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50 CELEBRATING

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Bentley braces for nasty flu season By Lacey Nemergut NewS ediTor

On January 9, Boston’s Mayor, Thomas Menino, declared a state of emergency due to a widespread and horrific flu outbreak this season, matching only the swine flu outbreak of 2009. At the time of the declaration there had been 700 confirmed cases, a 1000 percent increase from last year’s 70 cases. The virus claimed 18 lives in the state of Massachusetts alone and has affected residents in 49 states. According to health care professionals, this year’s vaccine is 62 percent effective and is available in both nasal spray and needle form. Typically, the vaccine takes two weeks to be fully effective. The range of flu season can extend from October to May, peaking typically in January or February. Thus, when students arrived back to school in the Boston area, healthcare professionals in the area were prepared with extra precautions. “I participated in a conference call early in January and also

Taylor suggests that members of the community protect themselves with the flu vaccine.

was called by them a few times after the call to see if we needed anything,” said Geraldine Taylor, Associate Dean for Health and Wellness. “I have a strong relationship with the Department of Public Health, developed over several years. I often was called as a spokesperson for the colleges during the H1N1 outbreak.”

Courtesy of facebook.com

The University prepares for flu season the summer before students return to Bentley. It hosts six flu vaccine clinics, beginning in September before flu season and a final session upon returning from winter break. “We placed updated flu information on our website and also on parent website, we

sent tweets and Facebook postings, we met as a staff and also with res life and university police,” said Taylor, listing the school’s detailed precautions. In terms of student precautions to avoid contracting the virus, Taylor encourages students to stay alert. “Number one: get vaccinated! It is not too late! Any protection is better than none!” said Taylor. “Avoid sick people— especially those who have flu symptoms, a fever of over 100, cough and/or sore throat. Don’t share food, drinks, smoking materials or lipstick with others. This will help protect you from other illnesses as well.” Taylor also encourages college students to decrease there stress levels, maintain a healthy diet and get at least eight hours of sleep to ensure that their immune systems operate at maximum effectiveness. If you come down with the flu, the University encourages See FLU, Page 5

Falcons UNite and CAB bring winter fun to Back Bay Indoor ice skating, winter crafts and hot chocolate create buzz By Francisco Salas CAmPuS LiFe ediTor

CAB and Falcons UNite welcomed students back on campus with arguably one of the coolest ideas to date. Last Friday night, CAB’s Event of the Month Chairs David Wu and Megan Girmaiy organized an indoor ice skating rink in the Student Center’s Back Bay rooms. It wasn’t the biggest rink, but to everyone’s surprise it was artificial ice. CAB partnered with Artificial Ice Events to setup a small rink for the event. CAB and Falcons UNite provided skates for those adventurous enough to go on the ice and for those spectating there was warm hot chocolate, desserts and ice cream. How does artificial ice work? The rink was made up like a giant jigsaw puzzle in 4-by-8 plastic polymer sheets that resemble the look and feel of ice, without the complexity of real ice. The panels have the consistency of the whiteboards found in

8 30 ROCK Liz, Jack, Kenneth, Jenna and Tracy bid farewell. Blurg.

Courtesy of Sarah Swidler

Bentley finally built a rink on campus—temporarily — allowing students the chance to skate indoors.

classrooms, but what sets them apart is the special lubricating solution that reduces contact friction and enhances the glide and speed while skating. When skating on natural ice, the friction of the skate blade generates heat and melts the ice, creating a thin

layer of water which is the source of that smooth skating glide. The Artificial Ice Sheet’s patented technology works in the same fashion. When the skater’s blades come into contact with the synthetic ice sheet, the same heat is created, causing the solution to lubricate the sur-

face just like water does on natural ice. CAB President Patrick Maguire said to be out on the lookout for more activities like this. This year, CAB is committed to revamping itself and doing events that more students want. See SKATING, Page 10

11 AUSTRALIAN OlL Potential oil deposit discovered in Australia.

13 NOTES FROM ABROAD Hear from Falcons all over the world.

Professor submits resignation amidst retraction controversy

James Hunton

By Lacey Nemergut NewS ediTor

James E. Hunton, an established Accounting Professor at Bentley University and prominent writer in the accounting community, resigned from the University on December 31, following a formal retraction in his co-authored article featured in the Accounting Review. Hunton provided the University with “family and health reasons” as the official reason for his resignation. “I think you have to view [the resignation and retraction] as possibly being coincidental…I can’t tell you that they’re related,” stated Bentley University Dean Roy “Chip” Wiggins. The article, entitled “A Field Experiment Comparing the Outcomes of Three Fraud Brainstorms Procedures: Nominal Group, Round Robin, and Open Discussion,” was released in the November 9, 2012 issue of the Accounting Review and was co-authored by Hunton and Anna Gold of Erasmus University. Wiggins referred to the Accounting Review as an “Alevel journal” with significant editorial oversight. Writers submit their paper to a blind review, during which 2-3 unknown readers read for content and accuracy. Following this review, the article must See HUNTON, Page 5

14 HOCKEY Team spends time with Perkins School for the Blind students.

Police Log 2 Counseling Tip 2 Cartoon 4 Voices 8 Alumni Experience 12 Falcon of The Week 16

Courtesy of bentley.edu


Page 2

News

January 31, 2013

the Vanguard

Police log youngs-mobile or oldsmobile? January 20th was the fourth anniversary of President obama’s inauguration, but it appears that a select few crazies continue to resist the liberal takeover of america. this is especially true of angry parents who want some wheels. this past week, a Bentley police sergeant had to settle a dispute between a student and her mother involving the use of a car. Supposedly, the mother needed to drive to a Meek Mill concert, but our fellow student wasn’t about to give up her primo parking spot right in front of Kresge! You can’t just let that bit burn. We have no idea who got the car, but there is one thing we do know – if this was Saudi arabia, neither one of them would be driving. ‘MurICa! Ball so hard Last Wednesday evening, officers responded to the Dana Center for a medical evaluation on the basketball court. a male student, who had been partaking in a game of pickup basketball, was gashed below the eyebrow. apparently the laceration resulted from a poorly (or well) timed swing of an opponent’s elbow. the baller was transported to nearby Newton Wellesley Hospital. So this is how intramural basketball is gonna be, huh gentlemen? Just throwin’ ‘blows on every

rebound? Shoving after the whistle? Maybe a little evander Holyfieldesque biting action here and there?I love it. If you get lost on the way to the courts, just follow the ambulance. and ladies: if you’re looking for excessively competitive guys sweating like pigs in a slaughterhouse…you know where to find us! hunting yaks In German, “Jägermeister” means “master hunter.” apparently, one freshman bro was hunting toilets on the first night back at school. after five or six shots, Bentley’s own elmer Fudd was stumbling his way to the bathroom. apparently, it was neither duck season nor rabbit season – it was vomit season. Freshmen, just remember that the fundamental hunting principle also applies to your weekends: if you take too many shots, you’re going to lose your lunch. except you’ll also get PC’ed, transported to the hospital, and judicially charged. Vewwy vewwy bad. six, Chicks on move-in day university Police were called to alder Hall just before 10 pm. upon their arrival, officers found a female student vomiting in the restroom. She had difficulty standing and demonstrated slurrrredddsssspeech, so officers brought her into protective custody and admitted her to Newton

Wellesley Hospital. reportedly, the student admitted to consuming six shots of vodka before her date with the porcelain gods. Six shots? Come on, girls, it’s the second semester…you should know the rules by now. Shots 1 to 3, you’re fine. Feeling loose, remarking on how hot you look in your little black dress, mascara still intact…it’s all good. Shot number 4, Joe across the hall with the acne and disgustingly long fingernails starts to look like ryan reynolds. that’s always fun. Shot 5: you peak. Heels are off and you’re doing the wobble in the middle of the dance floor like you’re V.I.C. himself. But shot 6? that’s when your roommate is holding your hair back, you’re crying like you just watched the end of Marley and Me. Stick to 5, girls. Bookin’ it university Police received a call last thursday informing them of a potential larceny in the library. apparently, a painting worth about 100 dollars was stolen. We’re assuming the painting was on display in that little square room in the middle of the first floor. Now before we get our respective panties in respective bunches over this, let’s consider the facts: unless the thief is a straight-up loner, that painting is definitely getting more views in a dorm room somewhere than it ever did in that library room. I mean,

honestly, have you ever seen anyone in there? answer: no. I think I saw a tumbleweed roll through it the other day. north Campus pee-asco Last Friday, officers reported to North Campus a after being alerted that a non-Bentley student was urinating in the stairwells. Bentley Pee D did not find anything; however, if you’re a resident of North Campus a, urine for a bad week. that smell is going to piss you off for at least six days. It doesn’t take a whiz kid to know that the smell would leak sooner or later. If you live in North Campus a and you have class, I would say that you have to go in stairwell number two. You have toilet the smell fade away before using the main stairwell again. Just sayin’. freshman puke Count after a semester-long hiatus, the F.P.C. makes its triumphant return to the pages of the Vanguard! For those who don’t know, this is where we report how many times in the past week that university Police finds vomit in the frosh dorms. this week, our number is a solid 4. Not bad at all, but there is certainly room for improvement!

