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BELLEVILLE THE MAGAZINE ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY

SUMMER 2016

BELLEVILLE.CA

CITY CELEBRATES

20TH TWINNING ANNIVERSARY WITH

GUNPO, KOREA LOCAL LOCATION FOR

PROVINCIAL

HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT


CITY OF BELLEVILLE 169 Front Street Belleville, Ontario K8N 2Y8 Tel: (613) 968-6481 TTY: (613) 967-3768 Belleville.ca MAYOR Taso A. Christopher COUNCIL Egerton Boyce, Paul Carr, Jackie Denyes, Mike Graham, Kelly McCaw, Jack Miller, Mitch Panciuk, Garnet Thompson EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER Rick Kester DIRECTOR, ENGINEERING & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Rod Bovay DIRECTOR, FINANCE Brian Cousins MANAGER, HUMAN RESOURCES Tim Osborne DIRECTOR, RECREATION, CULTURE & COMMUNITY SERVICES Mark Fluhrer ACTING DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES/CLERK Matt MacDonald DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY SERVICES/ FIRE CHIEF Mark MacDonald MANAGER, ECONOMIC & STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Karen Poste BELLEVILLE Magazine is published quarterly by the City of Belleville. Magazine Contributors: Elisha Purchase, Karen Poste, Marilyn Warren, Robin Baranyai and Stephanie Trattner Photography (pg. 16) Editor - Marilyn Warren mwarren@city.belleville.on.ca BELLEVILLE Magazine is available online and in an accessible text-only format at Belleville.ca Printed in Canada All information Š2016, City of Belleville. No use is permitted without written permission.

Belleville Magazine

Welcome

On behalf of my colleagues on City Council, Executive Management and all of the staff at the City of Belleville, I am pleased to welcome you to the 2016 Summer Edition of the BELLEVILLE magazine. As you have come to know, the pages of the BELLEVILLE magazine provide in-depth articles and updates on stories relevant to your community and the people who live here. With the summer weather now officially here, construction season is in full swing and major progress is taking place throughout the community. Significant changes are happening on key thoroughfares including Sidney Street, Dundas Street West and Front Street which will result in increased efficiency, improved aesthetics and upgraded underground infrastructure. A location for the new Police Headquarters Facility has also been selected and initial concept drawings are included in this edition. We are thrilled to share the progress within the pages that follow, including many infrastructure projects which are now complete. Also included in this edition are local success stories of community members who have gone above and beyond to make an impact within our City and throughout the world. We are honoured to be hosting a delegation from our Twin City, Gunpo, Korea this summer and in recognition of our 20th twinning anniversary, have featured Mr. Simon Kang, a dedicated member of our Cultural Committee. In addition, there are countless events taking place in the City of Belleville this summer providing an opportunity for parents to keep children active and busy during their summer holiday. You will find those details enclosed and we encourage you to partake in the many activities offered and to contact City staff with any questions you may have. Please enjoy this edition of the BELLEVILLE magazine and I kindly welcome your feedback and look forward to our continued work together in making the City of Belleville a great place to live, work and play. Enjoy your summer!

Taso A. Christopher, Mayor Belleville.ca

Summer 2016


Belleville

THE MAGAZINE ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY • SUMMER 2016

Contents

6

32-33 MARINAS

GREAT THINGS HAPPENING IN OUR CITY

SAVOUR THE SUMMER IN DOWNTOWN BELLEVIILE

2

Chair, Farmers’ Market Board Jackie Tapp

3

Volunteers Make a Difference Meet Janice Burton

4 Entrepreneurship Thriving in our Region 5 Quinte Business Achievment Awards Recognition Well Deserved 7 The Things We do for Fun Outdoor Photos 8

Royal Journey Continues Miss Teenage South Central Ontario

9

The Flow of Things Dan Collins

10

Our History’s New Home Archives in Downtown Belleville

THE OPTIONS ALONG OUR SHORELINE

16-17 Global Clean Water Crusader Allison Tummon Kamphuis 18

H.R. Frink Centre Outdoor Classroom Beyond Compare

19

The Good that Follows Northeast Feedermain

20

Bay of Quinte Immigration Portal

21

Concerts on the Bay Belleville Lions’ Club

22

The Village Pharmacy Making it Personal

23 24-25

20th Twinning Anniversary with Gunpo, Korea Bridle Path Tack Shop The Leap was Worth It

26 Strathcona Renewable Energy Resources 27

Soft Landings Give Businesses a Jump Start

11-14 Build Belleville Updates Project Highlights

29

70th Anniversary for McDougall Insurance & Financial

15

31

Poste It Note On Belleville Business

Ontario Provincial Singles Horseshoe Tournament

Summer 2016

Belleville Magazine


fla vour, fr eshness and fun

200 YEARS – T h e F a r m e r s ’ M a r k e t

“I find it very rewarding to be a part of the Farmers’ Market – especially when customers return and tell me how much they loved their previous purchase and are hoping to buy more. I feel like I’ve done a good job when my customers are happy.” Jackie Tapp

Chair, Farmers’ Market Board

Twenty-six years ago, Jackie Tapp was a young mother looking for a way to juggle family and employment when her father suggested she become a market gardener. It would provide her with more flexibility in her time with her family and she would be able to take her children with her to market if she chose to. So she became a part of a now 200-year tradition in our Belleville community. This year marks two centuries of vendors selling their produce and wares in the open air. Jackie’s Market Stand can be found at Market Square behind City Hall three days a week, 12 months a year. Jackie is now Chair of the Farmers’ Market Board, which works to maintain a good relationship with the community, organize vendors and act as a liaison between the vendors and City Hall administration. There are currently 80 stalls with a vendor count of 38, some vendors holding multiple stalls. The market is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays in Market Square behind City Hall. Strolling through the market you’ll find a delightful variety: fresh produce, beautiful flowers, home baked goods, jam, honey, unique handcrafted jewelry, carvings, hand knit items, freshly brewed coffee – the list goes on and on. On occasion as you browse the stalls, you’ll even enjoy entertainment by buskers. It’s more than merely shopping – it’s a warm, inviting, relaxing connection with our community. “As producers, we can tell our customers how the product was grown and the ingredients we used to make it. Shoppers can enjoy peace of mind knowing they don’t have to worry about chemicals and preservatives when feeding their families. It’s a meeting place and you develop relationships with customers and the other vendors. Some people come here simply to socialize, in particular some of the older people. It’s an outing where they will see friendly, familiar faces and that means a lot to them. Parents bring their small children as a family outing, letting them help choose the product and explaining what each is to them – a positive learning experience. On a busy summer Saturday there can be up to 2,000 shoppers strolling the walkway. I’m proud to be a part of this group and offer our customers delicious healthy food choices.”


volunteers m a ke a d i f f e r e n c e

MEET JANICE BURTON “Anyone can give back to the community, if they find the right place,” Janice says. “If they are good with computer programs they can build brochures; if they are good with baking they can have a bake sale and raise funds supporting a cause. A small pebble can make a big wave.” She also loves bowling, and recently competed in her first Special Olympics. Janice and her teammates train in fivepin with Coach David McQuaide. In May they won bronze at the Ontario Spring Games in Guelph – an experience she describes as “mind-blowing.” When Janice sees a need, her initiative kicks into high gear. At the Centre she developed a “two-year pin” club to reward volunteer dedication. Inspired by how much her friends enjoyed celebrating their milestones in learning, she decided to create the same opportunity for volunteer recognition and encouragement.

