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EDUCATION

University Of Pennsylvania Master of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, 2013 Harvard University - Career Discovery Landscape Architecture Discipline, Summer 2008 School of Visual Arts Bachelor of Fine Art Film | Video, 2000

WORK EXPERIENCE

BEN NICOLOSI - E NDO ben_n-e@alumni.penn.edu SKILLS

General: Design

Development, Drafting, Illustration 3D Modeling, Drawing, Directing, Writing, Curation Video Editing and Effects, Project Management, Cinematography, Photography, Research 3D Representation: AutoCad, Rhino, SketchUp Graphic Design: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign Media: Final Cut Pro, Premiere, After Effects, AVID

VOLUNTEERISM

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Horticulture Department 2008 - Present

ArTalk International International Youth Art Exchange 2006 - Present

LINKS TO WORK HISTORY / EXAMPLES

https://vimeo.com/benswork/videos https://www.linkedin.com/pub/benjamin-n-e/31/a9a/2ba

SWA Designer, January 2014 - February 2015 • Huizhou, China - Created diagrams, montages, and landscape designs for a multi-tower residential development • Fort Wayne, Indiana - Analyzed site, designed masterplan frameworks, and developed compelling design presentations for a waterfront proposal University of Pennsylvania Teaching Assistant, September - December 2012 • Delivered presentation on urban frameworks and representationorks and • Provided guidance on project development, aesthetics and design intent SCAPE Studio Intern, June - August 2012 • Blake Hobbs Park, Harlem - Mapped data, built conceptual models, facilitated community meetings, and designed park concepts • Petrochemical America - Coordinated exhibition, created collage proposals, edited images, curated digital archives, and prepared layout Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield Camera Operator | Editor, March 2006 - February 2011 • Filmed live events and commercials in HD (RED, XDCam, HVX) • Edited and created digital effects and design for video broadcast TREEHUGGER Camera Operator, July 2007 • Filmed musician Ben Harper for a segment about urban parks


PROFE SSIONAL

INTERNATIONAL / DOMESTIC PROJECTS AND INTERNSHIP


HUIZHOU THOUSAND FLOWER ISLAND Thousand Island Park will be a 12 hectare residential and commercial site in Huizhou, China. Our team researched the local Hakka culture and looked to the regional context to provide a foundation for the development of the landscape. The design emphasizes movement and connection within the park by staging a series of public spaces that reveal themselves through the ripple of landforms. Residents will be able to engage their surroundings through various programmatic elements that include adult and children fitness parks, community farming plots, flower gardens, pools, and outdoor reading rooms.

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


CON C EPTUAL F R AM E WO R K

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


TH O USA N D F LO W E R IS LAN D CH AR ACTE R

COMMUNITY LAKE

CENTRAL PLAZA

COMMUNITY GARDEN

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


C H O N Q I N G E L L I P S E PA R K Chonqing Ellipse Park is the heart of an important gateway of Yuelai Eco-City’s new town development. This central park is at the intersection of many street axis’s and combines complex program elements including stations for bus rapid transit and the City’s subway system. The park will also contain retail, strolling gardens, water features and large informal gathering spaces. The design emphasizes a pedestrian-first circulation strategy for connections to the entire development. A pedestrian-first connection network is emphasized as it ties into the planning strategy at a larger scale. Pedestrian crossings are largely at grade with two large entry plazas that are formed to direct the flow of pedestrians from the outer edges into the highly active center plaza. Each entry plaza is framed with interconnected shade trellises that not only direct flow into the center of the park, but also create a more walkable pedestrian network. ICONIC ELEMENT MAJOR VISUAL CONNECTION MAJOR PEDSTRIAN CONNECTION

