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01. Portfolio John Benjamin Bookout 02.01.13

Garden Bed

Timber Railing

stone Stairs

6” each

Sandstone Stairs rise 6” each

2' 6"

Concrete Footer 3/4” Rebar tie to concrete block

Wall Elevation

mber Wall xtention

Sandstone Cap min width 1’

air

tread

Sandstone Masonry Wall apprx height - 32”

2'


01

2%

Master of Architecture Thesis

Landscapes represent renovated by program ‘Quiero mi Barrio’ are conventional semi-functional designs.

The Unidad Vecinal Portales (UVP) is a housing development designed by the office of architects Bresciani, Valdés, Castillo y Huidobro (BVCH) in the late 1960’s. At its time of installation it was seen as the height of modern design replete with elevated pedestrian

1%

walkways and bridges. At the time it had functional outdoor spaces Functional plazas from the original design. Where residents came together to maintain a funtional plaza.

Universidad Catolica de Chile 14% 92%

Santiago, Chile

Estacion Central

Percentage of the population which lives in a state of poverty according to national standards

Spaces with a certain amount of landscape feature but lack in most cases lack maintenance or proper design.

8% Landscapes with a high degree of degradation often lacking in vegetation with compacted soils.

40% Percentage of households with women at high risk as the head of the household

25% Landscapes with a very high level of degradation. Often highly compacted with garbage present no or very low levels of vegatation.

23.3% Unidad Vecinal Portales

Percentage of households that have problems meeting basic needs

12% Portions of the landscape that have been occupied by residents. These are public lands that have been illegally privatized.

70%

0

190

380

n

- Quinta Normal Park - Housing Blocks UVP - Houses of the UVP - Universidad de Santiago - Universidad de Chile - Alonso de Ercilla School - Aeronautic School - Ministry of Ag. - National Museums - Streets

16%

Percentage of residents who believe thier neighbors take equal resposibility for common space

Built spaces of the landscape consisting of housing blocks and single family homes.

22% 25% 11,000

31 ha.

Percentage of residents living in apartments who say they don’t trust any of their neighbors

Paved portions of the landscape streets and sidewalks


01

La Ventana hasta la Plaza Abandoned Niche Program

Main Plaza Program

Apartment Program Years 5-8 The last stage would be where we would attempt to recuperate a plaza or a large abandoned section of the UVP with a community garden model. It is imperiative that this model function for all residents of the UVP and have a park function. The key to implementation of a successful urban agriculture program depends on identification of interested parties and using those parties to educate, garner support and design the program and spaces. Going from the window to the plaza allows for this type of development. Sycamore

Apple Trees

Reacycle Containers

Hay Bale Raised Beds

Years 1-2 In the first stage of the plan people and resources would concentrate on encouranging residents to cultivate on their terraces and windows, educate them how to care for the plants and give them the plants for free.

68m

0

9

18

15m

Plaza Pilot

Window

Cherry Trees

Years 3-4 The second stage would concentrate on implementing a successful pilot project in small abandoned areas of the UVP. The intention would be to generate enough interest in urban agriculture in the population to begin to recuperate large abandoned areas.


02

Guesthouse + Office

Bindu Farms Greenhouse Carbondale

Aspen

Barn

Paonia Colorado

Irrigation Canal

Rough drainage pattern

Area: 35 Acres

NW Winter Winds 25mph average

Hay Field

A1

A1

A1

A1

A2

Planted wind screen

A2

Access Road

A3

A2 A2

A3

A3 A3

Hay Field Orchard 3.5’ 3.5’

18’ 18’

8’

8’ Proposed Sandstone Patio

Proposed Sandstone Patio 8” Rise Stair

8” Rise Stair Existing Concrete Patio

A1

Mason Sand

Mason Sand to 6” Depth

Summer winds 20mph average

main garden beds food forest

n

patios and pathways

26’

26’ 28’

28’28’

28’

A3

rain/drainage garden perrennial garden

28’

A2 28’

Exposed south sun exposure

23’

Proposed Contours of Draiage/Rain Garden 2.5’ 10.5’

2.5’ 35’

10.5’

35’ 31’

11’

31’

11’

East

16’

23’

Elevation of Drainage Garden

16’


02

Bindu Farms

Description Bindu Farms is a permaculture project built in 2006-2008. The landscape is designed to reflect the independent energy process of the house. The client wanted beautiful gardens which produce a substantial amount of the families food needs as well as economic needs. The design concentrated on using permaculture design principles and designating each gesture and plant selection with more than one purpose. A highly colourful, culinary and medicinal perennial garden is located near the house. Culinary herbs are located near the kitchen to serve as a small kitchen garden. A forest garden would be phased in featuring multistory food production as well as beneficial perennials and bushes. The main cultivation area for the family is located in front of the main livestock barn. A unique rainfall drainage garden is located to the immediate south of the residence to take advantage of the natural drainage of the property. Changes in grade would direct water drainage from the roof slowly down the slope and plant selection would reflect these changes in grade and potential rain water collection. In addition an extensive windbreak was proposed to create a microclimate and increase efficiency of the property. Bindu Farms represents the integration of permaculture design principles with conventional design principles.

View from Southeast of main residence to the north

Entrance to the main residence at Bindu Farms

Pea Gravel patio and pergola installation for the guest house and office to the north of main residence.

Green sandstone patio planted extensively with thyme with perennial retaining wall to the immediate north. Guest house can be seen in the distance.

