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B E N J A M I N P OR T F OL IO

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BE N JA MIN J. R OU SH - P OR T F OL IO 2 012 www.benroush.com


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BE N JA MIN J. R OU SH - P OR T F O L IO 2 012 Š 2012 Ben Roush, All rights reserved. Printed Using Sustainably Sourced Materials


INTRODUCTION 005 ACADEMIC WORKS 006 EXPERIENCE 034 PHOTOGRAPHY 052 RESUME 064

C ONTENT S

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Ben Roush is a full-time Landscape Architecture student from Chapel Hill, NC, currently pursuing a Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture at North Carolina State University’s College of Design. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Landscape Architecture from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University as well as an Associates degree in Applied Horticulture Technology from Alamance Community College. Design concentrations include: urban design, brownfield remediation and redevelopment, abandoned landscapes and art and design interventions as catalysts to redevelopment. This portfolio presents a collection of academic and professional work as of December 2012.

IN TR OD UC TION

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ALAMANCE COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASSOCIATES DEGREE IN APPLIED HORTICULTURE TECHNOLOGY NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF DESIGN MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL & TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY BACHELORS OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


01. ACADEMIC WORKS


AR MF I E LD PA R K SU MM ERF IE LD , NC

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plot of land donated to the town of Summerfield, North Carolina was the site for my junior landscape architecture studio. The town requested a master plan for an environmental park that would address the community’s needs, and provide opportunities for environmental education. A thorough inventory and analysis of the site presented many challenges and opportunities. My design is centered around engaging users in environmental education through a number of active and passive activities.

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A network of boardwalks was designed to allow users to take advantage of the site’s natural wetlands without negatively impacting the flourishing ecological communities. A strategy for preserving the deciduous woodlands was also incorporated into this design.


9 A woodland amphitheater, environmental education center, and a series of boardwalks provide the community with a convenient interface to the natural environment. With recent increases in the prevalence of technology in many of our society’s daily activities, encouraging outlets for interacting with nature directly is critical.


NC A& T STATE U NIV ER SI TY S C I ENC E B UIL DING GR EEN SBOR O, NC

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n a third-year design studio, students were asked to develop a site design for the new science building on North Carolina A&T‘s campus. In addition to standard site design requirements, students were prompted to integrate a mathematical concept into their designs. I chose to base my site design on the golden ratio, a mathematical constant that appears in nature and has been used in art, science, and mathematics for thousands of years. I used the golden ratio to divide both the areas and volumes within the site.

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From a functional perspective, I chose to place pathways in the directions of the highest flows of pedestrian traffic. The existing location of the sidewalks align only with the street and was not designed with the actual needs of the typical pedestrian.


EAST W INSTON C O M MUNIT Y DE SIGN WI N STO N SA LE M , NO RT H C ARO LI NA

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ast Winston a community in WinstonSalem, NC was the subject of our senior studio in 2011 at North Carolina A&T. Our studio was introduced to the project by Simon G. Atkins CDC (community development corporation) and landscape architecture firm Design Workshop. East Winston, once a diverse, thriving community, was severed from its connection to downtown Winston-Salem when highway 52 was constructed. Since then, the community has lost much of its diversity and has fallen into disrepair.

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While the community has many positive assets, the lack of investment, disconnection to the downtown community, and its perceived higher crime rates have presented many obstacles for redevelopment. Our study of this area proposes a set of design solutions for reconnecting the community, preserving community character, and allowing it to become selfsustaining and vibrant once again.


A laser-cut, 100 scale topographic study model of the community was used to evaluate various urban design concepts .

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Once the final master plan was complete, I made a model for presentation. Wooden buildings were cut to depict proposed structures, while green foam was used to represent the existing buildings. A vellum overlay was used to show the proposed street network.


The final illustrative master plan for East Winston shows a denser, interconnected, transit and pedestrian friendly environment. This plan builds on the community’s assets, and encourages positive redevelopment and urban infill.