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

EARLY CONCEPTUAL DRAWING

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

FINAL CONCEPTUAL PLAN

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


METRO STATION +270m STATION METRO

METRO +255m METRO

RETAIL PROMENADE RETAIL PROMENADE

22m 22m

PROMENADE PROMENADE

6m 6m

WALKWAY WALKWAY

3m 15m 3m 15m

ROAD ROAD

18m 18m

WALKWAY WALKWAY

GARDEN GARDEN

10m 10m

POCKET PAKR POCKET PAKR + + SKYLIGHT SKYLIGHT PASSAGE PASSAGE

ROAD ROAD

40m 40m

RETAIL ARCADE RETAIL ARCADE

WALKWAY WALKWAY

6m 10m 6m 10m

+278m

+255m

GRAND PLAZA GRAND PLAZA

68m 68m

RETAIL ARCADE RETAIL ARCADE

15m 15m

WALKWAY WALKWAY

6m 6m

PROMENADE PROMENADE

+270m

16m 16m

PARK ENTRANCE UNDERGROUND PARK ENTRANCEACCESS +278m UNDERGROUND ACCESS

+276m

40m

3m

15m

6m

16m

WALKWAY

PROMENADE

8m

ROAD

65m

WALKWAY

+270m

GRAND PLAZA

WALKWAY

METRO STATION

STAIRWAY

ROAD

78m

RETAIL

CENTRAL PLAZA

3m

URBAN PLAZA

15m

WALKWAY

6m 6m

PROMENADE

METRO STATION

BUS STATION

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


STREET CHARACTER

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

3m

GRAND PLAZA

.5m 2m

WALKWAY

3.5m

CURB PLANTER

PLANTER CURB

3.5m

MOTOR LANE

WALKWAY

3.75m

MOTOR LANE

1m.5m 3.25m

MOTOR LANE

6m

BUS LOADING

10m

PROMENADE GROVE

6m

ARCADE

PROMENADE PATIO

9m

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


PLAZA CHARACTER

POCKET PARK

50m

PLAZA + RETAIL ENTRANCE

CENTRAL PLAZA

RETAIL ARCADE BRT/METRO ENTRANCE

GARDEN

10m

10m

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


R I V E R F R O N T FO R T WAY N E A community inspired masterplan drove the vision for a new destination in downtown Fort Wayne. The city is framed by three rivers, the Maumee, St. Joseph, and St. Mary’s. These rivers once spurred development and helped create a thriving city through their regional connections. Today Fort Wayne’s rivers are hidden by industrial development, infrastructure, and an unmanaged riparian edge. The design of the masterplan is focused on revealing the river’s as a great asset to to create a thriving economic and ecological downtown once again.

RIVERFRONT BEACH

MASTERPLAN

CONFLUENCE PROPOSAL

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


01 BACKGROUND sedimentation, some of which deposited upstream of the Maumee River dam. 01 BACKGROUND

LEVEES

LOCAL FLOOD PLAIN

The three rivers flow from west to east and include impoundment areas MCB-MARTINSVILLE LOAM, 0-2% SLOPES FLOODPLAIN LEVEES behind the Hosey Dam on the Maumee River and the St. Joseph Dam GH-GENESEE SILT LOAM MRB-MORLEY SILT LOAM, 2-6% SLOPES on the St. Joseph River. Fort Wayne City Utilities can lower river levels MFA-MARTINSVILLE SILT LOAM, 0-2% SLOPES a few feet by opening a gate at the Hosey Dam to allow more water to MCA-MARTINSVILLE LOAM, 0-2% SLOPES flow downstream. Between October 15th and April 15th the tainter gate is left open and rivers fall to a low winter pool level. Periodically, during the summer, the level of Fort Wayne’s rivers may be lowered for planned construction or maintenance projects. During the spring the level of the St. Joseph River north of the St. Joseph Dam is raised. This allows more water to pool upstream to help ensure that the City has an adequate supply of raw water to use for making treated drinking water.

The river system in Fort Wayne poses Like many early cities, Fort Wayne’s river system is used to drain excess challenges that include flooding, combined water, with combined storm and sewer outfalls (CSOs). This technology sewer overflows, and agricultural runoff. quickly moves large volumes of water during and after a rain event to preventLevees or reduce possible Whileaccess this is a benefit, waterviews quality to oftenflooding. block and can be compromised by heavy precipitation. During rainfall, water can river.Water levels are influenced pick upthe sediments and other contaminants that would otherwise not by the enter the water system or would be filtered out under natural conditions. Hosey Dam on the Maumee River.

LEVEES + FLOODWALLS

COMBINED SEWER OUTFLOW

LOCAL FLOOD PLAIN

EXISTING SOIL TYPES

To reduce water speed and overflowing conditions, the implementation of green infrastructure is recommended to promote healthy river functions.

RIPARIAN VEGETATION

WATERSHEDS WATER LINES

DAMS

RIPARIAN VEGETATION

FORCE MAIN SEWER LINES CSO LOCATIONS

RIVERFRONT

FORT WAYNE CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

01 BACKGROUND

VACANT CITY OWNED PARCELS UNDER UTILIZED

RIVERFRONT

EXISTING UTILITIES

FORT WAYNE CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

25

RIPARIAN VEGETATION

24

RIVERFRONT LAND OWNERSHIP

WALKING DISTANCE

Despite the challeges the rivers pose, there are many opportunities due to the flexibility of landuse adjacent to the rivers. This allows interventions to reveal the rivers by peeling back the levee and to thicken the riparian edge with a native plant palette. Downtown can also support riverfront commercial development with connections to existing destintions.

EXISTING TRAIL NETWORK

CITY PARK GREEN SPACE

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


COMMENTS FOCUSED ON NATURE

PUBLIC COMMENTS AND FRAMEWORKS

COMMENTS FOCU

DESIGNPROCESS PROCESS 0303 DESIGN

FOCUSEDCOMMENTS COMMENTS FOCUSED

Fort Wayne

DESTINATION CONNECTIONS MULTI-USE PARK SPACE OPEN SPACE UPGRADES

NATURE

COMMENTS FOCUSED NATURE COMMENTS FOCUSED ONON NATURE

RECREATION

DEVELOPMENT

COMMENTS FOCUSED RECREATION COMMENTS FOCUSED ONON RECREATION

COMMENTS FOCUSED ON DEVELOPMENT

RIVERFRONT

FORT WAYNE CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

COMMENTS FOCUSED DEVELOPMENT COMMENTS FOCUSED ONON DEVELOPMENT

RIVERFRONTFORT FORT WAYNECONCEPTUAL CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN RIVERFRONT WAYNE MASTER PLAN

5555

Several iterations of the master plan were presented to the public throughout each stage of the process. Collected feedback from the public and the project stakeholders were utlimately incorporated into the design. At the same time a team of consultants vetted the feasibility of master plan components from the standpoint of hydrology, ecology, infrastructure and economics. Three frameworks were created based on the themes of interest that developed through public input.