Water feature near SE patio at the main entrance to main residence


03

Exposures Fall 2011 As seen in Upon arriving at Alto Patache base camp, the first thing we noticed was the sculpture park of fog collector interpretations installed by Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María based in Iquique. The installation stands alone in the desert as if waiting to be discovered. It offers no protection and seems to suffer the same feelings of loneliness and exposure that typify the Atacama Desert. One feels so vulnerable in such a landscape with little protection from the sun and wind, save a few boulders. It leaves most wondering how anything can survive in such an environment. There is not much difference in looking at images from Mars and those of the Atacama Desert. Along with learning about the intentions of research at Alto Patache, we learned about the fog collection process, its potentials for plant growth and potable water. We also learned about the plant communities that survive on water droplets from the camanchaca. Constanza Caceres, Sarah Kutz, Isidora Larrain, Thibaut Villiers-Moriame and I made group observations of the area we would eventually use for our master plan at Alto Patache.

capturIng the camanchaca: designing Fog collection technology in the atacama desert

Experimental fog collectors at Alto Patache: These are double the size of a Standard Fog Collector (SFC) but use the same principles of construction as the SFC. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

Specifications for a Standard Fog Collector. (Image courtesy of Robert S. Shemenauer, 1994)

By Ben Bookout

I

n the far north of Chile lies the Atacama Desert, part of the greater Atacama Sechura ecoregion that covers a 1,300 mile stretch of Peru and Chile. The Atacama Desert receives an average of two millimeters of precipitation annually, and during the last 100 years the region’s largest city “Iquique” has not received a single drop of precipitation 60 percent of the time (Cereceda 2005). There seems to be little chance that life can survive in this moonscape environment. Yet, amongst the rocks at higher elevations, life seems to find a way to survive. Chañarcillo (Lyciunm leiostemum), Sosa (Nolana sedifolia) and Pingo Pingo (Ephedra breana) are just some of the plants that etch out an existence along with lichens and beetles in the harsh desert. They do not survive on scarce precipitation but on a continual cycle of fog called the camanchaca, which blows in off the Pacific Ocean. By grouping together around the rocks and increasing their collective surface area these species are able to create small oases. Because parts of the Atacama are inhospitable, this concentrates human populations to costal areas or small river valleys that flow from the Andes Mountains. In an attempt to make life in the desert less difficult, humans have adapted the use of natural plant processes for their own survival through fog collection. Similar to lichens that use the rock’s surface area and plants that use their leaf surfaces, the practice of fog collection uses relatively simple technology. Sheets of polymer-based fabrics suspended

The excitement surrounding fog collection in the Atacama Desert is twofold. The first is the technical challenges of harvesting water in a harsh desert environment and the resourceful ability to take advantage of an untapped water supply. The second is the innovative design of the fog collection device itself and its aesthetic repercussions for landscape architecture.

Collection pipe: collected water droplets are gravityfed to the pipe as it descends to a connected storage tank. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

trip to patache/ usm fog collectors Universidad Católica de Chile offers a class each spring called Paisaje Xerofito (Xeric Landscape) with the intent of designing new, prosperous futures at its research facility, Alto Patache. Each class visits the test site and groups create master plans and design interventions. In October 2008 our Paisaje Xerofito class took a trip to Alto Patache to observe, analyze, sketch and gather ideas for an eventual master plan and proposal. Professor Rodrigo Pérez De Arce picked us up on the side of a highway lined with salt from the nearby mine. The crusty white salt bound to North America gave the impression of snow but the heat, desolation and silence of the place made you reconsider. As Rodrigo pushed the overloaded truck up steep slopes and around corkscrew curves, we held our breath and clenched our fists. Having taught the class for the past five years, navigating the small truck around drop-off cliffs to the camp site seemed to be just another day at the office for our professor.

between two anchors harvest the small water droplets in the incoming fog. These droplets gravity-feed to a piece of pipe cut in half so it resembles a small trough. The water collects there and is again gravity fed to a holding tank nearby. At the Universidad Católica de Chile test site, Alto Patache, these collectors are placed facing the southwest where the camanchaca comes every afternoon carrying varying amounts of water depending on the season. Spring and winter historically yield the most; autumn and summer the least (Cerecede 2002). The cost for a Standard Fog Collector (SFC) is $100 U.S. The water collection can average from one to three hundred liters per square meter of polypropylene material depending on weather conditions (Schemenauer 1994). Fog collectors at Alto Patache average around eight liters per square meter per day.

technology issue

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exposures

The view from Alto Patache toward the southwest where the Camanchaca clouds originate. The Pan American highway runs along the coast of the Pacific Ocean. This photo is taken from an altitude of 800 meters above sea level where the fog contacts the tops of these coastal mountains every afternoon. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

Plan view for Camping Oasis Bajo Niebla. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

our design: camping oasis Bajo niebla Using our experience in the desert and building on previous ideas, we decided to plan a recreation area between Alto Patache and Bajo Patache located on the hillside just above the ocean. Through a system of interlocking gabion walls, the project will protect users and plant life from the Atacama wind and sun, anal-


ogous to the way people have survived for centuries in deserts. Locating the gardens between Alto Patache and Bajo Patache allows for greater access from the Pan American highway that follows the coast as well as access to the beach. The location’s other advantage is it can be irrigated by a gravity system from Alto Patache, where we located all fog collection devices to supply the project with water. We based consumption on an average of 30 liters per day per user with an average of 150 users per day and 500 liters daily for plant irrigation for a total of 5,000 liters daily use. Then we had to consider seasonal fluxuations of water supply. Thus we used a worst-case scenario in February where fog collectors receive and average of two liters per square meter of material to calculate the installation of 52 fog collectors. Installing for the lowest flow from fog collectors at Alto Patache will allow for a surplus of water the rest of the year which can be gravity fed to nearby settlements. For example, high flow is in September when it is estimated the fog collectors can accumulate 18 liters per square meter. Consequently, our project can function on just six fog collectors in September—the rest becomes surplus water for export. The design group decided to celebrate this small surplus amount of water in such a desolate place. The irrigation system has a main collection tank at the top of the gabion wall system. This tank is fixed with a float allowing a valve to be turned on automatically when the tank is full. The tank would fill as fog collectors worked in Alto Patache and water can be gravity fed to the holding tank below. Excess water would then flow down the main canal at various moments and be collected in the lower holding tank for export. Potable water tap systems and drip irrigation would also be supplied from the main tank and dispersed throughout the site.

conclusions The practice of fog collection in the Atacama Desert offers unusual design opportunities. The ability of this simple technology to alter the environment in the desert to create more irriguous microclimates has wide-ranging implications. More must be learned to understand the most efficient means to use this technology. The team has just scratched the surface of design possibilities for fog collectors and the water they accumulate. Universidad Católica de Chile is committed to implementing a design intervention at Alto Patache, and with further academic studies by various universities we may see a thriving desert oasis come from thin air, one that enhances local ecologies and local economies.

