Richardson Funeral Home

Page 1

1 Our family
your family
putting
first
2 Page 4 Welcome Page 5 Our Valued Staff Page 6 ............................. What Our Families Say Page 7 ............................................. Our Services Page 11 Veteran Services Page 13 Frequently Asked Questions Page 15 ....................................... Planning Ahead Page 22 Legal Issues Page 24 What is Grief? Contents The Most Valuable Asset in Real Estate… Family Transitioning a loved one to a new environment or selling their home that has been loved and cared for can be stressful and overwhelming. Easing this burden for you and your family is my priority. You will have my individual attention handling your unique family situations while prioritizing sensitivity, ensuring the experience is as seamless as possible. Global Real Estate Advisor Licensed in Arizona & California M: 480.262.7554 E: lauren@laurenmhouse.com A: 7025 E Via Soleri Drive #125, Scottsdale, AZ 85251 PATIENT | CARING | COMPASSIONATE Lauren House

Welcome To Our Funeral Home

Proudly Family Owned and Operated

We provide individualized funeral services designed to meet the needs of each family. Our staff of dedicated professionals is available to assist you in making funeral service arrangements. From casket choices to funeral flowers, we will guide you through all aspects of the funeral service.

We invite you to contact us with your questions, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Richardson Funeral Home 2621 S Rural Road

Tempe, AZ 85282

Call: 1-480-449-1000

Email: question@richardsonfuneralhome.org

Our Valued Staff

Our staff is comprised of dedicated and licensed professionals with the experience to answer all your questions regarding our services. Please feel free to contact any of our staff members at any time.

troy@richardsonfuneralhome.org

Troy began his funeral service career in 1988 at his hometown funeral home, Banta-Torrey Funeral Home in Alma, Nebraska. One night while in high school, he attended a career fair where he spent the evening speaking to a local funeral director. From this night on, he knew he wanted to make funeral service his career. In 1994, while in college, he worked at the Powers Funeral Home in Oskaloosa, Iowa. He received his degree in Pre-Mortuary Science from William Penn College in Oskaloosa, Iowa in 1996. He then went on to obtain his degree in Funeral Service from Mid-America College in Jeffersonville, Indiana in 1997. Troy became a licensed funeral director in 1998 in the State of Iowa. He relocated to Tempe, Arizona in December of 1999 and in February 2000 received his Arizona Funeral Director and Embalmer’s Licenses. He also received his Insurance license in the State of Arizona in 2002.

Over the next several years Troy has worked at several funeral homes in the Tempe, Chandler, and Mesa areas until realizing a life-long dream to start his own funeral home. Richardson Funeral Home is the culmination of his 20+-year journey working with families during one of their hardest times. Troy is an avid sports fan and was a member of the William Penn College Men’s Golf Team while in college. His passion for the University of Nebraska football team and the Arizona Cardinals is evident. Troy has been married to his wife, Sandra, for 17 years, and has a son, Bennett. Troy is an active member of the Tempe South Rotary Club, Tempe Chamber of Commerce, the National Funeral Directors Association, the Arizona Funeral Cemetery and Cremation Association, and the Better Business Bureau.

With over twenty years of experience in the funeral industry, Tim is a seasoned funeral professional. His desire is to help grieving families and loved ones as they go through their time of need, during what is one of the most difficult experiences of their lives. Tim constantly seeks to innovate with embalming techniques and has invented, developed, and produced various products and chemicals to that end. His ultimate goal is to provide a needed service and to be a consummate professional in all aspects of the business. Tim is licensed in the State of Arizona as Funeral Director and Embalmer.

Julie began her career in the funeral industry in 2013, almost by accident. During her senior year of high school, she had to write an essay of what she wanted to do when she graduated, she couldn’t pinpoint a specific career, just that she had a very strong desire to help people and make a difference in the world. When she started in the funeral industry, she realized she was fulfilling her dream. Julie grew up in Utah and moved to Arizona shortly after graduating from high school. Though she did not grow up in Arizona, she has strong family ties here, so she immediately felt at home. Julie received her degree in Human Services in 2013. When Julie is not working, you can find her spending time with her son, finding new exotic house plants to add to her collection, spending time outside, or just enjoying an evening in.

5
Tim Adkins Licensed Funeral Director & Embalmer Troy Richardson Owner/Licensed Funeral Director, Embalmer & Insurance Agent E: Julie VerHoef Office Manager/Funeral Arranger & Licensed Insurance Agent E: julie@richardsonfuneralhome.org Polly Bosworth Funeral/Visitation Attendant Kelly Rae Whitt Funeral/Visitation Attendant Pastor Fred Morse Funeral/Visitation Attendant Tom Mansfield Funeral/Visitation Attendant

What Our Families Say Our Services

“Troy was very comforting and led us through the process that we didn’t know much about. He was very attentive and had everything done for mom’s services so we didn’t have to worry about it.”