Sean Harrington and Brian Shea Vanguard Staff

Judicial action Summary Editor-in-ChiEf Jeff Breault Managing Editor gEnEral ManagEr Lindsay Beauregard Brian Fuerst Copy Editor nEws Editor sports Editor CaMpus lifE Editor fEaturEs Editor BusinEss Editor photography Editor onlinE Editor dirECtor of produCtion dirECtor of advErtising JournalisM advisor studEnt lifE advisor

Ben Klein Lacey Nemergut Matt Gustus Francisco Salas Kelsey Miller Jasper Huang Melisa Kocarslan Victoria Lin Meagan Kalpokis Kevin Laryea George Donnelly Nicole Chabot-Wieferich

For GeNeraL & CoNtaCt INForMatIoN aBout The Vanguard, PLeaSe See PaGe 4.

01.21.2013-01.30.2013

total number of cases: total number of individuals involved (violators): number of individuals dismissed from responsibility: number of educational sanctions given: (includes referrals to alcohol Education) Cash total of fines given for the week: number of work sanctions assigned: number of students placed on warning: number of parental notifications: number of individuals put on residential probation: (Loss of 15 Housing Credits) number of individuals put on disciplinary probation: (Loss of 30 Housing Credits) number of individuals put on suspension (housing): number of individuals put on suspension (university): number of individuals expelled from university: Provided by the Office of the dean of Student affairs

Welcome back Bentley! Have fun reconnecting with friends and getting involved. Don't forget to maximize your academic and athletic performance by getting at least 7 hours of sleep each night!”

16 21 3 20 $500 0 13 5 2 0 0 0 0


the VaNguard

CampuS LiFe & NewS

JaNuary 31, 2013

page 3

Presidents Day, Patriots Day result in Monday makeups By Francisco Salas Campus Life editor

If you have a day class on Monday this spring semester you will have to make up two classes to cover Presidents Day and Patriots Day. Many of you, like me, found out recently, perhaps on syllabus day that we have to make up Monday classes. The first thing that came to mind was: you said what? Yes, I had to read the syllabus to make sure that was correct. Now let’s get into why this change was made. Bentley, an accredited NEASC university, has to meet New England Association of Schools and Colleges standards of classroom time—the choice given to professors and administrators was either give up one holiday or make up the class. The registrar has announced that make up times will be held during the 8:30 a.m. time slot and activity period on selected Monday’s depending on the block you are in. Undergraduate evening and all graduate classes will be held on these holidays. Graduate classes will also have a Monday make up for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday that will take place

on Friday, February 15. See the above chart to see how your class will be impacted. Did you know that most federal and state holidays fall on Monday’s? The United States is one of the few countries in the world where almost all holidays magically fall on a Monday. It was not always the case, though. On January 1, 1971, by the appropriately named Uniform Monday Holiday Act, the U.S. Congress passed into law that Washington’s Birthday (known today as Presidents Day) fall the third Monday in February, Memorial Day

fall the last Monday in May, Labor Day fall the first Monday in September, Columbus Day fall the second Monday in October, Veterans Day fall the forth Monday in October and finally Thanksgiving Day fall on the fourth Thursday in November. The intention of all of this was to create more three-day weekends for federal employees. Which countries get the most vacation days? In the United States, Mercer, a human resource consulting firm, found that on average, large companies give “15 days paid vacation and 10 days of paid holidays for full-time employees with

10 years of tenure,” according to CNNMoney.com. In contrast, all companies in the European Union must provide workers with 20 days of paid vacation a year in addition public holidays. Can you believe that voters in Switzerland turned down a proposal that would have added two extra weeks of vacation per year? Last year in March, voters were turned down by two-thirds of the population in a national referendum that proposed the addition of two extra weeks of vacation. Why would anyone turn down vacation days? According to Time Magazine, the Swiss feared

that it may cost jobs and hold back their economy. Can more vacations lead to a reduction in economic performance? “When it comes to paid time off, whether it be vacation, family leave or sick days, the macroeconomic effect is actually pretty small,” said John Schmitt, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. Next time we can choose to have more vacation time, vote yes. It’s good for productivity and reduces stress, according to a 2009 study in the Harvard Business Review.

Keynote Speaker Dr. Neal A. Lester livens Bentley for MLK Day By Lacey Nemergut News editor

On January 29, Bentley University hosted its 27th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast, filling the EDR with students, distinguished guests, professors and corporate partners to celebrate the legacy and undeniable impact that Dr. King has left on the United States and its progression. Organized by the Bentley MLK committee, composed of both students and dedicated faculty, the Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast hosted Dr. Neal A. Lester, Associate Vice President for Humanities and Arts at Arizona State University, as the renowned key note speaker. “It’s a committee decision and it’s based upon what the students want to hear and what the colleges need as a whole,” said Claudette Blott, a member of the committee. “The students are selected from the 4,200 students we have had and it’s based upon their leadership academics and presentation skills.” The Ross Music Company serenated the crowd by performing inspirational

pieces of rhythm and blues, which they described as “sole music.” When asked about their presence at the conference they quickly responded, “Power to the people, get the violence off the streets.” Bentley Senior Amanda Miranda opened the Breakfast, sharing her personal experience in the Bentley STEP program, recalling her first attendance at the event five years ago as a high school senior. University President Gloria Larson then took the podium, attending her sixth MLK Breakfast, recalling the death of Dr. King in her senior year of high school and her attendance at the Washington Mall, accompanied by thousands of Americans. Bentley Senior Marcus Payne introduced Lester, vibrantly and enthusiastically, detailing the keynote’s impressively unique accomplishments and teaching style at Arizona State. “Dr. Lester is the type of Professor that I think everybody needs,” said Payne. Dr. Lester focused primarily on the atmosphere

currently facing today’s world, opening with the classic lines of “It was the Best of Times It was the Worst of Times” from the Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities . Lester challenged his audience to think past the commonly held belief that the millennial generation is full of tolerance and acceptance. “There are studies that we are the most divided politi-

cally and individually that we’ve ever been,” said Dr. Lester, referencing President of the United States Barack Obama’s contentious reelection. Led by the words of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going on,” Dr. Lester referenced recent radical events that have plagued our seemingly progressive society. He touched upon extreme instances of racist remarks

and slurs, concerning Obama’s presidency while challenging the audience to simply ask the question, “What’s going on?” Dr. Lester then intervened during his presentation to play the popular Black Eyed Pea’s single “Where is the Love?” asking us to contemplate the truly important things in life rather than the extraneous details.

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PAGE 4

JANUARy 31, 2013

Viewpoints

THE VANGUARD

QUoTEs of THE WEEk

*The Vanguard’s editorial as well as the editorial cartoon are proposed at each Editorial Board meeting. They are represented as being the opinions of the Board as a whole, although drawn by individuals, and not the Bentley community.

LETTER fRom THE EDiToR Welcome to 2013! New year, new Vanguard. Welcome back to campus and to another semester of homework, reading, sleepless nights and hopefully a whole lot of fun to balance the act. All of us at The Vanguard are eager to be back and to serve the Bentley community once again. 2013 is an important year for our organization, and we are excited for the chance to share it with you. The Vanguard was founded in 1963—meaning 2013 is our 50th year as the official student voice on the Bentley campus. All of us involved with the paper look forward to celebrating this milestone as we reflect on the impact the paper has had on the Bentley campus over the years. During the semester you will notice a series of changes to The Vanguard. From its appearance to the content, we hope you will embrace these changes as we continue to position the newspaper for another 50 years of success. Throughout the process we hope you will provide us with your feedback, ideas, criticisms and thoughts so we can truly serve as the voice of the Bentley community. I started with The Vanguard during the fall of my freshman year and

served as Director of Production and Layout in 2011. After taking a hiatus from the editorial board so that I could study abroad, I am excited to return to the organization as Editor In Chief. I am thankful for my predecessor, Sindhu Palaniappan, for encouraging me to run for Editor In Chief and helping me throughout the transition period. Our editorial board has the passion, creativity and desire to bring The Vanguard to new levels over the next year. I am excited to see all of them in action as we recreate The

Vanguard. We would love for you to join us by contributing as a writer, photographer, columnist, or production staff member. We are always seeking talented writers for areas such as Campus Life, News, Features, and Business. We invite you to visit us at the Activities Fair on Friday, February 1 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Student Center to learn more about our organization and how you can become involved. Jeff Breault Editor In Chief The Vanguard

Lindsay Beauregard/THE VANGUARD

PUBLicATioN iNfoRmATioN The Vanguard is the student newspaper of Bentley University. It does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the University administration; Bentley University is not responsible for statements herein. The Vanguard is published every Thursday of the academic year, excluding examination periods and holiday breaks. It is distributed free to all students, faculty, and staff of Bentley University. The Vanguard is funded in part by the Student Activity Fee, but relies on advertising revenue to cover the majority of its costs. Advertising rates are available upon request at (781) 891-3497. Circulation is 4,000 copies. We reserve the right to refuse an advertisement; only publication of an ad constitutes final acceptance of the offer to advertise. We reserve the right to edit all copy for grammar, spelling, punctuation, style, libel and length. The Vanguard Office is located on the third floor of the Student Center, inside the Bentley Bubble office complex. Mailing address: The Vanguard, Bentley University, 310M1 Student Center, 385 Beaver Street, Waltham, MA 02452. Phone: (781) 891-2912. E-mail: GA_Vanguard@bentley.edu

“Finally found a way to get them to be quiet!!!” -Melissa Cairns, an Ohio middle school teacher who posted a photo of her students with duct tape across their mouths. Cairns is currently on unpaid administrative leave. “Anybody can be Batman.” -Christian Bale, during a phone call to Zach Guillot, an 8 year old Batman fan who is battling leukemia. “Doesn’t that sound like a girl?” -Manti Te’o, while listening to taped phone calls from his fictitious girlfriend with Katie Couric on Katie. “I’m just so thrilled I have dental.” -Anne Hathaway, after accepting her Screen Actors Guild award for her role in Les Miserables. Disclaimer: The opinions published in The Vanguard are submitted by readers of the newspaper, and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Vanguard and its staff. We are not able to print any letters submitted anonymously.


