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PORTFOLIO KAREN BERBERYAN


NEW YORK 2017


PROJECTS

2016-2017 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK/ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND PRESERVATION

2008-2015 INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS

OPEN WORK Critic: Enrique Walker With Tigran Kostandyan, Nila Liem, Wantong Xu Oita, Japan 2017

CENTER OF INNOVATIVE DEVELOPEMENT OF MOSCOW Facade competition Moscow, Russia 2015

REDESIGNING DETROIT Competition Detroit, USA 2013

ICONIC PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE Competition With Narine Gyulkhasyan Amsterdam, Netherlands 2011

FLOOD PARK AT PIER 52 Critic: Richard Planz With Yang Jie, Nadia Soerjanto New York, USA 2016

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM Competition With Anahit Hayrapetyan Helsinki, Finland 2014

PERSISTENT FIT: ECOFFICE LIMA Competition Lima, Peru 2013

OLYMPIC GAMES INFORMATION PAVILION Competition London, Great Britain 2011

NYCHA: NEXT GENERATION Critic: Hilary Sample With Yang Jie, Nadia Soerjanto New York, USA 2016

CONTAINER VACATION HOUSE Competition Sydney, Australia 2013

THE COMMONS RIVERFRONT PARK Competition Detroit, USA 2012

FASHION MUSEUM Competition Tokyo, Japan 2010

VACATION HOUSE Imagining The Ultrareal Critic: Philip Crupi/ Joseph Brennan New York, USA 2016

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL TOWER Competition Dubai, United Arab Emirates 2013

KROB ARCHITECTURAL Delineation Competition 2011

THE HUB/ BUS STATION AND MUTILFUNCTION CENTRE Competition Charleston, USA 2010

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2003-2009 NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION OF ARMENIA

THIRD GOVERNMENT BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING PROJECT Competition, First Price Yerevan, Armenia 2009

2010-2016 PROFESSIONAL WORKS

DISPLACEMENT OF YEREVAN OPERATIONAL CENTER TO NORAGYUGH DISTRICT Diploma Work Yerevan, Armenia 2009

UWC DILIJAN COLLEGE With Tim Flynn Architects Dilijan, Armenia 2011 Position: Varies

CAFESJIAN MUSEUM EXTENSION AND CASCADE VILLAGE QUARTER at Tim Flynn Architects Yerevan, Armenia, 2013 Position: Project Architect

A YOUTH CULTURAL CENTER Forth Year Yerevan, Armeina 2008

ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING NEAR HALIDZOR ROPEWAY STATION With Tim Flynn Architects Halidzor, Armenia 2015 Position: Project Architect

RECONSTRUCTION OF DITAK SECONDARY SCHOOL With Quelque Chose Architects Ditak village, Armeina 2010 Position: Project Leader

WORKSHOP IV Competition, Grand Prix Clermont-Ferrand, France 2008

SECONDARY SCHOOL AND KINDERGARDEN With Tim Flynn Architects Stepanavan, Armenia 2015 Position: Project Architect

HOTEL THE CHEDI ANDERMATT With Quelque Chose Architects and Germann & Achermann AG Gotthard Pass, Switzerland 20102011 Position: BIM Developer

HOTEL COMPLEX Third year Yerevan, Armeina 2007

DILIJAN TUNNEL ENTRANCE With Tim Flynn Architects Dilijan, Armenia 2015 Position: Project Architect

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OPEN WORK Columbia University, GSAPP Urban Ecology Studio Critic: Enrique Walker With Nila Liem, Tigran Kostandyan, Wantong Xu Year: 2017 Location: Oita, Japan

This project responds to the requirement of the studio to double the surface of an open-ended building, which had been designed with anticipation of future change and growth. The Oita Prefectural Library was designed by Arata Isozaki in 1966. As of today, the building serves as an art plaza. The New Oita Library restores the program of a library with emphasis on reading room space, which is treated as the most viable element of a library. The additional structure within the volumes of spines allows to free the space under the building and use it as a shell for the new underground addition. The three added levels are inserted in the empty pit with an offset, which creates passe-partout of light around it. In the age of media and seamless communication, a reading room becomes a place of knowledge transfer catalyzed by social interaction. The existing building space is used for smaller-scale reading rooms, where the engagement with media is more private, while the new space underneath the existing building is used for larger-scale reading rooms.


