI), Stephanie Kiriakopolos (Romberg Tiburon Center), Alex Schuknecht (Gehl), Philip Vitale (Trust for Public Land)

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38 studio

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studio* Week One: Regional + City

Software: ArcGIS, InDesign Field Trip #1 – Bay Area Research + Mapping Bay Area Analysis Presentations

Week Two: City + Neighborhood Software: ArcGIS, ArcScene Field Trip #2 – San Francisco Research + Mapping Initial Design Proposal Review

Week Three: Neighborhood + Human Software: Rhino, Adobe CS Field Trip #3 – Walkabout Design Development + Representation Mid Review Presentations

Week Four: Design Production

Software: 123D Catch, Meshmixer, 123D Make, VRay for Rhino Digital Fabrication Models > Past, Present, Future Model Presentation Boards + Scale Models

Week Five: Presentation

Design Refinement Finalize Work > Prepare for Display Work Documentation > Portfolio and Studio Book

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40 studio

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regional issues: historical ecology indigenous history + culture coastal transformations urban morphology infrastructure demographics transportation land use

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sites: SOMA market mission geary


SOMA

Copyright:© 2013 National Geographic Society, i-cubed

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market

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mission

Copyright:© 2013 National Geographic Society, i-cubed

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geary

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analog mapping

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design process

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fabrication

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fabrication 55


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final presentation* Wurster Hall Gallery, University of California - Berkeley

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team 1 | geary Sai Narayan, Lujia Wang, Natalie Manukian We propose to revive Geary’s street life to emulate the essence of a promenade that supports the densification of the neighborhood and structurally allows for the breezy flow of fog, visitors and inhabitants. Introducing a light rail system along Geary Boulevard creates an EastWest transit hub. With the addition of bike lanes and sidewalk expansions, an auto-centric corridor becomes more accessible to alternative modes of transportation while fostering a more vibrant pedestrian experience. Inner Richmond’s low density provides potential to accommodate more residents. Housing will be built to maintain street level integrity and avoid overwhelming the pedestrian experience. The structural dips in height towards the direction of Geary Boulevard conserve the amount of daylight all units receive while maintaining views of the street and internal courtyard. Densifying a neighborhood calls for amenities to encourage social cohesion- fostering a sense of community, responsibility and pride. The placement of communal courtyard in the center of each residential building provides space for neighbors to interact and share. This is intended to mimic a residential backyard, but with more to offer. The repurposing of vacant lots throughout Geary Boulevard provides intervention opportunities for an attractive destination within the city that promote community building.

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Geary Boulevard - Dune City

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A B

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III

II

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B

C

Masterplan

Aerial View facing East

Enhancing Mobility Locate Site for Development

Raise Development to Accommodate Housing

Adding Density

Promoting Social Cohesion Site Location

Semi-Private Courtyard

Proposed Housing

Twist Opposite Ends for Light and Views Geary Boulevard, formerly sand dunes in the 1890s

Project Objectives

Driving Lane

Engaged Sidewalk

Proposed Light Rail

Perimeter Block for Community Courtyard Precedent: Horizontal Skyscraper, Steven Holl

Bike Path

Precedent: West57, Bjarke Ingels

Current Block Interior Condition

Proposed Block Interior Condition

Street Section : Geary + Spruce

Existing Middle School

Engaged Sidewalk

Community Garden

Driving Lane

Proposed Light Rail

Bike Path

Outdoor Public Space

I

Current Vacant Lot

Proposed lot envisioned as Bar + Open Air Terrace

Street Section : Geary + Arguello

Extension of Public Library

Engaged Sidewalk

Driving Lane

Proposed Light Rail

Bike Path

Semi-Private Courtyard

II

Current Vacant Lot

Proposed lot envisioned as Gallery + Open Exhibition Space

Street Section : Geary + 9th Ave.