<Camanchaca7.jpg > Caption: “Sculpture Park by third year architecture students from Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María (Profesors Ciro Najle and Jorge Godoy with collaboration from Pablo Barría, César González y Carlos Castro). The park was named Tardonaturalezas, Jardín de Niebla, or “Garden of Fog” and was constructed in a very desolate area. Specific project goals were to capture the camanchaca, allowing endemic species to take root near the fog collectors and to accumulate water for use by nearby settlements (Alumnos expusieron proyectos realizados en Desierto de Atacama 2009). These elegant interpretations of a simple SFC demonstrate the design and ecological potential of fog collectors at Alto Patache. With time we may see entire plant communities taking hold around these sculptures while water harvesting for consumption remains within reach. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)“ Fog collecting sculpture at the Alto Patache research site, designed using a combination of solid and perforated stainless steel tiles. The structure gains its shape from a series of metal ribs on the inside of the structure. The studio for this work took place during the first semester of 2008 (February - July). (Image courtesy of Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María)

The gabion rooms would have distinct uses: camping, picnicking, and designated garden space. Rooms that offer a function are fixed with water taps. This water is then filltered through small gray water gardens and along with water from the solar showers, it is collected in the gray water holding tank for export to the impoverished, nearby town of Chanabaya that currently imports water by truck. Water could be further separated into potable and non-potable sources with more infrastructure. Garden rooms use native plants found at Alto Patache, and by using gabions we hoped the walls would create their own ecology and begin to encourage plant and lichen environments similar to the process at Alto Patache. There is also a plentiful supply of large cobble near the beach, providing ready stone to form the gabion walls. Bamboo rods would be spread across the tops of some rooms for shade while the materials for wooden paths would be imported.

Upright sculptures at the Alto Patache research site. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout) Night rendering of strategically placed solar lights at camp Bajo Patache. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

notes All renderings are from the group studio work of Ben Bookout, Constanza Caceres, Sarah Kutz, Isidora Larrain, Thibaut VilliersMoriame, 2008.

references Alumnos expusieron proyectos realizados en Desierto de Atacama. http://www.dgc.usm.cl/?p=1440 (accessed October 19, 2009). Cereceda, Pilar, Pablo Osses, Horacio Larrain, Martín Farías, M. Lagos, R. Pinto and R. S. Schemenauer. (2001). Radiation, Advective and Orographic Fogin Tarapacá Region, Chile. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Fog and Fog Collection, Schemenauer, R.S. and H. Puxbaum, eds., pp. 457-459. Cereceda, Pilar, Raquel Pinto, Hoacio Larrain, Pablo Osses, Martín Farías, (2005). “Geographical Description of Three Fog Ecosystems in the Atacama Coastal Desert of Chile.” Instituto de Geografía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. http://www.geo.puc.cl/observatorio/cereceda/C37.pdf (accessed October 19, 2009). Schemenauer, Robert S. (1994). A Proposed Standard Fog Collector for Use in High-Elevation Regions. Journal of Applied Meteorology, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1994. World Wildlife Fund. Atacama-Sechura Deserts. http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/ecoregions/atacama_sechura_deserts.cfm (accessed May 26, 2010).

View from above Camping Oasis Bajo Niebla with access to adjoining Pan American Highway and Pacific Ocean. (Image courtesy of Ben Bookout)

ROOT is the University of Colorado Denver master of landscape architecture publication. Begun in 2009, it publishes 600 to 800 copies on an annual basis. Further information about ROOT can be found at www.root-land.org.

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exposures


Kracklauer Residence

04

Ecoscape Environmental Design

Lafayette Colorado

Boulder

Golden

Brighton

Denver

Description:The Kracklauer Residence is a modest

suburban home in a new housing development in Louisville, Colorado. The client wanted a modern design that included garden beds along the eastern portion of the existing concrete patio. The client also desired garden beds at the southern end of the back yard. The design response uses a combination of corrugated steel and wood to provide a modern feel to the proposed garden beds. It combines this with grays of Pennsylvania Blue sandstone and gray River Cobble to offset the plant material and coincide with the construction materials of the planting beds. The garden bed design to the south is meant to reflect the traditional four rivers garden with the water feature in the center. The installation changed this portion and the water feature was moved closer to the house. The design of the feature changed and it became a seamless piece meant to wet a circle of mexican beach pebbles as a punctuating end to the small garden of Japanese blood grass and beach pebbles at the south west corner of the house.

n Area: 8300sqft


14' 5-1/2

Kracklauer Residence

3’ x 3’ Snap Cut Sandstone Stair 2’ x 6” x 4” Sandstone Block

South Elevation

Eleveations 3.3 ft

Notes: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sandstone pieces. These are suggested for their cost and

locality with the understanding that the use of these materials has a much smaller carbon footprint. It is also suggested

Sections

East Elevation

14' 5-1/2"

Eleveations

Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 outlines how the upper portion of the deckwhich holds the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membrane will protect the existing wooden exterior 3.3 ft of the house. the treated wooden form material in place will allow for isolation of the concrete footer from the house and

Waterproof Membrane leaving

0' 8"

6' 4"

14' 5-1/2"

0' 8"

1' 2"

6' 10"

3' 0"

0' 8"

1' 2"

2' 0"

3' 0"

2'

South Elevation 4” x 8” Sandtone Block

Detail #1

Gray Breeze

3/4” GravelWaterproof Membrane

2' 8-1/2"

14' 11"

Notes: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sand locality with the understanding that the use of these materials

3.3 ft

Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 ou the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membra leaving the treated wooden form material in place will allow fo

Notes: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sandstone pieces. These are suggested for their cost and

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

locality with the understanding that the use of these materials has a much smaller carbon footprint. It is also suggested

11" respectively. In the south elevation, the large stairs are places to extend the exiting concrete patio to the14' south.