“Funeral Homes are the kind of business that a family needs to trust when losing a loved one. Troy has earned that trust from my family when we recently suffered an unexpected loss. We had no idea who we could trust, or what we would do. My gut led me to Troy. His communication and customer service was amazing! He helped guide us through our responsibilities in Arizona, while planning an out of state burial. He treated us with kindness and respect, and spent time talking to me like we had known each other for years. I trust Troy to handle any of our future needs, The facility is beautiful and clean, and everyone was so friendly.”

“Thank you so much to Troy and staff for everything and for your patience and understanding during this difficult time. They helped us from start to finish and worked with all of our (we have a large family) requests. We had a regular service (viewing), then dad was cremated, and we had the interment at the National Cemetery. Both services were beautiful.”

“The team at Richardson Funeral Home is exceptional. I had to plan a memorial service from out of state and Troy Richardson made the process so seamless. He was able to recommend things I had not considered and welcomed the ideas I already planned. In the end, we had a beautiful service with over 100 people in attendance. Troy and Tim handled all the details from parking to flower and food deliveries. In my opinion, the facility was much nicer than reflected in the photos. Since I was unable to see it in person prior to the service, I was very happy when I walked inside and found such a warm, welcoming environment. I truly cannot thank this team enough for all their hard work and attention to detail! I know the Arredondo family will be working with Richardson for many years to come.”

“Our family couldn’t be happier with the professional and compassionate help Troy and his staff provided. There was never any pressure or up-selling, just caring support as we navigated a difficult time. From making the arrangements, to managing the services, we were in good hands and could focus on our family. We highly recommend Richardson Funeral Home.”

A ceremony, whether simple or elaborate, traditional or contemporary, provides family and friends the occasion to say a final “good-bye”. A funeral represents a purposeful opportunity to reflect on the meaning of life and the impact that meaning has for the family and friends. This time is important because it gives the grieving family a chance to share their memories and support one another.

There is no single proper way to plan a funeral service. The service is meant to express the personality and life of your loved one. The choices you make will determine its significance for you as you create a meaningful experience for everyone.

Traditional funerals usually involve a visitation, followed by a funeral service in a church or other place of worship.

Family or religious traditions are often a factor for choosing a burial. Decisions need to be made on whether the body needs to be embalmed, what kind of casket to use and if it will be opened or closed, what cemetery to use, and what to put on the gravestone.

Pre-Planning a funeral is a great way to get peace of mind that your final wishes will be met. It also eases the burden on your loved ones at a time of stress and grief.

Our goal here at Richardson Funeral Home is to help people fulfill their loved one’s wishes, arrange a personal and meaningful service, and for those who wish to plan their funeral ahead of time to put together personalized pre-arrangements.

Traditional Services

Whether you choose burial or cremation, a funeral service is an important part of honoring your loved one and starting the healing process. We offer service options that are meaningful and affordable.

Cremation Services

We offer several service options for families that choose cremation which can include a full service funeral, a memorial service, or something more private, as well as permanent resting place options for the cremated remains.

Personalization

Our funeral directors are experts in helping to create meaningful services that are unique and honor your loved one in ways that are special and meaningful. We offer several ways to personalize a service from tribute videos to keepsakes, to live streaming for family and friends that cannot attend in person.

Veterans Services

There is no greater honor than serving those who have served our country. We help you get the benefits and provide a service worthy of a veteran.

7
“Amazing experience. It’s a breath of fresh air especially when dealing with such a hard emotional situation to have such a great customer service and the personal touch as well as advice. Highly recommend.”
Kirsten A. Glendale, Los Angeles, CA

Visitation

This time is set aside for family and friends to gather together to say goodbye, while being in the comfort of those closest to them. We can personalize the visitation to be as unique as your loved one with a tribute video, items or displays that were important to your loved one, or simply pictures displayed. We will work with your family to design the perfect gathering experience.

Funeral Service

The funeral service can be held in our chapel, a church, or any other venue the family chooses. We work with our families to design a service that honors their loved one with stories, music, or scripture. We also have life celebrants that lead services where clergy may not be chosen. Our celebrants are trained in creating experiences that help start the healing process.

Graveside Service

A graveside or committal service is typically held immediately following the funeral service but it can also be a small intimate gathering of those closest to you.

Traditional Funeral Service followed by Cremation

Many families find meaning and beauty in a traditional funeral service. With a traditional service combined with cremation, you can still choose to have a final viewing, visitation or wake, and a funeral service. However instead of in-ground burial, the funeral will be followed by cremation. Depending on your wishes, the ashes may be either returned to your family for storage in an urn, scattered, or interred in a columbarium. This option will include fees for the funeral services as well as the fees associated with the cremation itself.

Memorial Service

The funeral service can be held in our chapel, a church, or any other venue the family chooses. We work with our families to design a service that honors their loved one with stories, music, or scripture. We also have life celebrants that lead services where clergy may not be chosen. Our celebrants are trained in creating experiences that help start the healing process.

Burying the Urn

Similar to a casket, the in-ground burial of the urn allows for a final resting place.

Headstone

A headstone is designed and placed on the grave to permanently memorialize your loved one and mark the final resting place of their remains.