Janice Burton firmly believes volunteers are the future. By stepping up when help is needed, “they show other people the way to lead forward.” And Janice is off to a great start. At 20 years old she is already a veteran, volunteering for the past five years at the Links to Learning Resource Centre.

Her work at the Centre was recently recognized with the Maurice Rollins Community Leadership Award for Youth. The distinction is bestowed on a young person who has made an “outstanding and exceptional” contribution to the community.

The Centre provides academic support to children with disabilities – everything from reading incentives to one-onone tutoring. As a young person with autism, Janice can identify with kids who struggle in the mainstream education system. After graduating elementary school, she found a better fit for her individual learning needs at the Applewood Academy for Progressive Learning on Orchard Drive. Now she tutors other students in reading and math.

Ever humble, Janice says she didn’t realize the impact of her initiatives until she heard them read aloud at the Volunteer and Information Quinte awards ceremony. “I was not aware of how much I had accomplished until they were saying it,” she relates. “It’s an unimaginable, unexplainable feeling.”

Janice’s volunteering journey began with lending her computer expertise to develop brochures for the Centre. Then she noticed the medallions they award to recognize achievements in reading didn’t have a logo – so she developed one.

With graduation looming next year, this bright light is looking forward to the future, focusing on her art and perhaps competing at the nationals. But one thing won’t change. “I plan to volunteer at the Centre for a very long time!”

A self-taught techie, Janice creates detailed artwork in Microsoft Paint. “I have very low muscle control in my hand so I only draw with the computer mouse,” she explains. She is a prolific digital artist. For two years in a row her submission to the Belleville Student Art Show has been honoured with a Juror’s Choice award. 3


ENTREPRENEURSHIP alive, well and well-funded in the region The Small Business Centre (SBC) located in the Quinte Business Development Centre, in the Pioneer Building at Loyalist College, is part of a local agglomeration of entrepreneurial support systems in the Quinte Region. Along with partners such as the Trenval Business Development Corporation, the SBC provides valuable support and mentoring for every kind of entrepreneur in the region. Whether you’re a student who’s been bitten by the entrepreneurship bug or a seasoned business person looking for some assistance to take your business to the next level, the SBC can help. Staffed by Alison Davies, Marjorie Vilneff, Rachael Tracey, and Wendy Chesworth with Glenn Kozak providing managerial support, the SBC works closely with the other partners at the Quinte Business Development Centre to provide whatever support a budding entrepreneur or seasoned business professional may need. The Centre offers workshops, individual business counselling, events – and has a fully stocked business library to help with your research needs. The Small Business Centre Team - left to right: Marjorie Vilneff, Glenn Kozak, Wendy Chesworth, Alison Davies and Rachael Tracey.

Financially supported by the communities of Belleville, Quinte West, Prince Edward County and Hastings County along with the Quinte Economic Development Commission, the SBC is truly a regional resource for anyone to access – they even have satellite offices in Quinte West (Linda Donville at Career Edge) and Picton (Sandy Abbott in the Edward Building) to serve their clients as conveniently as possible.

Starter Company is another youth focused program that provides business start-up training, ongoing mentoring and funding of up to $5,000 for new or expanding businesses. It targets 18 to 29 year olds not returning to school and looking to operate their business on a full-time basis. SBC’s ‘Business 101’ training program guides the entrepreneur through business plan writing and start up best practices.

The SBC receives funding from the Government of Ontario to deliver a number of entrepreneurship programs including the Small Business Enterprise Centre program, Starter Company Program and the Summer Company program.

With all this support for entrepreneurship in Belleville and the Quinte Region, watch for and patronize some of these businesses when they open their doors this year. Entrepreneurs and small businesses are the largest economic driver in the community and can impact the prosperity of the region like no other industry can. The Small Business Centre in partnership with Trenval will generate over 100 startups in the next 12 months.

Summer Company is a long standing program in the region that introduces local students to the entrepreneurship experience. With up to $3,000 in start-up grants for each approved student, the SBC provides hands-on business training and mentoring to help students move their small business idea into reality over their summer break. This year the SBC will be working with 30 youth business startups!

This region is fortunate to have top staff, tremendous leadership and the support of the province as the SBC works with local residents to build their dream businesses. OFFICE: 613-961-0590 TOLL FREE: 1-877-961-0590 284B Wallbridge-Loyalist Rd. Belleville, ON smallbusinessctr.com

4


QUINTE BUSINESS achievement awards

2015 AWARD WINNERS If asked, most would agree we live in a region rich with innovation, strategic leaders and community commitment. Now the question would be – have you taken the time to tell those individuals or businesses just how great they are? How much you value their support in our local economy?

There are fourteen award categories, each significantly different, yet each a valued component in the region’s economic profile. Business Excellence Award

The Quinte Business Achievement Awards (QBAA) provides a forum to nominate outstanding businesses, not-for-profit organizations and business leaders - in areas such as entrepreneurship, business growth, company practices, product innovations, customer service, stewardship, marketing success and community service. The Quinte Business Achievement Awards is a completely independent program, open to any business, entrepreneur and not-for-profit organization based in Quinte West, Belleville, Brighton, or Prince Edward County.

Business Person Award Sustainability Award Trailblazer Award Agribusiness Award New Business Award

Created 20 years ago, the success of this awards program can be attributed to the supporting organizations and participants who recognize the value of a thriving community and work toward supporting a vibrant local economy. The organizing committee consists of individuals dedicated to the growth and development of business in the Quinte Region.

Young Entrepreneur Award Hospitality/Tourism Award Manufacturing/Industrial Award Not for Profit Award

Each year the awards are presented at the Quinte Business Achievement Awards Gala – a celebration of business excellence in the Quinte Region.

Retail Award Regulated Professions Award

To learn more about these prestigious awards and view past recipient photos visit qbaa.ca. We value our business community, those going that extra mile, passionate about what they do, leading by example and strengthening our economy - it’s time to let them know.

Specialized Services Award Trade & Construction Services Award For the purpose and criteria of each award visit qbaa.ca. 5

Belleville.ca

Summer 2016


great things happening in our City CITY HALL TEAM ON BIG BIKE RIDE

FREEDOM IN THE CITY PARADE

MAYOR’S LUNCHEON FOR THE ARTS AWARDS SENIOR OF THE YEAR AWARD

BIKE LANES OPEN

FIRE STATION #3 CELEBRATION

WALK FOR ALZHEIMER’S

GROUND BROKEN CASINO ON THE WAY CELEBRATING DIVERSITY

6


the outdoors are calling

GO SEE WHAT THEY HAVE TO SAY

7

Belleville.ca

Summer 2016


Royal Journey Continues for MISS TEENAGE SOUTH C E N T R A L O N TA R I O “Being awarded this title and having the opportunity to advance to the Miss Teenage Canada pageant in July has proven to me that you don’t have to live in a large city to achieve big things.” Isabella Rapino Miss Teenage South Central Ontario

In January 2016 Isabella Rapino was crowned Miss Teenage South Central Ontario and this July in Toronto she will be competing with 70 to 80 young women from across Canada for the title of Miss Teenage Canada.