Extension of Public Library

Public Green Space

Community Garden

Public Green Space

Bar + Open-Air Terrace

Children’s Playground

III

Public Green Space

Bar + Open-Air Terrace

Public Green Space

Gallery + Exhibition Space

Coffee House

Pop-Up Restaurants

Current Vacant Lot

Proposed lot envisioned as Public Congregation Space

Program Distribution for Vacant Lots

Current Elevation of Geary Boulevard: Facing South

Disc*2016 Proposed Elevation of Geary Boulevard: Facing South

final presentation 59 [The character “Frank Fluffy” is copyrighted, to the rights of Lujia Wang]


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team 2 | market Andres Cuevo-Robles, Caroline Lindquist, Yimeng Wang, Brex Arevalo Our vision for the Market area incorporate three elements: providing additional green space, expanding the existing transit network, and increasing density. The 101 Freeway will be transformed into an elevated linear park. This green space will provide walking paths, a bike lane that will connect to the existing bike lane down Market Street, and a light rail that will traverse the outer edge of the space. The light rail system will begin at the intersection of Market Street and 101, cross the Bay Bridge, and terminate in the East Bay. This transit line will ease ridership pressures on BART. It will also revive the once-bustling Bay Bridge Rail System, which was dismantled in favor of the automobile in 1958. Increasing housing options along Market Street and Van Ness will concentrate density around the new green space and transit. The buildings will be mixed-use residential and commercial. Forty percent of added apartments will be affordable housing, as opposed to the city’s existing requirements of twenty percent. These proposed high-rise buildings will surround the elevated park and extend the downtown cityscape.

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MARKET - SAN FRANCISCO

Sections Highline Above Perspective Model

A 1

B

c

HighLine Below Perspective

Se ection Cut A - Before and After Highline

Section Cut B

Section Cut C

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team 3 | SOMA Della Wang, Jessica Westervelt, Takeshi Yamamoto, Savannah Wu Our ultimate vision for the SOMA neighborhood in 2050 is a more enjoyable place to live in and visit. In order to achieve that we have four goals to reach. First, the main proposal of our project is to tunnel the currently above-ground freeway underground. With the freeway underground, our plan is to create a large park in the space previously occupied by the freeway. This is similar to the “Big Dig� project in Boston. Our second proposal is to pedestrianize 4th Street in order to make the street more livable for residents and visitors of the area. Eliminating vehicle traffic except for emergency vehicles emphasizes the importance of using public transportation, especially since a new bus line is being installed along 4th Street. Another goal is to make some of the blocks in SOMA smaller in order to create more alleys for pedestrians and easier access to both 4th Street and the new SOMA Park. Finally, sea level rise will impact the neighborhood so our last goal accounts for those effects. We are proposing the construction of levees to handle 1 foot of sea level rise. Subterranean parks and moving people from the first floor of impacted buildings can be in place by 2050 to prepare for 3 or more feet of sea level rise.

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team 4 | mission Shu Pan, Caroline Schoeller, Maria Suescun, Lucas Zarzoso Our group looked at the Mission district and asked ourselves how we can address the housing issue while still keeping the culture and values of the Mission in place. To address the immediate housing issue, we propose large, concentrated development around the BART stations. These mixeduse developments take advantage of the transit rich areas and provide needed affordable housing in a location that is faced with the constant threat of gentrification. In addition, we propose additional dwelling units or “ADUs� throughout the area as small incremental interventions that create more living and working areas while still keeping the low-lying shape of Mission intact. The low elevation of Mission Street is crucial in maintaining its vibrant street community. To keep and enhance the street atmosphere, El Capitan, an underutilized parking lot centrally located, will become a new market where both the local and neighboring communities can come together. Finally, the Mission is victim to an imaginary boarder which separates the Hispanic community from the white community. A bike sharing system and greenways running from Mission Street to Dolores Park will hopefully cut through the boarder running between Valencia and Mission Street.

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MISSION DISTRICT

DENSIFICATION around Bart stations

MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE the culture and community