Scattering the ashes

Some families find comfort scattering the cremated remains in a place that was special to their loved one.

9 8

Personalization Services

When searching for ways to personalize a funeral service, remember the moments you spent with the person and try to highlight the qualities that she or he are remembered for. Consider hobbies, subjects of interest and places where the person spent much of his or her time. It can help to make lists of their passions, achievements and memories you shared together. There are a number of ways that these lists can be incorporated into a service:

Photos and albums

There are many opportunities to display photos at a funeral service. Poster boards with photo collages can be placed on easels for display. Flat screen TV monitors can be used to display pictures or a slideshow during calling hours or just prior to the services. Photographs can be printed in the memorial folders, registry book or on urns.

Videos

A DVD video is a wonderful way to share your loved one’s life with others. It can be personalized with your special photos and music. These videos become keepsakes that you can share with your family for generations.

Artwork

Artwork of the deceased or art created in tribute is a beautiful addition to a service. Sculptures, a slideshow of drawings or displaying artwork throughout the funeral home helps people learn more about a life that was cherished.

Music

Live or pre-recorded music can be relaxing and comforting to those who have come to the service. Some other ways music can be used, is to record a CD with the deceased’s favorite songs or songs that he or she wrote or to have musically inclined family or friends perform at the funeral service.

Readings of Poetry & Literature

Passages from the deceased’s favorite books or poems that capture the essence of life help create a service infused with wisdom and words to remember. You can also invite friends and family members to read passages or poems of their choice or write their own pieces to share.

Veteran Services

Many of us take our freedoms for granted, but our staff at Richardson Funeral Home proudly acknowledges the sacrifices made by those who have served our country through their patriotism, love of country and willingness to protect others.

Our staff is committed to providing quality service and professional assistance to help families complete the necessary forms to obtain benefits that are provided through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs for deceased veterans.

What are VA burial benefits and memorial items?

The VA burial benefits are designed to assist service members, veterans, and their families plan and pay for a burial or memorial service in a VA national cemetery. Memorial items are provided through the Veterans Affairs to honor the service of those who have served the country.

Who qualifies for burial benefits and burial in a national cemetery?

• Veterans, service members, spouses, and dependents may be eligible for burial in a VA national cemetery, as well as other benefits, if they meet one of the requirements listed below:

• A veteran who didn’t receive a dishonorable discharge

• A service member who died while on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty for training

• The spouse or minor child of a veteran, even if the veteran died first

• In some cases, the unmarried adult dependent child of a veteran

11

What are military funeral honors and a committal service?

Military funeral honors include the playing of “Taps,” a rifle detail, a color guard and uniformed service members who properly fold and present the United States flag to the family. These flags are typically given to the deceased’s next of kin or close friend. In order for the survivors to qualify to receive the burial flag, the veteran or reservist must be described by at least one of the following:

• Served in wartime

• Died while serving on active duty after May 27, 1941

• Served after January 31, 1955

• Served in peacetime and left military service before June 27, 1950, after serving at least one enlistment or because of a disability that was caused - or made worse - by their active military service

• Served in the Selected Reserves, or served in the military forces of the Philippines while in service of the United States and died on or after April 25, 1951.

You must file a claim for a non-service-connected burial allowance within two years after the veteran’s burial or cremation. There is no time limit to file for a service-connected burial, plot or interment allowance.

You can apply online at https://www.va.gov/burials-andmemorials/application/530/introduction or by mail after completing the VA Form 21P-530.

A veteran who didn’t receive a dishonorable discharge or a service member who died while on active duty may be eligible for a headstone or marker if they meet certain requirements.

To find out if your deceased loved one qualifies, visit https:// www.va.gov/burials-memorials/memorial-items/headstonesmarkers-medallions/

Frequently Asked Questions

We have heard lots of questions, and chosen to provide you with the answers to some of the more common questions relating to a funeral.

Why have a Funeral?

Social Security Number

Veteran’s Discharge or Claim Number Education

Marital Status

Contact your clergy. Decide on time and place of funeral or memorial service. This can be done at the funeral home.

What are burial benefits and how do I apply?

The veterans death benefits help cover the burial, funeral and transportation costs associated with the deceased’s services and disposition. For those being buried in a national cemetery, survivors can receive assistance with the burial and funeral costs, the plot or internment, and the transporting of the veteran’s remains for burial.

The Department of Veteran Affairs also provides a headstone for unmarked graves of an eligible deceased veteran at no charge. To request a headstone, grave marker, or niche marker, fill out the VA Form 10-1330 and send to:

Department of Veteran Affairs

5109 Russell Road, Quantico, VA 22134-3903

For more information regarding VA burial benefits and memorial items, visit https://www.va.gov/burials-memorials/ or contact the VA office at 1-800-827-1000.