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Lawton astruc-

t to uld the

04

CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

CIRCULATION

PEDESTRIAN NETWORK EXISTING STREETS TO REMAIN

RECREATION TRAIL / BIKE PATH

EXISTING STREETS TOconnecting BE REMOVED Pedestrian pathways across the river tie the northern district to NEW STREETS the downtown. As plans move forward, the pedestrian experience should PROPOSED STREETSCAPE be emphasized to promote discovery (of activities and services) along the ENHANCEMENTS riverfront trail.

ENHANCEDRIVERFRONT BRIDGE CROSSING FORT WAYNE RECREATION TRAIL / BIKE PATH

PRIMARY PEDESTRIAN PATHS SECONDARY PEDESTRIAN PATHS PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES / BRIDGE ENHANCEMENTS

ENHANCED BRIDGE CROSSING

CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

A network of streets and pathways were created to strengthen connections and increase public engagement with Fort Wayne’s rivers. Bridges, lookout points, and riverfront walkways are proposed to establish a dowtown core that encourages movement between parks, neighborhoods, commercial districts, and regional trail systems. 71

PRIMARY PEDESTRIAN PATHS SECONDARY PEDESTRIAN PATHS PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES / BRIDGE ENHANCEMENTS

71

ENHANCED BRIDGE CROSSING

WETLAND WALK

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


EDGE STUDIES AND PROPOSAL

UNDULATING DECK

The river system, as existing, typically has flow velocities of less than 4 feet per second during flood conditions. Grass and naturally vegetated slopes generally have a capacity which exceeds this velocity, which means that there are no currently identified areas in need of additional erosion protection at present. However, many species occupying the river’s edge are invasive and block views to the river. Sectional studies suggest a terraced planting design that offers the public better connections to the water through a series of paths, plazas, lookout points, boat launches, and amphitheaters. Implementation of this vision begins by removing invasive and overgrown plants that block access to the river. Enhanced lighting, 05 SECTIONS seating and signage shape the newly designed edge. planting,

RIVERFRONT

MULTIPLE PATHWAYS

D

s

0

averag RIVER’S EDGE

R I P A R I A N

VIEWING PLANK

RECREATION

PARK

SPACE

PROMMAIN

HEADWATERS

TERRACE STRUCTURE

JUNCTION

100 ye

PROPOSED SECTION

PROMENADE - NORTHSIDE SECTION ‘C’

STREETSCAPE

RIVERSIDE

water

MAIN PROMENADE

PROMENADE OVERLOOK

average line

flood

RIVER’S EDGE

100 year line

PROMENADE - SOUTHSIDE SECTION ‘D’

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

RIVERFRONT

FORT WAYNE CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN BENJAMIN

NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


04 CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

STREETSCAPE

T

R PLAN

Urban streets that currently focus on vehicular traffic can be renovated into a “complete street” or “living street” that promotes and accommodates pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicular traffic paired with visually appealing, sustainable stormwater management practices.are strategically considered to spur privatesector investment while offering greater connectivity between neighborhoods. Statement streets give a special identity to district components near the river. The sidewalks should be extra wide to accommodate shopping and outdoor dining. Inviting seating elements and signature materials can be assembled with permeable pavers that aid with stormwater management.

MAIN DOWNTOWN CORRIDOR REIMAGINED

68

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


LAWTON PARK

21 4

1 2

3 21 5

12

URBAN FOOD GARDEN

SCIENCE CENTRAL

CAFE / BATH HOUSE / MEETING SPACE

4 5

SPY RUN

13 14 15

SCIENCE CENTRAL PLAZA

16

TERRACED GARDENS

6

CHALLENGE COURSE

17

PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

7

SKATE PARK / BMX BOWL

18

BOAT DOCK

8 9 10

ZIP LINES

FORT WAYNE BEACH

PARKING

19 20 21

11

AMUSEMENT ATTRACTIONS

22

MLK BRIDGE

CLIMBING WALLS

PASSIVE PARK

tree t

ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND

RECREATION TRAIL / BIKE PATH

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES RIVER LIGHT SCULPTURE

8

7

Ten n

15

ess

ee

RIVERFRONT

10

9

6

Stre et Riverfront Sub-Districts

LAWTON PARK

10

Lawton Park was bought to be used as an Indiana State Fairgrounds in 1866, (it was called Northside Park until the turn of the century). In 1918 Lawton had 40 acres and along with Swinney remained one of the city’s largest parks for many years. Cannons became part of the Lawton Park scene in 1901. Offering many activities for all ages, types and seasons, from beach activities that border the river to a science central educational park plaza for kids that connects to the museum. The park also includes terraced gardens, zip lining courses, amusement attractions and many other activities for the public. All these zones are surrounded by a soft landscape edge with trails, trees, and water from Spy Run Creek.

21

Spy Run Ave

TRAIL CORRIDOR

2 3

ton S

1

Clin

Parks within the masterplan offer many programs for a variety of ages from a gaming plaza and ropes course to an educational playground for children that sits adjacent to a science museum. Parks also include a beach , terraced gardens, and interpretive trails. A “lake” is carved out of the southern edge to provide greater opportunities for interaction with the river.