Oita Prefectural Library 1966 8


Oita Art Plaza 1996 9


First Floor

Second Floor

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Mezzanine Floor

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Oita Prefectural Library 1966 10

Oita Art Plaza 1996


Oita Prefectural Library 1966

Oita Art Plaza 1996 11


In his seminal essay ‘Theory of Process Planning� published in 1962, Arata Isozaki adapted Metabolist ideas, which were at the time applied to whole cities, to the scale of a building. The theory underlies a set of rules aimed at creating a system that ensures future growth and development of buildings. Oita Prefectural library was meant to be the manifestation of the Theory of Process Planning. Although the construction of the building does not follow a strictly modular system as the theory states, the reading of individual elements is clear in the final design.

Process Planning Theory


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Oita Prefectural Library as a Set of Elements 14


Physical Models 15


Oita Prefectural Library 1966

Iwata Girls’ High School 1963-1964

Kitakyushu City Museum 1972-1974

Gunma Museum 1971-1974

A careful analysis of buildings by Arata Isozaki from the early 1960s to the 1970s suggests that each of these projects uses “Elements” in different scale and with different programs.

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Oita Fukuoka Bank 1966-1967

Fukuoka City Bank Head Office, 1968-1971

Fujimi Country Club 1972-74

Kitakyushu Central Library 1972-75

These designs have a common feature of using combinations of several elements to create ground work and roof work, resulting in a project with distinct Shell and Ground. Solutions used in these buildings can be traced back to the Oita Library project.

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Skylight

Module Bridge Tubular Beams Spine

Oita Prefectural Library as a Set of Elements 18


Spine

Skylight

Bridge

Beam

Genealogy of Elements 19


Kitakyushu City Museum 1972-1974

Kitakyushu Central Library 1972-75

Fujimi Country Club 1972-74

Sections Highlighting Ground and Shell 20


Sections Highlighting Ground and Shell/ Oita Prefectural Library 21


Oita Prefectural Library/ Shell 22


Oita Prefectural Library/ Ground 23


Oita Prefectural Library 1966 Reading Room Stacks Service Support Functions

Oita Prefectural Library 1966

Reading Room

Stacks

Service

Support Functions

Isozaki Museum

Gallery

Service

Support Functions

Oita Art Plaza 1996 Support Functions Service Gallery Isozaki Museum

Oita Art Plazal 1996

Oita New Library Administration Seminar Support Functions Reading Room

Administration

Reading Room

Functional Diagrams 24

Auditorium

Service


Auditorium Service Administration Seminar Support Functions Reading Room

Administration

Reading Room

Auditorium

Oita New Library/ Functional Diagram

Service 25


Oita New Library/ Axonometric View 27


Exploded Axonometric View/ Structure 28


Exploded Axonometric View/ Addition 29


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Oita New Library/ Shell 30


1:300 Oita New Library/ Ground 31


Top View 32


East Elevation 33


Plan on Level +8.80m 34


Section Through East Entrance 35


Plan on Level +4.55m 36


Section Through North Entrance Highlighting the Vertical Atrium 37


Plan on Level +1.80m 38


Section Through South Entrance Highlighting Additional Structures 39


Plan on Level -3.30m (Ground Level) 40


Section Through Stairway/Sitting Area Connecting Two Levels of Reading Rooms 41


Plan on Level -6.60m 42


Section Highlighting Light Passe-Partout Around the Underground Addition 43


Plan on Level -9.90m 44


Section Through Western Vertical Core 45


Plan on Level -14.40m 46


Section Highlighing Underground Addition and Connection with the Existing Building 47


Physical Model of the New Oita Library 48


Physical Model Revealing Additional Structures 49


Physical Model/ Section 51


FLOOD PARK AT PIER 52 Columbia University, GSAPP Urban Ecology Studio Critic: Richard Planz With Yang Jie, Nadia Soerjanto Year: 2016 Location: New York, USA