The thought is this will be an additional area when entertaining large groups. It also provides an elevated place 6” x 1’ Concrete Footer

2' 8-1/2" 1' 10"

Detail 1

to look out over the proposed raised garden beds. The proposed pergola attaches to the east side of the northern planter wall and extends slightly over the planter and over the grass per the image provided by client.

8' 0"

Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 outlines how the upper portion of the deckwhich holds the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membrane will protect the existing wooden exterior of the house. leaving the treated wooden form material in place will allow for isolation of the concrete footer from the house and

1' 2"

Detail 1

11' 11-1/2"

3’ x 3’ Snap Cut Sandstone Stair

1' 10"

Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

1' 2"

6” x 1’ Concrete Footer

1' 10"

14' 11"

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

2’ x 6” x 4” Sandstone Block

3.3 ft

1' 2"

8' 0"

respectively. In the south elevation, the large stairs are places to extend the exiting concrete patio to the south. 12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone The thought is this will be an additional area when entertaining large groups. It also provides an elevated place 6” x 1’ Concrete Footer to look out over the proposed raised garden beds. The proposed pergola attaches to the east side of the northern planter wall and extends slightly over the planter and over the grass per the image provided by client. 2' 8-1/2" Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

4.6 ft

2' 8"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD Seating with Storage

8' 0"

1' 2"

respectively. In the south elevation, the largeNotes: stairs areThe places propt The thought is this will be an additional arealocality when entertaining with the u to look out over the proposed raised garden beds. The propose and extends slightly over the planter and over the grass per the Any more materia the grill will be iso leaving the treate

Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

Detail 1 3' 0" 11' 11-1/2"

Existing Patio

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

11' 11-1/2"

2' 4" 2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

2’ 0”

planter bed/seating area of the deck. All raised bed heights are proposed at 3’. Proposed widths try not to exceed 5’ with the understanding access from one side or the other should be about 2.5’. A top railing of shaped wood would be needed to negate the sharp edges of the corrugated metal. Between the shaped wood and corrugated metal curves the bed will have its shape. Timber frameconstruction will give the raised beds thier structure. The proposed water featurein the center would need approval. A traditional round fountain refelecting the classic four rivers garden is pictured. All access paths would be gray breeze these connect to the access path from the existing patio and proposed path to the south.

1' 10"

14' 11"

Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

Description: Proposed raised garden beds mirror the materials used in the

8' 0"

Description: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sandstone

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

Existing Patio

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

1' 6"

1' 0"

Waterproof Membrane

Notes: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sandstone pieces. These are suggested for their cost and

locality with the understanding that the use of these materials has a much smaller carbon footprint. It is also suggested

10' 5-1/2"

4' 7-1/2"

14' 11"

2' 4"

11' 1"

2’ 0”

Existing Patio

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

3' 0"

2’ 0”

2’ 0”

A3

3.3 ft

2' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

2' 0"

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

11' 11-1/2"

East Elevation

11' 11-1/2"

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

Existing Patio

2' 4"

1' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

2' 0"

1' 0"

2' 4"

11' 11-1/2"

South Elevation

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

6” x 1’ Concrete Footer

1' 2"

1' 6" 3' 0"

3’ x 3’ Snap Cut Sandstone Stair

2' 10"

2’ 0”

2’ x 6” x 4” Sandstone Block

11' 11-1/2"

pieces. These are suggested for their cost and locality with the understanding thatthe use of these materials has a much smaller carbon footprint. It is also suggested that theDetail red 1sandstone will be a good contrast to the corrugated metal roofing material of the privacy planter wall. Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 outlines how the upper portion of the deckwhich holds the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membrane will protect the existing wooden exterior of the house. leaving the treated wooden form material in place will allow for isolation of the concrete footer from the house and membrane and preven a space where debris can collect. The pictured shapes on the patio represent the bbq and firepit respectively. In the south elevation, the large stairs are places to extend the exiting concrete patio to the south. The thought is this will be an additional area when entertaining large groups. It also provides an elevated place to look out over the proposed raised garden beds.

3' 0"

11' 11-1/2"

Seating with Storage

11' 1"

A2

2' 8-1/2"

14' 6"

2' 8"

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

Waterproof Membrane

Redwood 4x4 Posts on 1’ Concrete Pylons

14' 5-1/2"

3/4” Gravel

Gray Breeze

1' 6"

0' 8"

1' 2"

Existing Residence Wall

A1

Gray Breeze

2’ 0”

Existing Patio

1' 0"

11' 11-1/2"

Detail #1

Redwood 4x4 1’ Concrete Py

3/4” Gravel

1' 0"

14' 5-1/2" 2' 0"

3'

Privacy Pergola attached to east side of planter wall

3' 3-1/2"

11' 11-1/2"

Seating with Storage

Seating with Storage

2' 0"

4” x 8” Sandtone Block Detail #1

10' 10"

4” x 8” Sandtone Block

3' 0"

10' 5-1/2"

4' 7-1/2"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

Panel Detail

Post Framing Detail

4.6 ft

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

4' 7-1/2"

Gray Breeze

2' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

10' 5-1/2"

4” x 8” Sandtone Block Detail #1

4.6 ft

2' 0"

Existing Pergola

14' 11"

2’ 0”

Detail 1

2' 0"

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

3/4” Gravel

2’ 0”

1' 2"

respectively. In the south elevation, the large stairs are places to extend the exiting concrete patio to the south. The thought is this will be an additional area when entertaining large groups. It also provides an elevated place to look out over the proposed raised garden beds. The proposed pergola attaches to the 2'east 4" side of the northern planter wall 3' 0" and extends slightly over the planter and over the grass per the image provided by client.