12

21 13

11 14

14

19

16

17

21

18

15

Fourth Street

22

21 20

FORT WAYNE CONCEPTUAL MASTER PLAN

1

TRAIL CORRIDOR

12

URBAN FOOD GARDEN

2 3

SCIENCE CENTRAL

CAFE / BATH HOUSE / MEETING SPACE

4 5

SPY RUN

13 14 15

SCIENCE CENTRAL PLAZA

16

TERRACED GARDENS

6

CHALLENGE COURSE

17

PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

7

ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND

PASSIVE PARK RECREATION TRAIL / BIKE PATH

SKATE PARK / BMX BOWL

18

BOAT DOCK

8 9 10

ZIP LINES

FORT WAYNE BEACH

PARKING

19 20 21

11

AMUSEMENT ATTRACTIONS

22

MLK BRIDGE

CLIMBING WALLS

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES RIVER LIGHT SCULPTURE

Lawton Park was bought to be used as an Indiana State Fairgrounds in 1866, (it was called Northside Park until the turn ofNICOLOSI-ENDO the century). In 1918 Lawton had 40 acres and BENJAMIN • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU along with Swinney remained one of the city’s largest parks

T


NATURE LOOKOUT

ENHANCED BRIDGE CROSSING

BOAT LAUNCH

NATURE CENTER

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Figure 1: South Bossier Redevelopment Area Boundaries 

BOSSIER CITY REDEVELOPMENT The study area is in the heart of South Bossier, Louisiana. It is situated between the Red River and Barksdale Air Force Base, just east of Shreveport. A freight rail line parallels the east side of Barksdale Boulevard, and greatly limits redevelopment and circulation. The vision of the study was to establish clear strategies for both public-sector improvements and private-sector investment. Public improvements include parks, trails, pedestrian and bicycle enhancements, streetscape and urban design elements, lighting, and local identity, which are strategically considered to spur private-sector investment while offering greater connectivity between neighborhoods.

LEGEND Levee Railroad Barksdale Blvd Arthur Ray Teague Pkwy

SHORT TERM GOALS

LEGEND Levee

Railroad PRIMARY THOROUGHFARES + CONSTRAINTS LONG TERM GOALS

MID-TERM GOALS

Barksdale Blvd

PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS

1 BARKSDALE BLVD COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT (BTWN PANTHER DR AND BELLAIRE BLVD) 2 WALKER PL MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT (COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL)

Barksdale Boulevard and Arthur Ray Teague Parkway are effective at moving high BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN volumes of vehicles at high speeds, but they do not provide easy connections PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS for pedestrians and bicycles to navigate along or across them to. By adding and improving crosswalks, sidewalks, trails and bike lanes, these barriers can be 1 MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT NEAR LEVEE mitigated in order to provide better access to the riverfront greenway.

AFB Barrier

PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS

Barksdale Boulevard and Arthur Ray Teague Parkway are effective at moving h volumes of vehicles at high speeds, but they do not provide easy connections for pedestrians and bicycles to navigate along or across them to. By adding and improving crosswalks, sidewalks, trails and bike lanes, these barriers can b mitigated in order to provide better access to the riverfront greenway.

AFB Barrier

Arthur Ray Teague Pkwy

1 BARKSDALE BLVD COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT (NEAR RED RIVER BRIDGES) 2 WALKER PL MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT (RESIDENTIAL AND OFFICE) 3 CENTURY LINK MIXED-USE AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

 

PRIMARY THOROUGHFARES + CONSTRAINTS

2 INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 3 JIMMY DAVIS HWY/BARKSDALE BLVD 51 COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014

1

BOUNDARY

29

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BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014

R

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REDEVELOPMENT AREA IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY | PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

KEY COMMERCIAL INSTITUTIONAL MIXED-USE

I

Legend

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

0

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1,000

2,000

3,000

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REDEVELOPMENT AREA

KEY COMMERCIAL INSTITUTIONAL MIXED-USE

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Legend

COMMERCIAL INSTITUTIONAL MIXED-USE

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

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1,000

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REDEVELOPMENT AREA

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Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, i-cubed, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

0

500

1,000

2,000

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BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU

BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014

- SEPTE


WALKER PLACE PROPOSED OPTION B

PROPOSED OPTION A

XISTING CONDITIONS

SECTIONAL STUDIES EXISTING CONDITIONS

PROPOSAL A

PROPOSAL B

WALKER PLACE

WALKER PLACE

POCKET PARK BENCH SHADE TREE

BIKE LANE

BIKE LANE SHADE TREE

SHADE TREE

PLANTING BED

PLANTING BED

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE TURN LANE DRIVE LANE

PARALLEL DRIVE LANE DRIVE LANE PARALLEL PARKING PARKING

DRIVE LANE

SHADE TREE

BIKE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

BIKE LANE

BIKE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

DRIVE LANE

BIKE LANE

STREET/PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING

PLANTER + BENCH

ARCADE

SHADE TREE

BRANDING SIGNAGE STREET/PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING PLANTER AND BENCH BRANDING SIGNAGE

PLANTER AND BENCH 24’

0 11’

0

4’

8’

11’

10’

11’

24’

11’ 0

SHORT TERM GOALS

Existing conditions on Walker Place

1 2 3 4

12’

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8’

MIKE WOOD PARK GATEWAYS CANAL SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS WALKER PL PARK COMPLETION STREET IMPROVEMENTS PEDESTRIAN/BIKE PATHS, PLANTING

4’

12’

12’

12’

12’

6’

24’

8’

24’‘B’ improvements 6’ 12’ 12’ 12’ Option include adding a bike lane12’ to the6’existing 4 24’ lanes and adding generous pedestrian walks, street trees, lighting and identity signs.