Funerals fill an important role for those mourning the loss of a loved one. By providing surviving family and friends with an atmosphere of care and support in which to share thoughts and feelings about death, funerals are the first step in the healing process. It is the traditional way to recognize the finality of death. Funerals are recognized rituals for the living to show their respect for the dead and to help survivors begin the grieving process. You can have a full funeral service even for those choosing cremation. Planning a personalized ceremony or service will help begin the healing process. Overcoming the pain is never easy, but a meaningful funeral or tribute will help.

What does a Funeral Director do?

• Pick up the deceased and transport the body to the funeral home (anytime day or night)

• Notify proper authorities, family and/or relatives

• Arrange and prepare death certificates

• Provide certified copies of death certificates for insurance and benefit processing

• Work with the insurance agent, Social Security or Veterans Administration to ensure that necessary paperwork is filed for receipt of benefits

• Prepare & submit obituary to the newspapers of your choice

• Bathe and embalm the deceased body, if necessary

• Prepare the body for viewing including dressing & cosmetizing

• Assist the family with funeral arrangements and purchase of casket, urn, burial vault and cemetery plot

• Schedule the opening and closing of the grave with cemetery personnel, if a burial is to be performed

• Coordinate with clergy if a funeral or memorial service is to be held

• Arrange a police escort and transportation to the funeral and/or cemetery for the family

• Order funeral sprays and other flower arrangements as the family wishes

• Provide Aftercare, or grief assistance, to the bereaved

What do I do when a death occurs?

The funeral home will help coordinate arrangements with the cemetery. Bring the following information to complete the State vital statistic requirements:

Birth Date

Birthplace

Father’s Name

Mother’s Name

The funeral home will assist you in determining the number of copies of the death certificates you will be needing and can order them for you.

Make a list of immediate family, close friends and employer or business colleagues. Notify each by phone.

Decide on appropriate memorial to which gifts may be made (church, hospice, library, charity or school).

Gather obituary information you want to include such as age, place of birth, cause of death, occupation, college degrees, memberships held, military service , outstanding work, list of survivors in immediate family. Include time and place of services. The funeral home will normally write article and submit to newspapers (newspaper will accept picture and they will be returned intact).

Arrange for members of family or close friends to take turns answering door or phone, keeping careful record of calls. If Social Security checks are automatic deposit, notify the bank of the death.

When I call, will someone come right away?

If you request immediate assistance, yes. If the family wishes to spend a short time with the deceased to say good-bye, that’s perfectly acceptable. Your funeral director will come when your time is right.

Should I choose Burial or Cremation?

Burial in a casket is the most common method of disposing of remains in the United States, although entombment also occurs. Cremation is increasingly selected because it can be less expensive and allows for the memorial service to be held at a more convenient time in the future when relatives and friends can come together.

A funeral service followed by cremation need not be any different from a funeral service followed by a burial. Usually, cremated remains are placed in urn before being committed to a final resting place. The urn may be buried, placed in an indoor or outdoor mausoleum or columbarium, or interred in a special urn garden that many cemeteries provide for cremated remains. The remains may also be scattered, according to state law.

Why have a public viewing?

Viewing is a part of many cultural and ethnic traditions. Many grief specialists believe that viewing aids the grief process by helping the bereaved recognize the reality of death. Viewing is encouraged for children, as long as the process is explained and the activity is voluntary.

13 12

What is the purpose of embalming?

Embalming sanitizes and preserves the body. Embalming makes it possible to lengthen the time between death and the final disposition, allowing family members time to arrange and participate in the type of service most comforting to them.

Does a dead body have to be embalmed, according to law?

The Federal Trade Commission says, “Except in certain special cases, embalming is not required by law. Embalming may be necessary, however, if you select certain funeral arrangements, such as a funeral with viewing. If you do not want embalming, you usually have the right to choose an arrangement that does not require you to pay for it, such as direct cremation or immediate burial.”

Why are funerals so expensive?

When compared to other major life events like births and weddings, funerals are not expensive. A wedding costs at least three times as much; but because it is a happy event, wedding costs are rarely criticized. A funeral home is a 24-hour, labor-intensive business, with extensive facilities (viewing rooms, chapels, limousines, hearses, etc.), these expenses must be factored into the cost of a funeral.

Additionally, the cost of a funeral includes not only merchandise, like caskets, but the services of a funeral director in making arrangements; filing appropriate forms; dealing with doctors, ministers, florists, newspapers and others; and seeing to all the necessary details. Funeral directors look upon their profession as a service, but it is also a business. Like any business, funeral homes must make a profit to exist.

Do I have to make different funeral arrangements if I chose cremation?

It really depends entirely on how you wish to commemorate a life. One of the advantages of cremation is that it provides you with increased flexibility when you make your funeral and cemetery arrangements. You might, for example, choose to have a funeral service before the cremation; a memorial service at the time of cremation or after the cremation with the urn present; or a committal service at the final disposition of cremated remains. Funeral or memorial services can be held in a place of worship, a funeral home or in a crematory chapel.

What can be done with the cremated remains?

