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ANNUAL REPORT 2013

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 1


CONTENTS REPORTS 

4

Artistic Report 

4

Chairman’s Report 

6

Company Report 

9

Learning Report 

10

Corporate Governance 

14

Artistic Self-Assesment 

16

2013 DONORS 

18

2013 PARTNERS 

20

FINANCIAL RESULTS 

22

Comprehensive Income 

26

Financial Position 

27

ADDITIONAL NOTES 

30

Attendance 

30

Government Support 

31

Summary Financial Indicators & KPIs 32

2013 PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS Henry 4: Lisa Tomasetti Phèdre: Rush The Comedy Of Errors: Matt Nettheim A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Lisa Tomasetti

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Peter Evans Co-Artistic Director

Reports

John Bell Co-Artistic Director


Our 2013 season was one of daring and diversity. We kicked off the season with Henry 4, an epic blockbuster which conflated Henry IV Parts 1 and 2 into one ambitious evening. John Bell adapted the text, played the role of Falstaff and directed the play in collaboration with Damien Ryan. Henry 4 was designed by Stephen Curtis and sought to give a snapshot of contemporary Britain as seen through Australian eyes. The set evoked an industrial worksite where the Big End of Town (that is, King Henry and his court) confronted a bunch of shop stewards and union bosses (Shakespeare’s ‘rebels’) while those at the lower end of the social scale (namely, Falstaff and his gang of thieves and layabouts) were relegated to the periphery. Things got off to a spectacular start in the play with a huge mural of milk crates, painted like a Union Jack, being demolished by the lower orders. From here Kelly Ryall’s pounding rock anthems helped to propel the action. An outstanding cast including David Whitney, Matthew Moore, Sean O’Shea, Nathan Lovejoy, Wendy Strehlow and Tony Llewellyn-Jones, all delivered highcalibre performances. Henry 4 opened in Canberra Theatre Centre’s The Playhouse before touring to Arts Centre Melbourne’s the Playhouse of the and Sydney Opera House’s Drama Theatre. Despite a generally enthusiastic reception the play failed to achieve its box office target. It was a large-scale production with a cast of fourteen actors and this was an expensive show to tour. Plus, as one of the lesser-known plays in Shakespeare’s canon, it posed a big challenge for our marketing department. We learned some hard lessons about scale and expectations from this production.

‘Anyone who’s seen a Bell Production will know quality is to be expected, but with Henry 4, the Company has exceeded itself.’ Crikey, Curtain Call ‘All in all Henry 4 is absorbing, thrilling and yet another reminder of why coming back to Shakespeare time and again is one of the best ways of being provoked and entertained.’ Stage Noise ‘Bell is at his outstanding best as wicked Falstaff.’ The Australian Hot on the heels of Henry 4 was Racine’s Phèdre with a magnificent translation by Ted Hughes. This rarely seen gem of the French classic repertoire was directed by Peter Evans and showcased an elegant set by Anna Cordingley (who also designed the contemporary costumes). Catherine McClements gave a powerhouse performance in the title role and she was strongly supported by Edmund Lembke-Hogan as Hippolytus and Marco Chiappi as Theseus. Julie Forsyth brought new and idiosyncratic life to the role of Phèdre’s Nurse, with outstanding work by Bert LaBonte (as the Messenger), Caroline Lee, Olivia Monticciolo and Abby Earl. Phèdre is to the French repertoire what Hamlet is to the English, and so we had high hopes that audiences would embrace the chance to see it. As with Henry 4, a lack of familiarity seemed to be a stumbling block. In a normal subscription season audiences are prepared to take a gamble on the unknown. But when it comes to single-ticket sales it’s a different story and a much harder sell. Again, this experience alerted us to the necessity of balancing exotic fare with the trusted and familiar.

‘McClements is riveting as Phèdre, sounding out her tragic depths and highlighting the absurdity of her passion with wry flashes of insight.’ The Sydney Morning Herald

‘A fine production that does great credit to a company brave enough to program this relatively obscure but rewarding work.’ The Sydney Morning Herald ‘As a piece of theatre this Phèdre is remarkably effective and singularly satisfying.’ The Australian ‘It’s rare to see Racine performed in Australia, so it’s exciting to see Bell Shakespeare assay his greatest tragedy, Phèdre, transforming that absence into an implacable presence. There’s an unnerving intensity, a claustrophobic quality to Peter Evans’ production that’s augmented by design.’ The Age Our national tour for 2013 was The Comedy Of Errors, which was a co-production with the State Theatre Company of South Australia. The show was rehearsed and built in Adelaide (where it then opened). Following this it toured an additional 31 venues all around Australia, from Townsville to Alice Springs and from Albany to Hobart. Imara Savage’s production, designed by Pip Runciman, took us to a sleazy sea-port setting full of strip-joints and shady characters, a cosmopolitan underbelly with an interesting ethnic mix of performers. The show was raunchy and physical and played at a hectic – at times hysterical – tempo. Standout performances included Nathan O’Keefe, Hazem Shammas, Anthony Taufa and Elena Carapetis. David Heinrich provided an exciting soundscape and the physical comedy consultant, Scott Witt, was kept busy. The popularity of the show was reflected in the strong box office and importantly it was a tremendously satisfying collaboration with a state company. A great model for future projects.

‘Words cannot do this remarkable production justice, it really needs to be seen. A spectacular end to what has been a brilliant Bell year.’ ««««« The Daily Telegraph ‘Bell Shakespeare and State Theatre Company of South Australia have revived a comical gem and, in the skilful hands of Savage and her energy-charged and talent-wired ensemble, made it dazzle with delight. Don’t miss it.’ Canberra Times ‘The Comedy Of Errors is the best thing on stage this year. Get yourself a ticket.’ Herald Sun ‘This reviewer cannot wait to see this wonderful play again.’ Australian Stage Our team of Players, eight talented young actors, took to the road again in 2013 performing in schools and theatres all over Australia to an audience of nearly 70,000 students. The productions included Such Sweet Sorrow (based on Romeo And Juliet), Macbeth: Undone, Double Trouble (a play about Shakespeare’s twins written for primary school audiences), and A Midsummer Night’s Dream (which played at Sydney Opera House and Melbourne’s National Theatre). Our teaching artists conducted residencies at Emmaville Central School in NSW, Yipirinya School in Alice Springs, Maningrida School NT, Shepparton High School in VIC, and the Collingwood English Language Schoolin VIC among many others. These residencies, combined with our work in Juvenile Justice Centres (Frank Baxter and Juniperina), formed the bulk of our work in education. Details of our work in the digital arena, as well as workshops and scholarships for teachers and students can be found in our Learning Report.