NewS

the Vanguard

January 31, 2013

Page 5

Human rights exhibit visits campus INVITATION FOR PUBLIC COMMENTS

By Yuriy Ivanov

Bentley University will undergo a comprehensive evaluation visit from March 24 to 27, 2013, by a team representing the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

The McGladrey Art Gallery is routinely host to unique works of art that challenge the individual observer to find deeper meaning within the confines of a painting’s brush strokes or a sculpture’s design, and the newly erected Helen Suzman exhibit is no exception. Director of Arts and Lectures Program, and one of the principal agents in the acquisition of the exhibit from the National African American Museum in North Carolina, Adam Payne commented, “The process was different from normal gallery exhibits, in that it is less artbased, and more focused upon highlighting just some of the amazing life of Helen Suzman. When you step into the McGladrey Art Gallery, it feels like a display exhibit at a museum.” Suzman was a South Africa human rights advocate and politician who for many years was the sole moral compass in a government heavily proapartheid. Throughout her life she was seen as a shining beacon of justice—a voice for the voiceless. “Students can learn numerous things from her, including finding the courage to stand up for what is ethical on behalf of their fellow colleagues,” said Payne. “And to also be inspired to do what they can in their own respective lives to carry forth the message of equality.” Though surrounded by politicians virulently opposed to her beliefs of equality, she stood up and unrelentingly fought for black South

The commission is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and accredits approximately 240 institutions in the New England. Bentley University (formerly Bentley College) has been accredited since December 1996 and was last reviewed in December 2002. Its accreditation encompasses the entire institution. For the past year and a half, Bentley University has conducted a self-study of its own effectiveness, addressing the commission’s Standards for Accreditation. A team of peer evaluators will visit the institution to gather evidence that the self-study is thorough and accurate. The team will recommend to the commission a continuing status for the institution. Following a review process, the commission will take the final action. The public is invited to submit comments regarding the institution to: Public Comment on Bentley University Commission on Institutions of Higher Education New England Association of Schools and Colleges 209 Burlington Road, Suite 201 Bedford, MA 01730-1433 Email: cihe@neasc.org Public comments must address substantive matters related to the quality of the institution. The commission cannot settle disputes between individuals and institutions, whether those involve faculty, students, administrators or members of other groups. Comments will not be treated as confidential and must include the name, address and phone number of the person providing the comments. Comments must be received by March 27, 2013.

See page 3 for a related story about changes made to the Bentley academic schedule to accommodate the accreditation requirements of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Vanguard Staff

also face editorial oversight. “That’s really designed to make sure that the paper is well done and written at a certain level,” said Dean Wiggins. The retraction revolved around the apparent inaccuracy of data presented in the article. The original article had stated that the sample included 150 offices of participating CPA firms were located only in the United States. However, by May 2012, a coordinating partner assisting with the article revealed that the sample included both domestic and international offices, thus skewing the sample and deeming the original piece inaccurate. Upon realizing this misinformation, the Editor and the Chairperson of the Publications Committee of the American Accounting Association immediately

Africans who had suffered through police brutality, forced resettlement, and all the injustice of being a secondclass citizen in the land of their birth. Despite the hate directed towards her, much of which manifest in antiSemitism, she allowed the public to call her at any time and kept close correspondence to highly controversial figures such as Nelson Mandela whom she would visit on Robin Island along with other prisons he was held at. All this fostered a strong mutual respect between the two human rights stalwarts, which would later lead him to credit her vital role in the peaceful transition out of Apartheid. “This exhibit gives all members of the Bentley community [an opportunity] to learn a little more about the individual who was instrumental in

Courtesy of telegraph.co.uk

getting things to move toward positive change as a member of the South African Parliament,” said Payne. Standing up for what you believe is never easy; however, Suzman pursued equality as if she had borne the full weight of injustice and lived in a secondary status when in fact she was white, and for all of her childhood and subsequently life experienced the entitled existence of the ruling class of South Africa. Regardless, she held in her heart a belief in justice and equality that never seemed to waver despite the vitriol directed at her, police wire taps and the simple fact that she could have backed down, turned a blind eye and comfortably lived, but instead stood resolute. The exhibit will remain at the McGladrey Art Gallery until February 22.

FLU

HUNTON Continued from Page 1

The exhibit focuses on the life of South Africa human rights advocate Helen Suzman.

asked for further information on the study. However, the sought after information was restricted by a confidentiality agreement between Hunton and the participating firm. It is clear that the second author, Gold, had not been involved in the experiment or receiving the data from the CPA firm. According to the source RetractionWatch.WordPress. com: “Consequently, in spite of the authors’ belief that the inaccurate description of the sample does not materially impact either the internal validity of the study or the conclusions set forth in the Article, the authors consider it appropriate to voluntarily withdraw the Article from The Accounting Review at this time.” Bentley University issued a formal statement to Beth Healy with the Boston Globe, ensuring readers of the University’s prestigious

name: “Bentley University and its faculty take the research process extremely seriously, and we place the highest expectations for rigor, diligence, and ethical methods on our faculty.” When asked about why the Boston Globe decided to run the story of Hunton’s resignation following the retraction, Wiggins stated, “I think that somebody leaving and the coincidental retraction created a curiosity.” Prior to his resignation, Hunton had received many awards from the University, including the $25,000 Mee Family Award in 2011. Following the presentation of the award, University President Gloria Larson had said, “During his nine years at Bentley, Jim has had a profound, positive influence on the welfare of Bentley’s students, success of his fellow colleagues, and international standing of the university.”

Continued from Page 1 you to take proper care and avoid contact with others. “If you have flu-like symptoms, stay out of work, class and group get-togethers until you are fever free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medicines,” said Taylor. “Seek medical care if your symptoms are severe or you are worried about them and not sure what you have or if you are sick, get better and then get sick again.”

For students concerned about missing schoolwork, Taylor assures the University that she has contacted professors and shared her recommendation of keeping students out of the classroom until their fever has subsided for 24 hours. “It is up to the student to communicate with the professor as soon as the student is ill and work with the professor to make up any missed work. It is the professor’s decision on how to handle class absences.”

Students should stay out of the classroom until their fever has subsided for 24 hours.

Courtesy of chacha.com


Page 6

January 31, 2013

The Vanguard

The Vanguard

THE VANGUARD 50TH EDITORIAL BOARD

1963-2013

Editor In Chief -HII%UHDXOW¶ Marketing

Copy Editor %HQ.OHLQ¶ Marketing

Features Editor .HOVH\0LOOHU¶ CFA

Managing Editor /LQGVD\%HDXUHJDUG¶ IDCC

News Editor /DFH\1HPHUJXW¶ Economics-Finance

Business Editor -DVSHU+XDQJ¶ CFA

General Manager %ULDQ)XHUVW¶ Managerial Economics

Sports Editor 0DWW*XVWXV¶ Accountancy

Campus Life Editor )UDQFLVFR6DODV¶ Economics-Finance

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Online Editor 9LFN\/LQ¶ Accountancy

Student Life Advisor Nicole Chabot-Wieferich Director, Student Activities

Journalism Advisor Director of Production 0HDJDQ.DOSRNLV¶ Accountancy

Director of Advertising .HYLQ/DU\HD¶ Economics-Finance

George Donnelly Executive Editor, Boston Business Journal


The Vanguard

The Vanguard

January 31, 2013

Page 7

MEET US. JOIN THE FUN. We are looking for News writers, Campus Life writers, Features writers, production staff, event photographers, and columnists. No experience needed!

VISIT US AT THE ACTIVITIES FAIR FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2013 | 4-6PM STUDENT CENTER

OR CONTACT GA_VANGUARD@BENTLEY.EDU


Page 8

FEaTuRES

January 31, 2013

the Vanguard

NBC’s 30 Rock comes to an end

VoiCeS

By Meghan Ryan Vanguard Staff

“What’s your favorite thing about coming back to Bentley?” KaRla MOTa ClaSS OF 2014 ManagEMEnT “I was excited to come back from the abroad program and was looking forward to taking classes at Bentley again.”

JOSh RiChMOnd ClaSS OF 2016 CiS “I was excited to see all my friends and excited to finally get back to work.”

STEvEn COSTa ClaSS OF 2013 aCCOunTanCy “To hang out with the class president, Kim Sok.”

