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ISSUE 69

INSIDE OUT

NEWSLETTER SPRING | 2018

The old bridge over the braided channels of the Yakima River, just off Interstate 82, Exit 52, in Zillah, Washington, was structurally deficient with large shear cracks in the cast-in-place concrete box superstructure and scour critical with the river attacking the spread footingsupported abutments. The new prestressed concrete girder bridge is 620 feet long with four spans over the main channel of the Yakima River.

Changing Course: The North Meyers Road Bridge Project Takes an Interesting Turn during Construction While each bridge that is repaired or replaced has its own set of complexities, when nature changes the conditions of the project, it may mean a whole new set of challenges for a project to deal with. Though the replacement of the crumbling North Meyers Road Bridge over the Yakima River had the usual complications of permitting, design, and budgeting, what was not anticipated was that high river flows would change the course of the river just prior to the start of construction. In 2003, Yakima County hired BergerABAM to design the replacement for the old bridge. Years were spent carefully negotiating and obtaining rights-of-way from landowners and the Yakima Nation. Meanwhile, the design and environmental process were advanced to obtained state and federal permits, along with federal and other funding for the project. Just as the County was completing the final stages of securing right-of-way easements for the project, the Yakima River changed course and caused a 30-foot section of the southern bridge approach to scour way.

It meant that the design had to be reviewed and revised, construction schedules modified, and environmental effects of this change had to go through reconsultation with state and federal agencies and project stakeholders. Utility lines adjacent the bridge would be challenging and expensive to relocate. Even access for evaluation of the river changes was challenging, and a drone was used to examine and assess the new river dynamics. At the same time, to retain federal funding, the in-water work windows for this project could not be revised. (continued on page 2)

To update your contact information, please email newsletter@abam.com EDITORS/CONTRIBUTORS Nora BretaĂąa, Karen Harbaugh, Lauren Hurst, Jana Roy, and Lynn Enebrad DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Ailoan Che, Lauren Hurst, and Jana Roy

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Inside/Out Newsletter | Spring 2018 | Issue 69  

BergerABAM is a consulting firm offering services in the areas of planning, civil and structural engineering, architecture, environmental se...

Inside/Out Newsletter | Spring 2018 | Issue 69  

BergerABAM is a consulting firm offering services in the areas of planning, civil and structural engineering, architecture, environmental se...