24’

0

4’

WALKER PLACE

8’

LONG TERM GOALS

8’

MID-TERM GOALS

Option ‘B’ improvements include adding a bike lane to the existing 4 lanes and adding generous pedestrian walks, street trees, lighting and identity signs. PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS

Option ‘A’ includes coverting the 2 outside lanes to parallel parking and PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS adding generous pedestrian walks next to a retail / dining arcade space.

PRIMARY IMPROVEMENTS

ALKER PLACE

4’

8’

6’

WALKER 91PLACE

1 LINEAR PARK ENTRY IMPROVEMENTS 2 CANAL SYSTEM ENHANCEMENTS

1 2 3 4

NEIGHBORHOOD ENTRY IMPROVEMENTS CANAL BRIDGE TO MIKE WOOD PARK MIKE WOOD PARK ENHANCEMENTS LINEAR PARK ENHANCEMENTS 5 STREET UPGRADES PEDESTRIAN/BIKE PATHS, PLANTINGS 6 GATEWAY PLANTING SHREVEPORT/BARKSDALE BRIDGE

BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014 TRAIL 3 LEVEE

4 STREET IMPROVEMENTS PEDESTRIAN/BIKE PATHS, PLANTING

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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT OPEN SPACE FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY PLAN | PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT

KEY

KEY PARK CANAL LEVEE TRAIL

STREET GATEWAY

KEY PARK CANAL LEVEE TRAIL

115

BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014

STREET GATEWAY

PARK CANAL LEVEE TRAIL

STREET GATEWAY

117 BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU

BARKSDALE BOULEVARD CORRIDOR REDEVELOPMENT PLAN - SEPTEMBER 2014


RIVERFRONT The existing linear park runs parallel to Arthur Teauge Parkway for just over two miles. Because of its proximity to the Red River, this open space offers an excellent opportunity to add series of riverfront destinations. that include the use of the levee for views to the river, Shreveport and beyond.

LEVEE PROPOSED OPTION B

TERRACE WITH RIVERFRONT STAGE - MINIMAL CONSTRUCTION - FOCUS ON INTIMATE INTERACTION WITH WATER

DECK AND BOARDWALK - CONNECTION ACROSS TEAGUE PARKWAY - FOCUS ON MOVEMENT AND VIEWS ALONG

CROSSWALK PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY TO WALKER PLACE

7500 to 11,000 sq ft Restaurant

STOP LIGHT

TERRACED OVERLOOK PLATFORM STAGE

OBSERVATION DECK RECREATION RENTAL KIOSKS

NATURE PATHWAYS

ACCESS VIA EXISTING TRAIL

RESTAURANT PARKING RIVERFRONT BOARDWALK

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

RIVERFRONT

PROFESSIONAL | SWA GROUP

Study Area Context

LEVEE PROPOSED OPTION A

RIVERFRONT

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


GATEWAY STRATEGY

PECAN ALLEE

COVERED WALK AND SIGNAGE

ICONIC ENTRYWAY PECAN ALLEE SHADED SEATING

PLANTED AND PROTECTED WALKWAY

SHADED SEATING

Major gateway monuments at the terminus of the Shreveport-Barksdale Bridge and the Jimmie Davis Bridge build on the unique character of their locations. The remnants of a pecan grove at Jimmie Davis Bridge can be enhanced by increasing the number of pecan trees along the street to create a strong axis into Bossier City. Color and gateway signs that continue the aesthetic of the bridge can also help establish a sense of arrival. Planting at the Shreveport Barksdale Bridge can point the way into Bossier while providing visual interest from above. The form of the planting can also echo the character of Barksdale Air Force Base.

PLANTED BUFFER

BIKE BIKE PATHWAY PATH BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


PETROCHEMICAL AMERICA

For the launch of Kate Orff’s and Richard Misrach’s book, Petrochemical America, I helped curate a national exhibition that displayed the work presented in the book. In addition, I created collages, layout studies, models, edited images and text, and managed print production.

PROFESSIONAL | SCAPE STUDIO

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


COLLAGE STUDIES

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


BLAKE HOBBS Blake Hobbs Park is located in Harlem, NYC. It sits near public housing, a senior center, and a charter school. For the project I acted as a facilitator to gather input from local community members and to help present early design ideas for the park. I also conducted site analysis, created diagrams, maps, scale studies, material studies, conceptual models, and drawings.

PROFESSIONAL | SCAPE STUDIO

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


NY HARBOR

Maps and structural studies were made to help initiate the development of areas in NY Harbor. Focus on the re-introduction of native species was to act as a catalyst toward the remediation of polluted waters and resilient landscapes.

CREDIT: SKETCH IMAGE - SCAPE

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


AC ADEMIC

INTERNATIONAL / DOMESTIC PROJECTS AND INTERNSHIP


LIVE WIRE

Re-activating Lancaster Ave as a conduit for existing and proposed energies

Lancaster County

DISTRIBUTION NETWORK Regional Food Supply

T AN LI PL O ES G CC TO S EGBRO MA PKINOTSH TO UMARRUAS NS P C Q IO S S N AN TS O BE E T BE LET CE U SOIL

APPLES

47,900lbs

59,040lbs

59,040lbs

X 365 (everyday) = 17,483, 500 lbs

59,040lbs

59,040lbs

59,040lbs

PAYA E PA BEETS LETTUC SH S SQUA CARROT TOM ON ATO ION ES S EGGPUMP PLA KIN NT

ORG WASTE

Regional Food Su

BRO BEA C NSCOL

I

Civic Food Suppl

X 104 (twice a week) = 30,700,800 lbs

Total: 17,483,500lbs + 30,700,800lbs = 48,184,300lbs/yr

Civic Food Supply Total per year: 70 acre X 50,000 lbs/yr = 3,500,000 lbs/yr

existing

Big Box

Education

Tapping the commercial attraction to promote and provide local food.