As part of the Miss Teenage Canada Pageant, there are fast-track awards given to the top 20 contestants, one of which enables us to show our support for Isabella - the People’s Choice Award. This award will be presented to the delegate with the most online votes prior to the competition. The voting begins on July 17 at: missteenagecanada.com.

Isabella is a graduate of Centennial Secondary School and trained at Quinte Ballet School for two years, graduating with Level of Distinction. Her dance training includes 14 years at Ireland Academy of Dance where she has continued to teach for the past five years, competitively choreographing for the past two – receiving three choreography awards. Isabella is now enrolled in the two-year Dance Performance Studies program at George Brown College in Toronto with the goal of becoming a contemporary ballet dancer.

Two prizes of special interest to Isabella are: The Talent Award, as the top three will perform during the final show, streamed live – a wonderful opportunity to showcase her dance skills to industry professionals, and The Fundraising Award – the recipient receives a ‘Me to We’ trip to Ecuador. “My family leads by example, encouraging me not to be afraid but to step up and accept challenges. I’ve always wanted to try new things and do more – this experience is definitely contributing to my personal growth.”

The past six months have been a whirlwind of activity for Isabella as she balances the responsibilities which are part of her role, with her college studies and dance instructor position in Belleville. Many hours are spent traveling by train between Toronto and Belleville which she uses to respond to emails and update her social media. Fundraising for Free the Children, event organization, guest appearances and public speaking are just a few of the activities Isabella has added to her life as Miss Teenage South Central Ontario. Time management has become a finely honed skill.

Miss Teenage Canada will receive over $20,000 in cash and prizes Official Charity: Free The Children. Last year 15 contestants raised over $65,000 Starting July 17th vote Isabella for People’s Choice Award at missteenagecanada.com 8


the flow of things DAN COLLINS

“It’s rewarding to know there is value in what we do. We’re working behind the scenes to provide quality drinking water for our community. I sincerely enjoy being a part of the team that makes this happen.”

Dan Collins Superintendent Water and Sewer Service and Distribution

department that handles any meter reading and consumption disputes (in conjunction with finance) while ensuring water quality and pressure is maintained. Underground locations and leak detection are included under this umbrella. They also play an important role in the ongoing capital construction projects with underground inspections. The City’s reinvestment in infrastructure has resulted in minimal leakage costs, with improved water pressure in the northeast area of the City.

As residents in the City of Belleville we’ve come to depend upon unlimited safe water, a resource that is readily accessible to drink, do our laundry, water our gardens or take a shower. We give little, if no thought, to the process and guardianship involved in making this possible. For those responsible for ensuring we enjoy this luxury, a great deal of thought and proactive action is taken on a daily basis to service the system that provides us with this resource. Dan Collins is one of those behind the scene individuals, keeping things flowing in Belleville.

“I take pride in our department’s safety record,” states Dan. “Over the past twelve years we haven’t had a single lost time injury and I attribute that to our strong safety culture. We also continue to meet or exceed the legislated QMS drinking water quality standards.”

Dan joined the Belleville Utilities Commission 28 years ago and assumed the role of Superintendent Water and Sewer Service and Distribution in 2001. His department is part of the City’s Environmental and Operational Services Department. As the supervisor of 15 staff members, he and his team are responsible for all things water related: water mains, hydrants, metering and the customer service they involve. Each of these areas within Dan’s broad portfolio has many components. The fire hydrant annual maintenance program is critical to community safety, ensuring each hydrant is operating and accessible for our fire services. Every City service has a meter and in addition to the maintenance of the meters and the data records involved, it is Dan’s

Regular working hours fall by the wayside when an issue arises. Leaks and breaks can’t be put on hold until Monday morning or even the next day. The team recognizes the need to leave a family gathering or crawl out of bed during the night to head to work – the understanding and support of their families is appreciated. Belleville residents can be confident a skilled and committed group is working hard so they can enjoy the pleasures that accompany excellent water service. 9

Summer 2016

Belleville Magazine


Our History’s N e w H o m e

Stained glass from former Corby Library greets visitors to the new archives’ location. “Every day I come to work with a smile on my face. I’m working with wonderful volunteers in a fabulous facility. I love this team and everything they bring to the table. Our days are filled with surprises – what question will be asked? What bundle will come through the door? We never know what will happen.” Amanda Hill

Archivist

On April 7, 2016 the Community Archives of Belleville and Hastings County formally opened its doors on the second floor of the Belleville Public Library on Pinnacle Street. This wonderful new facility, complete with temperature and humidity controls, is the result of years of planning with the City, Hastings County and the Historical Society. The vision has become a reality and the treasures of our past have an amazing place to call home.

maps and tax records. Others are looking for family information in old newspapers, obituaries and birth records. Community organizations, schools and hospitals all have a story to be told and the Archives is an excellent place to start. “We’re here to guide the people coming to the Archives,” explained Amanda. “ We listen and try to map out what they’re interested in and then share the information we have that supports those things.”

Archivist Amanda Hill is the keeper of our historical hub and manages the archives with a group of committed, knowledgeable volunteers, each bringing different skills to the mix and contributing to the process of settling in the new location. An experienced professional, Amanda trained as an Archivist in England and her first job was in Canterbury Cathedral Archives, which had charters dating back to 772 AD.

Other aspects of their role include the sharing of information with other archive associations and the posting of photos on Flickr, making them available to the public to view and download. Amanda is frequently a guest speaker for various organizations, recently addressing the Quinte Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society. In September the Archives will be a part of the Doors Open event and Amanda encourages guests to come and tour the facility and learn more about this wonderful community resource.

Those visiting the Archives come for many reasons. Some are in search of the history of their home, seeking 10


BUILD BELLEVILLE PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS Bay Bridge Road/CP Rail Overhead Replacement and Dundas Street West Rehabilitation New Structure Taking Shape on Bay Bridge Road Work on Bay Bridge Road and the CP Rail Overhead Replacement is progressing well. Construction of the bridge crash wall and both the north and south Reinforced Retaining System (RSS) walls has been completed. The bridge abutments have recently been completed allowing for placement of the bridge girders to begin. As this work continues the new five lane structure will really begin to take shape on its new alignment immediately east of the current four lane structure.

“The designed lifespan of the new wall and bridge is approximately 75 years,” says Project Manager Stan Czyczyro. “Commuters can expect a much smoother drive over the new structure once it is completed.” Construction on Dundas Street West from Coleman Street to Sidney Street includes replacement of the existing 1930’s watermain, widening the intersection at Bay Bridge Road to provide dual westbound left turn lanes and an eastbound right turn lane, and widening Dundas Street West to James Street to provide a centre left turn lane. In addition to these features, a new three-metre wide shared pathway for cyclists and pedestrians will be constructed along the south side of Dundas Street from Coleman Street, across the new bridge, and down into Zwick’s connecting to the existing trail.

“The shared pathway being constructed completes a significant connection within the City of Belleville’s trail system,” says Mayor Taso Christopher. “When this project is completed we will have a complete connection between the Downtown at Coleman Street and Zwick’s Park.”

When completed this project will become a gateway to our Friendly City with small landscaped lookout features on both sides of the new bridge providing an ideal view of the Bay of Quinte. Other decorative features that will make this gateway an outstanding entrance into the City include street lighting, landscaping and patterned concrete. The final product will be one that the City can be proud of for many years to come.