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CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

There was much to be proud of in 2013. Our three mainstage productions – Henry 4, Phèdre and The Comedy Of Errors – were all critically acclaimed, and The Comedy Of Errors enjoyed great commercial success too, playing in 32 centres around the country. Our Learning Programme continued to grow significantly and we launched our first ever in-school Primary Programme. Philanthropy was reinvigorated including our first gala fundraiser for a number of years. Yet despite these successes the Company had a very challenging year at the box office which led to a significant loss; our first in many years. We have learnt a lot from our experiences in 2013. Australian audiences are blessed with a plethora of choice when it comes to theatre, and to Shakespeare in particular. When John Bell founded Bell Shakespeare 24 years ago, Shakespeare was not being performed on a regular basis in Australia. This has changed. Yet Bell Shakespeare continues to be the only theatre company in Australia which makes Shakespeare available and accessible to all Australians no matter who they are and where they live. We believe passionately in this vision and look forward to performing outstanding work whether it is a show at Sydney Opera House or at a primary school in Port Hedland. To this end the Board at Bell Shakespeare is committed to working with the artistic directors and the management team to ensure that the Company’s financial security is assured. This is more vital than ever as we approach our 25th year. Our artistic vision continues to be expertly guided by John Bell and Peter Evans who together form the creative force behind Bell Shakespeare and I’d like to take this opportunity to thank them both for their leadership, passion and enthusiasm throughout 2013. Our Learning Programme continues to flourish. Our ensemble of eight actors, known as The Players, performed adaptations of Romeo And Juliet and Macbeth to almost 70,000 students around the country, and in 2013 The Players performed in primary schools for the first time. The Players also performed A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Peter Evans, to great acclaim in theatres in Melbourne and Sydney. Our wonderful Learning Programme is led by our Head of Education, Joanna Erskine, and our Resident Artist in Education, James Evans. Thank you to both of them and to our very talented and energetic Players. Our ability to continue our work at Bell Shakespeare is

Reports

reliant on the significant generosity of our loyal donors and corporate partners. Particular thanks go to our longterm corporate partners BHP Billiton, Wesfarmers Arts, J. P. Morgan, Australian Unity and Sofitel Melbourne. We are also grateful for the generosity of the trusts and foundations who support us. In particular, our Learning arm is appreciative for the continued support and enthusiasm of our supporters. Thanks must go to the Ian Potter Foundation, the Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, the Scully Fund and the Macquarie Group Foundation who have all been with us for many years. In 2013 we would like also to thank in particular the Bill and Patricia Ritchie Foundation. As a result of their support we were able to re-launch our Juvenile Justice Programme, which has been overwhelmingly well received. Our gratitude goes to the many individuals who supported the Company in 2013. This includes all the members of our Supporting Cast, the many donors to Hearts In A Row, as well as our valued guests at our many events. We appreciate your support of the Company very much and we hope it continues for many years to come. We also appreciate both the State and Federal Governments for their support of the arts, and of Bell Shakespeare in particular. We value highly the contributions made by the Australia Council and Arts NSW, and value our relationships with both bodies. Thank you to the entire management team and staff who work tirelessly to support the creative vision of the Company and to all the actors, creative teams and crew members who worked with us in 2013: you are the lifeblood of the Company. And finally, thank you to my colleagues on the Board for their wisdom, support and passion for Bell Shakespeare.

Ilana Atlas Chairman


Henry 4 2013 REPORT | 7 BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL


AReports Midsummer Night’s Dream 2013


COMPANY REPORT

Our 2013 mainstage activity is outlined in the Artistic Report, but this is by no means the full extent of the creative and theatrical work that the Company undertakes each year. Mind’s Eye research and development continued to flourish in 2013, commissioning plays from Sue Smith, Alana Valentine, Lachlan Philpott & Luke Mullins, Jane Bodie, Caleb Lewis and Anna Barnes. Practical workshops were undertaken for three of these new plays, with subsequent readings/showings being held for an invited audience. We collaborated with Chamber Made Opera in 2013 on the creative development and presentation of Opera for a small mammal. The production enjoyed a short sell-out season at La Mama in Carlton and was critically well-received too. We also collaborated with the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority in 2013, as part of The Rocks Windmill Project. In conjunction with the Authority we presented a number of primary school workshops and two evening presentations which explored the performance history of The Rocks precinct. This included excerpts from two of the first plays ever performed in Sydney (Jane Shore and The Miraculous Cure), as well as the first Shakespeare play to be performed in Australia (Henry IV ). If mainstage is our right arm, then Learning is our left. Learning comprises a suite of opportunities including regional scholarships for students, professional development experiences for teachers, school-based performances and much more. For full details please read on to our Learning Report.

DEVELOPMENT – PHILANTHROPY AND CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS 2013 saw the corporate partnerships and philanthropy teams consolidated into one department, led by the newly created role of Head of Development. This new department hit the ground running, introducing a number of initiatives this year including the Company’s first gala event in several years. This was a wonderful night where we celebrated the Company’s achievements with corporate partners, donors and friends of the Company. The philanthropy department also introduced an end of financial year fundraising campaign in support of Hearts In A Row (one of our key fundraising initiatives). Plus they created a philanthropy brochure, offering a concise summary of the huge array of works and programmes that Bell Shakespeare has to offer and for which support is sought.

It is only through the continued support and generosity of our supporters – individuals, corporate partners, trusts and foundations alike – that we are able to take Shakespeare to audiences across Australia. Every gift truly does make a difference. And while the environment for private philanthropic fundraising in Australia remains challenging (for instance, philanthropic trusts are increasingly streamlining their operations to invest larger sums in fewer organisations to maximise their impact) we are confident that donors will continue to respond positively to meaningful initiatives. As such, Bell Shakespeare’s acclaimed and diverse Learning Programme remains our main focus for applications and it continues to have success in gaining support due to the longterm and meaningful impact of our myriad initiatives. Hearts In A Row is still one of the most immediately engaging and rewarding fundraising programmes we offer, connecting underprivileged groups from Sydney and Canberra with the magic and wonder of live theatre. In 2013 we extended Hearts In A Row to include groups in Melbourne for the first time and this is something that will be further developed in 2014. In total, 21 deserving groups and schools received a Hearts In A Row experience in 2013. This programme encourages genuine partnerships with donors who (commensurate with the level of their gift) are able to determine which beneficiaries will receive a VIP theatre experience, and to join their nominated group to share in that experience. We continued to enjoy many successful corporate partnerships during 2013 and we’re pleased to announce Foxtel as our new National Schools Partner, as well as several pro bono and contra arrangements, involving creative communications, media advertising and promotions, production vehicles, wines, hotel accommodation and information technology donations. All contributed to various areas of the organisation and were integral to our success. For the full list of our 2013 donors and corporate and community partners please see pages 18–21.

