Page 1

BEREA COLLEGE: Forestry, Arts + Crafts, Fine Arts Focus Group  Attendees:  Tim Glotzbach, Director Student Crafts    tim_glotzbach@berea.edu  Clint Patterson, Forester        clint_patterson@berea.edu  Tim Jordan, Public Relations Director     tim_jordan@berea.edu  Tom Anagnos, H&C          tanagnos@hcarchitects.com  Patrick Ladendecker, H+B         pladendecker@hellmuth‐bicknese.com  Dan Hellmuth, H+B          dhellmuth@hellmuth‐bicknese.com    Distribution:  Building Team           BC‐BuildingTeam  Administration Committee         BC‐AdminCommittee  Virgil Burnside           virgil_burnside@berea.edu   Gary Mahoney, Technology        gary_mahoney@berea.edu  Lisa Kriner, Art Department        lisa_kriner@berea.edu  Chris Chivetta, H&C          cchivetta@hcarchitects.com   Dennis Lammert, H&C        dlammert@hcarchitects.com   Tom Anagnos, H&C           tanagnos@hcarchitects.com   Nancy Sopuch, H&C          nsopuch@hcarchitects.com  Morgan McIlwain          morgan@m2ddesign.com   Ron Finney            rfinney@hellmuth‐bicknese.com   Pat Ladendecker          pladendecker@hellmuth‐bicknese.com   Ralph Bicknese          rbicknese@hellmuth‐bicknese.com   David Macaulay    dmacaulay@kc.rr.com   Jeff Moody    jmoody@williamscreek.net  Matt Ford    mford@solutions‐aec.com  Pat Brinker    pbrinker@solutions‐aec.com      Meeting Location: Boone Tavern, Coyle Room Time: 10:30am – 11:30am    Purpose of Meeting 

Kick‐off meeting of the Forestry, Arts and Crafts, and Fine Arts focus group to establish goals of  the group, interaction with the residential hall design process, impact on programming and  design, materials and distance requirements of the Living Building Challenge, contribution to  LEED Credits as well as student interest in designing and helping build furniture for the project  and supplying local wood and stone masonry for the structure, interior finish, landscaping and  furniture.  Also to explore the use of art work within the residence hall to display student works 


or to integrate them into the site or building as well as the integration of ceramics, weaving and  ironwork into the project.    Berea College Forest ‐ Wood Supply & Logistics  ƒ

From the timber supply side there is plenty of timber available.  Currently there are  large tracts of mature stands which need thinning. 

ƒ

More critical are the logistics of getting to the timber to the mill, the challenge of getting  loggers in on schedule and with enough capacity to meet volume requirements which  may require more than one logger.  The weather can play a large role and can delay the  process if the ground is too wet. 

ƒ

Need to look at local sawmill options, best to saw on or near site and only have to travel  3 miles.  Much of the wood for the SENS had to be shipped all over in order to get it  processed. 

ƒ

Some of the local sawmill owners in the Berea area include:  o Eddie Saudi  o Harrods 

ƒ ƒ

Will need to so some research on other small specialty sawmills in the area. 

Kiln drying with be required for finish wood and furniture wood for varying lengths of  time depending on wood species, type of drying, when the wood is cut etc. 

ƒ

Heavy timbers for timber framing do not require kiln drying but the trees need to be cut  when the sap is down (from November 1st to March 1st) 

ƒ

Tech department has a small Woodmizer sawmill but it would not be practical to use  this for a larger scale project. 

ƒ

Clint currently has a smaller project for building a storage building using timber frame  construction from wood sourced from the Berea College Forest. 

ƒ

Logs are available in lengths from 32’ to 50’ especially the tulip poplar. 

ƒ

Heavy timbers need to be center cut to minimize twisting, off cuts could be sold or used  for other finish wood in the project. 

ƒ

Extra boards could be used by Woodcraft for other projects. 


ƒ

Would be helpful to find a like‐minded logger, woodworker that would take an interest  in the project. 

ƒ

Draft horses could be used for demonstration purposes but might be impractical to do  for all of the skidding due to timeline and volume required. 