WE’RE BUILDING A BETTER BELLEVILLE FOR YOU


City Centre Revitalization and Redevelopment Project Patrons Encouraged to Shop, Dine and Explore Downtown during Construction

Ensuring access for pedestrians is a key priority as construction progresses throughout the summer months. Front Street from Victoria Avenue to Bridge Street will remain closed to vehicular traffic until September when Front Street is complete. Campbell Street also remains closed to vehicular traffic until this time, with the exception of a lane of traffic opening in August that will allow for westbound traffic on Campbell Street to continue southbound on Front Street.

“Maintaining access to the downtown core is a critical priority during construction,” says Elisha Purchase, Project Coordinator. “In addition to directional, parking and pedestrian signage, staff from Len Corcoran Excavating are on site specifically to assist patrons in locating their destination or helping them through the work area.”

Construction of Phase 2 of the City Centre Revitalization & Redevelopment Project kicked off in the center of Belleville’s downtown core April 25, 2016. Phase 2 of the project takes in approximately 300 metres of Front Street from Victoria Avenue to Bridge Street, 120 metres of Victoria Avenue from Front Street to Pinnacle Street, and 120 metres of Campbell Street from Front Street to Pinnacle Street. During construction, visitors can park for two hours, free of charge, in the Riverside Parking Lot, and venture down any of the accessible walkways that connect to their favourite shops and services on Front Street. When visitors arrive in the Downtown, there is plenty of signage on site to help guide patrons to their Downtown destination, be it early in the day for shopping or banking or later in the evening for dining and entertainment.

BUILDBELLEVILLE.CA #BUILDBELLEVILLE


City Centre Revitalization and Redevelopment Project

The communications plan executed as a partnership between the BDIA and City has successfully helped to minimize the impact of construction on businesses, and assist customers by making it easy and enjoyable for the public to come experience the Downtown during this exciting revitalization project. Look and listen for project updates at BuildBelleville.ca and through various media channels or visit the Downtown to witness this exciting revitalization work in progress.

“We want to create awareness around the improvements being made downtown and continue to make the visitor experience an enjoyable one,” says Erica Holgate, Executive Director for the BDIA. “Stay tuned for exciting contests that will take place in the downtown throughout the summer construction season.” As construction progresses at a rapid rate residents and visitors are encouraged to check out the changes occurring downtown and the improvements being made that will benefit all who enjoy Belleville’s downtown neighbourhood.

WE’RE BUILDING A BETTER BELLEVILLE FOR YOU


Belleville Police Services

City Council at its meeting of April 25, 2016 approved the site of 459 Sidney Street as the location for the new Belleville Police Service Facility and Headquarters and approved the concept plan to renovate and expand the existing building without the new garage addition and providing for outdoor overhead covered parking. A presentation of the concept plan was also presented to the Belleville Police Services Board at a Special General Meeting on May 2nd, 2016. (Note – Shoalts and Zaback Architects Ltd. were approved by City Council at its meeting of November 9, 2015 to prepare the Concept Design and Site Selection of Belleville Police Service Headquarters - RFP CAO 2015-01).

Further, at the more recent Council meeting of May 24, 2016 City Council directed that the professional architectural services for the new Belleville Police Services Headquarters be advertised for public tender. Preparations of the documents are currently underway and the RFP will be published on the City’s website when completed.

BUILDBELLEVILLE.CA #BUILDBELLEVILLE


Ontario Provincial Singles

horseshoe tournament “Initially, horseshoes were a way to meet people when I first moved to this area. I never dreamed I would end up building a facility with indoor and outdoor pits, large enough to accommodate Provincial Championships.” Gary Batty

To be eligible for the Provincial Tournament, a player is required to have participated in three sanctioned tournaments and then Horseshoe Ontario takes the top eight in each category. The categories consist of Men’s, Women’s, Senior Men’s, Mixed Junior and Nine & Under Junior, with levels A, B and C, determined by their scores in the sanctioned tournaments.

In 1999, Gary Batty and a group of dedicated horseshoe players built what is known today as the ‘Rengar Horseshoe Palace’ on Gary’s farm. Once completed, the facility was large enough to host Provincial Championships and 2016 is the sixth year this tournament has been held on Blessington Road. The tournament is being hosted by the Belleville Horseshoe Club of which Gary is a member, and they are a part of the Quinte Men’s Horseshoe League which consists of approximately 20 teams with roughly 12 players on each team. They are anticipating 120 participants in this year’s tournament and in addition to participants, our region will welcome the competitors’ friends and families as they share the weekend’s events.

“Organizing the Provincials involves a lot of work, scorekeepers, caterers, banquet planning – you meet some wonderful people who really go above and beyond to help you out.”

Horseshoe Ontario Singles Tournament August 27 - 28 1090 Blessington Road

“This is a great way to introduce our guests to the Quinte region. I’ve had many participants tell me how they came to the tournament with their families and stayed an extra few days in the area as a mini vacation because it is such a beautiful spot.”

In 2014 Horseshoe Canada Nationals were held in Belleville at the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre.

Open to Public, Saturday 9AM - 4:30PM No Admission Charge Food for Sale on Site 15


allison tummon kamphuis

global clean water crusader “I have one of the best jobs at Procter & Gamble (P&G), if not the best, because I know that every day I can make a difference in the lives of others, especially kids. Clean water is easy to take for granted growing up or living in Canada and to help more people have the most basic need in life is very motivating to me.” Allison

Allison with her husband Mark, and daughters Mia (11) and Megan (8)

Allison & Mark met in grade nine and are both Moira Secondary School graduates Allison has a BSC (Nursing) McMaster University and an MBA from St. Francis Xavier University Joined P&G in Toronto in 1996 as Clinical Research Associate Allison and Mark moved to Cincinnati in 2001

Working with a small team in Cincinnati, Allison is the Leader of the Children’s Safe Drinking Water (CSDW) Program, a not-for-profit initiative started by P&G in 2004 to provide clean drinking water to children and families around the world. Externally she works with P&G partners to raise awareness about the global water and sanitation crisis, develop safe drinking water projects which usually include sanitation and hygiene education, and oversees the logistics of arranging for P&G Purifier of Water packets to be shipped from their plant in Singapore to communities around the world (75+ countries to date). Allison visits some of these projects and works with many P&G employees around the world who build local partnerships with companies, governments, NGOs and charities to help P&G provide more clean water. “Unless I am at a meeting or conference, usually I don’t spend much time in cities, but more rural areas with our safe drinking water partners (World Vision, CARE, Save the Children, ChildFund and others) visiting schools, health clinics or people’s homes - it is not exactly a typical business trip. Stamps in my current passport include: Mexico, Denmark, Sweden, UK, India, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia, Myanmar, Rwanda, Kenya, Uganda, Senegal and Ghana. I try not to travel during the summer when my daughters are out of school and not to be away more than one week at a time. Mobile connectivity makes it easier to stay in touch while I am away. My husband Mark is amazing and has everything totally under control.” Prior to joining the CSDW Program in 2008, Allison led clinical operations for global cardiac clinical trials for P&G Pharmaceuticals gaining over a decade of experience in research and development. Allison is a member of the Public-Private Partnership Group of the WHO/ UNICEF International Network on Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage and the Institute of Medicine Forum on Public Private Partnerships in Global Health and Safety. She is a Clinton Global Initiative Program Advisor and a frequent speaker on public-private partnerships and safe drinking water in the developing world. 16