Jill Raia ClaSS OF 2016 undECidEd “To see all my friends and my roommate and I was looking forward to going to the ski club trips.”

It is with a heavy heart that The Vanguard announces the end of an era. This week, the award-winning NBC comedy 30 Rock will air its series finale. Liz Lemon, Jack Donaghy, Tracey Jordan, Jenna Maroney, and Kenneth the Page will grace the small screen no more. 30 Rock was created in 2006 after Tina Fey left Saturday Night Live. Her original pitch was for a comedy about cable news. This was later revised to being a show about a sketch-comedy show producer, Liz Lemon, dealing with a new boss, Jack Donaghy, and a troublesome star, Tracy Jordan. This new format was created so Fey could write what she knew best and draw from her experiences at Saturday Night Live. Even the title of the show references SNL—30 Rockefeller Avenue is the address at which Saturday Night Live is shot. The show has attained many awards and critical acclaim. In 2007, after 30 Rock’s first season, it was awarded an Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series as well as an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series. 30 Rock went on to take home the Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy again in 2008 and 2009, and was nominated in 2010, 2011, and 2012. The show has also won the Best Series—Musical or Comedy Golden Globe award in 2009. After working on 30 Rock for four years, Fey was also awarded the highly coveted Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in 2010, the youngest winner ever to do so, and the third female to win. This past Sunday, Fey and cast mate Alec Baldwin won best Actress and Actor in a Comedy Series for the Screen Actors Guild Awards, allowing 30 Rock to end on a high note.

Tina Fey wrote for and starred in 30 Rock for each of its seven seasons.

Though its ratings have never been spectacular— with less than 10 million viewers watching each episode—30 Rock is a small program that has made a big splash in the television comedy world. The show’s end has come at a busy time in the lives of its stars. Both female leads, Fey and Jane Krakowski, have recently had children and lead actor Baldwin has mentioned leaving his contract. However, before the final season of 30 Rock, Baldwin allegedly went to NBC and offered to cut his pay so the show could continue for a final seventh and eighth season. Part of his wish seemed to come true as NBC permitted a final 13episode season to air. The actual finale promises to be full of the wit and comic chaos characteristic of the series. During the episode, Lemon will struggle with her new role as stay-athome mom, Donaghy will look at his life through the eyes of his exes—played by Salma Hayek and Julianne Moore—Jenna Maroney will write a song for the ending of the show within a show, TGS, and Jordan will deal with spending less time with Kenneth the Page—now Kenneth the CEO of NBC. In the mix will also be a few other guest stars, including

Courtesy of policymic.com

Nancy Pelosi and Ice-T. As 30 Rock ends, NBC is facing a shift in its programming. With its other longtime comedy program, The Office, ending this spring, the network is facing gaping holes left by its more popular programs. This year, it has launched a number of new shows, including comedies Go On, Animal Hospital, 1600 Penn, and Guys with Kids, trying to fill the shoes of these comedy giants. On Thursday nights, fan favorite Community will return to fill 30 Rock’s time slot, and new drama Do No Harm will air afterwards, hoping to attract more new fans to NBC’s Thursday night lineup. The end of 30 Rock does not mean the end of some of the familiar faces of the program, though. Fey retains her contract with NBC, which says that it plans to continue working with her in the future. Baldwin has three movies coming out soon—The Normal Heart, Blue Jasmine, and AmeriQua. Morgan also has upcoming projects to be released soon, namely a movie known as Nailed. Despite the future successes of these stars, the Thursday night witticisms of Lemon and her crew will be missed. The final episode of 30 Rock will air on January 31 in an hour-long episode at 8 p.m.

lExi SquiRE ClaSS OF 2016 idCC “After five weeks of being unproductive, I missed always having something to do and hanging out with friends.”

By Olga Kosheva PhotograPhy Staff

30 Rock received the Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy in 2007, 2008 and 2009, and was nominated in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

Courtesy of movies.netflix.com


the Vanguard

FEATurEs

January 31, 2013

Page 9

FOX premiers The Following starring Kevin Bacon & James Purefoy By Kelsey Miller Features editor

FOX premiered its new show, The Following, on the January 21 to fairly decent success, considering its graphic subject matter. The show, starring Kevin Bacon and James Purefoy, is a show about a serial killer’s following who murder for him. The series begins with Ryan Hardy (Bacon) learning that the infamous serial killer he helped put away eight years ago, Joe Carroll (Purefoy), has escaped from his supermax prison in Virginia. Now, Hardy, who no longer works for the FBI (read: he was booted out), has been reluctantly called back to consult on the case. No one, not even Hardy, believes he is well-suited for

James Purefoy plays a serial killer obsessed with Edgar Allen Poe.

the job, but Hardy is soon drawn right back into the web of Carroll, the romantic literature professor turned serial killer. Carroll has an obsession with Edgar Allen Poe, a trait that had allowed Hardy to capture him eight years prev i o u s l y —i t a l s o a l l o w e d Hardy to write a book about Carroll. This link immediately comes back when a girl shows up to the investigation with Poe’s work scrawled all over her body. The serial killer has broken out—walked out, really—of his prison to finish what he began nearly a decade ago, and he plans for Hardy to have a central role in the drama. But even though Hardy may know Carroll better than no one else—not even Carroll’s ex-wife—no one is

Courtesy of hollywoodreporter.com

prepared for what Carroll has planned. “Since anyone anywhere could be a follower, how do you know who to trust?” The Following’s wellknown cast, that includes Shawn Ashmore from X-Men and Natalie Zea from Justified, is sure to be a strong point for the series, since every part is acted perfectly. And credit is certainly due to the writer/creator, Kevin Williamson, for crafting such non-stop action and intrigue. If people can get past the violence, it is possible that The Following will become one of the top shows of the season. Which conveniently segues into one last point. This show is extremely violent. The images are graphic and unexpected, and the implications of the acts can be very disturbing. If you are the kind of person who does not like graphic, bloody, terribly violent shows, steer clear from The Following. You will not like it. At all. You’ve been warned. But, if you happen to like a little—a LOT of—violence in your entertainment, you’ll probably love The Following. It airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on FOX—channel 25.1 if you’re watching in your dorm.

The premier of The Following promises a graphic but intensely engaging series.

Courtesy of tvafterdarkonline.com


Page 10

January 31, 2013

FeATureS & CAMPuS LiFe

the Vanguard

Earhoox: The easy solution for earbud problems Bentley alumnus is co-founder of venture to bring comfort and ease to electronics users By Kelsey Miller FeatureS editor

Helmut Wyzisk II, a Bentley graduate, and Jeff Becker are the co-founders of earhoox, a creative solution to earbuds that simply will not stay in your ears. The

best part about earhoox is that they are completely detachableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to buy new earbuds. Earhoox work by wrapping around the earbuds you already own. The silicone material is designed in an eye-catching â&#x20AC;&#x153;shark finâ&#x20AC;?

Available in two sizes and five colors, earhoox are designed for athletes and non-athletes alike.

Courtesy of earhoox

shape that conforms to virtually every type of ear shape. And for those of you who like to look stylish while you listen, earhoox come in many bright and fun colors. Because of the earhooxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stretchy material, they can fit a wide variety of earbuds. Some of these include classic Apple Earbuds, Sony Earbuds, JVC Earbuds and many others. If you are a lucky owner of a brand new iPhone 5, which launched the new Apple EarPods, you can expect the modified version of earhoox to be ready around March. At the moment, earhoox are pretty rare. The company has undergone much development to make sure that earhoox fit well on any individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ears. They created twenty different prototypes of earhoox before they finally settled on a design. After determining the final product, earhoox took to the internet to fund production of the product. They used the well-known crowd-funding website, Indiegogo, to raise nearly $10,000 to create earhoox. The people who funded the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;nearly

400 of them, from 23 countriesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are currently the only people in the world who own earhoox. Earhoox were originally designed for athletes, but Wyzisk and Becker quickly learned that there is a demand for them from non-

athletes as well. Earhoox come in two sizes, large and small, to ensure that they fit everyone. If you are interested in earhoox, you can visit the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, www.earhoox.com, where 100 pairs are being given away.

SKATING Continued from Page 1 The next event on the horizon, sponsored by the Traditions Committee is going to be the annual Super Bingo night on Saturday, February 9 in the Dana Center. CAB is giving out thousands of dollars of prizes in the biggest game of bingo you will ever play, including some big-ticket electronics and gadgets.

Courtesy of earhoox

The design of earhoox resembles a â&#x20AC;&#x153;shark finâ&#x20AC;? that conforms to every ear shape.

CENTER FOR BUSINESS ETHICS

One game night that promises to be very interesting is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just in time for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dayâ&#x20AC;? which is a Newlywed Game on Tuesday, February 12 in the Pub. Come out and test your knowledge of your roommate, best friends, random students or your boyfriend or girlfriend. To register for this event, please email CAB at bentleycab.eventofthemonth@gmail.com.