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LEARNING REPORT

2013 was a year of new experiences for Bell Shakespeare Once again The Players performed in every state and Learning. territory including some of the most regional and remote towns across the country such as Narrabri, Brewarrina, Walgett We developed and released our very first app – Starting Shakespeare – in conjunction with digital education specialists, and Wee Waa in Far North NSW; Ballarat and Shepparton in VIC; Moranbah, Emerald, Cloncurry and Blackwater in QLD; Deeper Richer. We started new relationships with regional Newman, Kambalda, Kalgoorlie and Port Hedland in WA and and remote schools via residencies in Alice Springs NT, Leigh Woomera and Roxby Downs in SA. The Players also presented Creek SA, Shepparton VIC, and in Maningrida in Arnhem performances to non-schools audiences including regional Land NT. We launched our inaugural Primary Programme, and remote communities, retirement villages and at Juvenile introducing thousands of Australia’s youngest students Justice Centres. The combined audience for Actors At Work in to the language, stories and characters found in some of 2013 was 53,347 across 432 performances. Shakespeare’s best-loved plays. Students as young as six years old booed and hissed at Richard III, giggled at Hamlet’s Student Masterclasses were once again presented existential crisis, cheered Viola and Sebastian’s long-awaited on a range of different topics in 2013 by Resident Artist reunion, and left each show with a wealth of Shakespearean in Education James Evans and our team of arts educators. insults just ripe for use in the playground. Student Masterclasses focus on one or more of Shakespeare’s plays, and are specifically tailored for each group’s aims and We recommenced our Juvenile Justice programme, study needs. Masterclasses were delivered in both secondary working with young men and women in NSW facilities on and primary schools. A total of 109 Student Masterclasses their own performances of Romeo And Juliet. We introduced were presented for 3,560 participants at 45 schools. refugee and migrant students of Collingwood English Language School to the magic of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Specialist masterclasses were also presented for The And we released some incredible research on the value of Rocks Windmill Project, State Library of NSW, Adelaide our programmes for students and teachers, and the need to College of the Arts, Powerhouse Youth Theatre, Theatre expand them further. Then there was Peter Evans’ schools Council of Tasmania, the Australian Catholic University and the production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream which was such a Shakespeare in Gloucester Festival. success it has graduated to the mainstage for 2014. ‘I can’t tell you how good it felt to have Shakespeare being In 2013 we also toured extensively with Actors At Work, brought to life in our school and for the kids to be appreciating it offered Artist in Residence programmes, ran workshops, as they did. Some of these kids have never seen a theatre show plus we provided teacher Professional Learning, in-theatre before. Many have but are not all that interested. Today there productions and a host of digital experiences for students and was something new: theatre that was exciting, funny, dynamic, teachers around Australia. In total, our Learning Programme touching and engaging. It felt so good to have them in my school, reached 74,314 students and teachers face-to-face, and like an oasis!’ another 76,865 through online and digital activities. Simon Aylott, Teacher, Our 2013 Learning programmes were developed with the O’Loughlin Catholic College, Darwin NT expert help of two Resident Teaching Artists: Paul Reichstein and Saskia Smith. The Players for this year were: Griffin IN THEATRES Blumer, Ray Chong Nee, Joseph Del Re, Jenna Hutton, Our in-theatre schools production for 2013 was Peter Evans’ Andrew Johnston, Jane Mahady, Ildiko Susany and Janine A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with seasons at Sydney Opera Watson. House and the National Theatre in Melbourne, playing to a ‘Our students remember all the productions they have seen from combined audience of 11,927 from 133 schools. A series of the Bell Players. As they are in a small country school, attending digital workshops and a live-streamed Q&A was offered to live theatre is not high on their list of things-to-do but after support this production. watching your performances some of them even consider watching Schools were offered priority booking and specialist live theatre as a viable alternative to playing footy. They are full student and teacher resources for all mainstage productions, of praise and thanks.’ including Henry 4, Phèdre and The Comedy Of Errors. In Geraldine Brown, Teacher, advance of the national tour of The Comedy Of Errors, arts Molong Central School, NSW educators visited regional venues with a complimentary 75-minute workshop preparing students for the production, IN SCHOOLS as part of the Regional Access Programme. Workshops were highly practical and covered the play’s synopsis, key In 2013 Actors At Work saw four shows performed; two character journeys, scene work, and set and costume designs. for secondary students (Such Sweet Sorrow and Macbeth: We presented 38 workshops to a total of 1,107 students from Undone) and two for primary students (the brand new Double Trouble and Midsummer Madness) – as part of our inaugural 50 schools across Australia. Primary Programme.

Reports


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

programmes and ensuring longterm relationships with regional and remote schools. 2013 was the second residency in a three-year project presented at Collingwood English Language School, where the student body is comprised of new refugees, students who have recently immigrated to Australia and those needing intensive English training. This second residency was based on Shakespeare’s storytelling in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and was presented over ten weeks, with students attending Bell Shakespeare’s performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Students performed their own devised stories in response to the play on the final day of the residency, demonstrating vastly improved comprehension and literacy skills, public speaking and self-confidence.