ƒ

H+B will prepare task schedule for supply, design and manufacturing process to identify  pinch points to see whether this will be practical to use given the size of the project and  the quantity of material needed. 

ƒ

For furniture a higher grade lumber will be needed, lower grade lumber can be sold. 

Woodcraft ƒ

Students are looking at opportunities for creating real things and learning skills. 

ƒ

Working on furniture that will be used at the college creates a sense of excitement. ,  

ƒ

May also take better care of furniture as this process creates a sense of identity and  “ownership”. 

ƒ

In Danforth Chapel, an alumnus recently found the name of his father on the underside  of one of the chairs that his father had made while at Berea College. 

ƒ

Importance of tagging items for to provide identity. 

ƒ

Typical finishes used are furniture‐grade lacquer which might conflict with LBC or LEED  requirements for zero or low‐voc coatings. 

ƒ

Need to coordinate green finishes as opposed to typical finishes used.  Performance and  durability would be important considerations in the overall heavy use in the residential  hall. 

ƒ

Virgil Burnside from Residential life can assist in comparing the cost and style of  standard residential hall furniture versus what could be designed and built by students  at Woodcraft.  

Critical Timelines:  ƒ

Starting in September and continuing to December is the busy time for creating  furniture for the Berea College Craft Catalog and other outlets.  

ƒ

February/May/October are more open for other projects. 

Public Relations 


ƒ

Archival Images of Berea Forest, Arts and Crafts Historic Pictures of furniture made by  Berea College are available at the College Archives.  Contact:  Chris Miller, Curator of College Artifacts 

ƒ

Furniture made by students would provide a great opportunity to tell the Berea Story of  the continuing and evolving heritage of student participation in building the college. 

Furniture Logistics  ƒ

The furniture design would need to be carefully coordinated with room layouts. 

ƒ

Loftbed height needs to be coordinated with floor to floor height and ceiling height in  residence hall rooms. 

ƒ

Furniture size and layout options are related to residential hall room size. 

ƒ

Woodcraft has a kiln drying facility that is now used for drying brooms. 

ƒ

Gary Mahoney at Technology also has a solar kiln but with smaller capacity. 

Boone Tavern Experience  ƒ

The raw wood for Boone Tavern was purchased from a supplier which is more the norm. 

ƒ

Students were involved in design of furniture 

ƒ

Boone Tavern used mainly cherry for furniture wood, the typical woodcraft style is  colonial, shaker but for best results should relate to the building style. 

ƒ

Design of building should be coordinated with furniture with common themes. 

ƒ

Berea College is a strong liberal arts college with a small crafts program so larger scale  production has to be carefully considered and prepared for.  Also the primary purpose  of the Woodcraft is to teach students how to make furniture and other wood items not  commercial production in of itself although this is an important element.  

ƒ

National Website/Catalog is the main emphasis of the craft program. The Program trains  new students when they enter the school and provides Hands on training with  supervisor. There is an ongoing challenge in mixing the educational aspect of program  with manufacturing aspect but has been accomplished before and has the potential to  increase skill levels which have generally gone down over the years. 

ƒ

Don Coy is the Wood Studio Supervisor.   


ƒ

Fine Arts at Berea College are distinct from Arts & Crafts. 

New Sustainable Residential Hall  ƒ

The new residential hall will have quite different parameters than Boone Tavern.  The  design of the furniture will focus on a more durable and less elaborate (and hence less  expensive) approach. 

ƒ

Opportunity to engage the campus in with the design and construction of the residential  hall furniture with a Student Design Competition. 

ƒ

Design Considerations include:  o Moveable, Stackable  o Storage under beds  o Individually 

ƒ

Touch of were we are now (stylistically) 

ƒ

Importance of the uniqueness of built furniture and providing a sense of identity 

ƒ

Furniture could also be built ahead of time and can be put in storage. 

ƒ

Coordinate furniture design with facility standards 

ƒ

Currently Woodcraft is at the end point of labor capacity and would need to staff up to  accomplish this additional charge. 

ƒ

This process could engage students in most critical aspects and would be a good match  for 395/495 coursework.   