Sections

East Elevation

Redwood 4x4 Posts on 1’ Concrete Pylons

Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 outlines how the upper portion of the deckwhich holds the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membrane will protect the existing wooden exterior of the house. leaving the treated wooden form material in place will allow for isolation of the concrete footer from the house and

Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

14' 11"

4' 4-1/2"

8' 0"

locality with the understanding that the use of these materials has a much smaller carbon footprint. It is also suggested

1' 10"

14' 11" 6” x 1’ Concrete Footer

Notes: The propsed stone patio uses mostly snapcut red sandstone pieces. These are suggested for their cost and

4' 7-1/2"

6' 4"

Gray Breeze

3/4” Gravel

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

2' 8-1/2"

6' 10"

Patio Beds

3' 0"

2’ 0”

3.3 ft

Waterproof Membrane

Post Layout

3' 0"

1' 6"

0' 8"

2' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

10' 5-1/2"

2’ 0”

South Elevation

4” x 8” Sandtone Block Detail #1

2' 10"

Existing Residence Wall

Seating with Storage

4.6 ft

2' 0"

Eleveations

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

2’ 0”

3' 0"

3’ x 3’ Snap Cut Sandstone Stair 2’ x 6” x 4” Sandstone Block

2’ 0”

1' 2"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

10' 10"

3' 3-1/2"

2' 0"

Sections 4' 4-1/2"

10' 5-1/2"

4' 7-1/2"

4.6 ft

Privacy Pergola attached to east side of planter wall

4' 4-1/2"

2’ 0”

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

14' 11" Seating with Storage

11' 1" 12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

Existing Patio

14' 11"

14' 6"

2' 8"

6' 4"

11' 11-1/2"

Existing Residence Wall

Existing Pergola

2' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

1' 0"

3' 0"

2' 4"

1' 6"

Lazer Cut Plywood Top Pieces

Existing Residence Wall

3' 3-1/2"

Existing Residence Wall

11' 11-1/2"

Sections

3' 3-1/2"

Sections

3/4” Gravel

Redwood 4x4 Posts on 1’ Concrete Pylons

14' 5-1/2"

Detail 1

Gray Breeze

Eleve

respectively. In the south elevation, the large stairs are places to extend the exiting concrete patio to the south. The thought is this will be an additional area when entertaining large groups. It also provides an elevated place to look out over the proposed raised garden beds. The proposed pergola attaches to the east side of the northern planter wall and extends slightly over the planter and over the grass per the image provided by client.

4” x 8” Sandtone Block Detail #1

14' 6"

6' 10"

Any more materials would make the area too busy. Detail 1 outlines how the upper portion of the deckwhich holds the grill will be isolated from the house. A waterproof membrane will protect the existing wooden exterior of the house. leaving the treated wooden form material in place will allow for isolation of the concrete footer from the house and

6' 4"

3' 0"

Seating with Storage

2' 0"

2' 8-1/2"

2’ 0”

Treated Wood Concrete Form Work

2' 10" 14' 11"

1' 6"

2’ 0”

0' 8"

3' 0"

1' 2"

6” x 1’ Concrete Footer

4' 4-1/2"

10' 5-1/2"

4' 7-1/2"

6' 4"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

Privacy Pergola attached to east side of planter wall

10' 10"

1' 10"

2' 0"

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone

1' 2"

4.6 ft

8' 0"

14' 6"

12” x 18” Snap Cut Sandstone 14' 11"

14' 6"

Existing Pergola

14' 6"

Waterproof Membrane

6' 4"

3' 3-1/2"

Existing Residence Wall

Seating with Storage

11' 1"

2’ 0”

Sections

2' 8"

Treated 4x4 Posts in 1’ Concrete Pylons

Existing Patio

Garden Beds

1' 0"

11' 11-1/2"

2' 0"

2x4 Wood Framing Color TBD

1' 6"

04

11' 11-1/2"

2' 4"

3' 0"

East Elevation

1’ Concrete Pylons

respectively. In th The thought is thi to look out over th and extends sligh

2' 0"


05

Marble Colorado

Studio 1 Carbondale

Marble Colorado

The composite image gathered from imagery research Ink and Xylene interpretation of the composite image.

Aspen

Description: The first part of this semester long study

aimed to glean multiple graphical representations of the essence of this mining town. Some of our most important monuments have been constructed from the pure white marble which comes from the mines in this town. As a class we learned as much as we could about the geography, history, topography, botany, legality, economy and other anthropocentric and site specific natural functions of the place. We were then challenged to represent these changes, ideas and stories in a graphical manner. After a series of digital and hand drawn representations of the data, the project concentrated on one composite image. It then attempted to translate this image further in the landscape through painting, sculpture, photography, drafting, cinematography and other forms of expression. The project concentrated on xylene copies with ink painting and sculpture to express the composite image.

Construction drawings for model construction Model interpretation of the ink and xylene plan view


05

Marble Colorado

Observatory The observatory platform would elevate the user above the path facing the existing ice skating rink. This would provide the opportunity to star gaze at night and pervey the landscape during the day.

Path Entrance The proposed path entrance would provide a corridor of rough cut marble block similar to those extracted from the mine 300 feet below. The blocks would align with an important point in american history

Description: The second part of the study challenged

students to begin to generate landscape expression from the knowledge and imagery they collected in part 1. Essentially, this project connects the user with the sky and more specifically the night sky. It also tries to remind us of the role that navigation by night has played in our history in an attempt to reconnect us with this important part of our past. The project would provide opportunities for this reflection. It would also express the exact star alignment for important historical events in our nations history. Events that are memorialized in sculpture from Marble, CO. The expression of the project is an attempt to push the limits of the combinations of materials and methods which are used to express design and in this case landscape. The diversity of methods as a whole were successful in expressing a unifying expression of the project while remaining individualistic in form.