With cremation, your options are numerous. The cremains can be interred in a cemetery plot, i.e., earth burial, retained by a family member, usually in an urn, scattered on private property, or at a place that was significant to the deceased. (It would always be advisable to check for local regulations regarding scattering in a public place-your funeral director can help you with this.)

Today, there are many different types of memorial options from which to choose. Memorialization is a time-honored tradition that has been practiced for centuries. A memorial serves as a tribute to a life lived and provides a focal point for remembrance, as well as a record for future generations. The type of memorial you choose is a personal decision.

What is memorialization for a cremation?

You might choose ground burial of the urn. If so, you may usually choose either a bronze memorial or monument. Cremation niches in columbariums are also available at many cemeteries. They offer the beauty of a mausoleum setting with the benefits of above ground placement of remains. Many cemeteries also offer scattering gardens. This area of a cemetery offers the peacefulness of a serene garden where family and friends can come and reflect.

Can we scatter the cremated remains?

If you wish to have your ashes scattered somewhere, it is important to discuss your wishes to be scattered ahead of time with the person or persons who will actually have to do the cremation ashes scattering ceremony, as they might want to let your funeral professional assist in the scattering ceremony. Funeral directors can also be very helpful in creating a meaningful and personal ash scattering ceremony that they will customize to fit your families specific desires. The services can be as formal or informal as you like. Scattering services can also be public or private. Again, it is advisable to check for local regulations regarding scattering in a public place-your funeral director can help you with this.

If I am cremated, can I be buried with my spouse even if he or she was in a casket?

Yes — Depending upon the cemetery’s policy, you may be able to save a grave space by having the cremains buried on top of the casketed remains of your spouse, or utilize the space provided next to him/her. Many cemeteries allow for multiple cremated remains to be interred in a single grave space.

What do I need to know about income tax when I lose a spouse?

Uncertainty about income tax issues can add to the stress experienced from the death of a spouse. You should meet with your family attorney and/or tax advisor as soon as possible to review your particular tax and estate circumstances. Bring a detailed list of your questions to the meeting. If you do not have an attorney or tax advisor, call the IRS toll-free at 800-829-1040 for answers to specific tax questions.

Is there financial help if I need it?

There are a number of options available, including:

• Determine if the deceased person qualifies for any entitlements. Check with the Social Security Administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and with your State Fund. Many people are entitled to get financial assistance with their funeral costs from these agencies if they qualify.

• Review all insurance policies the deceased person has, including life insurance. Some life insurance policies have coverage clauses for funeral related costs.

• Find local charities providing financial help for funeral expenses. Search for non profit organizations and for churches in your area.

• Talk to your funeral director about cremation optionsthese can be much less expensive depending on your choices.

Planning Ahead

Taking the time to make arrangements in advance is important for you and your loved ones. Doing so allows you to make logical, thoughtful arrangements your family will appreciate, as well as allowing you time to tend to every detail.

Benefits of Preplanning

Peace of Mind

All of your arrangements are guaranteed and will be carried out just as you have directed. You and your family can feel comfortable that although you won’t need the plans for years to come, when they are needed, they will be available and take care of. There is an immense peace knowing your wishes will be executed as you designed them, meaning those you care about will be able to remember you as you want them to.

Flexible Funding Options

When you plan a funeral in advance there are more options when it comes to funding a funeral. Pre arrangements can be paid for with a pre need insurance policy, life insurance, or other payment options. At the time of death, services must be paid in full, so it’s important to understand your options ahead of time.

Relieve the burden from loved ones

Did you know that often more than 150 decisions and tasks must be completed within the first 24 to 48 hours after an individual’s passing? By arranging your final wishes ahead of time, you can ensure that your loved ones don’t have to wrestle over those details and decisions during their time of emotional upheaval. The ability to know everything is taken care of will allow proper remembrance and the first steps of healing.

Make your Wishes Known

Sadly, many families experience disputes and hard feelings when arranging for a loved one’s unexpected death. Because memories of the loved one’s wishes sometimes contradict each other, disagreements can easily arise. Such infighting and disunity can drive bitter emotions and damage the healing process. By making your plans now, your loved ones don’t have to guess at what you may have wanted; they will know you were remembered as you wanted to be.

15 14

Common Questions about Preplanning

Can I transfer my plans to or from another funeral home?

If you have plans at another funeral home and would like to move them here, we will help you do that. If you move from the area and would like to transfer your arrangements to another funeral home, we will assist you with that as well. For those wanting to transfer a Pre Need trust from another mortuary, we will absorb any revocation fee. There is no penalty or additional cost to you.

What steps are involved in pre arranging a funeral?

The first step would be to write down your wishes. Indicate if you would prefer burial or cremation. Write down your ideas for the service you would like, cemetery choice, etc. If you’ve made those choices, or even if you’re unsure, schedule a time to meet with one of our funeral directors who can explain the different service options, merchandise choices, as well as the different ways to pay for the funeral.

What information do I need to prearrange a funeral? You’ll need information basic about yourself or the person you are planning for, such as date of birth, marital status, parent’s full names, etc. Besides the biological information, you’ll need to choose burial or cremation, what type of service you’d like, what cemetery to use, etc. Our caring staff will help you with this process.