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Diversity in housing types and affordability will attract a socioeconomically diverse population of residents. The connected greenway system helps buffer the dividing highways and provides the community with an attractive asset that can be utilized by all residents of Winston-Salem. EA ST WIN STO N CO M M UNI TY D E S IGN STUD I O


FI GURE G ROUN D

STR E E T G R ID

EX IST ING

E X IST I N G The existing figure ground provides insight to the lack of density in East Winston, and the discontinuity in the grain of the urban fabric between the north and south. The large institutional buildings to the north are surrounded by vast expanses of under utilized surface parking.

PROP OS ED

The existing street grid reflects the symptoms of a vehicle-oriented society. The street network of East Winston is designed for the through traffic user and not for the residents of this community. The expansive “superblocks“ shown in this map create an unsafe environment that deters walking, biking, and transit.

PRO POSE D The proposed figure ground restores much of the community‘s original urban fabric and creates a pedestrian-friendly, transit-oriented environment. This increase in density is achieved through the implementation of strategic urban infill and the replacement of multi-family housing for mixed-use developments.

The proposed street grid, based on the pre-1957 street network, attempts to break up the superblocks and restore the dense urban scale to the community. Traffic loads are reduced to the major thoroughfares by providing multiple routes to each destination. This design promotes alternative forms of transportation and increases walkability.

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B L U FO R D CIRC LE DE SIGN C O M PE TITIO N GR EEN SBOR O, NO RT H C ARO LI NA

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design competition hosted by Vines Architecture asked students in landscape architecture, engineering, and graphic communications majors to design a temporary landscape installation that would serve as a placeholder before the construction of the NCA&T bell tower in four years. Our team proposed a landscape featuring a column of light that would be representative of the future bell tower location as well as create a prominent landmark for the university in the city‘s skyline.

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A nighttime rendering from outside of downtown shows the column of light projecting into the skyline.


The illuminated column of light becomes a gathering space that unifies the campus.


C H I C K EN PO INT CABIN D ESI G NE D BY O LS UNK U ND I G A R C H ITE C T S AR CH ITEC TU R A L R E ND E RI NG + ANI M AT IO N BY BEN R OU S H

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he following renderings were completed in an architectural rendering and animation course I elected to take my senior year at NCA&T. Students were asked to choose an already constructed residence to make 3D models and renderings of. Students were also responsible for siting the house at a fictional location and were encouraged to maximize the home’s environmental efficiency through orientation and selection of plant species that would screen sunlight during warmer months, allow canopy penetration during cooler months, and block prevailing northern winds.

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W R A P P ING TH E UR B AN SU R FACE : A C HAR ET TE WITH WA LTER HO O D IN TERN ATI ONAL CI VI L RI GHT S M USE UM N CA &T STATE UNIV. + UNI V. O F CA L. B E RK EL EY

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n a collaborative charette focused on designing commemorative landscapes by addressing the surface of the urban environment, landscape architecture students from NCA&T and Berkeley worked together to design the streetscape around the International Civil Rights Museum.

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The museum is located in downtown Greensboro, NC within a former Woolworth department store where in 1960, four African American students from NCA&T University sat down at a lunch counter and were denied service due to their race. The students passively refused to leave in protest of racial inequality, sparking a nationwide movement of similar civil rights protests. Our study area focused on the streetscape and facade of the museum along Elm street, as well as February One Place, the side street along the museum named after the date of the sit in.


A nighttime perspective of the museum depicts a concept for utilizing projected images through glass. This concept would allow the museum to communicate ideas, history, and information, and appeal to the younger population that frequent Elm Street during the nighttime hours.

By “wrapping the urban surface“ with images of prominent figures from various civil rights movements the nondescript February One Place streetscape becomes a canvas that allows ideas from inside the museum to be communicated to pedestrians along Elm St.