Coastal storms in their various forms and magnitudes are a reality for New York City that necessitates ongoing attention to its flood risk management strategies and capabilities. In the realm of built environment design, the idea of “living with water” is gaining popularity, and design strategies have been trending towards accommodation of flood waters. Concept: The site is designed as a model for coastal resiliency and a public-facing interface to raise awareness of ecological concerns specific to coastal cities and shorelines and to promote research in these areas. A highly specific landscape and building design ensures predictable responses to extreme weather events and offers facilities and conditions suitable for conduct of research as well as for attendance by general public. Through experimenting with the topography and permeability of the space, the landscape will allow tides as well as controlled flood waters (of specific categories) into the site, which could be used for recreational purposes. The landscape will also demonstrate various ecological strategies for storm water control, water-filtration, and shoreline protection, through the use of filtration swales, and wetland basins along the sloping edge on the south side of the site, which is designed to be submerged by the tides at different times of the day as well as during larger storm events. The building will embody layers of functions and flows, carefully engineered to withstand different categories of floods. The ghost piers that are characteristic to many waterfronts, including the Hudson River, form the basis for the aesthetics of the design. In terms of the building’s functionality, we foresee the upper level to be dedicated to coastal resiliency research – in the form of research labs and an auditorium for lectures and seminars. The lower level of the building will be given to exhibition space as well to public amenities and a cafeteria.


Axonometric View 55


Axonometric View/ Fragment 57


Tides/ MAX: +1.5m

Tides/ MIN

Flood Category 1: +2.4m 58


Flood Category 2: +4.5m

Flood Category 3: +6.3m

Flood Category 4: +7.9m 59


Ghost Pier 58 60

Ghost Pier 50

Ghost Pier 52/ Site


Ghost Pier 56 61


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1. Public Plaza 2. Parking 3. Urban Beach

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Ground Level 62


Aesthetic Flower Garden Filtration Swales

Oyster Beds/ Shallow Marsh

Interactive Zone

Pavilion

Interactive Zone

Meadow/ Lawn

Water Purification (pools)

Deep Marsh (Wetland)

Flood Park Zoning 63


1. Reception/ Lobby 2. Exhibitions 3. Staff Office 4. Classrooms 5. Auditorium 6. Conference 7. Media Orientation 8. Cafe/ Dining 9. Information Desk (Second Floor)

First Floor Plan 64


Conference Rooms

Classrooms

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Cafe/ Dining

Media Orientation

Auditorium

Exhibitions

Reception/ Lobby

Research Institute’s Functional Zoning 65


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Sections 67


View From The Elevated Platform 69


View To The Public Plaza 71


View From The Hudson River 73


Physical Model (Fragment) North Elevation 74


Physical Model (Fragment) South Elevation 75


NYCHA: NEXT GENERATION Individual Project Columbia University, GSAPP Typology Versus the City: Redrawing the Bronx Critic: Hilary Sample Year: 2016 Location: New York, USA

The project “Next generation NYCHA� relates to the future of New York City Housing Authority buildings and responds to officially stated notions of NYCHA developers, namely: 1.Change the way NYCHA is funded 2.Change the way NYCHA operates 3.Change how NYCHA looks 4.Change how NYCHA engages with residents. In order to preserve the continuity of green spaces and parks along Grand Concourse Avenue, as well as to create a buffer green zone to benefit the residents, all proposed buildings are pushed back from the street. There is a green space on the river side of the project as well that separates the project from high-rise buildings that are currently in construction. These green areas will join the Grand Concourse park and green zones and, in a larger scale, the Manhattan Greenway. NYCHA housing is partially subsidized and partially funded by rents and sales. The proportion is typically 80/20 but attempts are currently made to shift this proportion towards 50/50. This project adds public and commercial zones for businesses that will be attractive for residents of the area at large, and, ultimately, it will contribute to the change of the funding pattern. Using the existing terrain and flattening it from river side, the project creates an opportunity to connect to the nearby underground subway stations and, instead of 1 story access to the building, to have access points on each side at different levels. This action also affords large multilevel public plazas along the site, organizing the flow of people. The connection with elevated zones including cinema halls, music center, museums, exhibition areas, restaurants, cafes and retail spaces, makes these public plazas even more attractive for residents and outside public. The layouts of the apartments were chosen to take into account the obvious increase in household