Teacher Professional Learning was presented in every state and territory throughout 2013 to a total of 343 teachers. Each event was aligned with the Australian Curriculum and all NSW events were endorsed by the NSW Institute of Teachers. This year’s National Regional Teacher Forum, Lovers And Villains, was specifically designed to help teachers bring the most complex and colourful of Shakespeare’s characters to life in the classroom. Teacher Forums were held in Kiama NSW, Canberra ACT, Bunbury WA, Rockhampton QLD, Loxton SA, Wangaratta VIC, Launceston TAS and Alice Springs NT. 2013 saw the return of the popular Shakespeare Weekender, offering teachers a long-form Professional Learning experience in Sydney at Bell Shakespeare’s rehearsal room. Shakespeare In The Drama Classroom was presented in ‘I’ve seen the students’ confidence and engagement increase, NSW, VIC and SA focussing on providing secondary drama not only in the sessions but the effect has been widespread across teachers with techniques and skills to teach Shakespeare the school. There is an air of something great taking place and to their students. the most positive shift towards learning and being knowledgeable As part of our inaugural Primary Programme, a tailored being cool. The only regretful thing is that it is coming to an end. Professional Learning session for primary teachers was Thank you again for affording my students this once in a lifetime presented in NSW, Shakespeare In The Primary Curriculum. opportunity.’ This full-day session taught teachers the value of introducing Rebecca Grant, Teacher, Emmaville Central School Shakespeare’s plays to young students, as well as practical NSW classroom strategies and unit planning techniques. In partnership with Sydney Opera House, primary schools in JUVENILE JUSTICE regional SA were able to participate in a series of digital After pilot residencies in 2010 and 2011, Bell Shakespeare workshops, streamed live into their classrooms. started a three-year residency programme in 2013 at Finally, Arts Camp For Educators was a new initiative Juniperina and Frank Baxter Juvenile Justice Centres in NSW. developed in collaboration with six other Sydney-based arts Both residencies focussed on Romeo And Juliet and organisations: Sydney Opera House, Sydney Theatre Company, were preceded by an Actors At Work performance from Australian Theatre For Young People, Sydney Symphony The Players of Such Sweet Sorrow for 30 female detainees Orchestra, Sydney Dance Company and the Museum of at Juniperina and 120 male detainees at Frank Baxter. Contemporary Art. As part of this two-day multi-disciplinary Following the performance, participants were able to volunteer camp in July, Bell Shakespeare delivered Resurrecting to take part in the residency of ten masterclasses over a Richard: Bringing Shakespeare To Life – a three-hour five-week period. Resident Teaching Artist Paul Reichstein journey across Shakespeare’s greatest plays. This workshop and Arts Educator Genevieve Hegney worked with eight guided teachers through language analysis and the decoding participants at Juniperina while Resident Artist in Education of text, as well as directing skills, interpretation and staging. James Evans and Arts Educator, Huw McKinnon worked with 15 participants at Frank Baxter, exploring the play and ‘One of the best things was having teachers from all over Australia its themes. The residencies with both groups culminated in a attending. The discussions were so dynamic. The tutoring was performance for other detainees, including family and friends inspirational, enjoyable and inspiring.’ at Juniperina. Lynne Robertson, Teacher, Coffs Harbour Senior College NSW The residencies were enormously successful and we will be further expanding the scope of our work in each centre in 2014 and 2015. RESIDENCIES Ten residencies were presented in 2013, with a Bell Shakespeare arts educator spending one to two weeks in each school community working with staff and students on a tailored Shakespeare programme. Each programme was specifically designed in consultation with the school to suit student needs. Seven of the ten residencies were presented in regional and remote schools and three in urban schools, with a total of 1,525 students and teachers participating across all the residencies in practical masterclasses, Professional Learning and intensive, engaging Shakespeare study. Four two-week residencies were presented in regional and remote schools in 2013 at Emmaville Central School NSW, Yipirinya School in Alice Springs NT, Maningrida School in Arnhem Land NT and Leigh Creek Area School in SA. Three one-week residencies were delivered at Moree Christian School in NSW, Calrossy Anglican School in Tamworth NSW and Shepparton High School in VIC, as well as two urban residencies. Five of the seven regional and remote residency schools were previous recipients of Bell Shakespeare’s Regional Teacher Scholarship, further integrating our

‘It brings the real me out.’ Participant, Frank Baxter Juvenile Justice Centre

REGIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS We received a record number of applications for the 2013 Regional Teacher Scholarship, with 92 submissions received from around Australia. Twelve eager teachers joined the Company in Sydney, from 3–6 May 2013, for four days of intensive professional learning, networking, live theatre and unit planning. The teachers met with John Bell and saw the Bell Shakespeare production of Henry 4 at Sydney Opera House. The 2013 Regional Teacher Scholarship recipients were from Wellington, Woodenbong, Casino and Nyngan NSW; Alice Springs NT; Bowen QLD; Leigh Creek SA; Mount Gambier SA; Ulverstone TAS; Warrnambool and Shepparton VIC; and Karratha WA. The three 2012 Regional Performance Scholarship recipients were welcomed to the Bell Shakespeare headquarters in January 2013, where they spent a week in the rehearsal room of Henry 4 with director, John Bell, and also BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 11


‘The value of the Regional Teacher Scholarship is getting to a PD and realising that every teacher is in exactly the same position as me and experiencing the same barriers and yet despite this, there are answers that are 100% relevant to our situation. Finally, there are methods for teaching Shakespeare that do not exclude the illiterate, the behaviourally, socially or economically challenged, but celebrates their perspective.’ Caitey Wilton, Teacher, Shepparton High School VIC

DIGITAL INNOVATION AND ONLINE ENGAGEMENT

RESEARCH In 2012 Bell Shakespeare commissioned Educational Transformations to evaluate three of its key Learning programmes: Actors At Work, in-school residencies and the Regional Teacher Scholarship. The aim of this evaluation was to identify and quantify the value of these programmes, as well as what direction they should play in the future of the Company. In 2013 the results of the study were released, with results indicating that each key programme has a significant positive impact on all participants and that the longer the engagement, the more substantial the impact. The Educational Transformations research team comprised Dr Tanya Vaughan and Professor Brian Caldwell. Data was gathered from 19 schools, 126 students and 36 teachers and the results showed clear and significant impact on both student and teacher outcomes. Students who participated in the residency had significantly increased attendance, decreased anger, increased innovation and improved attitudes to English. Students who participated in the six-week residency had significantly higher self-reported attitudes to English, self-expression and creativity than those in the twoweek residency. Teachers reported significantly increased confidence in teaching drama and Shakespeare’s texts and increased knowledge, ideas and skills to teach Shakespeare through their involvement in the Regional Teacher Scholarships, Actors At Work and residency programmes. The teachers who received the Regional Teacher Scholarship had the highest percentage agreement to increased capacity in the above mentioned areas in comparison to the other programmes. Teachers who had participated in the Regional Teacher Scholarship reported significantly increased use of drama and Shakespeare’s texts in their classroom after their participation in the programme.