Star Pergola Wall Passage The user would be brought to the existing marble wall and be attarcted to pass through the doorway. Looking up points on the wall would align with stars important to an event in history.

The last installation along the path would be a pergola with an exact pattern that aligns with the stars present in the night sky on July, 4th 1776. Each year on the 4th of July the same stars would come into view at point in the pergolas roof.


06

Architecture Studio

A1

Universidad Catolica de Chile

Central Chilean Coast

A1

Assigned Terrain 2500 sq meters

Description: This architectural studio was based on the masters thesis of

Professor Felipe Assadi. The basis of his thesis was reprogramming existing structures with the theory in mind that as resources become more scarce we will have to reinvent the existing built form instead of starting from scratch. In this portion of the studio students were challenged to take an existing house design and reprogram it to work on the 100m x 25m portion of Chilean coastline. Only 1/3 of the structure could be below grade. The project is from the section of a 5 bedroom 2 story house in Colorado. The section chosen, highlighted in red on the plan, view was developed into the working structure installed on the existing terrain. The structure is vertical but has 2 bedrooms and office as well as 2 large outdoor terraces. For a designer who mostly concentrated on landscape this was a great exercise in architectural design and realization with a very practical purpose


07

Ohan Residence

Ecoscape Environmental Design

Boulder Colorado

Golden

Lafayette

Brighton

Denver

7980sqft

n

Description: Kerry and Teri Ohan live on a small plateau in

Boulder, CO. They wanted their back yard renovated to include a water feature, fire pit, sandstone patio and sandstone walkways. We came up with a unique mix of sandstones: Pennsylvania Blue full color, Penn Blue cathedral gray, Sebastian Brown sandstone and New Mexico Buff sandstone. The planting are shade tolerant, semi shade to very xeric on the ridge line. Because of the mature trees on site, the back yard is a nice oasis overlooking Boulder.


08

Landscape Lighting Sculpture

Description: The sculpture and proposal are part

of a design for a family residence in the table mesa neighbourhood in Boulder, CO. The concept was to recycle wine bottles into a night lighting sculpture for the front yard and bring something unique to the neighbourhood. The prototype is in a ceramic pot and functions as a night lighting element at its current farm location. It was thought this sculpture could be coupled with wine bottles buried at grade so the upper circle is illuminated serving as path lighting or up lighting for plants.

Wine Bottle Light 3-1/2"

Bottle at Grade 1' 2"

PVC pipe housing below grade

Sm. Night Lighting bulb to 12v system

Detail 1

Mailbox 2106

Description: This sculpture is a design response to a history

Wine Bottle Sculpture 4' 0"

PVC board at grade attachment holes with rubber washer

Bottles at varying heights attached to black pvc board.

2' 0"

of landscape architecture project at Lincoln University in New Zealand. The study asked students to choose a piece of the landscape and project a design of that element 100 years into the future. The mailbox was selected for this sculpture. The thought was that the mailbox would be obsolete by 2106 but on rural country roads in the Canterbury region of New Zealand the mailbox is often the only marker of a nearby residence. Thus, in order for the mailbox to retain its marking capabilities, it is reprogrammed into a planter/night lighting sculpture allowing passers by to note that there is a residence nearby on the country road.

Winebottle

This recycled lighting system would line the entrance to the residence. All lighting would be connected to a 12volt lighting system with controller. PVC sleve would allow for easy replacement of winebottles and access to the lighting element.

PVC box containing night lighting

Detail 2

Water proof lg night light on 12v system

This recycled light sculpture would provide a unique entrance focal point at night and during the day. At night the bottle sculpture would appear as a mass of lighted bottles at varying heights. This would tie in with the proposed lighting system for the front yard. Top element would have access to light below. This would be tied into the night lighting system.


House foundation Concrete footer

Glassburn Residence

Window well

09

Mason Sand

20’

Ecoscape Environmental Design

1/4” PVC sheet with poly membrane attached to copper pipe

1”Copper pipe

Lg. Ceramic pot

Drain

Poly Line Water line with float

Pump

4’ dia PVC basin below grade

n

Basement window

4700sqft Boulder

Longmont Colorado

Masonry seating wall

Description: The Glassburn’s is a medium sized residence. The

client wanted a simple and functional design that included a patio and a water feature. The project proposed using the clients existing large ceramic pot as the water feature and mask the concrete window well with a small seating wall. The client also desired a gentle path from the front to the back yard for her elderly father. The rain garden modified the existing drainage and slows the exit of rain water into the storm drain system allowing plants to take advantage of the precipitation.

Concrete block Sandstone patio

Gravel House foundation

Concrete footer Window well

Mason Sand

20’

1/4” PVC sheet with poly membrane attached to copper pipe

1”Copper pipe

Lg. Ceramic pot

Rain garden


10

Root Fall 2009 Part II:Travel

Unexpected Landscapes

Transmission from Chile: Arquitectura Del Paisaje Ben Bookout, Master of Architecture Candidate, Universidad Catolica de Chile

Atacama Desert

All Photos and Images by Author Unless Noted

The world’s driest desert and largest copper mine

U

nexpectedly, the professional perspective of arquitectura del paisaje (landscape architecture) is just beginning to be taken seriously in Chile. To gain a better understanding of the current state of arquitectura del paisaje as a profession, I interviewed Professor Consuelo Bravo, a practicing architect and landscape architect who holds an architectural degree from Universidad Catolica in Santiago and a double master’s degree of landscape architecture and urban design from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Landscape Ecology and Economics With fty-eight distinct ecotones, Chile is the most ecologically diverse country on the planet. It has a population of approximately 15 million people, half of whom live in the capital of Santiago, which lies in the Central Valley region of the country. In 1971, Chile was the rst South American country to democratically elect a socialist president, Salvadore Allende, who was subsequently overthrown in a military coup on September 11, 1973 by the iron-sted dictator, General Augusto Pinochet. Since this controversial dictator relinquished power, Chile has enjoyed Latin America’s fastest growing economy over the last ten years. In total, 91% of Chile’s economy is tied directly to its landscape including the world’s largest copper mine and value added goods such as wine, produce, and salmon (Bravo, 2008).

ecologically diverse country in the The recent economic boom in Chile has seen a marked e contains  fty-eight ecotypes. n as the Land of the Poets, Pablo growth in the construction industry and a growth in tured above being the most famous.

the architectural profession, especially in Santiago. With this economic and 13 population growth, there is an increasing concern for the environment. This new conscientiousness is a primary reason for the emergence of the profession of landscape architecture (Bravo, 2008). Santiago is comparable to Phoenix, Arizona in its desert setting, but its landscape looks European and its use of water is inefcient at best. Furthermore, Santiago has the worst air quality of any South American city.