P&G CHILDREN’S SAFE DRINKING WATER PROGRAM ESTABLISHED 2004 10 BILLION LITRES OF CLEAN WATER PROVIDED (MAY 2016) HELPING TO SAVE TENS OF THOUSANDS OF LIVES (EST.) ADVOCACY & IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS: 150 ORGANIZATIONS PUBLIC, PRIVATE, NGOs PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES: PEOPLE DRINKING DIRTY TURBID WATER, MALNOURISHED CHILDREN, INDIVIDUALS LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS, FAMILIES IN EMERGENCIES AND DISEASE OUTBREAKS Strong family ties bring Allison, Mark and the girls back to the Belleville area three to four times each year. “Belleville has grown significantly since I was a child here. The number of new neighbourhoods has expanded dramatically. Belleville has created many strong community programs and built a number of great facilities for community members of all ages to enjoy. The expansion of the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre into a lifestyle and recreation facility is a very noticeable one. The development around the waterfront trail and the parks and playgrounds is another.” Allison believes a large contributor to her career success and enjoyment is the opportunity to learn new things. “My McMaster Nursing degree is from the Health Science Faculty which is designed to develop life-long learning skills. I have rarely been bored in my 20 years at P&G because I’ve always been learning. It’s important to me to make a difference, work with people I respect and enjoy what I do. I love the diversity and the friends I have made around the world. I value each and every day as you never know what might happen – life experiences have taught me the importance of living life to the fullest.”

P&G PURIFIER WATER PACKETS • • •

one packet treats 10 litres of water effectively killing bacteria, viruses & removing parasites & solid materials provides residual chlorination – water remains usable for approximately one day each packet provides enough water for a family of five for one day 17

GOAL: TO PROVIDE 15 BILLION LITRES OF CLEAN DRINKING WATER BY 2020 ACCORDING TO WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) /UNICEF (2014), 663 MILLION PEOPLE LACK ACCESS TO IMPROVED SOURCE WHO (2015) REPORTS 1,000 CHILDREN ARE DYING EACH DAY DUE TO DISEASES CAUSED BY CONTAMINATED DRINKING WATER WOMEN AND CHILDREN (PRIMARILY GIRLS) SPEND 40 BILLION HOURS EACH YEAR COLLECTING WATER AND MANAGING HOUSEHOLD WATER NEEDS RATHER THAN ATTENDING SCHOOL OR EARNING INCOME FOR FAMILIES

To learn more about the global water crisis and the CSDW Program visit: csdw.org.


TH E F R IN K CENT RE

outdoor e d u c a t i o n The Frink Centre is a living textbook of wetland inhabitants, trails, creeks and boardwalks, surrounded by nature and all of its riches - a wonderful outdoor classroom for youth and adults alike. Classes visit throughout the school year for curriculum based science programs gaining first-hand insight from areas such as the Wetland Ecology Boardwalk and the Sustainability Demonstration Site. There are over 500 acres of diverse topography and ecosystems which include a class one wetland, succession fields, a mixed forest, swamps, the Moira River, Park’s Creek, a drumlin and a man-made pond. The 14 kilometres of winding trails include board walks and bridges which provide access to all of these areas. The H.R. Frink Outdoor Education Centre was established at the Plainfield Conservation area in 1972 by the Hastings County Board of Education and the Moira River Conservation Authority. The Centre was named after Herbert Frink, a well-known educator and conservationist who was an advocate of outdoor education. Today the Centre is operated by the Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board in partnership with the Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board. Quinte Conservation owns the land the Centre is located on and the Conservation Authority has assisted with labour and also financial support for special projects. The Friends of the Frink Centre have expanded outdoor education programs to the community by offering workshops and programs to day camps and other youth groups, and family activity days. Volunteers are essential to the Centre’s success, helping with community activities, school groups, trail grooming and special projects. Anyone interested in volunteering time, skills or equipment pertaining to outdoor education is encouraged to call the Frink Centre at 613-477-2828. One of the wonderful things about the Centre – there’s always something new to see. Nature’s like that, full of surprises. H.R. Frink Centre 381 Thrasher Road RR1 Plainfield 18


THE GOOD THAT FOLLOWS

the northeast feeder main

As the Northeast Feedermain makes its way through our City from the Gerry O’Connor Water Treatment Plant on the waterfront to the northeast urban reaches, the new line with its increased capacity, is making a significant difference to the water services provided to those regions. Business and industry in the Northeast Industrial Park have a new service that will meet their needs as they grow in the future. Residents purchasing homes in some of our beautiful new subdivisions will enjoy high pressure water at their fingertips. As the new Feedermain wound its way to the northeast region it left many other community improvements along the way. Some of the significant results of this infrastructure upgrade took place on Yeomans Street. It is now the delight of Belleville residents with sidewalks lining each side of the widened road and beautiful marked bike lanes stretching from Bridge Street to the point where Yeomans Street ends at the CN tracks. Older roadways, including a portion of Frank Street, are now proudly sporting smooth, newly paved surfaces, curbs and sidewalks. Those living in Sarah Court have a multi-use pathway, winding its way along the edge of the subdivision. After the project made its way under College Street, Lane Avenue and Donald Street were completely transformed, including a new roadway, curbs, sidewalks, and sanitary and storm sewers. The water supply provided by the new Northeast Feedermain, in combination with newly installed pumps at the Cannifton booster station, has created a system which provides the supply volume and pressure needed for our City to grow and function properly. In its wake – it left a trail of esthetic, functional and safety improvements for all to enjoy.

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B AY O F Q U I N T E

immigration portal

The provincial government, with the objective of attracting foreign entrepreneurs and investment, established an online portal designed to give people from around the world the opportunity to learn more about Ontario communities. This portal is composed of websites, each showcasing different communities - visually attractive overviews of each region’s offerings combined with detailed community information. Determined to become a part of this progressive initiative Belleville applied for a government grant to develop a Quinte region portal. The application was successful and Belleville received 100% funding from the Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade to create our region’s portal and in March of 2016 the Bay of Quinte Immigration Portal was launched. Our portal captures the essence of relocating to the Quinte region through interviews with people who have chosen this area as their new home. New Canadians and secondary immigrants share their stories about investment and employment opportunities, the support systems available, the friends they have made and the quality of life they now enjoy. Martin from the UK, Luisa from Italy, Carolin and Alex from Switzerland, Dr. Jinna from Russia and Jennipher from Guatemala are just a few of the people describing their experiences as newcomers to the region. Many new Canadians are from rural areas or small cities and they relate well to our rural landscape and close knit community. Within the first month of the website launch people from 20 different countries accessed information about our region through the portal. Belleville, Quinte West and Prince Edward County are partners in this marketing venture and the maintenance and updates of the site will be assumed by the Bay of Quinte Living Council. Additional enhancements are planned for ongoing updates. “The purpose of the portal is to grow our community - attract new investment and investors, draw skilled labour needed by local businesses and enrich our cultural community,” states Karen Poste, Manager, Economic and Strategic Initiatives for the City of Belleville. “This initiative is complimentary to the work being done by the Belleville Inclusion Committee which has the mandate to promote diversity and facilitate inclusivity in Belleville.” Newcomers from around the world or around the corner are invited to learn more about Belleville and the Bay of Quinte region by visiting: immigration.bayofquinte.ca.