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SO UTH EL M STR EE T C O A L DISTR ICT GR EEN SBOR O, NC

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he South Elm Street Coal District proposes a strategy for the transformation of a brownfield site that was once a coal yard into a thriving mixed-use district centered around local food. This district will provide a model for how local food can have a multitude of social, economic, cultural, and environmental benefits and inspire a deeper investigation into human interaction with the landscape and our relationship with fossil fuels.

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The 17.87-acre site is located at the southernmost edge of downtown Greensboro, North Carolina, Guilford County’s most populous city. The site is at a critical location in the city, at the convergence of four distinct neighborhoods and the intersection of two major thoroughfares: Lee St. and Elm St. Lee St. is a major divider in Greensboro. Great disparity exists between the more affluent, predominantly white communities north of Lee St., and the lower-income, predominantly African American communities south of Lee St. This disparity is not isolated to the Lee St. corridor but is reflected throughout the city.

E X I ST I N G S I TE C O ND I T I O N S --While the majority of the redevelopment site is open, the edges of the site boundary are characterized by structures with unique architectural, and historical interest.

H I STO RI C L A N D US E x C ON TAM IN AT I O N L E V E LS --This diagram attempts to illustrate the connection between the site’s historic use as a coal yard to it’s current levels of soil and groundwater contamination.


COAL MO L ECUL A R STRU CTUR E The hexagonal form seen throughout the design was inspired by the molecular structure of coal, in an effort to create a dialog about the consumption of fossil fuels and the impacts our choices have on the landscape.

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MA STER P L A N

24 SI TE SECT ION A- A 1

SITE SEC T IO N B-B 1 SOUTH ELM STRE E T COAL D I STRI CT


FOOD ACCESS I B IL I TY + E D UC AT IO N Downtown Greensboro does not have a grocery store. Grocery stores in Greensboro are concentrated in high income areas, while most residents of the lowerincome communities only have access to convenience stores and fast food. The proposed design attempts to alleviate this disparity by centering programing around food, specifically local, affordable, and nutritious food.

Plaza activated by farmers market.

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SU STAI N AB IL I TY + E D U C ATI ON The site’s sustainable solutions are revealed to the public rather than concealed in an effort to provide an educational experience for the users who interact with it. Among various other sustainable features, the constructed wetlands can treat over 5,000 gallons of wastewater from the surrounding buildings. The coal chemical structure has been sandblasted into the plaza’s retaining wall in reference to the site’s relationship with carbon.


RE TR O FIT TIN G T H E PE EL E HA L L PA R KING LOT R AL EIG H , N ORT H C ARO LI NA

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n my first semester of graduate school I elected to take a studio in design development. This course allowed me to refine my technical foundation before moving into more theoretical and research focused studies. This studio required students to complete a schematic design(shown on the right) in just two weeks in order to allow the rest of the semester for design development. The following pages include sheets from the my set of construction drawings.

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The site is an asphalt parking lot located on NC State’s campus in an important intersection of vehicular traffic, pedestrian movement, and architectural vernacular. My design draws on the intersection of two major architectural axes (the old grid and the new grid) which organize the buildings adjacent to the site. My design emphasizes this intersection of old and new through its form as well as its plant materials.

Schematic Design


Planting Plan + Details


Erosion Control + Tree Protection

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RETROF IT TI N G THE P E E LE HALL PA RK ING LOT


Layout + Materials


Grading Plan

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RETROF IT TI N G THE P E E LE HALL PA RK ING LOT


Typical Site Details


Pedestrian Bridge Details

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RETROF IT TI N G THE P E E LE HALL PA RK ING LOT


Bioretention Details


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nternships and professional collaboration have had a profound impact on my development as a designer. Experiences at Elsewhere Artist Collaborative, Swanson + Associates Landscape Architecture, and Kulturpark have helped guide my academic studies and professional development