ƒ

Important aspect of providing identity and character in Student Residence that is so  often lacking. 

Local Materials  ƒ

Tim Glotzback incorporated some of the work on the SENS house into his class. 

Finish Wood  ƒ

Additional opportunity to integrate timber from college forest for casework, wood  paneling, stair rails etc. 

ƒ

Issue of shaping at college due to time and labor constraints versus having this  outsources locally.   


ƒ

Some of the species available that would be appropriate for either finish wood or  furniture include: 

‐ White oak  ‐ Red oak  ‐ Loblolly Pine   ‐ Yellow pine  ‐ Tulip Poplar  ‐ Specialty Woods  Cherry    Additional Opportunities  ƒ

Other Crafts that may be able to be integrated in to the project include:  ‐ Ceramics  ‐ Weaving  Met at the Log House Weaving Studio with Amy Judd, Weaving Studio Supervisor and  discusses the potential for integrating textiles into the chair seats to provide more  character and identity to the residential community.  Fine Arts, Contact Lisa Kriner  Custom made to spaces  Woven rugs  Wall hangings  Paintings  Ceramic tiles  (some ceramics were used in Boones Tavern, contracted with a California  company for production that was a former Berea Grad) 

Proposed Meeting Schedule:  ƒ

Once a month (Virtual Meeting) In‐person when in town. 

ƒ

Staff Point‐of‐contact: Tim Glotzbach 

ƒ

Student Point‐of‐Contact: ___________________ 

ƒ

(to be determined on recommendation by Tim Glotzbach. 


Programming Considerations  ƒ

Coordination between furniture and room layouts. 

ƒ

Opportunity to provide special places to highlight student crafts and fine arts. 

ƒ

Structural layout with timber frame construction. 


LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE REQUIREMENTS:  Imperative 13: Responsible Industry  The project must advocate for the creation and adoption of third‐party certified standards for  sustainable resource extraction and fair labor practices.  Applicable raw materials include stone  and rock, metal, and timber.  For timber, all wood must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), from salvage  sources, or from the intentional harvest of timber onsite for the purpose of clearing the area for  construction.  Imperative 14: Appropriate Sourcing  The project must incorporate place‐based solutions and contribute to the expansion of a  regional economy rooted in sustainable practices, products and services.  Source locations for materials and services must adhere to the following restrictions:   Imperative 20: Inspiration + Education  OPPORTUNITY: TO TELL THE BEREA COLLEGE STORY  “Learning by Living”: Berea College Sustainable Dormitory Project – now being written!  The Story of how the College was founded, how students participated in much of the early  construction and how this unique aspect of Berea College culture has evolved over time and  how this project could effect future direction.  The Story of the Berea College Forest, how it was acquired, how it has been managed over the  years, utilized by the college and how this project could .effect future direction.  How the  students have interacted with the forest.  The Story of the Berea College Farm, how it was acquired, how it has been managed over the  years, utilized by the college, how the student labor program interrelates with the farm work.   How the farm interacts with community.  The Story of the Students who participated in the design process, how this effected the process  what they learned from being part of it and how this changed the end building. 


LEED Credits:  Materials & Resources Credit 5.1

Local/Regional Materials, 10% Extracted, Processed &

Credit 5.2

Local/Regional Materials, 20% Extracted, Processed &

Credit 7

Manufactured Regionally

Materials or products that are extracted, harvested or recovered, manufactured within 500 miles of project site.

Manufactured Regionally

Certified Wood

Use a min. of 50% (based on cost) of woodbased materials/ products that are certified by FSC

Innovation & Design Process Credit 1.1

Innovation in Design: Local Sourcing + Manufacturing

Using timber resources from the Berea College Forest for structural finish wood and furniture.


