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bd BEN DEINES PORTFOLIO


portland’s nighttime skyline long exposure panorama


BEN DEINES PORTFOLIO When planting a garden, the most important aspect to consider is its relationship with the surrounding environment. While we can cultivate the health of a space, its livelihood is ultimately dependent its place within a greater landscape. This concept can be applied not only to gardens, but to all designed and built spaces. I feel that I understand the world through my interactions with my environment. My mission is to use that understanding to work in a role that integrates architectural and landscape design in the interest of social responsibility. As I move forward I hope to continue to learn about modern architectural practice and help evolve its place within the cultural, ecological, and economic layers of the modern world. This portfolio is intended to show some of the ways we might think about the design of architecture and landscape as a holistic discipline.

Ben Deines ben@oxalislandscapes.com bendeines.com 541.554.9813


GRADUATE THESIS: URBAN ECOLOGY

honeybees as indicators illustrator

natural resources

apicultural practices

water management

native habitat

physical infrastructure

agricultural practices

waste management energy and transportation

Like all life, humans have interdependent relationships with the ecosystems in which we live. We cannot thrive or even survive without the functions of the undomesticated, wild environment, and yet humans have been migrating from rural landscapes into urban areas since the development of agriculture. This migration has created a dilemma in which increasing human population density is associated with the degradation of the ecosystems that support our growth and quality of life. Recent human history has been the history of urban growth and ecological crisis. One species which has accompanied humans on our journey is the honeybee. While the honeybee has been partially domesticated, it has fundamentally retained its wildness. This duality makes the honeybee an ideal indicator species for urban ecology because it acts as an ambassador between the domesticated and the wild layers of the urban environment. As we strive to improve the health of our urban ecosystems we can use the honeybee as a metric to gauge our impact. While all urban areas deserve consideration when striving to cultivate a richer and more diverse ecosystem, existing industrial corridors represent one of the greatest opportunities for improvement in the urban environment.


EAST PORTLAND MULTICULTURAL CENTER Cultural organizations in Portland, OR have come together to create a multicultural center which will support their programs while also bringing them together. Using food as a medium for cultural exchange is a central concept for this design. Using the metaphor of a salad bowl, this multicultural center will be a celebration of mixing, in contrast with the traditional American concept of a melting pot. Multiculturalism is a duality of cooperative and independent identity. The spatial organization of this project was based on a balance of space for cooperation through gathering areas and independence through learning, administrative, and support spaces. These programs were divided into two volumes. The cooperation volume was extended towards the street to create a clear public entrance, while the independence volume was pushed towards the back of the site to create a public courtyard for eating and selling food from the kitchens. Cultural and generational interaction will be the lifeblood of this project and will be the core objective for the organization of the space.


approach perspective rhino, maxwell, photoshop


site plan rhino, illustrator


Sustainability features were chosen to act holistically. By combining multiple strategies such as shading, high thermal mass night flushing, minimal electric heating and ventilation, and a high thermal performance building envelope, other more expensive and energy intensive systems were avoided. A tight, well insulated envelope along with a heat recovery system helps maintain the buildings environmental control. Rainwater management on this site is achieved through an integrated approach to landscape and architectural design. Stormwater from the main gable-end volume is divided between the east and west sides of the site. The majority of the east side is buffered with a sedum ecoroof along with an existing cedar tree. The west side of the site includes new trees and a large bioswale which controls parking lot runoff. All rainwater captured on site is returned to the hydrosphere through infiltration or evapotranspiration; none is sent to the municipal sewer system.

passive solar

stack ventilation

sedum ecoroof

exposed thermal mass

sustainability diagram rhino, maxwell, illustrator bioswale


1A

cedar rainscreen 3/8” spacing

1B

1I 1J

18 ga corrugated steel rail

1N

attached to cascadia clips 1C

5” cascadia clips

attached with 7” long #14 screws 1D

1D

waterproof membrane

1E

minimum 4” overlaps 1E

3” polystyrene insulation R-15 total for 3” cavity

1F

vapor barrier

1G

1A 1B

attached to plywood sheathing 1G

1K

1F

1C

5/8” plywood sheathing attached to stud wall

1H

8x8 glulam structure

fastened with knife plates 1I

1M

2x6 doug fir framing studs @ 16” O.C.