City Hall

Tapping into gov’t programs and partnerships like SNAP, TRACKS,and Fresh Food Financing Initiative that provide education and incentives for a healthy diet.

Tapping into UPenn’s UNI program that provides health ed. and agricultural training through city schools.

proposed

Food Bank + Axis

A food bank provides locally grown produce from to the community. A new axis from Lancaster Ave allows better access to the park and gardens.

Node

Garden market, food attractions, civic social space.

Node + Axis

New axis from Lancaster leads from a node to the new agricultural museum strengthening the cultural network in the park.

Lancaster Av. Dis

Lancaster Av. Distribution Community production: 5150,000 lbs/yr = 9,407 people/day (3 servings) Demand: extra 88,455 people’s 1 servings = 44,228 lbs/day

Community Distr

7,500 lbs X 2 vehicles X 3times/day

Node

Garden market, food attractions, civic social space.

Community Distribution Demand: extra 88,455 people’s 2 servings = 88,455 lbs/day

agri- Culture GROUP

3,800 lbs X 8 vehicles X 3times/day

Agri-Culture operates through three scales of intervention in order to create a socially driven and integrated urban landscape system. A disused bread distribution center along Lancaster Avenue can be reanimated as a node for managing produce from Lancaster County. This node can strengthen regional ties to Philadelphia through existing rail infrastructure that runs parallel to Lancaster Avenue. Local produce will have a direct point of entry in a sector of the city that is greatly lacking nutritious food access. By re-activating Lancaster Avenue as a commercial food destination, an armature can be established that engages communities by linking to a proposed tertiary network of vacant lots, schools and urban agriculture. These community links can be a catalyst that strengthens the development of urban agriculture and community involvement with the landscape. E

Y

DE

FOOD

E D U C AT I O N

SOIL

JOBS

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ID

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LT

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CA

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BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


SEEDING 40th St.

sowing the ground for community health and prosperity

INDIVIDUAL

The area of 40th Street between Lancaster Avenue and Fairmount Park borders the neighborhoods of Mantua, Belmont, and East Parkside. It is considered an area of great need due to its poverty, poor health and lack of higher education. One of the major barriers to 40th St. has been the closing of the 40th St. bridge several years ago. The lack of a bridge cuts off access to Fairmount Park and East Parkside. This creates a stifled stretch of 40th St., which differs greatly from the more prosperous character of the street south of Lancaster Avenue. The bridge was scheduled to re-open at the end of the following year making this stretch of 40th St. a great opportunity for an intervention. ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

VACANT LOTS + FOOD DESERT

EXISTING CONDITIONS

CLOSED BRIDGE + TRAFFIC

124/148 100/200

0/100

0

EXISTING SLOPE AND TOPOGRAPHY

Low elevationa coincide with a density of vacant lots; it is an optimal location for urban agriculture. BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


School Garden

Farmer’s Market

Local Eateries

Wild Garden

Local Food Industry

School Garden

Community Garden

40% reduced runoff stormwater to raingarden and cistern

Community Garden

Farmer’s Market

pump

CORRIDOR STRATEGY

By utilizing the street’s many vacant lots, adjacent schools and social programs with a system of urban agriculture, a vibrant culture can emerge through a renewed identity as an active food destination. Stategically placed gardens act as anchors to catalyze further sustainable

IRRIGATION STRATEGY

32,000 gallons/yr captured cistern

Community Garden 40th and Ogden

Wild Garden

ANCHOR - COMMUNITY GARDEN

SPECTACLE - TRANSITORY WILDFLOWER GARDEN

stormwater to raingarden and cistern

Community Garden

Community gardens can be irrigated through a rain water harvesting system from roofs and streets through a transparent process of remediation involoving plants and cisterns. BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Phase 2 STAKE

Phase 1 ACTIVATE

Fresh Move Fresh

40TH ST. BRIDGE - RENEWED THRESHOLD

COMMUNITY GARDEN - 40TH AND OGDEN

LOCAL MARKET - 40TH AND LANCASTER

APPROPRIATION STALL

ESTABLISH MARKETS AT MAJOR INTERSECTIONS FOR FRESH LOCAL FOOD FRESH FOOD FROM LANCASTER COUNTY WILL ARRIVE TWICE A WEEK TO THE LANCASTER AVE AND GIRARD INTERSECTIONS.

PUNCTUATE THE STREET `TO SET UP ITS FUTURE IDENTITY INITIATE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE COMMUNITY, THEIR VACANT LOTS, AND GROWING. APPROPRIATION STALL

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

ORCHARDS

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Phase 3 REACH

TAP INTO EXISTING FUNDING AND PROGRAMS

Establish partnerships with organizations with mutual interests help support the new 40th st. corridor. ADVOCACY

SCHOOLS

EDUCATION CAPITAL

40th St. Energies

Tracks Philabundance Urban Nutrition Initiative University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia Orchard Project Healthy Corner Store Initiative The Food Trust Friends of 40th St.

Director: Dr. Barbara Lohse Pennsylvania program funded by USDA to fund and create healthy food programs President: William J. Clark Largest hunger relief organization in the region. Goal is to make nutritious food available to all.