02. EXPERIENCE elsewhere artist collaborative (intern) swanson + associates landscape architecture (intern) kulturpark: investigating pl채nterwald berlin (collaborator)


e l s e w h e r e


Elsewhere, is a non-profit artist collaborative and living museum where a diverse group of artists from around the world come to create, collaborate, and interact with the community of Greensboro, North Carolina. The museum is located in downtown Greensboro in what was once a thrift store owned by Sylvia Gray, the grandmother of one of Elsewhere‘s founders. Her 59 year collection of knickknacks, textiles, army surplus, toys and miscellaneous “junk” is now in constant transformation and curation by hundreds of artists in an ever-evolving living installation.

collaborative

Every week Elsewhere hosts events where members of the community are invited to be involved and interact with the museum. Elsewhere is as much a sociological experiment as it is a museum for the exhibition of art. The most important lesson I took away from my internship at Elsewhere is that the process of creating is often times more powerful than the product or outcome itself. I have applied this understanding to my way of looking at landscape architecture, and the design process in general.

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CR EAT I V E CO MMU N ITY C O L L ABO R AT IO N

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Elsewhere promotes collaborative projects through a number of community outreach programs such as “picnic,“ a forum for community groups to submit proposals for the funding of creative projects around the city.


s w a n s o n + a


Working with David Swanson at Swanson and Associates has been one of the most influential experiences to my education in landscape architecture. As a full-time intern at Swanson and Associates for the summers of 2011 and 2012, I participated in a wide range of projects with diversity in both scope and scale.

Completing this internship before the last year of my Bachelor’s degree allowed me to gain valuable insight into my interests within the field of landscape architecture. I was able to apply what I learned as an intern to my academic studies, and now have a more comprehensive understanding of the profession.

Working in a small firm like Swanson and Associates allowed me to see almost every aspect of the profession. Mr. Swanson made my education and exposure to the profession a priority at all times. My responsibilities as an intern included: participating in client and contractor meetings, presenting designs to clients, digital drafting, digital rendering, conceptual design, design development/ construction documentation, construction administration, and coordination with allied professionals.

ssociates

landscape architecture

One of the most beneficial aspects of my experiences at Swanson and Associates was the diversity of project types. Some of the project types I was exposed to included: commercial, institutional, residential, public, and environmental. Clients included: UNC Hospitals, UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke Gardens, The Town of Chapel Hill, Duke School for Children, St. Mathews Episcopal Church, and numerous other commercial, institutional, and residential clients.

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U NC H O S PI TA LS- G R AV E LY PAV I LL I ON


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NC Hospital’s Gravely Building, where many of the hospital’s cancer related services were located, was recently demolished. These services were relocated to the new North Carolina Cancer Hospital just east of the former Gravely Building. In its place, Swanson and Associates was asked to design a pavilion around a small new building designed by ZGF Architects that now houses the hospital’s valet and parking services.

In the late stages of the design, a well known sculpture named “Next Generation” by the Native American artist Allan Houser was donated to the hospital. This sculpture is now the centerpiece of the new Gravely Pavilion. Working on the rendering of this plan and attending meetings with hospital administration, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders, gave me a unique opportunity to see the complexity involved in a project of this scale.

The site needed to serve as a welcoming entry to the hospital, as this is the most significant open space in close proximity to the Children’s, Women’s, Neurosciences, and NC Cancer Hospitals. This proximity also required it to serve as a space conducive to reflection for patients, family members, and hospital employees. One of the most prominent elements of this design is the arching pathway that connects the exit from the parking deck to many of the most frequently used hospital entrances. This pathway is framed by ornamental grasses and rose bushes, among other plantings, and features the hospital’s main flagpole.