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THE BELLEVILLE LIONS’ CLUB

concerts on the bay

Throughout the summer, grab your lawn chair and head to the Lions’ Pavilion in West Zwick’s Park Sunday and Wednesday evenings. The Lions have another great lineup of outdoor entertainment for you to enjoy on the waterfront. July concerts are from 6:30 - 8:30 PM and August’s from 6:00 - 8:00 PM. Free will donations are accepted in support of Lions’ Community Services.

JULY 3

BAY CITY BAND

VARIETY DANCE BAND

JULY 13

MATT CAGE & DEREK MORRIS

TRIBUTE TO ELVIS & JOHNNY CASH

JULY 17

THE COMMODORES’ ORCHESTRA

BIG BAND MEMORIES

JULY 20

TEXAS TUXEDO

ROCKING COUNTRY

JULY 24

ANDY FORGIE & ED’S GARAGE

50’s/60’s/70’s ROCK

JULY 27

KINFOLK

50’s/60’s ROCK/COUNTRY

JULY 31

WHITE BROTHERS

COUNTRY

AUG. 3

KEN STAPLEY & FRIENDS

CLASSIC VARIETY

AUG. 7

CATHY WHALEN & LAND O’LAKE CRUISERS

COUNTRY

AUG. 10

THE REASONS

50’s/60’s/70’s ROCK

AUG. 14

KEN STAPLEY/LIONS COUNTRY JAMBOREE

AUG. 17

LYNZI COUCH & WROUGHT IRON ROOTS

COUNTRY CLASSIC (5-8PM) BLUE GRASS/COUNTRY/FOLK

AUG. 21

KEN KOVAC & HEARTLAND

COUNTRY CLASSIC

AUG. 24

GRAMPA’S GOODTIME GANG

YESTERYEAR FAVOURITES

AUG. 28

FRANK HOWARD ORCHESTRA DIRECTED BY LANCE JEFFREY

BIG BAND MEMORIES

AUG. 31

THE EMILY CREEK BAND

COUNTRY/FOLK/DANCE

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THE VILLAGE PHARMACY making it personal

“I am passionate about my customers’ health and the importance of caring for each individual. I always put myself in their position and think about how I would like to be treated. Honesty and compassion are as much a part of the service I provide as my 18 years of pharmaceutical experience.” Maha Majeed Pharmacist This April, the downtown core welcomed a new addition to its long list of unique shopping options, the Village Pharmacy. Nestled in at 216 Front Street, owner Maha Majeed has positioned the pharmacy as a community business, servicing those living and working in the area. Maha feels strongly that every downtown should have a grocery store and a pharmacy to truly accommodate those in the area. As a pharmacist, she feels she can fill this niche. The location of the Village Pharmacy makes it ideal in that it’s within walking distance for the seniors living in the area and those working there throughout the week. Maha is committed to getting to know each of her customers, listening to their concerns, and working with them to accommodate their personal needs. As a small neighbourhood business, they do full medication reviews, address diet issues and diabetic concerns – and even prepare their customers’ weekly medication compliance packages. Those stopping by the pharmacy have access to a blood pressure machine, flu shots and assistance with smoking cessation. All drug plans are accepted and free delivery is part of the service provided. “With a small business such as this you are able to develop relationships with your customers,” Maha explained. “We’re here to listen, understand and help them – give them facts so they can make their decisions. Taking the time to understand the customer’s questions and concerns is a top priority. It’s important for me to know their medications, what they need, and

how they should use their prescriptions correctly. My concern for each of my customers is genuine and it means a great deal to me to be able to help each individual in the best way I possibly can.” In addition to pharmaceutical products, Maha is building lines of unique specialty items, some of which include: Tocca perfume and body lotions from Europe, Diner Mugs – designed as gifts for specific people and occupations, and mouthwatering Rogers’ Chocolates from British Columbia. “I’ve always liked being able to move freely and give things my personal touch,” added Maha. “The Village Pharmacy provides me with the opportunity to do so.” Originally from Iraq, Maha moved to Mississauga in 1996 and worked as a licensed pharmacist there until 2004 when she and her family relocated to Marmora. She has two children, a daughter in grade eight and a son studying to be a Pharmacist in England. Her husband works with her in the business. “The new customers I have met are beautiful and very supportive,” she added. “I look forward to meeting many more, getting to know them and providing them with a warm, inviting Village Pharmacy atmosphere they will enjoy and value in their neighbourhood.”


20th twinning anniversary with GUNPO, KOREA

SIMON KANG

BELLEVILLE AMBASSADOR TO GUNPO What began as friendly conversation between former Belleville Mayor George Zegouras and Sinyong (George) Kang, at the Victoria Convenience store, has grown into a relationship which transcends borders and language, a Twin-City partnership between Gunpo, South Korea and Belleville. Sinyong’s connections with family and friends in South Korea included the Mayor of Gunpo which opened the door to the exploration of twinning and the subsequent partnership. In 1996 an Agreement of Intent to establish a Twin-City relationship was signed, making 2016 our 20th Anniversary.

As part of the anniversary celebration a delegation from Gunpo will visit Belleville from July sixth to tenth. It is anticipated Mayor Kim and eight other Korean delegates from the Gunpo City Government will arrive in time to help us celebrate our Waterfront and Ethnic Festival. The Korean Consul General will be in attendance during our official welcome ceremony. Councillor Jackie Denyes, Chairperson of the Cultural Exchange Committee for the past 13 years, expresses how honoured the City is to celebrate this 20th anniversary with our sister city. “It is our goal to showcase as much of our fine city and its amenities with our Korean counterparts as possible. There will be tours of local businesses and City departments such as: the new Fire Hall, City Work’s Operations, Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre, and tours of two of our local schools that enjoy a yearly cultural exchange of young Korean students. Our Parks staff focused on Koreanrelated plantings around the City and we have a special surprise unveiling during their visit. A quick tour of the Quinte area is planned also. Our primary focus is to establish business links and promote our City. This endeavour has been successful over the years as this area enjoys an active Korean community. Hanon Systems Canada Inc (formerly Halla Climate Control) is an excellent example of the relevant benefits generated through our cultural exchange relationship. As in the past, our delegation will be hosted and honoured at a dinner sponsored by our local Korean Businessman’s Association,” adds Councillor Denyes.

“When our father became ill, my sister Catherine and I returned from California to help with the family business. Our father passed away shortly before the twinning agreement was signed – which is sad because it was his and George’s initial plan. I became the liaison between Gunpo and Belleville,” explains Simon Kang. In 2004, Simon was named Belleville Ambassador to Gunpo by Mayor Mary-Anne Sills. He was praised for helping to streamline communication between the groups of delegates when visits were conducted both here and there. His dedication to the twinning relationship was recognized and valued. The partnership has afforded Belleville representatives with business and economic opportunities which would be extremely difficult for others to access. They have toured the Hyundai plant, Samsung headquarters and KTC (The Korean Telecommunications Office) and studied Gunpo’s recycling process.

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Our City extends a warm welcome to these special guests.


starting our business was a leap of faith

– so glad we jumped

“When we first opened we were excited if we received three calls in a day – now 20 would be slow. The business soon outgrew the basement and we moved to this location, 1344 Highway 37 North in April of 2010. We’ve also expanded to Kingston and have a shop on Princess Street which employs six people. That’s pretty exciting to have grown from our home, to two shops and a staff of 13. We have great employees, most of them have been with us for many years, helping us serve our customers with expertise born of experience.”