Director: Danny Gerber Addresses issues or poor nutrition and physical fitness

Founder: Paul Glover Grows orchards in Philadelphia with a focus on permaculture and food security.

Director: Yael Lehmann Corner store intiative offers subsidides and grants to stores in food deserts if they provide healthy food. Planning Advisors: Harris Steinberg and Harris Sokoloff A non-profit focused on planning issues for 40th st. Advocates for safer and healthier neighborhoods along 40th st.

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


SANTO DOMINGO PUEBLO (KEWA)

Trading Post

The Santo Domingo people are part of an ancient Pueblo culture that stretches back thousands of years. In order to help preserve their culture and spiritual identity, the following design proposal suggests an artist’s community that would help provde economic, environmental and social wellbeing. Existing arroyos are employed to capture and direct water for an agriculture centered on plants that are used for native crafts. Visitors can learn the craft in a proposed art center near a rail station and a historically important trading post. They may also watch the Pueblo people forage and make their art through varying vantage points that provide different degrees of privacy for the Santo Domingo people. Thresholds are delineated through elevations that echo the surounding mountains and runnels that recall the Rio Grande - an important feature in Pueblo culture that is considered their source of well-being.

LEARN Art Retreat and School SHARE Demonstration Garden

Live/Work Space for Local Artists

COLLECT Forage Garden agricultural zones for plants used in traditional crafts

THREE LARGEST ART MARKETS LA

NY SANTA FE

SANTA FE

DOMINGO 40 minutes rail or road

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

rt 26

rt 88

1930 to present

Interest wanes for pueblo crafts. The Trading Post burns down in 2001. The community lacks a center for their cultural arts.

late 19th c

The Trading Post opens when the rail reaches Santo Domingo. The pueblo is exposed to many tourists. Their craft becomes a way of life.

early 19th c

Explorers from outside Santo Domingo discover the unique quality of the pueblo’s craft and it becomes valued as art objects which become a commodity and placed in museums.

circa 700 AD

The people of Santo Domingo have developed their craft of pottery and jewelry for centuries. Materials were obtained locally and through trade with other tribes. Items were largely utilitarian or ceremonial in purpose.

?

SANTO DOMINGO PUEBLO

DOMINGO

Rio Grande

DESIGN STRATEGY

rt 22

rt 22

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


overflow

Demonstration Garden

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

cistern 5,400 gallons/yr (14in rain/yr.)

Work/shop

runnels to artist’s forage garden

Artist Residence

Community Plaza

Residence

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Kewa Craft Mesa Verde

Yuca Plant

Turquoise

Ch

am

BC AD 10,000

7,000

1,500

50

Heishi Necklace

500

750

900

Sea shell

1150

1350

1600

present

aR

Gypsum

ive r

Bee Plant

Pottery Container

Record

Thunderbird

AGRICULTURE

BC AD “Pottery is made from MotherChaco Earthit is from the earth Canyon 10,000 7,000 1,500 50 500 750 that the Pueblo people formBeginning andofsustain their lives. “ Hunting of small game animals maize cultivation, beans become cultivated plants

and planting on higher altitudes

900

including ceremonial rituals in great kivas

First Spanish explorers in the area

900

1150

1350

12 mi.

500 mi. 1600

1846 - 1848: Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo - Mexico cedes northern holdings (today’s American Southwest and California) to the U.S.

present

1605: Devestating flood destroys village Santo Domingo people join the founding of Laguna Rio

present

Santa Fe 1803: Louisiana Purchase - U.S. buys extreme northeastern portion of New Mexico from France

e

750

Gra nd

500

present

r ive

Gulf of California

50

1600

sR

1,500

1350

1276-1299: drought and Great Migration to central and southern Arizona and New Mexico

Peco

BC AD 7,000

and Horse to Pueblo

Kewa

FLOODS/SPIRITS

10,000

1150

Settlement on higher landforms for better defense and benefit from winter snowfall and summer

- water management/conservation Kewa is world renowned for their jewlery and pottery. Materials to craftprecipitation techniques emerge their objects were obtained from far distances by trade and were also FESTIVALS sourced from justBCoutside their village. Their crafts generally served AD utilitarian purposes but with500tourism750in the late 19th 10,000 7,000 1,500 50 900 century 1150 their 1350 crafts 1600 Community based activities emerge, 1541: Spanish introduce Sheep became a major source of income.

N

1886: Another devestating flood Santo Domingo people move East

Cerillos Mountains

Albuquerque

DRESS/SYMBOLOGY BC AD 10,000

7,000

1,500

50

500

750

900

1150

1350

1600

present 1853: Gadsden Purchase - U.S. aquires rest of New Mexico state, related to construction of U.S. transcontinental railroad

1880: Transcontinental railroad constructed - recorded beginning of Santo Domingo people making pottery

Early 1900s: Santo Domingo becomes a major tourist destination

1929 - 1941: Great Depression, Thunderbird necklaces

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


TACONY, PENNSYLVANIA Tacony is a neighborhood located along the Delaware River in northeast Philadelphia. On Tacony’s eastern edge lies a vacant shipping lot approximately 130 acres in size with a major elevated highway running through the property. Diverse habitats and enclosures were created by an armature to allow for a series of succession, while initiating links toward the amelioration of neglected adjacencies. A rhythm of expansion and contraction leads visitors as they move through a variety of spaces that frame the river. The main circulation path was primarily linear and meant to provoke deviation as rooms in the vegetated landforms opened and enticed visitors with the promise of discovery.