VERIZON VISITING PROFEESSORSHIP IN BUSINESS ETHIICS

T en a ci ty : Th e A m er ica n Pur s ui t o f C or p or a te R es p on s ib il it y A Publiic Lectur u e by

Kennethh E. Goodppaster, PhD

Koch Endowe w d Chair in Business ness Ethics Opus College g of Business, Unniversity of St. Thomas (MN)

Since the arrival of the t modern corporation inn the nineteenth century, Americans have held tenaaciously to a free market model despitee frequent disappointments ts. Corporations have demoonstrated amazing productivi tivity, innovation, and adaptabilitty, andd when they have failed ethic e ally, Americans have sought to deepen corporate responsibility rather than to overturn the system in favor of mor m e socialistic models. Thiis pattern is revealed in a reecen tly-published volume Corporrate Ressponsibility: The Amerrican Expperrience (2012) for which Gooodpaster was the Executiv ive Editor. In his lecture, Goodpaster will explore some underlyinng assumptions behind thiss pattern (e.g., shared moral convictions and a desire to see them embodied instittutionallyy) -- and he will ask whether our ur tenacity is sustainable gooing forrward. KENNETH GOODP D ASTER has taught at Not N re Dame during the 19970s, Harvard during the 1980s, and since 1990 as the David and n Barbara Koch Endoowedd Chair in Business Ethics at the University of St. Thomas, MN. He has published widely, including the Joournal of PPhi h losoophy, Ethicss,, Environmenta hi tal Ethics, the Joournal of Businness Etthhicss,, Business Ethics Quarterlyy, and the Harvaard Business Revvieww. His book, Conscience and Corporrate Cullture (2007) received critical acclaim. He sits on the he boards off the Better Bus u iness Bureau and the Center for Ethical Business Cultu u res. V

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the Vanguard

January 31, 2013

Page 11

Exxon Mobile Corporation takes a bite out of Apple

Exxon Mobil Corp. now has the largest market cap worldwide.

By Kevin White Vanguard Staff

Last Friday, Apple Inc. lost its title as the world’s largest company in stockmarket value to Exxon Mobil Corporation. Ironically, the change came exactly one year after Apple surpassed Exxon in market capitalization. The decline has led many to question Apple’s ability to deal with increased competition in a field it once dominated. There is also growing concern that CEO Tim Cook will not be able to fill the shoes of the late Steve Jobs—especially

Courtesy of topbusinessworld.blogspot.com

important for a company that relies heavily on innovation as a competitive advantage. Since late September, Apple has seen share prices decline from just over $700 per share to closing on Friday at roughly $440—a 37 percent decline. With the sharpest decline occurring last week as it reported disappointing sales growth even with the iPhone 5 and the iPad Mini introductions. On Thursday of last week, the price decline was so severe that short selling had to be restricted. Short selling is an investment strategy that

bets on the price of the stock falling. The restriction made each short sale lead to a small increase in share price. Increased competition has had a major impact on Apple’s sales growth. More specifically, Samsung’s recent attempt to go where no other company has been able to compete: the smartphone market. And they have been successful. Since launching a marketing campaign poking fun at Apple users in 2011, Samsung has become the market leader in smartphones. Samsung’s profit has exploded as a result. Fourth quarter profits released last week was up 76 percent to a record high. Concerns for Apple were fueled with this information in tandem with its flat earnings growth. Analysts agree that Samsung has not been able to match Apple in design and software capability. However, a unique production strategy has allowed it to sell at a much lower cost. Apple executives have refused to comment on pricing strategies. But Cook has stated that Apple is “unwill-

ing to cut corners in delivering the best customer experience in the world.” Would Apple’s woes be any different if Jobs was still at the helm? If history is any indication it would seem possible. Jobs co-founded Apple in the 1970’s and the company experienced success for many years. In 1985, Jobs left, citing a power struggle with the Board of Directors. It wouldn’t be until 1996, when facing bankruptcy, that Apple would take Jobs back as CEO. In just two

years, he turned the company around and started making a profit in 1998. There is no doubt that Job’s played a critical role in Apple’s development since then. But was his guidance so valuable it sheltered Apple from competition? Or was it just a matter of time until some company was able to catch up? One thing is for sure: all eyes will be on Apple as the now secondlargest company in the world prepares to return to the success it once had.

Some question whether Tim Cook will be able to fill Steve Job’s shoes as CEO.

Courtesy of online.wsj.com

Potential $20 trillion shale oil discovery in South Australia

The Arckaringa Basin is the location of a significant portion of the discovered oil.

By Alex Grotevant Vanguard Staff

Just last week, Linc Energy, an Australian energy company, released two reports regarding oil reserves in Australia. The content of those reports, which was based off of drilling and seismic exploration, was rather shocking. Most significantly, the Arckaringa Basin in South Australia is believed to be holding up to $20 trillion worth of shale oil. If the estimates in the reports are accurate, Australia’s gas and oil supply could multiply to a point where the continent would no longer need to rely on other countries for these resources. In other words, this finding could potentially transform Australia from an importer of

Courtesy of abc.net

oil to a relatively large exporter of oil. The potential implications of a finding of this magnitude are massive. With recent advances in technology, the idea of shale oil extraction has become much more real. Essentially, this type of extraction consists of drilling vertically then horizontally for long distances through shale rocks that hold oil. To put the significance of this kind of drilling in perspective, shale oil extraction has allowed the United States to come very close to surpassing Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest producer of oil. Peter Bond, the managing director at Linc Energy, believes a “shale boom” such as that in the United States is likely to occur in Australia. He described South Australia

as “one of the key prospective territories in the world at the moment” and investors are certainly keeping an eye on the area. Linc Energy currently has a 100 percent interest in licenses that cover 65,000 square kilometers in the Arckaringa Basin. They have hired Barclays Bank to help them find a partner to assist in further developing these prospects. Thus far, Linc Energy has spent $130 million on four deep wells and nearly two dozen shallow wells. The next stage of their project, which is expected to cost anywhere from $150 to $300 million, will entail drilling six more horizontal wells to confirm their estimates.

Linc Energy, however, is certainly not the only company trying to get a piece of the profit in Australia. Altona Energy, a British-based energy company, is planning to begin drilling in the same basin within the next month. Their proposed coal to liquids and power project is expected to cost upwards of $3 billion. It’s no secret that extraordinary sums of money are being invested in the South Australian oil reserves. A potential $20 trillion worth of oil is just sitting underneath the ground waiting to generate profit. Not only could many individuals and companies make millions off of the finding, but the entire continent of Australia could

become self-sufficient with regard to oil. Undoubtedly, there is a great deal of money to be made from shale oil in Australia. However, that does not mean those involved in dealing with the South Australian oil reserves should neglect the interests of the planet itself. Dealing with natural resources always sparks controversy because the interests of individuals and companies can often conflict with the interests of the planet. Therefore, one can only hope that over the next few years, environmental consciousness and sustainability become equally as important, if not more important, than trying to make as much money as possible.


page 12

COLuMNS

January 31, 2013

HorosCopes By Vanguard Staff

Aries

Scratching the Surface: The Gun Debate: Everything but Guns

(March 21-April 19)

Exciting new develop ments in your professional life are already happening. Take full advantage of the opportunities offered or you will be left with regrets.

Taurus

(April 20-May 20)

Look to your family for help in your current crisis. Though you haven’t always gotten along, they will be there for you now.

Gemini

(May 21-June 21)

Expect to feel strange emotional feelings throughout the week. Venus is perched between your sign and sending confusing signals.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

A strong resolve will get you through the current homework and project crunch. By next weekend you will be in the clear.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Important events are unfolding before you. Your exuberant personality will energize those around you. Keep a level head and you will succeed.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Trust your intuition for the remainder of the week. Too often you pass by significant opportunities by over analyzing the situation. Abandon reason for instinct.

Libra

Courtesy of Moussa Hassoun

As many of you may already know, the debate about guns has exploded as a result of the Newtown, CT shootings. With it, the discussion has expanded to cover security in schools, individual rights, tyrannical rule, mental health, violence in media and much more. Unfortunately, in our efforts to avoid more mass shootings we seem to be unable to find any solution to the problem. We shouldn’t only limit ourselves to preventing mass murders. Gun violence kills more than ten thousand people every year and while every killing can’t be avoided, that should be no reason to take no

doing so. My college years left me with many great memories and life-long friendships.

As the week comes to an end you have earned a nice relaxing weekend. There will be a big win for your team this weekend.

Do you have a favorite campus memory? Spring Day has always been near the top of this list for me. What better way to kick off the warmer weather than with a concert on campus!

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Insensitive remarks about you have been causing distress. Confront the sourceto bring resolution to the situation.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Satisfy your love of exploration this weekend. A long week of class has earned you the right to spend a day with a friend traveling. Courtesy of Lauren Fitzgerald

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Finding a practical solution to your problem may be unrealistic this time around. Some situations require unusual answers to be resolved.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Unsuspecting Pisces will be directed to you this weekend. Be prepared with strands of twine and sea shells in the Student Center.You’re wel-

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Natural forces at work are converging on your location to bring misfortune and bad luck. Keeping a strand of twine with a sea shell on your person will protect you from mishap.