12 R O O T

Hindering landscape development is Chile’s restrictive market as governing bodies allot only 9% of development space for open space and parks, without offering nancial support for landscape construction–limiting open space to only those developments that can afford it. Additionally, maintenance of constructed open space is the responsibility of the municipality, many of which are nancially limited.

Central Valleys pisco, wine, astronomy

Santiago Home to half the population and Universidad Catolica de Chile

Region of Maule

Due to nervousness about global warming and its implications for Santiago, there is a real need for developments in environmentalism in Chile (Bravo, 2008). Environmental engineers are hard to nd and ecologists and urban foresters hardly exist. Furthermore,the existing industry has had lax regulation as Chile’s version of the EPA has only been around for the last 10 years. Currently there are very few environmental impact statements for existing industry and new developments. Bravo hopes that landscape architects, along with ecologists and legislators, can bring more responsibility and restraint to the industry, enabling a recovery of their browneld sites.

Chile’s main wine and fruit production

The Lake District Tourism and German Immigration

Chiloe Unique palito architecture

Chilean Patagonia Home to Torres de Paine National Park

Changing Gender and Colonial Paradigms Traditionally, the practice of landscape architecture in Chile has been a shared practice between the architect and paisajista. Historically, the paisajista profession has been practiced by females, is typically devalued by the machismo culture in Chile, and is a secondary consideration to architecture. For example, an architect (usually male) would design a house, building, or development and its landscape, lastly consulting with a paisajista to determine which plant selections suit the design. A further inuence on the landscape comes from Chile’s history of colonization. This can be seen specically in Santiago with its classic European parks and older private residences, contrasting with the recent emergence of more native public landscapes. This duality of landscapes has become more pronounced as Chileans have discovered both the aesthetic and ecological value of their native land. This return to more native landscape phenomenon has only been practiced in Chile since the turn of the millennium (Felsenhard, 30-33).

Brave New Landscapes At the forefront of change in landscape architecture, urban design, planning, Bravo works with her husband Jaime Bravo at their rm I.B.A. in Santiago, Chile. Bravo hopes that landscape perceptions will continue to change and more native, xeric designs will become the norm in the metropolitan regions of Santiago,Valparaiso, and Vina del Mar. Most of I.B.A.’s clients are developers, some who want to appear more environmentally friendly, while others respect the value of landscape architecture and use their rm because they are talented, local, and less expensive than foreign rms which are more commonly used. The value of the service still lays in the perception of the developer and their opinions of the profession determine its viability in new construction and existing renovations. When contracts are won, it is often hard to nd materials or relate construction standards as most contractors “shoot from the hip” or are not experienced in landscape construction.

The most ecologically diverse country in the world, Chile contains  fty-eight ecotypes. Also known as the Land of the Poets, Pablo Neruda pictured above being the most famous. 13


Part II:Travel

Unexpected Landscapes

Above: Universidad Ponti cia Catolica de Chile-Lo Contador campus is set to open Chile’s  rst master program of landscape architecture in early 2009. Opposite Page: I.B.A. Arquitector’s parking lot design for the Conjunto Armonico development in Punto Fraile, Chile. Images courtesy of Consuelo Bravo, Principal of I.B.A. Arquitector

Bravo is not alone in the struggle to bring landscape architecture to Chile. In April 2008, architects, landscape architects, and landscape professionals came together form ICHAP (Instituto Chileno de Arquitectos Paisajistas). Ideally, this organization will give landscape architecture a public voice and enhance its viability. Bravo teaches at the Universidad Catolica and is developing its master of landscape architecture program, set to begin in early 2009. Recovering Native Landscapes An example of Bravo’s work incorporating sustainable values in contemporary Chilean landscape design can be seen in the Conjunto Armonico vacation development in the small coastal town of Punto Fraile. As part of a beach house development, Bravo proposed a permeable parking area with highly xeric and durable plantings directly under the parked cars. Because the parking area is not used as often as a full-time residence, she focused on making the parking lot a landscape asset rather than a typically mundane feature. The design team experimented with native varieties with mixed results. A nal planting plan emerged using a mixture of sedum and other hardy varieties joined the native plants to take on the task of absorbing oil, gas, and other toxic liquids from vehicles. In addition, the parking lot is constructed of permeable materials to allow rainfall to permeate the soils rather than run off to 14 R O O T

drainage. This is an example of how Bravo is trying to change the opinion of native landscapes. She combined non-native xeric ornamentals with Chile’s native plant palette to expose people to the “new” native varieties. Conclusion Chile is a country of tremendous potential and tremendous beauty. Economic advancements and environmental concerns have brought a growth to landscape architecture. Traditional paradigms of gender and colonial values are changing quickly as economic gain and a rising concern for the environment in Latin America change the role of landscape from colonial luxury to the realm of native necessity. Contemporary landscape architects like Bravo have the opportunity to play an important role in protecting the rich ecosystems of the country from irresponsible industrial and suburban development. At the forefront of budding interests in sustainable urban design, and planning, these practioners are helping Chile dene its landscape and its global context. REFERENCES Bravo, Consuelo. (4 June 2008). Lectures in Paisajes Productivos. Universidad Ponticia Catolica de Chile. Felsenhardt, Christina. (jul/aug/sept 2001). “Naturaleza, Paisaje, y Paisajismo Nuestra Mundo y su Interpretacion.” CA Ciudad y Arquitectura (105). 15