diversity, including the growth of the proportion of non-family households that already make 33% of Bronx population. The habitable space in this project is significantly diversified to accommodate various types of household units and various family preferences. Since higher floors and high-rise buildings are inadequate for many individuals and households, the two bottom floors of the project are totally separated from the rest of the building, with traditional apartment layouts arranged on both side of the corridor and with their own vertical circulation. (Gross/ useful area25/75). Beginning with the 4th floor, the floorplans are very different. The corridors are more spacious and provide for community space. There are storage locations for bicycles, office areas that can be rented by the residents for their own small businesses. There are also common kitchens for these office areas and for occasional use by the residents that choose to have only a small kitchenette in their apartments for daily use. Staircases are not enclosed anymore, but fully open to the outdoor, well-lit and safe for the residents. There are also light shafts in different parts of a building, letting the light to penetrate into the depth of the building and corridors, and providing second light source for apartments. (Gross/ useful area40/60) From the 15th to the 22nd floor, denser and more traditional or luxury apartments are again located. (Gross/ useful area- 30/70). A total of 350 apartments are planned. The project abandons the traditional NYCHA approaches. The increased cost of a diversified habitable space with elements of advanced design is justified by the added possibilities to attract more funding from residents and businesses. A different type of partially subsidized housing, this project is not just for low income households and does not isolate them. This housing is made to be desirable for low and medium income population and to encourage positive change and advancement. Living space is the most important factor that determines dignity, self-respect, and motivation to work and to be independent. Improved housing keeps families together and makes destructive tendencies like substance abuse and criminal activity less likely.


Master Plan


1. Residential Space 2. Cinema Halls, Music Center 3. Exhibition Areas, Museum 4. Restaurants, Meeting Rooms 5. Retail Spaces 6. Public Plaza 7. Subway Stations 8 Lower Grand Concourse BOA 9 Hostos Community College 10. Parking

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Axonometric View/ Site 79


Axonometric View 80


Exploded Axonometric View/ Various Apartment Layouts to better accommodate increasing Household Diversity 81


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Exploded Axonometric View/ Fragment 83


Exploded Axonometric View/ Fragment 85


Exploded Axonometric View/ Fragment 87


Exploded Axonometric View/ Fragment 89


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GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM Competition entry With Anahit Hayrapetyan http://designguggenheimhelsinki.org/ Year: 2014 Location: Helsinki, Finland

The aim of the competition was to produce a proposal for a new Guggenheim museum in Helsinki. It was envisioned to develop a distinguished profile for organizing and presenting internationally significant exhibitions of artworks from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries while also specializing in Nordic art and architecture. An agent of change, it would explore the latest curatorial ideas, connect the public with artists, draw new audiences and tourists, and provide civic space where local residents can gather and socialize. Distinctive, sustainable, and built for the long term, the museum had to fulfill the promise of its prominent waterfront site close to the city’s historic center. Concept: The new Guggenheim Museum is intended to outshine its neighbors and contemporaries, similar to the ones in New York and Bilbao. It was expected to be a unique structure yet subtly semblant of the other Guggenheim Museums for those who had seen them. Wave-shaped tubes were arranged in step-like fashion with uninterrupted, obstacle-free connections between them to enable spiraling, smooth flow or visitors. This core structure, although completely new, reminds of the New York museum with somewhat similar flow of people, and Guggenheim Bilbao with its plasticity and tall outline. The ground floor of the construction is elevated to organize public space. A visitor walks into a spacious area with multiple bridges, exhibition galleries, and viewing platforms hanging above. It is from this area that one starts discovering the chain galleries and multi-purpose zones located between them in corners. The external spiraling roof can be used for a number of purposes and accessed from any floor.


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Circulation by Ramps

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Circulation by Escalators

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Functional Diagram (opposite page) Collection Storage 357m2 Technical Rooms 470 m2 Maintenance 385 m2 Visitor Services 400 m2 Programs and Events 900 m2 Dining / Retail 1000 m2 Multi-purpose zone 1300 m2 Exhibition Galleries 4750 m2 Offices 200 m2

Outdoor Circulation Diagram/ For Outside Exhibition Purposes 98

Roof Garden 380 m2


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Circulation Diagram

Functional Diagram 99


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CONTAINER VACATION HOUSE Competition entry Individual project http://www.ac-ca.org/en/home Year: 2013 Location: Bondi Beach, Sydney, Austraila