In 2013 Bell Shakespeare collaborated with digital education specialists, Deeper Richer, to create a unique new curriculumaligned iPad app for primary schools. Starting Shakespeare was designed to be a fresh, accessible and rich learning resource for students in Years 3–6, clearly aligned to the Australian Curriculum. The app explores the world and work of William Shakespeare through two of Shakespeare’s best-loved plays (A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Macbeth) and uses videos, retellings, character profiles, historical information and active learning journeys. To support the work of classroom teachers, the app also comes with a complimentary, comprehensive teacher handbook. The app was released for sale in December 2013 and became ‘best new app’ in its ADULT EDUCATION first month in 17 countries. In early 2014, Deeper Richer will work with several schools to test with app within classrooms, 2013 saw the return of our adult education programme, with integrated within school curriculum. two five-week Actor Training courses: the Graduate course We once again delivered a live-streamed online Q&A for recent graduates led by James Evans, and Shakespeare following a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The Lab for more experienced actors, led by Bell Shakespeare Q&A was with the cast of the production and was delivered artist Sean O’Shea. Sessions covered language and text via our website, with students and teachers submitting analysis, voice, modern acting techniques in approaching questions to be answered live. During the Sydney season of A classical text, movement and characterisation. Guest sessions Midsummer Night’s Dream, schools were able to book prewere also presented by Co-Artistic Director, Peter Evans, show digital workshops by video-conference, streamed movement expert, Scott Witt and NIDA Head of Voice, live from Sydney Opera House straight into their classrooms. Katerina Moraitis. Digital workshops were also delivered to primary schools We continued our partnership with the National prior to the Actors At Work primary tour of Double Trouble and Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA). James Evans and Damien Midsummer Madness. Schools were able to book interactive Ryan delivered an intensive six-week course for first-year workshops for their students to experience and explore the actors, commencing with detailed workshops on verse and story and themes in each play before the school performance. text analysis, before working with students on selected Bell Shakespeare also played a key role in the NBN-Enabled monologues. The course ended with a presentation of scenes Education and Skills Services Program, delivering teacher from Macbeth for NIDA staff and students. James Evans also Professional Learning to primary teachers in regional SA via ran a series of workshops for graduating actors on audition video-conferencing. and monologue skills. A total of 68 actors participated in our Once again, The Players connected with their audiences adult education programmes in 2013. while on the road via social media platforms. Their Meet ‘It’s useful, accessible and it’s a great environment to be in. You’re The Players blog had 3,282 unique views in 2013 and their learning from the best tutors in Australia and if Shakespeare is increasingly popular Facebook page enabled 3,177 students something you want to learn as an actor, then this is an amazing to interact with them. Bell Shakespeare’s Online Learning way to hone in on your skills.’ Packs supported teachers with classroom resources and Laura Farran, Graduate Course participant behind-the-scenes information linked to each individual Bell Shakespeare production. A total of 76,865 students and teachers engaged with our programmes through online and digital channels in 2013.

Reports

Phèdre 2013

took a series of acting masterclasses with some of Australia’s most revered Shakespearean actors. A total of 99 students from across regional Australia auditioned for the Scholarship, during 2011. The winners were: Natalie Abbott, St John The Evangelist Catholic High School, Nowra NSW; Brittany Santariga, William Ross State High School, Townsville QLD; and Eden Gonfond, Taree High School NSW. Since participating in the scholarship, Brittany Santariga has been accepted to study at Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts.


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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Below is an update on the Board’s progress regarding its compliance with the eight Good Practice Governance Principles promulgated by the Australia Council’s Major Performing Arts Board:

1. L AY SOLID FOUNDATIONS FOR MANAGEMENT AND OVERSIGHT During 2013 the Board continued to operate in line with the principles and practices set out in the Company’s Corporate Governance Policy. The focus of Board meetings was the regular review and monitoring of progress towards achieving its strategic goals as outlined in the 2013–2017 strategic plan. The Audit and Risk Committee complemented the strategic role of the Board in dealing with the financial position of the Company and in risk management. Also in making appropriate recommendations to the Board on these matters. The Nominations and Remuneration Committee was established to make recommendations on any new appointments to the Board, as well as on the remuneration of senior executives and regarding succession planning. In late 2013 the Development Committee was reinvented under the leadership of Alden Toevs.

2. STRUCTURE THE BOARD TO ADD VALUE The tenure of Board directors is limited by the Company’s constitution to two terms of three years each. During 2013 Richard Freudestein resigned from the Board and three new directors were appointed (Janet Whiting, Alden Toevs and Greg Hutchinson). Further information, including a brief biography of each director, is contained in the Director’s Report of the Statutory Accounts which are available on our website.

3. PROMOTE ETHICAL AND RESPONSIBLE DECISION MAKING The Bell Shakespeare Company’s Governance Framework is informed by the Company’s constitution. Section 8 of that document sets out the Board’s powers of delegation to committees and management. Each of the Board committees has its own charter. Roles and responsibilities of all personnel are clearly defined and documented within position descriptions, letters of appointment and contracts. Decision-making also takes place within the context of the Company Risk Management Plan. The Company adheres to all legislative requirements and the Board ensures that all decisions are made in an ethical and responsible manner.

4. SAFEGUARD INTEGRITY IN FINANCIAL REPORTING A primary aim of the Board is to grow and maintain the financial reserves underpinning the Company’s future activities at a level of at least 20% of annual operating

Reports

costs. The ratio as at 31 December 2013 was approximately 25% (in 2012 it was 40%; 2011: 35%). The Audit and Risk Committee reviews major financial issues such as the budget, annual audit, risk management and investment policy, as well as overseeing the format and content of all forms of financial reporting.

5. RECOGNISE AND MANAGE RISK A key component of the 2013–2017 strategic plan is to revise the risk management plan in line with the changes in risk profile. The Audit and Risk Committee is responsible for making recommendations to the Board on risk management.

6. ENCOURAGE ENHANCED PERFORMANCE The Board conducts an annual self-assessment of its performance, as measured against the agreed expectations of a director. Outside of the Board and committee structure, the Company receives extensive advice and feedback from external reference groups in the areas of artistic vibrancy and the delivery of its learning programme, for example the Artistic Advisory Panel.

7. REMUNERATE FAIRLY AND RESPONSIBLY The chairman, with the approval of the Board, takes responsibility for regular performance and salary reviews for senior management staff, as well as the co-artistic directors. Base salary levels and any increments are determined by reference to experience, skill set, market place considerations and industry comparisons. The Board is kept informed of movements in senior executive salaries.

8. RECOGNISE THE LEGITIMATE INTERESTS OF STAKEHOLDERS Recognising, and responding to, the interests and needs of internal and external stakeholders is a central tenet of the Company’s Strategic Plan. The Company holds an Annual General Meeting of members as required by law. Sponsors and donors are acknowledged throughout the year in all marketing materials, programmes and publications as well as in this Annual Report.