Interview for Alumni Spotlight Name: Lauren Fitzgerald 2005 Alumna Model for Maggie, Inc. How would you describe your college experience? I adored living on campus during my years at Bentley. From working on group projects in the library study rooms to relaxing on the green space-I just couldn’t get enough. The campus has so much to offer. I was part of many group projects that I loved. I was able to learn from likeminded business students and make friends while

What made you decide to attend Bentley? I always had an interest in pursuing business. I was impressed with Bentley’s respected reputation in the business world and its advanced technology integrated into learning. I also loved the close-knit feel Bentley offered. Its proximity to Boston was very convenient but in the end Bentley’s lively community made me rarely want to leave campus. How did your Bentley experience influence your career path? A: Bentley’s professional feel and entrepreneurial environment really influenced my career path. I am now my own boss, marketing myself to new and existing clients. The way many of the projects and classes were han-

By Moussa Hassoun

been inaccessibility to mental health care. For the past two semesters I’ve been to counseling here at Bentley and it has helped me figure a lot out in my life, and I continue to be an advocate for taking advantage of mental health resources even if you don’t think you have major life problems. While access to such care can be important, especially for those who most need it, it can’t serve as the primary tool we use to reduce violence. It can and should be part of a comprehensive package of reform but to say that people are killing each other because they don’t have a counselor to talk to diverts attention from the real issue behind this discussion: guns and their place in our society. We’ve heard this debate time and again, and perhaps that’s why we turn to other areas to push the discussion forward but that doesn’t mean that we should ignore the long history that guns have in our society. That history is similar to that of Japan and its Samurai sword, expect they no longer have widespread use of the sword. The gun was used to fight the English for independence, but also in less exotic

Alumni Experience

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Capricorn

measure to reduce such violence. The debate springs up again with every mass shooting but our discussion shouldn’t be limited to how we can reduce those shootings, rather gun violence at large. When delving into this debate we should be sure to avoid any red herrings. For one, violence in videos games, movies, and other media have not been proven to be the cause of real world violence. While several studies indicate a possible relationship between violent images and aggressive behavior, that correlation isn’t enough to prove a cause. As many gamers make the case, video games don’t desensitize them from real world violence - like all humans they can differentiate between fake and real violence. Indeed crime has been decreasing for 20 years but the sale of video games has increased over that same time period. In other words, while there may be a connection between aggressive behavior and violence-ridden media, there is no proof of causation to target such industries in our solution to gun violence – at least not completely. Another red herring has

THe Vanguard

acts like hunting for food. It cemented its place in our history as a tool of assassination of former presidents, civil rights leaders and more. It is used to protect families and kill them. It was glamorized with the gangster in movie and TV culture. Today there are nearly 300 million guns out in private and public hands and we’ve become a gun soaked society. For the foreseeable future they will be around but that doesn’t mean we must accept rarer mass murders and the collective mass murder of 10,000 people as normal. Whoa! I can already hear it: Guns don’t kill people, people kill people. True, the gun doesn’t have a mind of its own, however, the gun enables the murderer to be a more effective killer – It’s harder to kill 20 kids in school or 30 people in a theatre with a knife. Whatever policy decisions are made moving forward must be on guns and we must concentrate on long term changes rather immediate results. While we’re at it, defining the debate between good and bad people is false. Rather, it should concentrate on responsible and irresponsible people and actions.

Presented by The Senior Year Experience Committee

dled helped develop my entrepreneurial spirit. I appreciated being surrounded by people who had a similar focus while I was a student, and I am still in touch with many of my close friends. It has been a lot of fun watching each of us progress after graduation. What do you miss most about your college days? College was my first taste of independence without the real world responsibilities. Living on campus provided a short 10 minute walking commute (maybe 20 when I lived in Copley North!) to class. Also, my closest friends were within walking distance. You could always find a lunch date! What is your current job title and who is your employer? I am a model working mostly through Maggie Inc. in Boston. I also book jobs directly or through other agencies outside of Massachusetts. W h a t d o y ou e n j o y m o s t about your work? Every day brings a new adventure. I work with many different companies and meet many interesting people. From catalog to runway, it differs daily. I’ve been

fortunate to work with companies such as Coca-Cola, RueLaLa, and Neiman Marcus. The business side of me is always intrigued to see how different companies develop and market their lines. As an al umnus/a, wh at makes you most p roud of Bentley today? I enjoy being an alum so much that I recently had my engagement photos taken on campus where I met my now husband (also a Bentley alum)! We even surprised our Bentley friends at our wedding with a special appearance from Flex the Falcon! I also get excited to read the Bentley Observer. Hearing of alumni endeavors and accomplishments makes me proud to be a Bentley graduate.

The columns found in this newspaper are written by individual authors and do not reflect the opinion of The Vanguard, its Editorial Board members, or Bentley University. Comments resulting from the columns may be directed to the author and/or The Vanguard.


ColumNS

thE VaNgUard

Notes from Abroad Question: “ What has been the most shocking difference or change you’ve experienced abroad compared to the U.S.?” By Gerard Fischetti LoNdoN, ENgLaNd

As I begin my second semester in London, I can say I’ve adjusted nicely to living in a big city. I love the British accents, the diversity of the city, and my walk along the Thames to campus each morning. Perhaps the most difficult thing for me has been, and continues to be, the academic rigor of the school. British universities are no joke. Because students declare their major before entering school and obtain their undergraduate degree in three years, the pace of the courses is very fast. Students know what courses they will take all three years, and might only get to choose one or two courses in other departments. It also appears that many students are coming to uni-

versity better prepared than American students. Every “fresher” I’ve met has learned calculus, economics and statistics in high school. I spend even fewer hours in the classroom than I did at Bentley. This is great because it gives me time to explore the city, but it leaves much of the learning to be done on one’s own, in the solitude of the dorm or library. This is a style that I’ve had to adapt to. Did I mention that an LSE student’s entire grade for the course is based on a threehour exam in May? After my semester ends in March, I will have five weeks off for travel and studying. Then the real work begins in preparation for exams. Sending good vibes back to the Bentley community! Keep calm and drink tea; it’s the British solution for everything.

By Christopher Jo CopENhagEN, dENmark

“Scandinavian Ice” is a term which describes the cold nature of Scandinavians. This isn’t to say Danes are not friendly or welcoming, but rather, Americans tend to have a more outgoing mindset when it comes to approaching new people. It’s easy to make a trip to the grocery store in Denmark when the only words you will say are “hej” (hi) and “tak” (thanks). But in As the U.S. there is a lot of small talk between strangers. I have also found it hard to meet local Copenhagen Business School students because exchange students need to put in a lot of effort to

Courtesy of Nick Vasiliadis

If you’ve ever felt like a member of the crummiest generation of all time, you’re probably right on. If you’re like me, during the brunt of your teenage years—precious, formative years—you were bombarded with constant reminders from parents, grandparents, the media, and generally every person older and wiser than you that kids these days just a r e n ’t m a d e o f t h e s a m e “stuff” that they used to be. Although I’d like to apathetically shake off these claims with arguments about changing times and worldredefining innovations like the internet, unfortunately, it’s likely that my rebuttal would fall on deaf, old ears. And besides, I have to contest that older generations do make a fairly strong

meet them. However, once you befriend a group of Danes, there is an entirely different word. The Danish word “hygge” describes the warm feeling that you get when you are in good company. There is no English translation for hygge, but the closest word is “cozy.” In the winter, sitting around a table of friends enjoying a cup of coffee can be very “hyggelide,” or cozy-like. Or in the summer, it could be throwing a party for a handful of your closest friends to grill and catch up. The idea of hygge is something that I find to be very unique. Once you get close to a Dane, they consider you a friend for life. All you have to do is break the ice.

rear and barely pull my own weight. Although my family never overtly scolded me for being born with a silver spoon surgically implanted into my mouth, I’ve always felt somewhat lacking in old-school necessities like moxie, elbow grease and chest hair. While it’s not my fault that I was born into a world where I was afforded every possible opportunity to succeed, somehow I can’t help but feel a little spoiled, and I’m guessing I’m not alone. Not only are today’s young men and women painted as relatively devoid of the ruggedness and determination which had defined youth for decades, the media constantly reminds us that we’re morally bankrupt as well. While we may have a little more freedom than previous generations of teens and early twenty-whatevers, today’s young adults definitely aren’t being caught out past curfew locking lips at make-out creek or smoking cigs in a jean jacket behind the old high school. Instead, we’re engaging in oral sex by the time we’re eleven and have experimented with inhaling every household cleaner from

pagE 13

By Ann Situ miLaN, itaLy

Prada, Gucci, Louis Vuitton. This is all you see when you walked down the streets of Milan Beautiful women wrapped in designer accessories wear heels 3 inches thick. I have only seen a total of 6 people in public wearing sweatpants. I’m definitely not at Bentley anymore. Being in Milan makes me feel the need to start dressing up. Even with my wardrobe, “dressing up” still wouldn’t compare to the styles I find in Milan. Milan is definitely one of the fashion capitals of the world and I can’t wait to go shopping!

Courtesy of Christopher Jo

The Copenhagen Business School is one of the largest business schools in Europe.