The task in the Container Vacation House competition was to design a house overlooking the Bondi Beach waterfront in Sydney. The competition was also intended to increase research of various combination possibilities for freight container units, to encourage design excellence at a small scale, which integrates function, structure, details, and the spirit of waterfront home. Concept: The main inspiration for the project comes from the captivating image of the jagged interface between the millennia-old resilient rocks and the unsettled environment around them. The project suggests blending the new structure with the astounding sight of rocks hanging over the sea, rather than displaying a stark symbol of global industrialization and trade. The exterior of the project therefore adapts to the perpetually beautiful natural site with minimal interference. The main focus of the project is on the interior solutions, tenant convenience, and environmental responsibility. The vacation home functionality is achieved by circumventing the unfavorable aspects of the construction units, primarily their limited volume. The design uses the simple concept of a double-sloped common house, placing the habitable space underneath the containers as they form a roof of the structure, rather than its walls. Finally, the design drew inspiration from images of container ships in calm seas and in distress. It takes advantage of the inherent features of containers that have evolved over years to assure mutual and overall stability as they are stacked aboard ships. The vacation house was therefore designed as a stable self-supporting structure with the main habitable space positioned underneath. The proposed innovative approach minimized the effect of construction unit limitations and resulted in a highly functional and attractive interior.


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Site Plan

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Pictures presenting containers, which are combined with each other to form an integral structure

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1. Typical container / limited area, ceiling height 2. House typical model 3. Container modification / functions as a roof


A STORAGE ROOM LAUNDRY UTILITY ROOM

LIVING WALL GARAGE: SUITABLE FOR 2 CARS

GARAGE ABOVE WALK-IN PANTRY HALL / ENTRANCE

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SWIMMING POOL

BATHROOM FOR GUESTS GUEST ROOM No. 1 -2.100

LIVING ROOM GUEST ROOM No. 2 -3.900

UP

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REDESIGNING DETROIT Competition entry Individual project http://hudsons.opportunitydetroit.com/ Year: 2013 Location: Detroit, USA

The “Redesigning Detroit: A New Vision for an Iconic Site” competition invited submissions for redeveloping the 92,421 sq.ft. historic site of the demolished Hudson’s department store. The sponsors were looking for a signature project that could play a significant role in the revitalization of downtown Detroit. The historic significance of the site, its physical and cultural context, and its potential for the future had to be considered. Successful proposals had to show optimism about the future of Detroit and promise a positive, catalytic impact on the community. Concept: History of a city is best told by the buildings it carries, particularly by the heritage buildings it is endowed with. Still, the longevity of constructions of great historic and architectural value varies greatly. Some of the landmarks, such as the Hudson’s department store in downtown Detroit, age morally, technologically, and physically. Most Detroit citizens used to have a strong emotional connection to J.L. Hudson’s, which was associated with either glory, controversy, or despair at different times. The site of Hudson’s has a second chance now to become a symbol of positive change. The approach of this project is to abstract from the legacy architectural style and design of the building that is physically gone and now belongs to history. Taking the notion of Detroit’s rejuvenation seriously suggests disregarding the nostalgia that is perpetuated by the dimness of current circumstances. Replacing Hudson’s by a bright and assertive, technologically advanced public venue is the goal. The project is therefore combining contemporary architecture and modern ecologically responsible technology in a sizeable

construction to physically replace and functionally surpass its monumental predecessor, with a spirit of a large and exciting public venue being the only feature common with the Hudson’s. The building stands out as deliberately different from all others in the area by its originality and magnificence. The new building is easily recognizable in the landscape, featuring the unity of determined boldness (the stone wall) and delightful transparency. Function: A multipurpose family-oriented entertainment and education complex featuring children’s museums and science fair/ exhibition venue, movie theaters, technology shows and libraries, a convention hall and some residential floors for school trip groups, visiting educators and exhibitors. The complex also houses animation, web design, art, robotics, filmmaking, music, and other clubs with workshops, guest lectures, and community events. The building is connected to the tram line through the first floor for easy access. Special arrangements are included for children with disabilities. Open public space is used by cafes, restaurants, bookstores, industry-sponsored art and technology exhibits and shows. The facility is expected to be managed by a non-profit company and funded through a partnership of government and private sector; many elements of the facility may be self-sustainable through club and family memberships, company sponsorships, and advertisement. Materials: Most of the exterior is finished by a combination of frosted and transparent glass. The external walls with openings are made using black stone (depending on the availability of local material) and cantilevered from the bearing structure. The walls have the function of shading. Being far enough from external glass walls, the dispersed daylight fully penetrates into the building. The irregular form of the roof is completed in reinforced concrete covered by form - replicating frosted glass. This ensures dispersion of the light as well, which is ideal for the library located just under the roof.