BEREA COLLEGE: BEREA FOREST  Conversation with Clint Patterson, 12.22.2010  Contact Information  Work: 859‐985‐3587  Cell: 859‐625‐2817  Home: 859‐985‐7351  Logistics  Berea Forest is 3 miles from campus  FSC Certification  The Timber Inventory is currently in progress.  Fountains Forestry www.fountainforestry.com is  carrying out the inventory and field work will hopefully be completed in the next several  months and the final report is due December 31st at the latest which will include the  management plan, maps, digital GIS data, audit results, summaries of growth, carbon capture  and biofuel data, plot files, and field tallies including growth, age, site index and continuous  forest inventory information.    The FSC certification process will commence once this is complete.  Some Timber Species to be found in the forest include:  ƒ

Tulip Tree, Yellow Poplar (plentiful)  Exterior siding, sashes, doors, rough carpentry, strong, rot resistant, works like pine 

ƒ

Virginia Pine (plentiful) 

ƒ

Loblolly Pine (plentiful) 

ƒ

Short Leaf Pine, Yellow Pine (scarce, repopulating) 

Sustainable Student Housing Opportunities  1. Dormitory Furniture  ƒ

Bunk Beds 

ƒ

Desks


ƒ

Tables

ƒ

Chairs

ƒ

Common Space Furniture 

ƒ

Side Tables 

ƒ

Bookshelves

Potential Student Input and Involvement:  ƒ

Timber Marking and Harvesting Process 

Sustainable Forestry Practice   


Email Correspondence: Clint Patterson, Wednesday, December 22, 2010 5:34 PM    There is plenty of timber available here... over 6,000 acres dedicated to forestry.  However,  much of our mature forest stands are difficult to access because of steep terrain and/or lack of  adequate ingress and egress to a usable roadway.    Fortunately, not all of the "easy to get to" mature timber on the forest has been harvested.  The  site I have in mind for a supply for this project would be to use the same area that I was  planning on securing the tulip poplar logs for the small timber frame building project I have  already been trying to put together as a demonstration project (and to have the building for a  tool shed behind my office).    The harvest area could simply be expanded to accommodate for the larger volume necessary  for this project.  The location is ideal, as the terrain is relatively gentle, there is an acre or so flat  area to yard the logs, there is already a creek crossing over the only creek that needs crossed,  and best of all, it is on Highway 21 just three miles from campus.    As long as it is dry or frozen enough to skid the trees without rutting up the soil... I don't see a  problem using the site... in fact, the former forester had already begun marking the stand for a  timber sale, so there is precedent to have the sale too.    Currently, the following timber has been marked:  tulip poplar, 9,000 bf; white oak, 8,600 bf;  chestnut oak, 6,500 bf (a type of white oak); red maple, 5,000 bf; Virginia pine, 3,500 bf; Red  Oak, 2,000 bf; and Hickory 1,300 bf.  There are also a few sweet gum, ash and sycamore. a few  12 to 16 inch tall white pines are also available in the vicinity.    So, this gives you an idea of what the species composition is.  The total footage marked is  37,600 bf and I am sure that not all of this could be used, so the harvest area will need to be  expanded.  This is not a problem, so long as the species composition I described works. The  marked trees range in diameter (d.b.h.) between 14 inches and 30 inches diameter, but the  majority are in the 16 to 20 inch size range, which I would assume would be just right for this  project.  They're are good straight, tall trees, with most attaining 32 feet or more in stem length  before "branching out".    In order to get things set up, I'll need to know about what is needed as far as diameter and  length of logs needed of which species... hopefully, a variety of species can be incorporated.    I had hoped to have this logged with horses, and am supposed to meet with a local horse logger  after the Holidays to discuss the job.  I don't know if he would be fast enough to do a bigger  project, but my way of thinking was that while skidders and dozers are sitting around waiting 