Looking to slide your feet into a pair of fine western boots? Cinch your jeans with a stunning buckled belt – or longing to wrestle with the dillema of which cowboy hat to choose? Then head out highway 37, just a stone’s throw away, and see the western wonders Bridle Path Tack Shop has to offer. But wait, the shop goes beyond you looking good – their inventory includes all things horse related and much, much more. Lori Rossit developed a love of horses at an early age, riding them and working for her uncle in his tack shop on Highway 62. She and Robert met in high school and have been married for 26 years with two daughters. Robert worked as an electrician and Lori was employed at LCBO when her uncle closed his business. Through encouragement from family and friends they decided to take the plunge into the entrepreneurial world and opened Bridle Path Tack Shop in the basement of their home on Casey Road.

The growth of the business led to Robert leaving his electrician job and joining Lori in the shop full time. Their skill sets compliment each other well, Lori primarily in the storefront with customers and Robert in the office managing large orders and developing partnerships with organizations such as the Tweed Stampede, restaurants with western themes and country bands. They’ve made shopping easily accessible online at bridlepathtack.com but don’t let that prevent you from stopping by the shop. The endless rows of saddles, stalls, gates and accessories, the one-of-a-kind purses and the selection of jeans, shirts and jackets make shopping in person an experience you shouldn’t miss.

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“Making a living doing something you love is a wonderful thing. We could never have done this without the strong support of our family, friends and customers – for that we are forever grateful.�

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S T R AT H C O N A

r enewabl e ener g y r eso ur c es “The City of Belleville has been outstandingly welcoming to Strathcona and it is a pleasure for us to continue to create our future right here in the Bay of Quinte region. We are proud to be part of this community. Every solar project we initiate from here, every service we provide, is our contribution to this city as a great place to work and to live in - not just today but for future generations as well.”

Karl Hollett, CEO Strathcona Energy Group

In 2015 Strathcona Energy Group (SEG) made the decision to relocate their office headquarters from their initial location in Napanee to Sidney Street in Belleville. SEG is a highly diversified holding company that specializes in providing renewable energy solutions. Included in the SEG group is Strathcona Energy International which produces solar modules. There are currently 60 full-time employees at the plant, a number which experiences seasonal changes with the installation or production of solar panels. Currently all Strathcona Energy International solar panels are proudly manufactured in Belleville. Strathcona Solar Initiatives is an award winning full service solutions provider that specializes in the design, installation and maintenance of solar projects. They provide client specific sales and engineering, as well as operational support for solar applications from high-yielding solar trackers, to rooftop and ground-mount solar. More and more businesses looking to create additional revenue streams, reduce operational costs or lower their carbon footprint are utilizing solar energy. These systems are not limited to urban industrial areas. Residential and agricultural systems are also available. The systems installed in the province are predominantly FiTs or microFiTs (Feed-in-Tariff) – the owners are paid a certain amount of money per kilowatt hour generated and ‘fed’ to the grid. Others are netmetering programs that allow the owner to use the energy generated by the solar panels for their own use and send the excess energy into the grid for which they receive credit from the utility company toward their next bills. Perhaps Belleville’s most visible solar installation to date is at Meyers Pier. You can access the live reading of the system through the City website at belleville.ca/city-hall/ page/solar-panels where in addition you will find the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre and City Transit solar readings. 26


SOFT LANDINGS

g i v e businesses a J UM P S TA RT

“CHIRP is part of what makes the City of Belleville so attractive for any new business: a commitment to support local entrepreneurs in their growth initiatives and a genuine openness to new businesses from other global markets. This results in a productive, innovative exchange from which the citizens of Belleville can profit long-term.� Karl Hollett, CEO of the Strathcona Energy Group

enterprises from Asia and Europe that are primarily active in the manufacturing and technology sector and interested in expanding their operations to the North American market place.

Those interested in relocating their business to new markets are challenged with more than merely choosing a new location. The need for a reliable office, IT infrastructure, resolving visa issues, space to meet with clients, securing a skilled workforce and receiving the necessary support and guidance to grow the business are also important factors to be addressed. The Canadian Hybrid Incubator Resource Platform (CHIRP) is Canada’s only Soft Landings International Incubator and is currently undergoing certification by the National Business Incubation Association. Located at 250 Sidney Street, CHIRP provides premium access to both the Canadian and U.S. markets in a unique setting that combines state-of-the-art physical resources with in-depth business assistance and established networking alliances. The core concept behind CHIRP is to provide small-tomedium enterprises from abroad and domestic start-ups with the resources and confidence to tackle new markets while never having to lose focus on their core competencies. Worldwide there are approximately two dozen soft landings incubators, mainly in Asia, Central Europe, and the United States. The designated goal of the Belleville incubator is to attract established small to medium-sized

CHIRP has an experienced and dedicated team prepared to assist businesses entering the North American marketplace with all their requirements. Clients can access mentoring and consulting to help them gain a better understanding of the new markets, all-encompassing IT and administrative support, distribution and warehousing access, right through to in-house catering. CHIRP provides all the support systems to make clients feel at home in their new location. CHIRP is an economic development initiative led by parent company Strathcona Energy Group, a vertically integrated holding company specializing in renewable energy solutions, and the Canadian government. Since the incubator soft landings hybrid opened its doors last fall, CHIRP has been steadily growing, offering its clients over 8,000 square metres (30,000 square feet) of fully customizable office and laboratory space as well as an abundance of IT and professional services. 27

Summer 2016

Belleville Magazine


Along our City’s waterfront you’ll find trails to walk, restaurants to dine in, picnic areas to enjoy, boat launches, playgrounds and marinas.

28


70th anniversary “Our City is great in many ways, but if asked to choose the thing I love most, I’d have to say it’s the pride people have in this community. They know it’s not perfect, but they work really hard because they want to see it succeed. Their support is limitless and I’m proud to be a part of that.” Ross McDougall

McDougall Insurance and Financial is celebrating a special milestone this year, 2016 marks the 70th Anniversary of Lorne McDougall opening the doors of their first office with five staff members. Ross joined the family business in 1971 and the company has grown to include 29 offices across Eastern Ontario with 300 employees. “We have chosen to locate our offices in smaller towns and cities because it’s important to us to become involved in each of these communities. We encourage our staff to build a presence, go beyond the office and give their time in ways that make a positive difference – coaching sports teams, joining service clubs, fundraising – they are active participants in the areas in which they live.” Ross McDougall does not simply encourage his staff to give of their time – he leads by example. He served on City Council from 1980 to 1989 and was Mayor of the City of Belleville from 1994 to 2000. In addition to working with numerous community groups and organizations, Ross has also served as Chairman of the Board for Belleville General Hospital (BGH), Chairman of the BGH Foundation and Chaired the United Way Fundraising Drive. “My father always stressed the importance of caring for the people in our community and I’ve never forgotten that.”

McDougall’s has ensured their 70th anniversary is a memorable one. An additional $100,000 has been allocated for financial support for the communities their offices are located in. Each office determines how the money will be used in their area. The Belleville office is also busy creating a time capsule and in June, 400 guests were invited to a festive evening at the waterfront, complete with live entertainment and fireworks. To cap the excitement, they have relocated to a newly renovated office space on the second floor of Century Place and look forward to many more years of serving the communities they call home.