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The Comedy Of Errors 2013

A Midsummer Night’s Dream 2013

Henry 4 2013


ARTISTIC SELF-ASSESMENT

Bell Shakespeare’s Artistic Advisory Panel (comprising Bell Shakespeare’s artistic staff and external representatives from the broader community) meets biannually to appraise Bell Shakespeare’s annual programme of work across all areas of the Company’s operations. The panel looks at the artistic ambitions of the Company as a whole, and those of each individual production. They also consider the reach and impact of Bell Shakespeare nationally, educationally and within the community. The panel is comprised as follows: Jane Caro (Chair)

Corporate audience members and sponsors

John Bell

Co-Artistic Director

Lyndsay Connors

Education, community and regional audiences

Campion Decent

Industry peers and theatre community

Peter Evans

Co-Artistic Director

Fran Kelly

Media and broadcasting

Hugh Mackay

Broader social and cultural influences

David Malouf

Broader arts community

Brett Sheehy

International touring and festivals circuit

Each panel member is asked to report from their area of experience in relation to the stated goals for the Company as a whole and for each production. These goals are circulated prior to each meeting and then discussed at length. The discussion and feedback from this meeting is minuted and forwarded to the senior management and Board for review which informs future programming decisions.

Reports


A Midsummer Night’s Dream 2013 | 17 BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT


SUPPORTING CAST We are extremely grateful for the generous support of our annual Supporting Cast donors, who enable us to direct funds to where they are needed most. This ensures that we are able to remain dedicated to making an impact through our performances, our creative development programme, Mind’s Eye, and our unparalleled national education, training and outreach programmes, including our Creative Artists Programme. Founding Benefactor The late Anthony Gilbert am Life Members Tim Cox ao & Bryony Cox Martin Dickson am & Susie Dickson Virginia Henderson am David Pumphrey Stage IV $10,000+ Robert Albert ao & Libby Albert Atlas D’Aloisio Foundation Mr John Bell ao obe & Ms Anna Volska Susan Burns Martin Dickson am & Susie Dickson Katie & Vic French Kate Guy Bill & Alison Hayward John Hindmarsh am & Rosanna Hindmarsh am Tom & Elisabeth Karplus Mr Robert Maple-Brown ao & Mrs Sue Maple-Brown am Andrew Sisson The Carnegie Foundation The Rowley Foundation Stage III $5,000+ Dr Kimberly Cartwright & Mr Charles Littrell Phil Chronican Tim Cox ao & Bryony Cox Richard & Jane Freudenstein Louise Gourlay oam Mark & Patricia Grolman In Memory of Herta Imhof Dr Sue Kesson Brian & Helen McFadyen David & Jill Pumphrey Kenneth Reed Sam Sheppard Charles & Sandy Shuetrim

2013 Donors

Diane Sturrock Dick & Sue Viney Anonymous (2) Stage II $1,000+ Bill & Kate Anderson Dr Margaret Barter Annabelle & David Bennett Dr Catherine Brown-Watt Bill & Sandra Burdett John & Alison Cameron Jim & Diana Carlton John Cauchi sc & Catherine Walker psm Yola & Steve Center Robert & Carmel Clark Kevin Cosgrave Professor A T Craswell Joanne & Sue Dalton Antony de Jong & Belinda Plotkin Deutsche Bank Australia M S Diamond Diane & John Dunlop Dr & Mrs B Dutta Elizabeth Evatt ac Diana & Richard Fisher Professor PJ Fletcher David & Jo Frecker John & Diana Frew Graham Froebel Justin & Anne Gardener Belinda Gibson & Jim Murphy Jennifer Giles Colin & Sharon Goldschmidt Peter Graves Catherine Parr & Paul Hattaway The Hon Peter Heerey am qc Jane Hemstritch Dr Gary Holmes & Dr Anne Reeckmann Vincent Jewell Cam & Caroline Johnston Mathilde Kearny-Kibble The Hon Justice Francois Kunc & F Rourke Owen Lennie

Richard & Elizabeth Longes Carolyn Lowry oam & Peter Lowry oam Hon Ian MacPhee ao Maple-Brown Abbott In memory of the late Lloyd Martin am Peter Mason am & Kate Mason Alana Mitchell Keith Bayliss & Holly Mitchell Dr W B Muston Patricia Novikoff Tom & Ruth O’Dea The Hon Mr Barry O’Keefe am qc & Mrs Janette O’Keefe Kathy Olsen & Bruce Flood Martin O’Shannessy J & K Preedy John B Reid ao & Lynn Rainbow Reid Elisabeth & Doug Scott Penelope Seidler am Patrick & Angela Snowball Alan & Jenny Talbot Victoria Taylor David & Jenny Templeman Robert & Kyrenia Thomas Mr Alden Toevs & Ms Judi Wolf John Tuckey Alexander G White oam Sylvia A Wiggins George M Wilkins Helen Williams ao Anonymous (9) Stage I $500+ Heather Adie Merrilyn & Chris Beeny Pamela Berriman Ted Blamey Beth Brown & Tom Bruce am Geraldine Bull Rick Burrows Mr Mark Carnegie George Clark Zoë Cobden-Jewitt & Peter Jewitt Dayn Cooper


Susan Culverwell & Grace Farrugia Ms Jessica Debrodt Jane Diamond Mr & Mrs J T Dominguez Ian Dunlop Michael & Roslyn Dunn Bronwyn Edinger Richard & Anna Green Fred & Alexandra Grimwade Lesley Harland Steven K Harvey Mr Armon Hicks & Dr Karin Sowada Ken & Lilian Horler Reverend Bill & Mrs Rosemary Huff-Johnston Mike & Stephanie Hutchinson Geraldine James John Colet School Susan & David Leaver Margaret Lederman Bob Lim & Jennifer Ledgar

Ardelle Lohan Michael Long am Carol & Rod Mackenzie Justice Jane Mathews ao Diane Matthews Ross & Chris McDiven Karen Michael Louise Miller Shirley Morris Elizabeth Muir J Norman Helen O’Neil Ruth & Steve Ormerod Harry & Joe Traucki CMDR Warwick Potter ran Donna Ravenscroft Mary & Michael Regan Greg J Reinhardt Bridget & Peter Sack Zara Selby

Dr Agnes Sinclair Professor Dr Michael Smith Helen Swift & Les Neulinger Robin Syme am & Rosemary Syme Suzanne & Ross Tzannes am Nerelle Poroch & Phil Waite Dr Sharon Wallace Ms Jennifer Wang Honourable Justice Anthony Whealy Evan Williams am & Janet Williams David & Kristin Williamson Peter Willis & Eleneth Woolley Capt W Graham Wright ran ret Isobel & George Yuille Anonymous (3) We would also like to thank our family of donors who have generously contributed up to $500 – every gift makes a difference to what we are able to achieve.