for soil conditions to get dry enough to work, a horse logger could be steadily plugging away  without damaging the site... and it would make good PR too.    My hope was that I could sell the timber to him, minus the logs I needed for the timber frame;  which he would log for me, and deduct a pre‐negotiated fee per bf for logging.    Next, I was going to collaborate with the Technology department to saw up the logs for the  timber frame, on site.  The Tech. dep't has a small portable sawmill (Woodmizer) and is on  board to do this as a class project.    After that, forestry students and tech. students would work together to do the framing and  erect the building.    I doubt if we could handle a project as large as the dormitory like this...but, perhaps the same  methodology could be used.  I know that if I was still in Illinois, where I had numerous logger  and sawmill contacts, I could get a custom portable sawmill person to come and saw these up  to our specs. on site... then, maybe Trillium Dell's guys would only have to have them hauled  three miles... talk about the carbon emissions saved...  If sawing them on‐site would work, I  could probably call a woodmizer dealer in KY and find someone willing to do that.    Email Correspondence Clint Patterson 01.05.11:     Timber supply:  There is plenty of timber available on the Berea College Forest, if the species  mix I described can be used (various white oak and red oak species, tulip poplar and pine with a  smattering of ash, sycamore, maple, sweet gum, and other miscellaneous).  The problem isn't  the supply, but rather the logistics of getting it done in the desired time frame, and having to  coordinate this between several groups which are dependent on another group either before  or after them in the process.  The weather also plays a part in this.    Logistically, it sounds like we're talking about two different scenarios: one using both timbers  and lumber, and the other using only lumber. If both timbers and interior lumber are to come  from the Berea College Forest, one material would require drying, while the other would not;  which could put further constraints on timing.    Certainly, some of the fabrication could be done, I think, by the college; including students.  However, the amount of help that can be coordinated would probably be more educational in  scope than a means of lowering fabrication costs.  Faculty and Staff who are over the  Technology and/or Student Crafts departments would be more knowledgeable about this than I  am, and I am sure Steve, too, would have a better idea of how much the various departments  could contribute.     


The smaller structure that I have initiated, like the dorm. project, is highly dependant on the  logger, to get the trees cut and yarded so they can be sawn... but from that point on, it can be  incorporated into a single class, augmented with volunteers, changed in scope if necessary, and  there is no pressure to get it done in any specific timeframe... the end result of having the  building is part of the desired outcome, but the learning experience along the way...with trial  and error being part of this process... is just as important.    However, with a project as large, expensive, and time‐constrained as the dormitory, each step  of the way is highly dependant on the step before... from logging onward... and there is very  little room for error.      Therefore, I would think that only the very first steps and/or very last steps in the dorm project  could be easily worked into a cooperative effort with the college... either obtaining, through the  use of a logger and/or sawmill the actual logs (coordinated by Forestry department).. or doing  finish work by students (Tech and/or Crafts dep't.).      Whether a timber frame structure is done or not, Forestry could coordinate a harvest to supply  the logs for students to turn into the trimming, moulding, furniture, etc..  There would be a  wider time frame for doing this if the timbers are not needed, I think, and obviously a smaller  volume needed.  But, again, volume of material is not a constraint... time and amount of labor  involved, availability of equipment, etc., are the primary constraints.    Whether the college Tech. dep't could do the sawing on the scale needed, even for the trim  boards, (like with the small barn project), I do not know.  It may work best to have the logs  sawn, dried and planed into the desired quantity of lumber by a local sawmill/contractor while  the main construction work is taking place, and then having the finishing touches done by  students (cutting to length the trim boards, staining them, possibly installation, and furniture  making).      Others can answer some of your questions better than I can... but speaking of the trees, there is  no problem with supply.      


Aerial Photo of Berea College Forest


Topo Map of Berea College Forest   


Tour of Berea College Forest 

   

   

   

Typical Stands of Yellow Poplar 

                       

         Forest Landscape 

Owsley Fork Reservoir 

         City of Berea Water Utility (located in Berea Forest 

Sample Horse Skidding (courtesy of Clint Patterson)              Sample Small Local Sawmill (courtesy of Clint Patterson)  


Tour of Arts & Crafts Studio 

Woodcraft Equipment   

Yellow Poplar used in Skittles Game    

Furniture for Catalog 

                         

  

  

  

                        Cherry used in Furniture 


Furniture for Catalog 

       Salvaged Materials in Studio 

Weaving Studio   

 

       Weaving Loom 

  

       Broomcraft Brooms 

Wood Kiln used by Broomcraft 

   

BC Forestry Focus Group 1  

Kick‐off meeting of the Forestry, Arts and Crafts, and Fine Arts focus group to establish goals of the group, interaction with the residenti...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you