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Existing Site 118


Existing Ground Level/ Structure 119


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Ground floor plan 1. entrance/ reception; 2. multipurpose auditorium; 3. conference hall; 4. technology displays; 5. technology museum; 6. information desk; 7. bookstore; 8. technology presentation hall; 9. kitchen; 10. storage; 11. restaurant/ cafe A

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Typical educational floor plan: 1. department of programming/ web design; 2. department of animation; 3. department of music; 4. department of film making; 5. recreational spaces 120


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First floor plan 1. school main entrance/ reception; 2. administration/ offices; 3. public terraces; 4. restaurant/ cafe; 5. kitchen; 6. storage; 7. loading area; 8. retail space; 9. tram station A

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Typical residential floor plan 1. one bedroom apartments; 2. two bedroom apartments 121


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PERSISTENT FIT: ECOFFICE LIMA Competition entry Individual project http://www.arquitectum.com/ Year: 2013 Location: Lima, Peru

This competition entry responds to a call for an eco office design in a very tight space between two similar-height structures. The North-South orientation and strict requirements added complexity to the challenge. The main argument of the design is maximizing natural light in office spaces without substantially compromising the total useful area. This is achieved by recessing the Western side of all floors from the plot margin by 1.8 meters to generate a light shaft through the entire height of the building. Simultaneously, the structure is combined with the faรงade in a way that it supports the weight of the building slabs and empties the internal space, thus enabling open planning of the offices. Furthermore, the external structure, while recessed on the Western side, touches the ground only in two points, opening space for a welcoming main entrance and a wide entry to the underground parking. Functionally, the building has eight floors of office space, two levels of collaboration and conference room space on the two lower levels, nine levels of underground parking for 120 cars, and a restaurant with gym on the top floor.


Main Entrance 129


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Parking (Typical Floor Plan) 130

First Floor Plan


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Second Floor Plan

Typical Floor Plan (Office) 131


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Exploded Axonometric View 135


THE SELF-SUFFICIENT CITY Academic work Individual project Graduation project at YSUAC Supervisor: G. Astvatsatryan Year: 2013 Location: Yerevan, Armenia A project seeks to decongest the Central District by reversing the self-destructive centripetal trend, through revitalizing Noragyugh – a declining residential district that sits close to the city center along the highway leading to the Zvartnots international airport. Several self-sufficient growth centers are envisioned, which will compete for businesses and residents and eventually re-specialize, along with the old city center, to evolve into a healthier, younger, and environmentally sustainable metropolitan area. The proposed business complex houses office suites, financial institutions, and hotels. The support infrastructure of 80 residential buildings minimizes motor vehicle use. In order to make the new district both functional and ecologically clean, the project aggressively combines “green” erected structures with planting and landscaping of public space. The dominant building type in the project is a roughly ten story, wide-based structure with an unusually interrupted mid-piece. At varying levels, these buildings have been divided along

a curved horizontal plane, and the upper floors have been substantially elevated on supporting structures to reveal surfaces open to free air. These areas are covered by grass, trees, and shred recreational spaces. Thus, the collective footprint of these buildings is returned to nature at a few meters’ altitude in the form of open greenery – a small park for each building. The new roadway network will be elevated above ground level throughout and around the district to yield ground space for greening and recreation and to reduce deposition and concentration of pollutants. At the very center of the circular inner loop is the main business complex, with residential buildings and other smaller office and retail space. The inner loop itself is composed of three stacked levels for parking space, the roadway, and light rail. The ground level, in its turn, is part of a network of its own: parks, walking and bicycle trails. The majority of architectural solutions proposed in this project can be implemented by the existing construction capacity and available technology, and have been designed with the local geological and climatic circumstances in mind. Revitalized Noragyugh will not only avert the impending transportation collapse of Yerevan City center, but will also become the first major exhibit of master-planned environmentally conscious architectural ensemble.