11

Lincoln Strip

Lincoln University

Christchurch New Zealand

24.270sq meters

Description: The concept of the project was to challenge second year landscape architecture students with connecting the strip of roadside farmland with Lincoln University to its immediate south across Ellesmere Road. The design response was made of four main elements: transport, agriculture, business, and landscape feature. The design proposed connecting the northern part of the existing campus with a tunnel under Ellesmere Rd. leading to a transportation hub for the bus to Christchurch. The proposal also tries to involve Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s international student base in a form of community gardens allowing each culture to grow certain crops from their country. The products from this garden would then be served in a small cafe on the premises which is also connected to the viticulture program at Lincoln. The viticulture program would be responsible for the vineyard outside the cafe and wine making for the cafe. Lastly, students would want to experience the changes in grade to the west of the main transportation hub. A car park would be located here to help alleviate crowded parking conditions at Lincoln. The entire strip would be connected with railroad tie paths re linking the area back with its railroad history.


John Benjamin Bookout

email: jben.bookout@gmail.com Windemere Country Club

07 J

j a s o nd

Lincoln University

Christchurch, New Zealand -GPA 6.0/9 -Environmental Officer

Naropa University Boulder, CO. USA

Peace and Plenty Farm

tel. 970.261.1724 Hotchkiss, CO. USA -Construct Design -Green House Construction -Animal Housing Construction -Lg. Scale Irrigation

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2009j fm am

j f mam j a s o nd J

University of Colorado Denver, CO. USA -3.7/4 GPA

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http://huertasdel encuentro.bligoo.com

Santiago, Chile

-Volunteer Work -Organize volunteer for irrigation irrigation installation in Community garden.

10

j a s o nd

-Landscape Design -Project Management -Design Sales -Construction Oversight -Employee Management -Office Management -Marketing

Revolver

http://www.santiagomagazine.cl/

Santiago, Chile

-Online Magazine Writer

11 j f m am j a s o n d J

2012 j f m am

j f am j a s o n d

Masters of Architecture

2006 j f m a m s o nd

La Aldea

Landscape Designer

Santiago, Chile -English Teacher

j f m am

-Volunteer Work -English Instruction -Immigrant Support

Irrigation Design

Bridge Linguatec

05

tel. 303.996.0275 Boulder, CO. USA

Landscape Architecture

J

j f ma m j a s o J

-Landscape Design -Project Management -Design Sales -Construction Oversight -Employee Management -Office Management -Marketing Intercambio

English Teacher

J

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Landscape Designer

-Landscape Horticulture -3.7/4 GPA

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2003j f

j a s o nd

Landscape Architecture

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO.

02

-Volunteer Work -English Instruction -Immigrant Support

-Business English -Curriculum Formation -Child Instruction -Program Sales

Permaculture Design

J

j as ond

tel. 303.996.0275 Boulder, CO. USA

English Teacher

j f m am

Maximo Nivel

tel.51.8.425.7200 Cusco, Peru

Intercambio

T.E.F.L Certificate

Bachelor of Science

J

01 j a s o nd

-Landscape Construction -Irrigation Design -Employee Management -Budget Formation -Project Management

Permaculture Design Certificate

2000j f m am

tel.303.447.2282 Boulder, CO. USA

tel.303.447.2282 Boulder, CO. USA

tel. 303.449.1624 Boulder, CO. USA

English Teacher

Juneau, AK.

Ecoscape Environmental Design

Ecoscape Environmental Design

Robert Howard &Assoc.

Landscape Foreman

Alaska Travel Adventures

Raft Guide

Assistant Superintendant

tel. 941.263.1700 Naples, FL. USA -Employee Management -Golf Course Management -Forestry -Irrigation

cel: 303.731.2667

J

13 j a son d

U. Catolica de Chile Santiago, Chile -Thesis in Spanish -5.2/7 GPA


References

13

Bill Melvin Ecoscape Environmental Design +01 303 447 2282 Bill@ecoscapedesign.com Professional Reference Rodrigo Tapia Universidad Catolica de Chile +56 2 354 77 47 rtapia@uc.cl Academic Reference Nicholas Difrank Landscape Architect for the City of Boulder +01 303 829 8362 ndifrank@gmail.com Personal Reference

303-447-2282 www.EcoscapeDesign.com PO Box 704, Boulder, CO 80306 November 15, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: I am delighted to be called upon as a reference for Ben Bookout. I have known Ben for almost 10 years now and find him to be an exceptional employee and person. Ben began his employment with us in the summer of 2006 until he departed in 2007 to follow his passion in a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program for Landscape Architecture. Upon completion of his degree, Ben returned to work at Ecoscape until the summer of 2012 when his departure overseas was imminent. Ben played a key role at Ecoscape helping us to carry the company to a higher level of professionalism and creativity. His collaboration with his colleagues gained him much respect and strong connections that was evident in his project management over sight of our installations. His close collaboration with our clients was one of Benâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strongest skills, being a very personable individual that brought much positive feedback from our clientele. While at Ecoscape, Ben acted as our main landscape architect, carrying out projects from start to finish. From the initial consultation, to closing sales, schematic development and designing, estimating, and project management skills, his attention to detail was integral to our quality of work. His work in developing landscaping standards and production rates for our estimating and field work has proven to be invaluable. I enthusiastically recommend Ben as a very promising candidate for any landscape architect position he applies for. He is a great team player and demonstrates strong abilities in dedication and his role in going beyond expectations. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be happy to discuss this matter with you personally if you have any additional questions.

Sincerely,

Bill Melvin Owner/ President Ecoscape Environmental Design Boulder, CO (303) 447- 2282


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