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“Next Generation” sculpture by Allan Houser

SWA N S O N + A SS O C I ATE S L AN DSC AP E AR C HI TEC TUR E


D U K E G AR D E NS- E D W IN F. STEF FEK MEM ORI A L BR IDG E

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he curators of the Sarah P. Duke Gardens wanted to build a memorial to Edwin F. Steffek, a world renowned authority on botany and author of many horticulture books who had recently passed away. A site was chosen within the H.L. Blomquist Native Plants Garden where a bridge that had fallen into disrepair had been torn down. The Bloomquist Garden is home to over 900 species of plants native to the southeastern United States, many of which were cataloged by Mr. Steffek. Swanson and Associates was asked to design a bridge that would commemorate Steffek’s life achievements and contributions to Duke Gardens.

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The design of the bridge relates to the architectural vernacular of other constructed elements within the Blomquist Garden, and features metal fern fronds native to the southeast. The design strikes a delicate balance between its substantial steel members and its delicate metal fern fronds. The steel components of the bridge have been coated with a special finish which will transform the black color seen in the image to the right into a natural patina as it ages.


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SWA N S O N + A SS O C I ATE S L AN DSC AP E AR C HI TEC TUR E


D U K E G AR D E NS- WO O D L A N D BRI DG E

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fter completing the design of the Steffek Memorial Bridge, Swanson and Associates was asked to design another bridge for the Blomquist Native Plants Garden. This bridge was meant to marry two design themes; the architectural vernacular of Duke Gardens and the aesthetics found in Civilian Conservation Corps era design. After participating in the first bridge design, Swanson and Associates Principal, David Swanson allowed me to take on the design of this bridge all the way through construction documentation.

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This project increased my understanding of the importance of design taking place at every stage of the process, and the challenges that exist when translating a design from concept to construction.

SWA N SO N + A SS O CI ATE S L AND S CA PE AR C H I TE C TU RE


Kulturpark is a project focused on the investigation and artistic intervention of an abandoned amusement park in Treptower Park of East Berlin, Germany. Kulturpark, orginally named Spreepark, was built in 1969 by the socialist DDR government of East Berlin. This was one of the few sites built for recreation and amusement for the people of East Berlin. Since the park’s abandonment the site has remained relatively untouched, allowing the natural environment to gain a foothold and begin to retake ownership of the landscape. Fenced off around its perimeter, with guard dogs and security guards trying to prevent the relentless infiltration of “jumpers,” individuals who climb over the fence to paint graffiti, photograph, or just experience this fantastical landscape frozen in time.

w w w.kultur p ar k.or g

In June 2012 artists and designers from around the world collaborated in a series of charrettes, think tanks, and events to envision potential futures for the site. The project culminated in a temporary public opening that featured the works of a number of Berlin-based visionaries. This intervention was designed to serve as a catalyst to inspire interest in the preservation of this cultural time capsule.

Kulturpark Visionary Supporters: 476 Kickstarter Backers, The Artmatters Foundation, James Alefantis, The Mikesell Family, and Rene Tettenborn. Affiliates: Goethe-Institut-DC, Betahaus, Kunstrepublik, Spreestudios, Urban Culture Institute, Forcast Public Art, Dirty-Mag.com, Elsewhere Collaborative, Spinello Projects, Artstars* and Arte TV, Plus Null, and Supermarket Creative Educational Partners: Charles Waldheim Department of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Christina Lanzl Urban Arts Institute at Massachusetts College of Art and Design Curators / Producers: George Scheer, Stephanie Sherman, Anthony Spinello, Agustina Woodgate Collaborators: Dieta Sixt, Christina Lanzl, Natalia Zuluaga, Andrew Persoff, Chris Lineberry, Juliet Hinely, Ben Roush, Ben Boyles, Valerie Wiseman, Jess Weos, Paris Furst

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K U LTU RPA RK: CU R ATI N G L A ND S CAP E . . .

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ne weekend during the Kulturpark project, the public was invited to experience the park with tours given in both German and English. During this weekend a number of events took place including: performance art, film projections, interactive installations, and train rides. These events are being complied for a documentary film and publication with additional essays, artwork, and documentation of the park and the intervention process. The thumbnails to the right are from a document made by artist and designer Anthony Spinello and Ben Roush, given to park visitors on opening day to guide them to the park’s remote location, and included a schedule of events. Collaborating on the Kulturpark project has inspired the direction of my graduate studies researching art and design interventions as catalysts.