Do I have to pay in advance?

Preplanning is merely making your wishes known; however, most families who do this choose to pre-fund their funeral as well. Doing so will relieve the financial burden from your family and offers peace of mind to you.

I wished to spare you as much anxiety, doubt and confusion as possible at the time of my death, so in this booklet, I have suggested some arrangements in advance.

This booklet includes vital statistics, funeral service guidelines and cemetery requests, which are all important to share with the funeral director while assisting you to plan my service.

The booklet also includes more personal material for eulogies, obituaries and other remembrances as well as advice and guidance on other important issues you may come across.

Please accept these arrangements in the spirit they are given: with love, hoping to give you comfort and help you to remember the times we shared.

17 16
Signature ......................................................................... Witness............................................................................. Date .................................................................................. Date .................................................................................. Person to be notified first upon my death: Name Relationship..................................................................... Address ............................................................................ Telephone Notes .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... Information For Obituary Place of death Spouse ............................................................................. Date of death Married for number of years ........................................... Children, their spouses and their places of residence .......................................................................................... Siblings , their spouses and places of residence .......................................................................................... Education .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... Clubs & Lodges Special interests, hobbies & pets .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... Memorial Donations To My Family And Loved Ones
19 18 Pallbearers 1 2........................................................................................ 3........................................................................................ 4........................................................................................ 5........................................................................................ 6 7 8 Honorary Pallbearers 1 2........................................................................................ 3........................................................................................ 4........................................................................................ 5........................................................................................ 6........................................................................................ 7 8 Conducting Family Prayer Organist Chorister Opening Song Opening Prayer ................................................................ Life Sketch ....................................................................... Speaker ............................................................................ Musical Selection............................................................. Speaker ............................................................................ Concluding Remarks ....................................................... Closing Song .................................................................... Closing Prayer Graveside Services Cemetery Dedication of the Grave Preferences For My Service Full Name (First, Middle, Last) Address City County.................................................................................Zip Code Social Security Number Date of Birth........................................................................Gender Place of Birth (City, State) Occupation ............................................................................................................................................................................ Industry.................................................................................................................................................................................. Military Service/Branch ......................................................................................................................................................... Marital Status ......................................................................................................................................................................... Maiden Name......................................................................................................................................................................... Name of Spouse (incl. Maiden Name) .................................................................................................................................. Father’s Name........................................................................................................................................................................ Mother’s Name (incl. Maiden Name) .................................................................................................................................... Notes ...................................................................................................................................................................................... My preference for the location of the Service or Celebration of Life: Funeral Home Outside Venue Place of Worship Other Address of venue, place of worship or other location: .......................................................................................... Notes .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... .......................................................................................... Vital Information About Me Community Organizations or Clubs that may participate .......................................................................................... I would like the following religious beliefs expressed: .......................................................................................... Favorite poem, verse or scripture .......................................................................................... Some significant accomplishments in my life .......................................................................................... One of my fondest memories .......................................................................................... One of the greatest inspirations in my life If I could live my life over again, I would change .......................................................................................... Personal Life Review
21 20 Favorite places....................................................................................................................................................................... Favorite colour flower, food, etc ........................................................................................................................................... I want my family to remember me for .................................................................................................................................. A message to my family and friends ..................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................ Other notes The following are my wishes regarding my final resting place. Name of Cemetery Address City/Town/Country Property, Crypt or Niche Owned? Yes No If yes, specify location written on cemetery purchase agreement ................................................................................................................................................................................................ Final Resting Place Burial Mausoleum Interment following cremation Niche Other ................................................................................ .......................................................................................... Marker or Monument Purchased? Yes No Monument company name .......................................................................................... Inscription Instructions Reception Location: Funeral Home Outside Venue Place of Service Other Details Notes ..........................................................................................

Wills, probate, joint property, estate taxes, selecting estate trustees/attorneys for property and personal care and other issues may appear somewhat intimidating at first.

Fortunately, with a little guidance and preparation, dealing with such matters does not have to be so overwhelming. Planning ahead and revising your plan often will help avoid unnecessary grief and confusion in the end.

‘Estate Planning’ includes all of the following issues and documents.

Wills

A Last Will and Testament is one of the most important legal documents a person can create during his or her lifetime. If a person dies without a Will they are said to have died “intestate” and state laws will determine how and to whom the person’s assets will be distributed.

If a person dies without a Will the beneficiaries can not dispute the court’s distribution of that person’s estate under the intestacy laws. Even if that person expressed different wishes verbally during their lifetime the statutes control the distribution. With a valid Will, a person can legally determine how their property will be distributed… and to whom. Most intestacy statutes distribute a deceased person’s assets between a surviving spouse and their children or to only the children if there is not a spouse. If there are no surviving children the assets then are generally distributed to extended family members.