HEARTS IN A ROW We would like to thank our 2013 Hearts In A Row donors whose generosity enabled us to extend the programme into Melbourne for the very first time, as well as provide life-changing theatre experiences for over 600 individuals from disadvantaged schools and community groups. Annamila Pty Ltd ACTEW Corporation Robert Albert ao & Libby Albert Atlas D’Aloisio Foundation John & Helen Ayliffe Paul Bedbrook Mr Sam Bedford Mr Duncan M Boyle Graham Bradley am & Charlene Bradley Helen Bristow Ms Sarah Callaghan Mr Andrew Cameron Ms Kate Caro Mr David Caulfield Mrs Deborah Claxton Mr Stephen Connolly Ms Lyndsay Connors Michael Crouch ao Mrs Katherine Day In celebration of the life of Ray Daley Mr Chris Dunwell Ms Robyn Elliott Ralph & Maria Evans Mr Ian Fraser Dr Neil Fraser David & Jo Frecker Jinnie Chowdry & Ross Gavin Belinda Gibson Ms Maree J Gill Miss Pauline Griffin Kate Guy

Professor Margaret Harris Mrs Nina Harrison Mr John Hawkins Sally Herman Mr Eric Hewitson In memory of Armon Hicks Jnr Mrs Rosanna Hindmarsh am Mrs Lynette Howard Mr Zeb Jamrozik Miss Kaye Johnson Miss Karen Johnston Mrs Ilse Katz Kennards Hire Dirk & Maria Klein Mr Richard La’Brooy Mr Owen Lennie Jennifer Ledgar & Bob Lim Ms Catherine Livingstone ao & Mr Michael Satterthwaite Ms Robin Low Mrs Jane Lowder Carolyn Lowry oam & Peter Lowry oam Alexandra Martin In memory of Lloyd Martin AM Peter Mason am & Kate Mason Mr S McKenzie Ms Ann McLaren Mr Saliya Mendis Ms Karen Michael Mrs Mandy Minogue Nick & Caroline Minogue

Mrs Katie Monticone Mrs Michelle Mountford Ms Linda Notley The Hon Mr Barry O’Keefe am qc & Mrs Janette O’Keefe Mr Paul Orton The Pace Foundation Mrs Roslyn Packer ao Ms Denise Pedrotti Rebel Penfold-Russell oam Angela Pickett Ms Kathleen Powrie David & Jill Pumphrey Pamela Reisner Terry & Veronica Rooney Miss Noreen Ryan Ms Jan Shier Ms Meegan Sullivan Mrs Ruth Tarlo Diane Tennie Mr Stephen Thatcher Mr Andrew Thomson Gene Tilbrook Ms Christine Tongue Mr Arthur Wang Dr Peter Wesley-Smith Peter Willis & Eleneth Woolley Roger Woock & Fiona Clyne Mr Peter E Woolf Anonymous (2)

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 19


LEADING PARTNERS

Regional Communities Partner

MAJOR PARTNERS

NSW Education Partner

Official Wellbeing Partner

Automotive Partner

National Schools Partner

SUPPORTING PARTNERS

Perth Season Partner

Canberra Season Partner

COMPANY PARTNERS

Accommodation Partner

Airline Partner

Legal Partner

Aesop Official Catering Partner Sydney

Community Partner

PRODUCTION PARTNERS

The Comedy Of Errors

2013 Partners

Public Affairs Advisors

Paper Partner

Special Event Partner

Printing Partner

Special Event Partner


COMMUNITY PARTNERS We would like to thank the following trusts and foundations for their support, which enables us to make a genuine impact across the country. Bill & Patricia Ritchie Foundation Collier Charitable Fund Ian Potter Foundation JS Love Trust James N Kirby Foundation

Limb Family Foundation Macquarie Group Foundation Pratt Foundation Scully Fund Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation Weir Anderson Foundation

GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Bell Shakespeare is supported by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

Bell Shakespeare is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

The Australian Government is proud to be associated with Bell Shakespeare through the national performing arts touring program, Playing Australia which gives Australians across the country the opportunity to see some of our best performing arts.

Henry 4 was supported by the Centenary of Canberra, an initiative of the ACT Government and by the NSW Government through Arts NSW.

Bell Shakespeare Learning Initiatives 2012 to 2015 is supported by the Australian Government Department of Education.

INDUSTRY PARTNERS

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 21


Phèdre 2013 Financial

Results


BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 23


Grant Thornton Audit Pty Ltd ACN 130 913 594 Level 17, 383 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Correspondence to: Locked Bag Q800 QVB Post Office Sydney NSW 1230 T +61 2 8297 2400 F +61 2 9299 4445 E info.nsw@au.gt.com W www.grantthornton.com.au

Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of The Bell Shakespeare Company Limited

We have audited the accompanying financial report of The Bell Shakespeare Company Limited (the “Company”), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2013, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information and the directors’ declaration of the Company . Directors’ responsibility for the financial report

The Directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Act 2001, and the NSW Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and the NSW Charitable Fundraising Regulation 2008. The Directors’ responsibility also includes such internal control as the Directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require us to comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error.

‘Grant Thornton’ refers to the brand under which the Grant Thornton member firms provide assurance, tax and advisory services to their clients and/or refers to one or more member firms, as the context requires. Grant Thornton Australia Ltd is a member firm of Grant Thornton International Ltd (GTIL). GTIL and the member firms are not a worldwide partnership. GTIL and each member firm is a separate legal entity. Services are delivered by the member firms. GTIL does not provide services to clients. GTIL and its member firms are not agents of, and do not obligate one another and are not liable for one another’s acts or omissions. In the Australian context only, the use of the term ‘Grant Thornton’ may refer to Grant Thornton Australia Limited ABN 41 127 556 389 and its Australian subsidiaries and related entities. GTIL is not an Australian related entity to Grant Thornton Australia Limited.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Liability is limited in those States where a current scheme applies.

Financial Results


In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Independence

In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. Auditor’s opinion

In our opinion: (a) the financial report of The Bell Shakespeare Company is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: i) giving a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 31 December 2013 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and ii) complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001; (b) the financial report agrees to the underlying records of The Bell Shakespeare Company, that have been maintained, in all material aspects, in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and its Regulations for the year ended 31 December 2013; and (c) monies received by The Bell Shakespeare Company, as a result of fundraising appeals conducted during the year ended 31 December 2013, have been accounted for and applied, in all material aspects, in accordance with the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and its Regulations.