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he park’s landscape, reminiscent of a post apocalyptic movie set, is filled with an assortment of unique amusement park elements, creatures, rides, and structures. Among these features is a railroad(still functioning) that takes visitors on a fascinating tour that weaves in and out of the forest and through tunnels.

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series of think tanks invited designers, artists, developers, citizens, and government officials to participate in discussions about what should be done with the park. A common sentiment held by many of the participants in these discussions was the idea that interventions should be made only to provide access and presentation of the parks existing features, not altering or removing them. This idea prompted me to consider the larger idea of “curating landscapes;� in other words, presenting landscapes and cultural relics instead of recreating them.


03. PHOTOGRAPHY


KULTU R PA RK FE RR IS WHE E L B E RLIN , GE RM ANY


KULTU R PAR K R A ILR OA D OVE R DU C KW EE D PO N D BE RLI N, GER MAN Y

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WI L LI AM S & SO N FUR NITURE + SOUT HSI D E HAR DWAR E G RE EN S BO R O, NC

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N O R FO LK SOUTH E RN R A ILR O AD TR ESTL E GR E ENSB OR O, NC


B ER L IN WAL L B E RLIN , GE RM ANY

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TE M P EL HO F A IRP ORT PAR K BE RLI N, GER MAN Y

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SO UTH EL M STR EE T G RE EN S BO R O, NC

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R U ST Y TR A ILOR GR E ENSB OR O, NC


TEUF E LS B E RG AB A NDONE D U. S . L I STEN I N G STATI O N B ER LIN , G ERM ANY

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N E U E NAT IO NA LG A LE RIE BY L U D W I G MI E S VA N DE R R O HE BE RLI N, GER MAN Y


04. RESUME


E D U C AT I O N North Carolina State University College of Design 2012-Present Master of Landscape Architecture GPA: 4.0/4.0 North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University 2010-2012 Bachelor of Science Degree in Landscape Architecture GPA: 4.0/4.0 Alamance Community College 2008-2010 Associates Degree in Horticulture Technology; Diploma in Landscape Design and Installation; Diploma in Nursery Production; Certificate in Landscape Design; Certificate in Greenhouse Production; and Certificate in Landscape Management. GPA: 3.5/4.0

EXPERIENCE Intern, Swanson + Associates, P.A. Landscape Architecture, Carrboro, NC Summer 2011 + Summer 2012 Working closely on a diverse selection of design projects with firm principal, David Swanson. The scope of my work as an intern included: drafting, digital rendering, conceptual design, site visits; and participating in client, consultant, and contractor meetings. Collaborator, Kulturpark, Berlin, Germany June/July 2012 Kulturpark is a project focused on the investigation and artistic intervention of an abandoned amusement park in East Berlin built by the DDR in 1969. As a collaborator my research focused on historical site mapping, ecological assessment, and the post-apocalyptic-like relationships between this constructed amusement park and the natural environment. I also participated in a “think tank� hosted by Kulturpark that invited artists, designers, government officials, developers, and residents to participate in a charette envisioning the park’s future.