Briefcase Banter: Generation Apathy point. My father grew up in rural Greece, and when his parents moved to the United States he had to learn English entirely on his own, ostracized in a school system of surprisingly mean-spirited and comically racist youths. My mother’s father had come to America a few decades earlier with mostly just the clothes he happened to be wearing and, for lack of literally anything else to do, just started working construction for thirty years. Meanwhile, my grandmother, who barely knew any English, worked as a full-time babysitter and took care of all domestic-related concerns. And then there’s me: when a professor asks me to say something about myself on the first day of class, I shrink into my chair and nonchalantly mutter something neutral like “I like music.” While I’m vastly more proficient in the gamut of Microsoft office software than my forebears somehow I’m left feeling a little bit soft next to my more aged kin. A spongy caboose to my family’s ever elongating train of descendants, like many kids these days, I bring up the

JaNUary 31, 2013

By Nick Vasiliadis

Pledge to Mr. Clean before we’re legally allowed to drink. While the media isn’t doing us any favors, I’m comfortable admitting that old coots have every right to think of today’s youth as a bunch of spoon-fed, television-bred narcissists. We’re profiting lavishly off of their years of hard work, and they’re totally right about us. We’re gluttons for simple luxuries, and we aren’t thankful for how great and easily accessible everything is nowadays. But we’re only products of

our environment. Hazardous byproducts of a toxic Starbucks leak, but products nonetheless. It’s not our fault that we’ve been conditioned to expect our lattes hot and our phones fully charged; that’s just suburban America in the twenty-first century. So what if I can’t build anything with my bare hands or I’ll never know what it means to put in a hard day’s work? Given the economy these days, we ought to be the ones preaching about the value of a dollar: surprise grandpa, it’s like half-pence.

Today’s youth don’t think about how easy we have it compared to previous generations.

Courtesy of mediafastlanes.com


PAGE 14

JANUARy 31, 2013

SporTS

THE VANGUARD

Falcons wrap up regular season, prepare for NE-10 championships By Emily Ellis VANGUARD STAff

The men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams finished the regular season with winning records. The men finished 7-3 while the women ended the regular season at 9-1. January was an exciting month full of wins and broken school and pool records. The Falcons traveled to Vermont to face St. Michael’s College on January 9 and both teams came home with wins. Senior Abby Mathews won both diving events and broke the school record. Senior All-American captain Jessica Hodson won three individual events, including the 100-yard breaststroke, the 200-yard individual medley, and the 100-yard butterfly. The women continued the winning streak on January 13 when the Falcons traveled to Albany, NY to compete against the College of Saint Rose, while the men were handed their first loss of the season. Freshman Colton Bridge won the two diving events for the men. Bridge attests much of his success to his coach, Rick Danehy. “Coming into this season I had never been formally

coached, I was just an exgymnast with a can do attitude,” said Bridge. “But, Coach Danehy took his time (and a lot of patience) to help me develop my technique and improve exponentially.” Freshman Nicola Mancini won the two diving events for the women as well. Junior Amanda Le was a double winner, taking the 100 and 200 breast stroke races. Head coach for the men’s and women’s diving team, Mary Kay Samko, tallied her 400th career win as the girls remained undefeated after hosting Babson College on January 16th. Samko has coached Bentley for 17 years and carries the winning record of 400-174 between the men’s and women’s teams. Mancini set a pool and school record as well as a personal record with a diving score of 295.11 on the onemeter board. Sophomore Nadine Edwards was a double winner as well, winning the 200 freestyle and the 200yard individual medley. The men’s team were outswam by Babson College, losing 14083. Bridge won two diving events for the men. The men dropped their third straight meet and the women picked up their first of the season as they hosted

Keene State College on January 19. “January was tough for our team,” said Bridge. “We went against some very hard teams including nationally ranked Keene State. But I think it was good for our guys to see top competition to get into a championship mindset.” However, it was not a completely unsuccessful day for Bentley. Mancini set four more diving records–both school and pool records in the one-meter and three-meter events. Mancini credits her team to her success this season. “It’s nice to have all my hard work finally pay off,” said Mancini. Hodson also won two individual events for the women. The men and women compete separately but work and train together to become the best swimmers and divers they can be. “Everyone on our team is extremely supportive of each other,” said Mancini. “We all cheer each other on and want to see each other do well. We definitely feed off of each other’s energy as well.” “I think what has driven me the most to aspire what I can be is the fact that my female teammates are some of the top female divers in the nation, and they push me

Hodson finishes her last home meet with wins in two individual events.

each and every day to succeed at the same level that they have,” said Bridge. Both Bentley teams finished the season with a win on their senior night celebration in the Dana Center against Bridgewater State. Hodson, swimming for the last time in her home pool, won two individual events and combined with three classmates to be part of a winning relay. The men won all 16 of their events. The Falcons will next compete in

Courtesy of Sports Information Office

the Northeast-10 Championships at Southern Connecticut State next weekend. Because the team feeds off of each other’s energy, Mancini hopes that all of the swimmers and divers work together to be their best going forward. “It’s always ideal to have everyone do well and have their best meet, I hope we can have a similar scenario going into championships,” said Mancini.

Bentley goes 3-4 over break, looks to rebound after loss to New Haven By Ian Giancursio VANGUARD STAff

The Bentley men’s basketball team had an up and down stretch over Christmas break, recording three wins and four losses before losing its latest game to New Haven, 50-48. The Falcons said hello to 2012 with a game against the NE-10’s top scoring team in Saint Anselm. While they put forth a valiant effort, Bentley was unable to overcome Saint Anselm’s threepoint shooting and lost 78-

69. Sophomore forward Andrew Shaw led Bentley with a career-best 23 points off the bench, and freshman forward Tyler McFarland contributed 10 rebounds. The game saw Saint Anselm go 9 of 20 from three-point land, led by freshman forward Mike McCahey’s fourof-seven from beyond the arc. Bentley continued its losing streak in its next game against Assumption, falling behind early and giving up a 16-5 run to start the second half that proved to be insurmountable. Junior guard

Bentley ended break with a loss to New Haven in the last 50 seconds.

Jasper Grassa led the Falcons with 14 points and was followed by freshman guard Alex Furness, who scored 10 points in a strong effort off the bench. The Falcons finally found the winning formula against Pace University, coming from behind to win 61-60 in riveting fashion. Sophomore forward Jate Cheshul was fouled with 9.4 seconds remaining and sunk the tying and go-ahead free throws to propel the Falcons to victory. Cheshul recorded eight points and four

Corinne Kelly/THE VANGUARD

Freshman Tyler McFarland helped the team to a win against Saint Anselm.

rebounds in his first start of the season. Junior guard Jasper Grassa scored a game-high 21 points, with 18 coming in a strong second half in which he ignited a late burst with two threes within a minute of each other. Bentley followed up this victory with a secondstraight win, this time 65-57 over AIC. The Falcons went on a game-ending 16-8 run spurred by eight points from Grassa. They also received important contributions from freshman forward Shakir Phelps, who recorded a career-high 12 points off the bench. Unfortunately, this momentum did not carry over as the Falcons closed

Corinne Kelly/THE VANGUARD

the break with two close losses to Saint Rose and Adelphi. The Falcons last game ended in heartbreaking fashion, as three last-minute points helped the University of New Haven edge Bentley, 50-48. A low-scoring first half gave way to a 12-5 New Haven run to start the second-half. After taking its first lead of the second-half at 48-47, Bentley allowed New Haven’s Jeffrey Adkins to score three points in the last 50 seconds, ending the game in depressing fashion after a promising start. Bentley heads into its next game versus Le Moyne looking to improve upon its 5-8 NE-10, 7-10 overall record.


SPoRTS

the Vanguard

Falcons take time off to give back Skate with students from Perkins School for the Blind By Billy Fitzhenry

Page 15

reCent reSultS Results from 1/22-1/26

Hockey (11-11-1, 9-7-1 AHA) at Holy Cross (1/25)* Holy Cross (1/26)*

Vanguard Staff

The Bentley men’s hockey team took some time off from their busy schedule to give back to the community this week as they skated with students from the Perkins School for the Blind on Wednesday. The Perkins School for the Blind was the first school founded specifically for the visua lly im p a ired in t he United States. The school works to “provide an education and services for children and adults around the world who are blind, deaf or visually impaired.” Helen Keller is one of the most famous alumni of the school. On Wednesday, eight students from the school skated with members of the Bentley hockey team for almost an hour before practice. “[Wednesday] was a great opportunity to take a step back from the season and enjoy spending time with the students of the Perkins School,” said head coach Ryan Soderquist. “Both our team and the students took a lot away from spending time together today.” This was the second straight year the Bentley hockey team has taken time to work with students from the Perkins School for the Blind. Over the weekend, the Falcon’s played an important home and away series against conference rival Holy Cross. Bentley played the first game at Holy Cross on Friday and defeated the Crusaders, 4-1. The Falcons took the lead early in the first period on the power play when freshman forward Andrew Gladiuk found fellow freshman defenseman Matt Blomquist at the point for a one-timer that got past the

January 31, 2013

Result W 4-1 L 2-1

Men’s Basketball (7-10, 5-8 NE-10) at Adelphi (1/23)* New Haven (1/26)* Men’s Swimming (7-3) Bridgewater State (1/22)

W 72-65 L 50-48

W 145-128

Men’s Track and Field BU Terrier Invitational (1/26)

No team score

Women’s Basketball (17-0, 13-0 NE-10) at Adelphi (1/23)* W 66-53 New Haven (1/26)* W 75-66 Women’s Swimming (9-1) Bridgewater State (1/22)

Members of the Bentley hockey team skated with students before their practice.