Powers Of Attorney

Power of attorney (POA) is a legal document granting authority to a trusted person to act on your behalf. That individual, called an attorney in fact, is empowered to manage your financial, business and legal affairs. Power of attorney can be broad or limited to specific matters. Depending on the terms, that person could:

• Pay bills

• Manage banking and investments

• Sign documents

• Make business decisions

• Sell property

• Hire professional help

Powers of attorney can be granted at any time if you are ready to turn over the reins, or it can be set up to “spring” at a future point if and when you can no longer manage your own affairs. A durable power of attorney means that the powers endure after incapacity until you either recover or pass away.

Probate What is probate?

When a person dies, their assets are distributed in the probate process. Probate is a general term for the entire process of administration of estates of deceased persons, including those without wills, with court supervision. If a person dies with a will, a petition to probate the will is filed with the probate court in the county where the deceased resided at the time of death, asking for letters testamentary to be issued, giving the executor authority to handle the estate affairs. If a person dies with a valid will, an executor is named to handle the distribution of the estate. If the person dies without a valid will, the court appoints an administrator to distribute the decedent’s assets according to the state’s laws of intestacy.

The court will issue letters of administration, also called letters testamentary, to the administrator, giving the authority to handle the affairs of the deceased. An heirship affidavit may also be used to conduct estate affairs when a small estate is involved. In cases where the decedent didn’t own property valued at more than a certain amount, which varies by state, the estate may go through a small estate administration process, rather than the formal probate process.

Information Gathering

Upon death, one of the first things to do is to gather as much information as possible. It is important to look for and gather any Wills, deeds, financial documents, notes and insurance policies that the deceased may have.

Before estate matters can be persued (i.e transferring a house or automobile, other legal matters), a copy of the death certificate is also required.

Speak to the funeral home about obtaining certified copies of the death certificate (as some agencies will not accept photocopies).

23 22
Legal Issues

What Is Grief?

“Grief is reaching out for someone who’s always been there, only to find when you need them the most, one last time, they’re gone.’’

The death of a loved one is life’s most painful event. People’s reactions to death remain one of society’s least understood and most off-limits topics for discussion. Often grievers are left totally alone in dealing with their pain, loneliness, and isolation.

Grief is a natural emotion that follows death. It hurts. Sadness, denial, guilt, physical discomfort, and sleeplessness are some of the symptoms of grief. It is like an open wound that must heal. At time it seems as if this healing will never happen. While some of life’s spontaneity begins to return, it never seems to get back to the way it was. It is still incomplete. We know, however, that these feelings of being incomplete can disappear.

Healing is a process of allowing ourselves to feel, experience, and accept the pain. In other words, we give ourselves permission to heal. Allowing ourselves to accept these feelings is the beginning of that process. The healing process can take much less time than we have been led to believe. There are two missing parts. One is a safe, loving, professionally guided atmosphere in which to express our feelings; the other is knowing how and what to communicate.

The Grieving Process

When we experience a major loss, grief is the normal and natural way our mind and body react. Everyone grieves differently, but at the same time there are common patterns people tend to share.

For example, someone experiencing grief usually moves through a series of emotional stages, such as shock, numbness, guilt, anger, and denial. Physical responses are typical also, they can include: sleeplessness, inability to eat or concentrate, lack of energy, and lack of interest in activities previously enjoyed. Time always plays an important role in the grieving process.

As the days, weeks and months go by, the person who is experiencing loss moves through emotional and physical reactions that lead toward acceptance, healing and getting on with life as fully as possible.

Sometimes a person can be overwhelmed or bogged down in the grieving process. Serious losses are never easy to deal with, but someone who is having trouble beginning to actively re-engage in life after a few months, should consider getting professional help.

For example, if continual depression or physical symptoms such as loss of appetite, inability to sleep, or chronic lack of energy persists, it is probably time to see a doctor.

Allow Yourself To Mourn

Someone you love has died. You are now faced with the difficult , but important, need to mourn. Mourning is the open expression of your thoughts and feelings regarding the death and the person who has died. It is an essential part of healing.

You are beginning a journey that is often frightening, painful, overwhelming and sometimes lonely. This section provides practical suggestions to help you move toward healing in your personal grief experience.

Realize Your Grief Is Unique

Your grief is unique. No one will grieve in exactly the same way. Your experience will be influenced by a variety of factors: the relationship you had with the person who died, the circumstances surrounding the death, your emotional support system, and your cultural and religious background.

As a result of these factors, you will grieve in your own special way. Don’t try to compare your experience with that of other people or to adopt assumptions about just how long your grief should last. Consider taking a ‘’one-day-at-a-time’’ approach that allows you to grieve at your own pace.

Talk About Your Grief

Express your grief openly. By sharing your grief outside yourself, healing occurs. Ignoring your grief won’t make it go away; talking often makes you feel better. Allow yourself to speak from your heart, not just your head.

Doing so doesn’t mean you are losing control or going ‘’crazy.’’ It is a normal part of your grief journey. Find caring friends and relatives who will listen without judging. Seek out those persons who will walk ‘’with’’ not ‘’in front of’’ or ‘’behind’’ you in your journey through grief.