1J

fiberglass batt insulation R-19 total for 2x6 cavity

1K

weatherproof jamb extensions

1L

painted concrete composite 1L

1O

weatherproof exterior sill painted concrete composite

1M

doug fir casement window sealed with silicone sealant

1N

1/2” gypsum board attached to stud wall

1O

3/4” cedar trim

protected with stain and sealant

wall construction detail rhino, maxwell


1A

standing seam metal roof

1J

3” polystyrene insulation

1B

3/4” cedar fascia

1K

5/8” plywood sheathing

1C

2x8 rim joist

1L

fiberglass batt insulation

1D

2x8 roof purlins

1M

2x6 doug fir framing

1E

cedar plywood soffit board

1N

8x8 glulam structure

1F

aluminum soffit vent

1O

pre-fab glulam truss

1G

cedar rainscreen

1P

3/4” cedar trim

1H

18 ga corrugated steel rail

1Q

1/2” gypsum board

1I

waterproof membrane

3/4” drip overhang at edge

protected with stain and sealant

sistered at roof edge

switch direction at overhang

attached to purlins

continuous along overhang

3/8” spacing

attached to cascadia clips

R-15 total for 3” cavity

vapor barrier on exterior face

R-19 total for 2x6 cavity

studs @ 16” O.C.

fastened with knife plates

exposed tails flashed on top face

protected with stain and sealant

attached to stud wall

minimum 4” overlaps

1I

1A

1J 1D

1B 1C

1K 1F

1O

1L

1E

1M

1N

1G

1P

roof construction detail rhino, maxwell 1H 1Q


CESAR CHAVES ECO-CROSSING Vegetation patch connectivity is fundamental to ecological health and diversity. The City of Portland’s vegetation mapping shows a scarcity of connectivity between contiguous patches of forest and woodland over a half acre in size. Two major ecological patches were identified along the 33rd/39th corridor in east Portland; Grant Park in the north and Laurelhurst Park in the south. The social and ecological value of these natural resources can be increased by the cultivation of an eco-corridor which crosses I-84 and Sullivan’s Gulch. By expanding and reconnecting the existing natural framework using a native plant palette, a thriving ecosystem can develop and mature. eco-crossing concept diagram charcoal

eco-crossing section illustrator


eco-crossing migration photoshop, watercolor


4 4 bed bed

4 bed

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: CO-HOUSING MODEL Habitat for Humanity has traditionally focused on single family homes, but with increasing urban density and a mission to serve more people, the organization is now considering options for multi-family buildings. Co-housing can be an ideal model for increasing density while also building community. Co-housing usually consists of smaller units and a common house which is shared. Parking is often consolidated to create a more pedestrian oriented streetscape. The common house in this design will act as a beacon for the co-housing community. It’s location between the parking lot and the units takes advantage of the members’ daily routines. The common house also gives community members of sense of identity and belonging in a new place.

4 4 bed bed

4 4 bed bed

4 4 bed bed

5 bed

5 bed

5 bed

5 bed

4 bed

4 bed

4 bed common house

site plan autocad, illustrator

4 bed

4 bed

3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed 3 bed


site perspective at dusk rhino, maxwell


site section rhino, maxwell, illustrator, photoshop


NIGHT STUDIO: PHOTOGRAPHY PAVILIONS The nighttime condition offers unique opportunities for architectural and artistic expression. One of the best media used to represent the different qualities of night is long exposure photography. Capturing a city though photography is often expressed in one of two ways; of the city (skyline) and from the city (surrounding context). Both of these techniques deserve their own dedicated space, each expressing and supporting the art form it is intended to house. The skyline of Portland is defined by its relationship with the Willamette River. Reflections of the city lights always show up as a series of parallel lines. The natural environment offers a different kind of light show, which can best be captured high above the light pollution from the city. Star trails always emerge as a series of arcs surrounding the North Star. Both pavilions focus the photographer’s attention on light.

linear light

urban reflection pavilion section: photographer faces west

arced light

star trails pavilion section: photographer faces north

urban section between pavilions


arrival

arrival

photography

photography

approach

approach

urban reflection pavilion star trails pavilion


NORTH FREMONT RE-ENTRY CENTER The United States is the has the highest rate of incarceration in the developed world. Social issues surrounding crime and rehabilitation are often pushed out of sight and out of mind. Expression through art and design are critical to society as forums for discussing these issues. Alternative programs for non-violent offenders have been proven to be effective in reducing recidivism. This public venue offers a venue for discussion about how the culture of social deviants and mainstream American society can be re-synthesized with one another, focusing on the music and storytelling of convicts reentering society. Reclaimed timber construction along with an open floor plan contrast with traditional repressive concrete prison designs.


interior perspective sketchup, podium, photoshop


entrance perspective sketchup, podium, photoshop


flashing gravel ballast sedum ecoroof

reclaimed fir decking

reclaimed cedar siding knee brace reclaimed cedar nailer

recycled glass windows

reclaimed fir framing

moisture barrier OSB sheathing rigid insulation A-C plywood

steel knife plate

recycled concrete floors recycled concrete stem wall recycled aggregate concrete recycled concrete footing


MT. TABOR COFFEE CULTURE CAFE Love of coffee and a passion for local produce are both cultural elements that define Portland as a city. Unfortunately, in our region we are normally only able to experience the culture of coffee from the roasting process onward. The Coffee Culture Cafe is sited on Mt. Tabor in SE Portland, a location which is reminiscent of the mountainous coffee growing regions of Central America. The design for this cafe was developed to offer a deep connection to coffee through the recognition of an agricultural industry which provides us a product that we cannot easily produce locally. Through a better understanding of the social and ecological processes of coffee production, the program can inform the public about the importance of issues such as fair-trade, shade grown, and organic agriculture.