Crusader goaltender to give Bentley the 1-0 advantage. In the second period, Bentley capitalized on another power play opportunity as Gladiuk found sophomore forward Alex Grieve on the wing. Grieve did the rest of the work, driving to the net and stuffing the puck past the goalie to put the Falcons ahead, 2-0. The Falcons were penalized three times during the second period, but were able to kill off all three without conceding a goal. As the third period began, the Crusaders got a quick goal to cut the Falcon lead in half to 2-1. A little over six minutes later, Bentley responded as sophomore forward Brett Switzer scored on a three-ontwo breakaway to give the Falcons a 3-1 lead. With two minutes left in the game, Switzer struck again, scoring his second goal of the game to put the game out of reach. Bentley goaltender Branden Komm was spectacular in

The hockey team has worked with students from the Perkins School for the Blind for two years in a row.

Courtesy of flickr.com

Courtesy of bentley.edu

goal, stopping 44 shots on the night to secure his 10th victory of the season. This victory marked the first time that the Falcons won against Holy Cross since the 2010-11 season. On Saturday night, the Falcons were not able to replicate their previous night’s success as they dropped a close one to Holy Cross on their home ice. The first 35 minutes of the game were scoreless as both Komm and Holy Cross goaltender Matt Ginn stopped every shot they saw. The scoreless tie was finally broken with five minutes left in the second period as Grieve received a pass from Gladiuk near the left post and was able to push a shot past Ginn to put the Falcons ahead, 10. Five minutes into the third period, Holy Cross tied the game at 1-1 as Crusaders forward Jake Youso tallied his eighth goal of the season. A little over two minutes later, the Crusaders went on the power play as the Falcons were called for a tripping penalty. Holy Cross took advantage of the power play opportunity, Crusaders forward Evan Zych ripping a shot past Komm to give Holy Cross the 2-1 lead. Bentley had one last chance to tie the game up when Holy Cross was called for a penalty with a little over two minutes left in the game. While on the power play, Blomquist took a shot from the point that ricocheted off the post. A few moments later, Grieve took a shot from close range that hit off the post as well. With time running down, Ginn made one last pad save off a Blomquist shot to preserve the Crusaders’ lead and to give them the 2-1 victory. Komm had another solid game in net, stopping 29

W 157-119

Women’s Track and Field BU Terrier Invitational (1/25)

No team score

*Conference Game

uPCOmIng SChedule Feb. 8 Hockey vs. UConn*

7:05 p.m.

Feb. 12 Women’s Basketball vs. St. Michael’s* 5:30 p.m. Men’s Basketball vs. St. Michael’s* 7:30 p.m. *Conference Game

Freshman forward Andrew Gladiuk was named AHA Rookie of the Week.

shots, but his efforts were not enough. The loss snapped the Falcons three game winning streak and drops Bentley to 11-11-1 on the season and to 9-7-1 in the Atlantic Hockey Association. On Monday, Gladiuk was recognized for his stellar play over the weekend as he was named the Atlantic Hockey Rookie of the Week. Gladiuk earned the honor due to the fact that he tallied four assists during the two games against Holy Cross. This is the second week in a row that Gladiuk has garnered this honor and

Courtesy of Sports Information Office

the fifth time this season he has been named the Rookie of the Week. Gladiuk is the leading scorer on Bentley with 12 goals and 14 assists and is tied for the conference lead in goals. Gladiuk is also tied for the lead in points per game with 1.18 among all Division I rookies. Bentley currently is in fourth place in the AHA and will be taking on the first place team, Niagara, this weekend. The Falcons travel to Western New York this Friday and Saturday to play two games against the No. 17 team in the nation.


pAGE 16

JANUARy 31, 2013

SporTS

THE VANGUARD

No. 2 Lady Falcons remain undefeated, improve to 18-0

Bentley is one of four unbeaten teams in Division II at the moment.

By Matt Gustus SpoRTS EDiToR

The women’s basketball team, currently ranked second in the country, has continued its hot streak, improving their season record to 18-0. After four double-digit wins to bring in the New Year, the Falcons faced a tough twogame road trip with games at St. Rose and Adelphi. At St. Rose, the Falcons started the game ice cold, cashing in on only two of their first 20 shots. It wasn’t until 14 minutes left in the half that Bentley scored its first field goal, thanks to freshman guard Jane White’s first triple of the contest. However, the shooting woes continued, and with just under nine minutes left in the half, junior forward Tyler Parker Kimball scored the team’s second bucket. Two St. Rose shots brought the Golden Knight lead to 17. The Falcons were able to fight back and found themselves down 10 points at the end of the first half. For the first 15 minutes of the second half, the difference stayed around 10, and with five minutes left to play St. Rose held a 65-55 lead. Then, starting with a jumper from junior forward Lauren

Battista, the Falcons closed the gap, tying the game with two minutes left. From there, the game went back and forth. With the game tied at 72-72 with 47 seconds left, Battista converted a three-point play. After a St. Rose missed threepointer, senior guard Courtney Finn was able to haul in the rebound and put the game away with two free throws. Bentley avoided the upset, 7974. The win at St. Rose was Bentley’s 500th Northeast-10 win in the program’s history. Finn, who had a tough shooting day from the field, made up for it by grabbing eight boards, dishing out five assists, and recording three steals while hitting an astonishing 16-of-19 free throws. The following week, the Falcons traveled back to New York to take on Adelphi University. Once again, the Falcons started off slow, finding themselves down 16-5 just five minutes into the game. Later, down 11 with ten minutes left in the half, the Falcons buckled down on defense, forcing Adelphi into just 3-of-16 shooting and climbing back to take a twopoint lead at the break. The tough defense continued during the second half, as

Suzy Hallak/THE VANGUARD

the Falcons exploded for a 224 run over the first eight minutes. From there, the Falcons kept their lead in double digits and finished off Adelphi, 66-53. Once again, it was Finn leading the way, recording a double-double with 20 points and 10 rebounds while playing all but one minute in the game. Junior forward Jacqui Brugliera had an efficient day as well, shooting 50 percent from the field and grabbing eight rebounds. Returning home Saturday,

The Falcons will soon face So. Connecticut State, Merrimack and St. Anselm in three away games, the first of which is this Saturday.

FAlcoN FAcT

FAlcoN

22.23

oF THE

Junior Eric Kennedy broke the Bentley record in the 200 meter race Saturday at the Boston University Terrier Classic. His time of 22.23 seconds was twohundredths better than the previous school record. Kennedy’s time was good enough for third place among Division II runners at the meet, and is the fourth best by a NE-10 runner this season. He also set a PR in the 60 meter race with a time of 7.31 seconds.

the team faced NE-10 dweller New Haven looking to keep its momentum rolling. However, the Falcons came out shooting poorly again, making only six of their first 29 shots. On the other side of the ball, New Haven came out fast, taking it to the defending NE-10 champs and holding a 15-point lead late in the first half. Over the final five minutes of the half, the Falcons asserted their dominance, cutting the deficit to just one point with a 20-6 run. New Haven led at the half, 36-35. In the second half, the Falcons took the lead early and never looked back. A 13-2 run and an 8-2 run later put the team up by 13, a lead too daunting for the Chargers to recover from. The scoreboard read 75-66 when the final buzzer rang. Finn continued her strong play, recording another double-double with 19 points and 11 rebounds. Also helping the team in the rebound department was Kimball, who was all over the boards on both ends, recording a career-high 15. Tuesday night, Bentley finished out its homestand with a dominant win over Le Moyne. Propelled by 11 first

WEEk

half points from Battista, the team raced out to a 45-22 lead at the half. The second half was more of the same, with Bentley cruising throughout. Of the 11 players who stepped on the court for the Falcons, 10 scored four or more points. The game was the teams highest offensive output of the season, as they won by the score of 85-51. Nationally, the team is one of four remaining unbeaten teams in Division II. The Falcons are ranked second, behind Ohio-based Ashland University, who defeated the Falcons in the NCAA Tournament last season. A quick look at Ashland’s schedule shows they have been very dominant, winning every game this season by double digits. Also, the team was able to defeat Dayton University, currently ranked No. 17 in Division I with the record of 17-1, in a preseason exhibition game by two points. The Falcons will embark on a three-game road trip beginning this Saturday with a trip to Southern Connecticut State University. The team will then travel to Merrimack and St. Anselm, facing two teams the Falcons defeated earlier this season.

Suzy Hallak/THE VANGUARD

Finn Named Falcon of the Week Senior guard Courtney Finn of the women’s basketball team is the Falcon of the Week. Finn paced the team’s offense last week, averaging 19.5 points in wins over Adelphi and New Haven for the undefeated Falcons. She also averaged 10.5 rebounds and two steals. Finn scored 20 points and had 10 boards in Bentley’s 66-53 victory at Adelphi, while going 3-7 from three-point range. She added 19 and 11 and four steals as the Falcons bested New Haven 75-66 at home last Saturday. For the season, Finn is second on the team in scoring with a 13.8 per game average. Bentley, 18-0 following Tuesday’s win over Le Moyne, will be at Southern Connecticut State Saturday.

Bentley Vanguard  

The first issue of the bentley vanguard for the new 2013 school year

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