View from new 2nd floor offices.


The City maintains over 500 acres of parkland at 55 locations throughout the community.


POSTE IT NOTE On Belleville Business

“I am a self-confessed statistics junkie and I love trying to interpret what our demographics mean for Belleville and the region.”

Karen Poste Manager, Economic and Strategic Initiatives

the City and provide utilities will go up and our ability to attract new investment will be diminished. Minimal population growth is required just to maintain the quality of life we all enjoy. Too much growth can create just as many issues as a decline in population, so manageable growth is our goal. Communities that lose population over time typically have an aging population – when this happens, the community can begin to lose its balance. Just as problems are created when a community is dominated by seniors, it can also be an issue when it is dominated by young adults or young families – like everything in life, balance is the key.

By now everyone should have completed their 2016 census forms and we municipal types will patiently wait as the results trickle in over the next several years. Census release days are like Christmas for those of us who can’t wait to see how the community has changed over the last five years. While we all wish the results could be released right after census day, the information is still useful in terms of quantifying any changes in the community and showing us the trends that are occurring over time. I am a selfconfessed statistics junkie and I love trying to interpret what our demographics mean for Belleville and the region. The last data we received from the 2011 census made two things very clear – we’re slowly growing and we’re getting older!

With an aging population, Belleville is in a position to look outside its boundaries to attract a new population base to strike that balance. As time moves along, welcoming newcomers to the community will become more and more important. New residents will bring investment, entrepreneurship, much needed skills as well as new perspectives and experiences. All of these things will help Belleville grow and evolve into the best City we can be. Initiatives like the Build Belleville Infrastructure program, the City’s Official Plan and the work of the Belleville Inclusion Committee are all projects that will help Belleville accommodate the needed growth and development that will develop our marketplace and secure our incredible quality of life.

Belleville is one of the few small cities in Ontario that has consistently seen growth over the last few census periods – we’d like to see more growth but in this age of mass urbanization, growth in a small city like Belleville is something we can all be proud of. Why is growth so important to a community? Without growth, our businesses will lose profitability, our funding from other levels of government can be cut, the cost to run 31

Summer 2016

Belleville Magazine


MARINAS

THE OPTIONS ALONG OUR SHORELINE

meyers pier

VICTORIA PARK - 86 SOUTH FRONT STREET • 80 FULLY SERVICED SLIPS, ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE 35 FOOT BOATS • WASHROOM FACILITIES • FREE WIRELESS • STAFF AVAILABLE FROM 7AM - 9PM EACH DAY • FOUR-DAY USE RIVER DOCKS • HOST OF TWO DRAGON BOAT CLUBS • WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE TO DOWNTOWN BELLEVILLE AND LOCATED ON THE BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT TRAIL • ADJACENT TO BOATHOUSE RESTAURANT

victoria park

MEYERS PIER - 1 SOUTH FRONT STREET • 180 FULLY-SERVICED SLIPS, ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE 55 FOOT BOATS • WATER TRAVELERS CAN GAS UP, PUMP OUT AND USE THE FULLY ACCESSIBLE WASHROOMS AND LAUNDRY FACILITIES • FREE WIRELESS, NIGHT TIME SECURITY AND STAFF AVAILABLE FROM 7AM - 9PM EACH DAY • OPEN TO WELCOME BOATERS FROM MAY UNTIL THANKSGIVING • HOME TO QUINTE SEARCH AND RESCUE, THE MARINA HOSTS FIVE RESCUE BOATS • LICENSED PIER BBQ & GRILL WITH LIVE ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS • WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE TO DOWNTOWN BELLEVILLE AND LOCATED ON THE BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT TRAIL


crates

basin

stillwater

CRATES BELLEVILLE - 25 DUNDAS ST. W. • 220 FULLY-SERVICED SLIPS ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE UP TO 75 FOOT BOATS • GAS, PUMP OUT, WASHROOMS, LAUNDRY • FULL MARINA SERVICE CENTRE • 50 TONNE TRAVEL LIFT- MOVES 80 FT. BOATS • FIBREGLASS REPAIR • MACHINERY WORK • ONSITE CANVAS SHOP • FULL MARINA CHANDLERY STORE • VOLVO & MERCURY DEALER • 20 TRANSIENT SLIPS • FULL FREE ACCESS TO TRAVELODGE SWIMMING POOL & 20% DISCOUNT IN RESTAURANT • MOBILE SERVICE VAN • FREE INTERNET AND BBQ USE STILLWATER BASIN- 9 WILKIE STREET • 50 FULLY-SERVICED SLIPS ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE 45 FOOT BOATS • OWNERS HAVE OPTION OF STORING BOATS ON PROPERTY DURING WINTER • WASHROOM & LAUNDRY FACILITIES • FREE WIRELESS • UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT (APRIL 2016) • NINE RENTAL PROPERTIES ON SITE

OUR SHORELINE OUR SHORELINE OUR SHORELINE

OUR SHORELINE OUR SHORELINE OUR SHORELINE


Just a few great things you don’t want to miss!

July 1

CANADA DAY W. Zwick’s Pk.

7-10 WATERFRONT & ETHNIC FESTIVAL W. Zwick’s Pk., attractions including meet & greets with TV & movie characters, main stage music, vendor expo, Canine Water Sports, parasailing & paddle boarding 9

DRAGON BOAT FESTIVAL Victoria Pk., in support of Three Oaks Shelter & Services

15-17 HOLLYWOOD NORTH FILM FESTIVAL 9

ANNUAL TOWN & COUNTRY GARDEN TOUR details cfuwbelleville.com

20-23 EMPIRE ROCKFEST Empire Square, downtown Belleville, details: empiresquarelive.com 23

PRIDE IN THE PARK W. Zwick’s Pk., festivities start with a parade, gathering at Empire Square 12PM and will continue down Front Street to Zwick’s Park. Activities in the park will continue until 4PM

23-24 FIREFIT CHAMPIONSHIPS Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre, Southern Ontario Regionals, known as the toughest two minutes in sports, competition based on firefighting tasks commonly performed in emergency situations, free admission 28

OUTDOOR MOVIE at dusk at Empire Square in downtown Belleville

August 5

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW Driftwood Theatre Group, 7:30PM, W. Zwick’s Park

10-11 RCMP MUSICAL RIDE Belleville Fairgrounds, performed by a full troop of thirty-two riders and horses, plus the member in charge. The Musical Ride consists of the execution of a variety of intricate figures and cavalry drill choreographed to music 12-14 QUINTE RIBFEST W. Zwick’s Pk., in support of Big Brothers Big Sisters – Hastings Prince Edward 13

GEORGE PEPPER MEMORIAL FLAT TRACK RACE Belleville Fair Grounds, The Canadian Vintage Motorcycle Group will have a display of their vintage motorcycles at this flat track race

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BRIDGE BASH 2016 downtown Belleville, entertainment by AMBUSH

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OUTDOOR MOVIE at dusk at Empire Square in downtown Belleville

CLASSIC VINTAGE AND CAR CRUISE NIGHT Tuesdays at the A&W Parking Lot (366 Front Street North), from 6:00PM till dusk

Belleville Magazine Summer 2016  
Belleville Magazine Summer 2016