BRIDGE THE GAP between Valencia A Mission

B

1. DENSIFY

2. ADU’S

3. COMMUNITY

4. BIKE SHARE

5. GREEN WAYS

Legend ADUs

Legend

Comunal Space North-south Axis

Densifying Areas

East-west Axis Green Buffer Parklet Park/Garden Greenspace

Legend Densification Zones Possible ADU Locations

RESIDENTIAL

SIDEWALK

STREET

PUBLIC PLAZA

SIDEWALK

MIXED USE

BART STATION

BART STATION

ADUS

Dearborn Community Garden Alioto Park

Mission Playground

Dolores Park

EL CAPITAN

MARKET

Legend Main Corridors Secondary Corridors

STREET RESIDENTIAL

BIKE LANES

EL CAPITAN

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S/WALK

STREET

BIKE

S/WALK

CULTURAL CENTER

COMMUNITY GARDEN

GREENWAY

final presentation 71


72 final presentation

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team 5 | market Winnie Zhang, Hesper Wang, Spenser Atlas, Bushra Rajab Our vision for Market is predicated on the notion that private cars will be obsolete in San Francisco by 2050. In turn, our design proposals will facilitate the reclamation of Market Street – one of the city’s largest public corridors – by pedestrians and cyclists. Historically speaking, Market Street has served as the city’s main transit artery for over a century: It continues to function as a gateway for people entering the city from the East Bay via public transportation and as a thoroughfare connecting native residents to the entirety of the peninsula. In the mid-20th century, modern city planners disrupted the public nature of the site by placing a freeway through Market. As a result, the private automobile eventually dominated the public realm. Today, Market Street can be characterized by an overwhelming lack of accessible green space, widespread homelessness, a dilapidated physical infrastructure, as well as a distinctly autocentric culture. These four factors have compounded over time to sterilize the street life of Market Hub. Our design proposals aim to revitalize Market by… (1) Encouraging biking as the dominant mode of transportation (2) Making public green space more accessible (3) Adding retail space to highlight the commercial identity of The Hub (4) Increasing the stock of affordable housing in an effort to economically empower marginalized peoples

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final presentation 75


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final presentation 77


team 6 | SOMA Cystal Xiang, Hannah Farley, Nikita Stepanyuk, Valerie Tse The vision of SoMa district is for the creation of a sustainable and liveable neighborhood by 2050. Three steps will be implemented: support pedestrian oriented growth, maintain mixed-use infrastructure and increase housing, and address sea level rise. To enable these steps, the I-80 freeway that cuts through SOMA will be put underground, freeing up immense amounts of public space that we will turn into a large public park for the community. Within this space, bioretention systems will be intergrated to store excess sea water. In conjunction, streets in threat of sealevel rise will be retrofited with biorentention systems. 4th St. from Bryant St. will experience an increase in pedestrain space. A pedestrian promenade will be placed in the middle of the street with one lane of traffic on either side of the pedestrian walkway. Lastly, densification will occur with increased housing that aims to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to thrive.

78 final presentation

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SOMA Propsed Green Connector [Highway Removed]

4th Street Promenade

1:20 Section of 4th Stree & Harrison St. [Current]

1:25 Section of 4th St. [Proposed]

1:20 Section of 4th & Brannan St. [Proposed]

1

3

Implementation of a levee at Mission Creek

Apply bioretention system on a street level

Intergrate bioretention system with the green connector

2 LANDSCAPE AS INFRASTRUCTURE

1:35 Section of 4th & Stillman St. [Proposed]

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final presentation 79 CURRENT ELEVATION


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final presentation 81


team 7 | mission Sherry Fu, Eduardo Lopez, Marcella Palma, Hannah Yi Weave between Mission and Valencia street to stitch the disjointed cultures and form a socially resilient Mission. 1 // Rent for those who have lived in the mission for more than 15 years will remain constant until they decide otherwise. 2 // Market price in the Mission District will be no higher than the median monthly wage. 3 // The ground floor of ALL new development MUST be raised at least 10ft off ground level and on at least one floor higher than 30ft to allow for public space. 4 // 30% of all new development must be affordable housing and be more than 4 levels high to encourage communication between income levels. 5 // Affordable housing must be available for everyone who wants it. Those who can’t pay rent cover it through community service (ensuring proposed urban area remains approachable). 6 // Area between 16th street and 24th street Mission BART stations will be bus and car friendly on weekdays only, with two lanes to extend pedestrian and bike paths. Curbs as a form of hierarchy will be eliminated. 7 // The Mission is home to urban campers. Public space is increased through circulation paths. All these items must be flexible and movable. 8 // Mission street is a market zone. Buying and selling of goods is encouraged. Patrons must live in the Mission District to run these markets. 9 // Cultural festivals and traditions are encouraged in all public space. 10 // Communication/protest through street art is encouraged. Emergence of conflict provokes empathy and will build a socially resilient Mission. Art acts as a historic documentation of the political state of the Mission. 11 // Proposed creek from the historic wetlands will encourage wildlife and natural ecology back to the city as well as preparation for climate change.