City centre

Noragyugh district

Master Plan

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Site Plan GSPublisherVersion 0.0.100.100

Concentration of new buildings in the city in 2000s Concentration of new buildings in the city in 1990s

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Scheme showing new highways and circular tram line

Scheme showing the pedestrian and moving walkways

Scheme showing the use of the solar panels on the roofs of the builings

Scheme showing the usage of adjacent river for creation of water surfaces

More than 250 new buildings were built in the city center in the past two decades 139


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Site Diagram

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Scheme of one of the typical sustainable buildings of the site

Section/ Elevation/ Central Part 141


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UWC DILIJAN COLLEGE Location: Dilijan Area: 88 Hectares Status: on-going Professional work: Tim Flynn Architects http://www.timflynnarchitects.com/ Master Plan Architect Leader: Ashot Pirverdyan Master Plan Design Team: Narine Gyulkhasyan, Karen Berberyan UWC Dilijan College is the first BREEAM-certified project in Armenia. Phase 1 included the main academic complex, sports center, dormitories, technical buildings, medical center, and the gatehouse. Phase 1 was completed in 2014. Completion of Phase 2 is expected by 2020. The campus has been designed to ensure sustainability and efficiency, local maintainability, and use of environmentally friendly solutions such as green roofs and living walls. The main UWC school complex includes administration, classrooms block, science and art block, and the learning center (library, IT, and group presentation pods). The exterior features living walls, green roofs and the local Armenian tufa stone. Internally, there are two atriums with a concertina-shaped glazed roofs with internal courtyards and circulation spaces. The sports center includes a UEFA international standard soccer pitch; all-weather basketball, volleyball and tennis courts; a competition 25m swimming pool, and large flexible areas for basketball, netball, indoor mini-soccer, gymnastics, ping-pong and badminton. A fully equipped gym includes martial arts and dance areas with ample spectator

seating and viewing galleries. Architecturally, the Sports Centre features an innovative combination of local stone and contemporary full-height glazed curtain walls. Externally, the sports center includes a lawn, green roofs, and living walls. The small gatehouse at the campus entrance has been designed to be in harmony with the main school buildings and incorporates living walls and a green roof. The Headmaster’s house oversees the dormitories built in Phase 1. The two-story house has a basement, three bedrooms, four bathrooms, an office, and a library with a balcony overlooking the school. Framed in 13 meter logs, the house will not require additional insulation while maintaining year-round comfort with minimal energy expenditure. My contributions to the design and construction of the UWC campus include: concept of landscape architecture, furniture (benches, light fixtures), participation in the design of the main Academic Building, Sports Centre, Headmaster’s House and Boarding Houses, drawings and 1:20 detail solutions, 3D modeling (BIM), rendering, furniture design (including all built-in components), and preparation of all presentation material. For the, Private Residential Type XL and Security Gatehouse, I was the project manager with responsibilities for all levels of design, 3D modelling (BIM), preparation of construction drawings (including 1:5 detail solutions) and specifications, interfacing with all engineers working on this project, and construction supervision.


SECURITY GATEHOUSE

SPORTS CENTER ACADEMIC BUILDING

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BOARDING HOUSES HEADMASTER’S HOUSE PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL/ TYPE XL

Master Plan 149


ACADEMIC BUIDING Area: 14000 m2 BREEM Certificate [Good] Trendsetting Architecture award (IGRA Green Roofs), 2015 European Property award, 2015 Selected for AJ Architecture Tomorrow gallery at MIPIM UK, 2015 Silver World Winner of the FIABCI Prix d‘Excellence, 2016 Design Leader: Arman Alaverdyan Design Team: Narine Gyulkhasyan, Karen Berberyan

The school campus has been designed to ensure that the buildings are not only sustainable and efficient, but also locally maintainable and environmentally friendly, and that renewable technologies are used where possible. Green roofs and living walls will absorb rainwater, provide insulation, create a habitat for wildlife, and help to lower air temperatures in summer and insulate in winter. UWC Dilijan College is one of the first schools in the world to cover such large areas of its façade with 4750 sq. meters of green roof and 1500 sqm of living walls made of vegetation. The main school buildings of Dilijan consist of the administration building, the general classrooms, science and art block and the learning center, which includes the library, IT department, and group presentation pods. The massing and architecture of the building is broken up into three specific areas and functions: learning hub; office block; educational facilities. Externally the architecture includes living walls, green roofs and the local Armenian tufa stone. Internally, the school academic buildings are designed with two atrium spaces that create internal courtyards and circulation spaces. The atrium spaces are fully covered with a concertina shaped glazed roof.


