Issuu on Google+

Existing Products (Secondary research) David Mellor

Nedda El-Asmar Inspired by the oval shape of the Japanese tea leaf plant

Lukas Peet  

 

Skandium

h p://www.davidmellordesign.com/   h p://www.skandium.com/   Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Zaha Hadid I found some images of architecture by a famous architect called Zaha Hadid. I really like the use of long sloping curves in her designs, these are things that I think could be implemented in the design of my flatware.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Existing Products (Primary research) To research a little further I took a walk round Newcastle to see what sort of cutlery was already out there and to see if I could gain any inspiration. I looked at the more high priced cutlery in John Lewis, Debenhams etc.. These had designer names such as, Jasper Conran and Rocha. John Rocha. Whilst out I was mainly looking at form and the finishes.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Current trends in dining Like anything else, restaurants have trends that change with time. Social and economic issues also play a big part in these trends. I will be looking at what's popular in 2013 and seeing how I can adapt my cutlery to fit in with the current trends of dining. 1)

 

Restaurant food truck businesses.

2) Sustainability and local food.

Many people are starting up food truck businesses as either a sole business or as an extension of their already existing restaurant. Its a great way to reach out to customers and gain popularity. They are also known as ‘pop up restaurants’ as they can come and go.

Use of local produce is a massive trend within the restaurant business. People are becoming more and more aware of where their food is coming from, so when people see that a restaurant offers locally produced food they are automatically drawn too it.

The cutlery on these food trucks would have to be light weight and probably of a smaller size , taking into consideration the limited space.

A great example is the olive and bean cafe in Newcastle city centre. Its offers a wide range of organic, locally produced items on its menu and is a delight to eat at. They even have an email address for people who are local producers to contact them about any new products they have which can be added too the menu.

Some of these food trucks or pop up restaurants may not have seating so perhaps wont use metal cutlery, instead they might use plastic.

3) Burger diners. I have noticed that burger diners have become increasingly popular in the last few years. Some have gone down the old school American diner theme from the 50’s and others have gone for a more rustic approach. A good example of this is also in Newcastle, the Fat Hippo in Jesmond specialises in burgers. It has a very rustic feel too it, for example the food comes on slabs of wood instead of plates, some drinks are served in jars instead of glasses etc..

The cutlery used at places like this is often minimal (no pattern work) however has a great finish too it and always has a shine. I think tis helps convey the idea of local food, nothing artificial, no rubbish, just quality.

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Existing Products continued... (Primary Research)

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ergonomics of the Knife, folk and spoon. When looking at the Ergonomics of the knife, folk and spoon you must consider the different ways in which people interact with them. Some people use them with a closed fist, which usually means they are eating fast where as others have their index finger over the top of the handle and hold the cutlery quite high up. This is just a couple of ways I've noticed myself.

This is a diagram of the hand and lists the percentile of hand sizes of women and men. This will help me decide the best sizes to make my cutlery so it is comfortable to use for all users.

On this page I will be exploring the different ways people hold their cutlery and will take all this into consideration when designing my own cutlery so its made to suit a wide audience.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Initial modelling 1

This is one of my initial models which is probably one of my favourite designs at the moment. The knife blade runs under the handle then blends into it. Obviously it needs developing further, for example where the handle and the blade meet there is a crevice. This would have to have a radius on it to reduce the risk of food getting caught in it.

 

2

 

This is another design I came up with. I like the detail on the prongs of the folk with the different levels. I wasn't able to get all the details on but I will develop this further and go into more detail.

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Modelling continued... 3

 

 

I like the curve at the bottom of the handle on this idea. It makes the spoon more comfortable to hold and acts as an aesthetic feature. When i first sketched this idea down i used quite jagged edges, however i realised this would cause hygiene issues as dirt and bacteria could harvest there. By putting the curve on the handle it decreases the hygiene issue and makes the design more sleek.

This is probably my favourite design so far and is the one i believe i can take further. Its simple yet elegant and there is room for changes and development without changing the initial idea too much.

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Initial modelling of final design I have decided that this is the design I want to develop and use as my final product. I particularly like the curves at the bottom of the handles as it aids comfort and is also a great design feature. My next steps are going to be modelling all three pieces of flatware, develop them too a standard where they are both aesthetically pleasing and ergonomically sound, then put my designs onto Auto CAD. I am also going to use solidworks to record a three dimensional representation of my designs.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Rendered models

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Initial modelling final design continued..

This is the design i have chosen to use. The handle is quite chunky and has dips at certain points on the handle for a comfortable fit on the hand. This is the first model so i will develop it and tweak it to make sure its right.

 

 

I am going to do a small ridge to separate the handle from the blade. This will be a feature on all three pieces so they are distinguished as a set. Initially it was going to be a curved ridge but that would collect too much bacteria from food.

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Development of final fork.

 

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Development of final knife .

I decided to narrow the handle at the top and narrow the blade as well. I have put a slight curve along the top of the blade.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Developed final models

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Final models After evaluating my previous set of models i realised the design wasn't quite right so I made some minor adjustments.. Such as, instead of having too many complex curves in the handles (which would be difficult to file on the working prototypes) i decided to go with one curve on each piece. Also the bend in the handles of the fork and spoon weren't quite right in my previous set so i have adapted that so the angle is right .

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Manufacturing process of prototypes.

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


FINAL PROTOTYPES

 

 

Ben Ashby. 3D Design. DE0843– Design for production.


Flatware portfolio