GRANT THORNTON AUDIT PTY LTD Chartered Accountants

James Winter Partner - Audit & Assurance Sydney, 26 March 2014

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 25


COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 2013

2012

$’000s

$’000s

9,201

10,211

(5,198)

(4,515)

(67)

(78)

(593)

(803)

Venue expenses

(1,073)

(1,052)

Touring expenses

(1,639)

(1,347)

Marketing expenses

(971)

(1,090)

Fundraising expenses

(138)

(166)

(29)

(44)

Rent expense

(324)

(312)

Administration expenses

(469)

(439)

(68)

(80)

(1,368)

285

(1,368)

285

(Decrease)/increase in fair value of available for sale financial assets

138

116

Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax

138

116

(1,230)

401

Revenue Employee benefits expense Depreciation and amortisation expense Production expenses

Audit, legal & consulting expenses

Other expenses

Surplus before income tax Income tax expense Surplus after income tax for the year

Other comprehensive income after income tax:

Total comprehensive income for the year

The Comedy Of Errors 2013

The above Statement of Financial Position should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements which are available at bellshakespeare.com.au

Financial Results


FINANCIAL POSITION Note

2013

2012

$’000s

$’000s

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents

3

2,614

498

Trade and other receivables

4

601

349

Other assets

4

127

217

3,342

1,064

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

NON-CURRENT ASSETS Financial assets

6

1,343

4,372

Property, plant and equipment

5

91

106

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

1,434

4,478

TOTAL ASSETS

4,776

5,542

LIABILITIES CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables

7

1,969

1,508

Provisions

8

168

157

2,137

1,665

16

24

16

24

TOTAL LIABILITIES

2,153

1,689

NET ASSETS

2,623

3,853

96

96

139

1

General Funds

2,388

3,756

TOTAL FUNDS

2,623

3,853

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

10

FUNDS Issued Capital Available-for-sale revaluation reserve

The above Statement of Financial Position should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements which are available at bellshakespeare.com.au

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 27


Henry 4 2013 Financial

Results


BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 29


ATTENDANCE LOCATION

Mainstage Productions

Learning Programmes

TOTAL

Mainstage Productions

Learning Programmes

TOTAL

2013

2013

2013

2012

2012

2012

Metropolitan Adelaide

4,213

4,213

4,033

4,033

Brisbane

1,098

1,098

1,756

1,756

14,666

7,019

21,088

14,950

10,019

24,969

4,502

3,427

7,929

2,601

4,003

6,604

Sydney

29,230

34,976

64,207

36,896

41,305

78,201

Total

48,398

50,734

99,132

54,447

61,116

115,563

ACT

9,856

2,812

9,045

11,941

2,151

14,092

NSW

3,970

10,752

14,722

6,638

7,404

14,042

487

825

1,312

708

350

1,058

QLD

2,404

2,339

4,743

1,386

2,738

4,124

SA

1,177

862

2,039

578

578

TAS

1,913

2,957

4,870

1,941

1,873

3,814

VIC

624

1,299

1,923

1,220

329

1,549

WA

1,365

1,734

3,099

667

1,601

2,268

Subtotal

21,796

23,580

45,376

24,501

17,024

41,525

Total

70,194

74,314

144,508

78,948

78,140

157,088

Melbourne Perth

Other Locations

NT

Notes: Other Locations includes Canberra, Hobart and Darwin. Mainstage Productions includes attendance of school students at matinee performances.

Other access The Company continues to expand its activities via remote community residencies and post-performance Q&A sessions on selected school performances, which have been streamed live. Our pilot programme delivered into two Juvenile Justice centres has proved very effective and we look forward to expanding this programme. We gratefully acknowledge the grant provided by the Australia Council in relation to extending our website to facilitate access in the regional and remote areas. This project is ongoing.

Additional Notes


GOVERNMENT SUPPORT ANALYSIS OF GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES IN 000’s Core

Touring

Education

Other Rent subsidy

Australia Council Tripartite Funding

Projects

634

Australia Council Young and Emerging Artists

20

Australia Council Creative Development (Mind’s Eye) Australia Council Professional Development* Arts NSW – Tripartite Funding

43 617

Arts NSW Multi Year Funding Agreement

117

TOTAL

TOTAL

2013

2012

634

619

20

20

30

43

20

617

617

117

117

Arts NSW Regional Touring Programme

144

144

149

Arts NSW – Canberra festival

50

50

447

447

357

320

360

25

25

20

25

2,417

2,359

Playing Australia Dept of Educ (formally DEEWR) Learning Initiatives in 2012 – 2015

320

Austrade – Export Incentive Grant Victorian Dept Education Residency

25

Arts SA – DPC

Effective Total Support

1,251

641

345

117

63

A Midsummer Night’s Dream 2013

*25 unexpended at 31/12/13.

BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT | 31


SUMMARY FINANCIAL INDICATORS & KPIs 2013

2013

2012

2012

$’000

%

$’000

%

Assets Net assets

2,623

3,854

Total assets

4,776

5,542

Net Assets / Total Expenditure (KPI)

24.8%

39.7%

Income Performance

4,212

45.8%

4,699

47.0%

Private sector

2,228

24.2%

2,572

25.7%

Other income

344

3.7%

368

3.7%

6,784

73.7%

7,639

76.4%

Sub-total: earned income Private Sector / Earned Income (KPI)

24.2%

33.7%

Government support: Core

1,251

13.6%

1,236

12.4%

Touring

641

7.0%

532

5.3%

Education funding

345

3.7%

405

4.1%

Other

180

2.0%

186

1.9%

Sub-total government

2,417

26.3%

2,359

23.6%

Total Income

9,201

100.0%

9,998

100.0%

Surplus Earned income

6,784

7,639

(10,569)

(9,713)

(3,785)

(2,074)

2,417

2,359

(1,368)

285

9,201

9,998

(10,569)

(9,713)

Profit

(1,368)

285

Reserves % of Revenue:

28.5%

38.5%

Expense Earned loss Government support Net surplus

Profitability Total income Total expenditure

Additional Notes


The Comedy Of Errors 2013 | 33 BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT


Additional Notes


Henry 4 2013 | 35 BELL SHAKESPEARE ANNUAL REPORT


Level 1, 33 Playfair Street The Rocks NSW 2000 PO Box 10 Millers Point NSW 2000 Australia Telephone +61 2 8298 9000 Facsimile +61 2 9241 4643 Email mail@bellshakespeare.com.au Web bellshakespeare.com.au

Additional Notes


Annual Report 2013