Avoid people who are critical or try to steal your grief from you. They may tell you, ‘’keep your chin up’’ or ‘’carry on’’ or ‘’be happy.’’ While these comments may be well intended, you do not have to accept them. You have a right to express your grief; no one has the right to take it away.

Expect To Feel A Multitude Of Emotions

Experiencing a loss affects your head, heart, and spirit. So you may experience a variety of emotions as part of your grief. Confusion, disorganization, fear, guilt, relief, or explosive emotions are just a few of the emotions you may feel. Sometimes these emotions will follow each other within a short period of time, or they may occur simultaneously.

As strange as some of these emotions may seem, they are normal and healthy. Allow yourself to learn from these feelings. And don’t be surprised if out of nowhere you suddenly experience surges of grief, even at the most unexpected times.

These grief attacks can be frightening and leave you feeling overwhelmed. They are, however, a natural response to the death of someone loved. Find someone who understands your feelings and will allow you to talk about them.

Allow For Numbness

Feeling dazed or numb when someone loved dies is often part of your early grief experience. This numbness serves a valuable purpose: it gives your emotions time to catch up with what your mind has told you. This feeling helps create insulation from the reality of the death until you are more able to tolerate what you don’t want to believe.

Be Tolerant Of Your Physical And Emotional Limits

Your feelings of loss and sadness will probably leave you fatigued. Your ability to think clearly and make decisions may be impaired and your low energy levels may naturally slow you down. Respect what your body is telling you. Nurture yourself. Get daily rest. Eat balanced meals. Lighten your schedule as much as you can. Caring for you doesn’t mean feeling sorry for yourself; it means using your survival skills.

Develop A Support System

Reaching out to others and accepting support is often difficult, particularly when you hurt so much. But the most compassionate self-action you can do during this difficult time is to find a support system of caring friends and relatives who will provide the understanding you need. Find those people who encourage you to be yourself and acknowledge your feelings - both happy and sad.

Make Use Of Ritual

The funeral ritual does more than acknowledge the death of someone loved. It helps provide the support of caring people. Most importantly, the funeral is a way to express your grief outside yourself. If you eliminate this ritual, you often set yourself up to repress your feelings, and cheat everyone who cares a chance to pay tribute to someone who was, and always will be, loved.

Embrace Your Spirituality

If faith is part of your life, express it in ways that seem appropriate to you. Allow yourself to be around people who understand and support your religious beliefs. If you are angry with God because of the death of someone you loved, recognize this feeling as a normal part of your grieving process. Find someone to talk with who won’t be critical of whatever thoughts and feelings you need to explore. You may hear someone say, ‘’With faith, you don’t need to grieve.’’ Don’t believe it. Having your personal faith does not insulate you from needing to talk out and explore your thoughts and feelings. To deny your grief is to invite problems that build up inside you. Express your faith, but express your grief as well.

25 24

Allow A Search For Meaning

You may find yourself asking, “Why did he/she die?” “Why this way?” “Why now?” This search for meaning is another normal part of the healing process. Some questions have answers, some do not. Actually, the healing occurs in the opportunity to pose the questions, not necessarily in answering them. Find a supportive friend who will listen responsively as you search for meaning.

Treasure Your Memories

Memories are one of the best legacies that exist after someone dies. Treasure them. Share them with your family and friends. Recognise that your memories may make you laugh or cry. In either case, they are a lasting part of the relationship that you had with a very special person in your life.

Move Toward Your Grief And Heal

The capacity to love requires the necessity to grieve when someone you love dies. You can’t heal unless you openly express your grief. Denying your grief will only make it become more confusing and overwhelming. Reconciling your grief will not happen quickly. Remember that grief is a process, not an event.

Be patient and tolerant with yourself. Never forget that the death of a loved one changes your life forever. It’s not that you won’t be happy again; it’s simply that you will never be exactly the same as you were before the death.

Accepting A Loss

For each of us - rich or poor, young or old - there are times in our lives when we must face and deal with personal losses along with the pain and sorrow they cause. Examples that come easily to mind are the death of a parent, spouse, child, or other close family member or friend. Many other events and transitions also bring with them sadness and a need to grieve:

• Being told you have a serious, possibly terminal illness.

• Having to give up interests and activities that have been a major part of your life.

• Seeing serious decline in the mental or physical health of someone you love.

• Retiring from career or voluntary activity that has helped shape who you are and what you stand for.

• Losing a significant part of your independence and mobility; even giving up driving can be a significant loss for many people.

• Moving out of your home.

• Saying goodbye to a favourite pet.

Losses such as these are simply part of life. Like their counterparts among the joyful occasions in our lifetime - the birth of a child or grandchild, a celebration of marriage, an enduring friendshipthey are part of what it means to share in the human experience. The emotions they create in us are part of living, as well.

27 26

Important Notes

29 28
31 30
32 2621 S Rural Road, Tempe, AZ 85282 T: 1-480-449-1000 E: question@richardsonfuneralhome.org W: richardsonfuneralhome.org