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First Floor Plan 154


Fourth Floor Plan 155


Section H-H

East Elevation

West Elevation 157


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SPORTS CENTRE Area: 13900 m2 Status: completed Aug. 2014 BREEM Certificate [Good] Design Leader: Paruyr Poghosyan Design Team: Narine Gyulkhasyan, Karen Berberyan

At UWC Dilijan College students are encouraged to balance their academic studies with sports and exercise. Staying with this holistic philosophy, the UWC sports center was designed with a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities. These include a UEFA international standard flood-lit grass football pitch; all-weather basketball, volleyball and tennis courts; a competition-standard indoor 25m swimming pool; spacious multi-gymnasium areas for basketball, netball, indoor football, gymnastics, trampolin­ ing, table tennis and badminton. A fully equipped fitness gym includes a judo and dance areas. The halls also accommodate ample spectator seating, tribune areas and viewing galleries. Architecturally, the Sports Center features an interest­ing combination of materials - traditional local stone and contemporary fullheight glazed curtain walls. The exterior of the sports complex is complemented by a green lawn, green roofs, and living walls.


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Plan On Level +0.00m 164


Plan On Level + 4.00m 165


Section A-A

East Elevation

West Elevation 167


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BOARDING HOUSES Area: 9290 m2 Status: completed Aug. 2014 BREEM Certificate [Good] Design Leader: Norayr Avagyan Design Team: Karen Berberyan, Narine Gyulkhasyan, Anush Harutyunyan

Each boarding house constructed during Phase 1 of the school consists of four quadrants, with a central common courtyard. Each quadrant accommodates approximately 40 persons, including space for in-house staff. Local construction methods and materials are used including aselection of Armenian stone and timber, along with traditional clay- tiled roofs to give a typical Dilijan feel.


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Plan On Level -0.90m 174


Plan On Level -0.20m 175


Section 9-9

East Elevation 176


Section 22-22

North Elevation 177


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ENTRANCE SECURITY GATEHOUSE Area: 50 m2 Status: completed Aug. 2014 BREEM Certificate [Good] Design Leader: Karen Berberyan

This is a small security building at the main gate of the college campus, which has been designed with living walls and green roof, to be in harmony with the main school buildings and the scenic natural landscape. The building includes a security room, a small kitchen, a restroom, and a staff locker room.


Construction stages 183


Ground Level 185


Section 1-1 187


PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL: TYPE XL Area: 1050 m2 Status: under construction Design Leader: Karen Berberyan Design Team: Paruyr Poghosyan

Type XL is the biggest private residential house on the campus, with two 400 sq.m levels and a 250 sq.m reinforced concrete basement. Above the ground level, the structure is entirely wooden. Built with 13 m Larch logs, it will not require additional insulation in winter, and the log construction will keep the rooms cool in the hot summer months. First floor houses kitchen, sitting and dining rooms, library, and laundry; the second floor has four bedrooms, one in each corner of the building. Despite the traditional wood structure, private residential house XL is equipped with an advanced HVAC and other engineering systems.


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First Floor Plan

Section A-A 192


Main Staircase Detail 193


HEADMASTER’S HOUSE Area: 280 m2 Status: completed Nov. 2015 Design Leader: Paruyr Poghosyan Design Team: Karen Berberyan, Karine Dulyan

The Headmaster’s house is designed to sit above the boarding houses built in Phase 1 of the school, to become part of the cluster of private residential loghouses. The two story house contains a basement along with three bedrooms, four bathrooms, an office, and a library with a balcony overlooking the school. When complete, the house will be used by the school Principal. Built with 13 meter Larch logs, it will not require additional insulation in winter, and the log construction will keep the rooms cool in the hot summer months. Although loghouses are not typical throughout Armenia, it was felt that the materials would be appropriate within the context of Dilijan surrounded by densely forested mountains.


East/ South Facades 196


West/ South Facades 197


Main Staircase 198


Master Bedroom 199


First Floor Plan 200


Section A-A 201


KAREN BERBERYAN/PORTFOLIO


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