MATERIALITY + HISTORY

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

EDGE CONDITIONS

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


The resulting design for Tacony Park utilized an armature of dense planting and subtle landforms to provide a highly differentiated space that re-engages inhabitants with the Delaware river. Preliminary pattern studies based on natural formations served as a framework for the creation of a park at the location. Subsequent site investigations looked closely at soil, hydrology, vegetation, and community relationships to the site.

increase edges and patches

Shape + Line Study

STUDY MODEL

Extract

Break

Integrate

Fragmentation allows for greater habitat diversity. Increased adjacencies provide more interaction between patches, while added intersections lead to species richness.

Armature

Landform + Dense Planting a variety of spaces for respite play, and vantages of Tacony and the Delaware River

SW - predominant wind direction

Enclosures

Dense plantings and shifts in topography provide protection from wind and sun, as well as offer more intimate spaces.

WOOD STUDY MODEL

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


FINAL MODEL

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


MILDRED’S LANE Mildred’s Lane, located in rural northeastern Pennsylvania, is a collective collaboration between artist J. Morgan Puett, Mark Dion, their son Grey Rabbit Puett, and their friends and colleagues. “Mildred’s Lane attempts to coevolve a rigorous pedagogical strategy, where a working-living-researching environment has been developed to foster engagement with every aspect of life.” The studio’s main objective for the site was to collaborate with artists, engineers, hydrologists, architects, and others to plan an aquatic environment for both humans and non-humans using algorithmic concepts and landscape principles for the design and build phase.

PONDHOUSE SPRINGHOUSE POND ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


Pond As Biotic Stepping Stone

ALGAE

SUBMERGED

Chara Filamentous Nitella

FLOATING

EMERGENT

Spatterdock Water chestnut Water lily

Elodia Hydrilla Hornwort

Arrowhead Bulrush Pickerel Weed

Vegetation As Generator

Bass

Emergent

Feed

Shelter

Chara

Cattail

Amphibian

Fish Minnow

Algae

Salamander

Darter

Amphibian

Bird

Newt

Ducks

Geese

Swans

Salamander

Floating

Bass

Geese

Shade

Nest

Lotus

Bladderwort

Amphibian Darter

Ducks

shallow water summer

lack of migration

SUCCESSION FORM + BALANCE

Rodent Muskrat

Submerged

Fish Minnow

Insect

Bird

Frog

winter

visibility

deep

Newt

Frog

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Mollusc Snail

Fish

Amphibian Frog

Insect Flatworm

Beetle

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


WINTER

Torch Festival cattail acts well as tinder and the lit ends can create warmth for winter.

AUTUMN

Cattail Down Harvest fluff from cattail seed heads are often used for blankets, pillows, and earthen walls.

SUMMER

Weave And Eat leaves of cattail make excellent mats and roofs. The shoots, rhizomes, and pollen are edible.

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


GROUP WORK

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


10” 2’8”

GROUP WORK

1’4”

1’6”

947’

J

F 15’3”

7’9”

10”

5’

12’5

10’5”

Section 1’’ = 4’

8”

1’5” 947’

G 12’8”

5’

12’6”

1’6”

16’2”

1’7”

2’6”

947’

8’5”

12’9”

H C

18’3”

7’1”

2’6”

1”

2’4”

1”

1’1”

2”

9”

8”

1’11” 1’4”

947’ 14’5”

10’2”

17’8”

12’9”

I

B A

I

0”

H 20’9”

G

8’6”

F

13’

E

6’4”

5’

D

5’5”

5’

Vernal Pool Sections

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


EARTHWORK

GROUP WORK

Our team began exploring our ideas through sketching, clay modeling and looking at the styles of earthwork artists like, James Turrell and James Pierce. What developed were landforms inspired by Chinese mythology. The circular mound leading to the apex of the site is a symbolic form that echoes the cosmos. The terrace that lies below with its rectilinear form represents the earth as it does in Chinese geomancy. Our goal was to design a place that has a greater connection with the environment, and one that integrates natural processes. To the south of the mound is a vortex that redirects the flow of the river. Water pitching from the higher elevations travels down a swale and is redirected to the pool and then downstream in a cyclical manner. The whirlpool is also meant to a have a temporal dimension, so that over time the circular form enlarges.

Canopy

Subcanopy

Understory Grass and shrubs

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU


KATSURA VILLA

Four models were created as a group project and were accompanied by individual research papers about Katsura Villa. The importance of stones and philosophy in Japanese garden design was emphasized in each model. For hundreds of years stones have been used for their religious, ritualistic and aesthetic properties. Each stone was carefully chosen and placed for it’s experiential,symbolic and metaphorical purpose. Some Japanese garden scholars have counted over 130 categories for stones.

I and a fellow collaborator worked on the sculpting of the plaster stones for the models.

ACADEMIC | UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

BENJAMIN NICOLOSI-ENDO • BEN_N-E@ALUMNI.PENN.EDU

Profile for Benjamin

Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2015 | Benjamin Nicolosi-Endo  

https://www.behance.net/bne _________________________________________________ MLA | University of Pennsylvania /////////////////////////////...

Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2015 | Benjamin Nicolosi-Endo  

https://www.behance.net/bne _________________________________________________ MLA | University of Pennsylvania /////////////////////////////...

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