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mission for the mission weave between Mission and Valencia street to stitch the disjointed cultures and form a socialy resilient Mission

walgreens with carpark build above/ public space

parking lots: demolish kidow park: to remain parking lot: demolish empty: build parking lot: build vacant: build above

vacant: build above parking lot: build parking lot: build

parking lot: demolish

empty lot: build parking lot: build above/ demolish existing park: to remain

parking with street art on walls: build above parking lot vacant parking lot: build vacant: public space parking lot: demolish parking lot:: build vacant: build parking lot: demolish walgreens: build above old gas station: build

parking lot: demolish parking lot: demolish BART

parking lot: demolish

proposed public park/ space

parking lot: demolish parking lot: demolish

proposed market price housing

parking lot: demolish

proposed affordable housing

proposed

existing site

master plan 1”:400’

section a

section b

section c

c a

b

b c a

dayliight river with proposed bridges 1”:200’

amenity two

amenity one library

amenity two

amenity two

amenity one

bike rack

library garden

art installation walkway

garden

art wall meditation center

bench

lounge

art wall

market

classroom

amenity one

proposed affordable housing

proposed market price housing

proposed public park/ space

head to attach water flow lid

collapsible body

base acts as shower release

feet for drainage

flexible housing

amenity two

amenity one proposed affordable housing above Walgreens

proposed affordable housing on a vacant site

Disc*2016 elevation 1”:40’

proposed public park/ space

final presentation 83


84 final presentation

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Disc*2016

final presentation 85


team 8 | geary Divya Sundar, Phoemphol Sinchai, Dina Luo, Kristen Lee The grid has historically been used to divide and parcel land into private property. It has been critical to the prevailing conception of land as something to be owned and possessed as opposed to shared. Our project interrogates this history by re-purposing the grid for building social and ecological resilience in which resources and labor-power are pooled and redistributed. We do this through two design interventions: the “eco-block� and a pedestrian walkway. Each eco-block is intended to be a self-sufficient unit with respect to energy, waste, and water. This will be achieved through an integrated green infrastructure system that operates at the block scale. Private backyards will be abolished and the land will be pooled to create communal green squares accessible to all residents who live on the block. Depending on their social and economic needs, residents can choose to make these spaces into community gardens, play spaces for children, or recreational facilities. A green pedestrian walkway that extends along the main intersection connects the central corridor to Rossi Playground. The walkway’s wave-like structure echoes the undulating sand dunes that once covered this region. The walkway integrates itself into the life of the neighborhood through dendrite-like branches that link up to rooftops and streets. From the elevated walkway, residents and passerby can gaze up and down on the built city and reflect on the legacy of the grid. A farmers market will take place on the walkway where residents can sell and barter the products they harvest from their community gardens.

86 final presentation

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GEARY BLVD building community power through green infrastructures

erasure & domination of natural landscape parceling of land into private property land use segmentation & containment of “nature�

A

B

Section B

playground

community

community

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farm

farm

final presentation 87 Section A


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final presentation 89


90 public presentation

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public presentation* The Exploratorium’s Fisher Bay Observatory Gallery, San Francisco

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public presentation 91


92 public presentation

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public presentation 93


credits* images: cover + 2, 3 - North American Press Association via David Rumsey Historical Map Collection 6 - Vincent Bloch 8 - Resilient San Francisco via City and County of San Francisco 24 - Mosaia.com 26 - U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service via Wikimedia Commons 34, 36, 38 - Map data Š 2016 Google via Google Maps 40 - De Leuw, Cather and Company + Ladislas Segoe and Associates via David Rumsey Historical Map Collection

book: graphic designer + editor: Jonah Merris editor: Gabriel Kaprielian photographer: Kent Wilson

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Profile for UC Berkeley Summer [IN]STITUTE

Disc*2016 (Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities) Catalog  

A compendium documenting the final student projects completed during summer 2016.

Disc*2016 (Design & Innovation for Sustainable Cities) Catalog  

A compendium documenting the final student projects completed during summer 2016.

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