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Student Teaching Assistant, Landscape Architecture Department, North Carolina A&T State University Greensboro, NC 2011 My role as a student teaching assistant at NCA&T involved tutoring and assisting Landscape Architecture Professor Anna Reaves with the instruction of freshman and sophomore landscape architecture students in digital rendering, graphic communication and 3-D modeling concepts and workflows. Intern, Elsewhere Artist Collaborative, Greensboro, NC Spring 2011 Elsewhere is a non-profit organization that provides a setting for creative collaboration through its living museum, innovative residency program, educational initiatives, and special events. Elsewhere facilitates collaboration among visiting artists from around the world. Lead Merchandiser, Plant Partners Inc/Metrolina Greenhouses, Huntersville, NC 2009-2010 Plant Partners is a progressive third-party merchandising company and subsidiary of Metrolina Greenhouses, the largest single-site greenhouse location in North America. My responsibilities as a merchandiser included: implementing and coordinating plant service programs at the store level throughout the Triad of North Carolina, inventory management, horticultural consultation, and display design. Sales Associate/Horticulturalist, Fifth Season Gardening Co., Greensboro, NC 2008-2009 Fifth Season Gardening Company is a locally owned retail business specializing in organic gardening and horticultural systems. My responsibilities included: client education, garden design, and providing information regarding organic certification.


COMPUTER SKILLS Operating Systems: Proficient in both Mac and Windows operating systems. Software/Applications: AutoCAD 2013, Adobe Photoshop CS6, Adobe Illustrator CS6, Adobe InDesignCS6 , ArcGIS, Google Earth, Google SketchUp Pro, Shaderlight Pro V2, Microsoft Office Suite, Apple iWork. Trained in the operation of CO2 laser cutting/engraving systems and software.

MEMBERSHIPS+RECOGNITION 2012 Landscape Architecture Foundation University Olmsted Scholar 2012 American Society of Landscape Architects Certificate of Honor 2012 American Society of Landscape Architects NC Chapter Merit Award-General Design Category-South Elm Street Coal District 2012 John Francis Robinson Landscape Architecture Award NCA&T School of Agriculture + Environmental Sciences Student Achievement Award-Highest Senior G.P.A. NCA&T Dean’s List ACC President’s List Bluford Design Competition Finalist Sigma Lambda Alpha (Landscape Architecture Honor Society) Associate ASLA (American Society of Landscape Architects)

VOLUNTEER WORK Greensboro Redevelopment Commission Greensboro, NC Fall 2011-2012 Served as a community advisory board member for a 9-acre urban brownfield redevelopment site that once housed a coal yard and pintsch gas plant. Koppertop Life Learning Center Liberty, NC 2009-Present Koppertop is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization that provides recreational and horticulture therapy on a 33-acre working farm. Patrick Dougherty: “Stickworks” Guilford College Art Gallery, Greensboro, NC Spring 2011 Assisted artist Patrick Dougherty in the construction of a massive sculpture composed entirely of hardwood saplings. NCA&T Landscape Architecture Department, Greensboro, NC Spring, 2011-Present Volunteered at local high school career fairs, to promote the university’s landscape architecture program and the profession of landscape architecture. Appalachian Service Project, Johnson City, TN Summer 2004, Summer 2005 The Appalachian Service Project (ASP) provides aid to impoverished regions of the Appalachian Mountains through the construction and renovation of housing.

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R E F E R EN C ES Mr. David Swanson, ASLA Principal, Swanson + Associates P.A. Tel. 919.929.9000; Email: david@swansonlandscapearchitecture.com Prof. Gene Bressler, FASLA Professor and Head, Department of Landscape Architecture NC State University College of Design, Raleigh, NC Tel. 919.515.8350; Email: gene_bressler@ncsu.edu Prof. Anna Reaves, ASLA Assistant Professor, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, Greensboro, NC Tel. 336.334.7520; Email: areaves@ncat.edu Prof. Perry Howard, FASLA Program Coordinator, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, Greensboro, NC Tel. 336.334.7520; Email: howardp@ncat.edu Mr. Winston B. Crisp, J.D. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tel. 919.966.4045; Email: wbcrisp@email.unc.edu Prof. Justin Snyder Department Head, Horticulture Technology, Alamance Community College Tel. 336.506.4192; Email: snyderj@alamancecc.edu

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Ms. Susan Coe Market Service Manager, Plant Partners Inc. Tel. 704.699.1552; Email: susan@plant-partners.com


919.423.1711

www.benroush.com

benjroush@gmail.com


Ben Roush Portfolio