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Benjamin Bedel Application for Internship University of Cincinnati Fall 2011

Dear Sir/Madame, I am writing to you seeking a co-op position with your company for the fall of 2011. I am currently a third year student at DAAP, University of Cincinnati with previous working experience and several quarters of completed in-studio projects, all of which has prepared me for the challenges and opportunities of working with your firm. Freshman year at DAAP trained students in design thinking, drawing, communication, history, and very importantly, working in a team. I developed my skills and was named to the Dean’s List several times. Sophomore year focused on completing individual projects; in-depth building designs covering site, precedent, social and historical context, space relationships, lighting, sustainability, and efficiency. My craft and thoughtfulness during the projects were noted, with recommendations from my professors even securing a scholarship award. Working with Champlin-Haupt in Cincinnati for three months trained me in responsibility, cooperation, and putting the firm before personal needs. I edited designs for a community arts center being planned near where I lived, so I was able to contribute to the vitality of my own neighborhood. I’ve also volunteered for four years, since I was 16, with the Cincinnati Preservation Association, taking customers on guided architectural and historical tours of downtown Cincinnati, giving me an outlet for my desire to directly improve the neighborhood I care about deeply. If you find it fitting to hire me to work with your firm, I pledge to work with punctuality, respect, and open-minded resourcefulness, while always learning from your experience and putting the interests of good design and cooperation first.

Sincerely, Benjamin Bedel


BENJAMIN BEDEL

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


LIVE/WORK APARTMENT COMPLEX Conceived as ‘activity within a courtyard’. The building is composed of five living units on three floors (four half floor units and one penthouse) along with five workspaces on the bottom plinth. The wrap-around wall that creates the enclave is given play with a simple pattern, and broken in the rear with contextually inspired porches. These create beautiful extensions of the living space, integrate the central structure and the wall while supporting the latter, and give poetic westerly views filtered by the fire escapes. The circulation of the building is duly complex. Shop patrons enter from the street or along a tall vertical space on the left. Residents move up a converging ramp on the right, welcomed overhead with warm light patterns, turn left under their porches and move into a smaller courtyard framed with balconies. This terminates with the main stair, which culminates in a skylight and rooftop garden.


CENTER FOR LITERARY STUDIES


The literary center serves as a residence for a visiting author, a meeting place for him/her to exchange with the public while a project is underway, and a gallery space for the author’s theory and writings to be displayed and borrowed. The program divides the spaces accordingly along a spectrum from totally public, the central courtyard, to totally private, the author’s apartment at the rear of the structure. Circulation is marked by a tall entry column (which does much to control heat) and a ramp set below sidewalk-level skylights. The largest space, a reading room, is totally below grade, and can be seen at left.


SKETCHING Previous Page: “European City with Many Churches” 11’’x 8.5’’ Below: facade design for a baroque church 4’’x 4’’ Far Right: explorative sketches of high rises


DIGITAL WORK Clockwise from Left: Andy Warhol Collage “Tetra Fawn” “Eye Candy” CD Cover “Liza and Julie”


D.A.A.P. COURTYARD REDESIGN Project to transform barren and uneven courtyard. Final program uses terraces, ramps, and stairways to divide and level the space, along with slices, slants, and a stage to give it some jazz. Context:The east stair to the left would descend away from the viewer in the photo below, parallel to the wall surface on the far left.


‘EMBLEMATIC OBJECT’ Abstraction of a student resource building on U.C’s campus


PHOTOGRAPHY


CINCINNATI WINERY Project program called for landscaping research, park precedent studies, winery typology research and visits, site conditions study (rain, sun exposure, soil studies, fog, drainage, frost), and other research to inform the land and building’s design. My inspiration was found in the sensuous curves and hills of the site, the ancient symbolism relating grapes with femininity, vineyards as cultivating the fruit of the earth, and lips, breasts, eyes, and grapes as feminine and life-giving forms. The structure is placed on the tip of a prominent ridge, with the vines leading up to it. It crowns the fertile mound of the fields. Other features I would like to note are the spherical entry space, half concrete and half glass, emerging from the green roof that slopes down and around it, meeting the plaza and the front door. The concavity of this space is bridged to allow access to the main part of the structure, which is built above grade but covered so that the landscape appears seamless. The space is divided around a central stair and hall, and cupped around a courtyard composed of three circles. The outdoor space is accessed from a bar/dining room to the right, an office to the left, and the aforementioned stair head on. There is also a kitchen and retail shop with a curved glass wall/shelf between it and a large bottle storage room. Within the courtyard is a ‘Y’ shaped stream that cascades down over a stepped land feature into a pond. Also in the courtyard are two suspended gazebos (shown in section below) designed with planters sheltering their full height and made of steel columns. The two southern-most walls of the building are cut by large verandas, accessible only from inside, allowing unbroken views of the valley.The processing level below is cut into the hill, and accessed by a continuous tunnel which passes under the courtyard. Its largest feature is a circular barrel storage room.


Upper Level Plan plans align


Lower Level Plan


Site high-point ‘Mound Folly’

Seen at first turn in driveway

View from folly down rose crescent hill

Aerial view of gold triangular colannade (shown as orange) along ridge towards building

Perspective along driveway with entry sphere at convergence


Rear View over vineyard

Rear perspective, showing green roof, courtyard, and driveway tunnel


Winery Site Map

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1 Entry from road to right, through White Birch Forest 2 Turn in road placed to give direct view across prairie towards the folly. This area is the highest elevation of the site. 3 Turn through wood and along ridge towards the building. 4 Building with parking, guest areas, and grape processing areas placed at end of ridge, with landscape sloping down from it 5 Large crescent of rose plants 6 Vines planted in areas of greatest sun exposure 7 Forest of Sierra pines and dogwoods at lowest elevation

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8 Collection pond at low point

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FT. ANCIENT HOTEL AND RESEARCH CENTER


This structure is placed adjacent to an historic Native American Indian mound complex and houses researchers. Suspension wires lift the building above a surrounding flood plain. The entire outer surface would be vinecovered and trees would grace the verandas’ and rooftop garden’s corners.


THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU


Bedel Portfolio  

Ben Bedel's portfolio

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