perspective sketchup, podium


site plan graphite, pen


traditional boardform process vs. earthform process

earthform concrete wall mock-up

Traditional farmhouses exemplify the use of a multiple pour boardform process for building concrete walls and foundations. This design adopts this technique using the earth as the formwork for the casting process. The concrete is poured before much of the excavation is complete, allowing the walls to be revealed during the final grading. The result is a unique texture which reveals the materiality, grade, and color of the native soil.


street perspective rhino, maxwell, photoshop


OUTSIDE IN: GROUP HOUSING Outside-In is a non-profit which provides safe housing, meals, and healthcare to youth as a way of pro-actively preventing homelessness. Access to work plays a critical role in a young person’s growth and development. One potential answer to this need is a cooperative housing model which incorporates a micro-industry into its social and spatial organization. Sustainable urban landscaping, or permascaping, has become increasingly popular in recent years, especially in the Portland area. Permascaping services are more than a good solution for income, but offer other fulfilling benefits as well. Horticultural therapy has become a leading technique for physical and mental rehabilitation. By working with plants and animals the residents of the Urban Homestead Workshop will learn about business, community, and personal health.

site plan


PSU MICRO TREATMENT WETLAND As a leader of a group of PSU students, faculty, and staff, I worked to create an educational treatment wetland on the Portland State University campus. Local landscaping companies, government entities, students, researchers, and the public would all be able to learn from this functional small-scale treatment wetland. Wash water from the PSU landscaping equipment and other vehicles was once rinsed into a storm drain. This wetland would treat the water and allow it to be infiltrated through a raingarden. We received funding for the project, but the permitting phase of the project took longer than our grant window would allow. In the end we used a much more simple technology as a treatment for the washwater. wash water in stormdrain

proposed educational solution autocad

no red tape, low cost solution


oil/water separator

primary aerobic cell

myco-remediation raingarden secondary aerobic cell anaerobic cell micro treatment wetland section diagram rhino, maxwell, photoshop


This study analyzed the daylighting potential of a five-story children’s hospital in Lexington, KY. It required both high quality daylight and minimal solar gain. With new climate-based daylight modeling software, firms can more accurately and affordably design project specific strategies which optimize daylight and solar gain. This study was a collaborative effort between PSU Architecture and SRG Partnership. We utilized Grasshopper and DIVA to study the effects of possible daylighting design strategies within the schematic design phase of the project. The results validated many of the existing design decisions but also showed project-specific data which might not have been possible using other daylighting study methodologies. The computer modeling allowed details to emerge such as the effects of interior wall placement and light reflecting off of surrounding structures. The roles of different shading devices and glass types were able to be tested in rapid iteration.

schematic phase

RESEARCH INTERNSHIP: DAYLIGHT ANALYSIS

concept phase

methodology diagram

design development phase

ideal design software workflow

revit BIM modeling

rhino NURBS modeling

grasshopper parametric design

diva daylight simulation


proposed design

n

ideal design

shading device comparision- irradiance 3rd floor, autumnal equinox, clear sky with sun


modular pre-grown sedum ecoroof liveroof system, river rock stepping stones


PRACTICE: ECOROOF CONSULTING Sedum ecoroofs similar to their predecessors in Germany have been adapted for the Pacific Northwest and are now the most common ecoroof typology in the region. Ecoroofs and other vegetated elements are becoming increasingly common in contemporary architecture. Stormwater management, habitat creation, and evapotranspiration are just a few of the benefits that ecoroofs can offer. My interests in both plants and architecture have led me to be involved in a number of residential ecoroof projects as a consultant. In one project on Bainbridge Island, WA we used a pregrown modular system. For another project in southeast Portland we created a custom built-up layered system, and then planted it with sedum cuttings. Both projects are healthy and are enjoyed by their respective owners.


PRACTICE: OXALIS LANDSCAPES INC. As a Landscape Construction Professional in Oregon I have had experience designing, installing, and maintaining landscapes. Working with my business partner Cam Stewart, I built up a small landscape business in Eugene, OR. As contractors we worked with clients, designed residential and commercial projects, collaborated with landscape architects, and worked within the city permit and inspection process. I recently closed the business to pursue an education in architecture, but I have retained an interest in landscapes and their relationship with architectural design. I hope continue to use my knowledge of plants and landscape construction to support my practice.


front yard viewing deck sustainably forested redwood


THANK YOU

Thank you for your interest in my work. I would also like to thank the following people and organizations for supporting my work and this portfolio:

Stephen and Barbara Deines Portland State University School of Architecture University of Oregon SRG Partnership Robert Thopmson Dave Dunkak Cam Stewart

Ben Deines Portfolio  

2014

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