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BELLEVILLE THE MAGAZINE ABOUT OUR COMMUNIT Y

BELLEVILLE.CA

COMMUNITY EMBRACES ROGERS HOMETOWN HOCKEY WEEKEND

SPRING 2018

AMAZING 2017! EXCITEMENT BUILDS FOR YEAR AHEAD

DOWNTOWN CONDOS DRAW NEW RESIDENTS TO CITY CENTRE


CITY OF BELLEVILLE 169 Front Street Belleville, Ontario K8N 2Y8 Tel: (613) 968-6481 TTY: (613) 967-3768 Belleville.ca MAYOR Taso A. Christopher COUNCIL Egerton Boyce, Paul Carr, Jackie Denyes, Mike Graham, Kelly McCaw, Jack Miller, Mitch Panciuk, Garnet Thompson EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER Rick Kester DIRECTOR, ENGINEERING & DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Rod Bovay DIRECTOR, FINANCE Brian Cousins MANAGER, HUMAN RESOURCES Tim Osborne DIRECTOR, RECREATION, CULTURE & COMMUNITY SERVICES Mark Fluhrer DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES/CLERK Matt MacDonald DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY SERVICES/ FIRE CHIEF Mark MacDonald MANAGER, ECONOMIC & STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Karen Poste GENERAL MANAGER, ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES Perry Decola GENERAL MANAGER, TRANSPORTATION AND OPERATIONS SERVICES Joseph D. Reid BELLEVILLE Magazine is published quarterly by the City of Belleville.

BELLEVILLE Magazine

Welcome

On behalf of City Council, The Executive Management Team and staff of the City of Belleville, I welcome you to the 2018 spring edition of the BELLEVILLE magazine. In this edition it brings me great pleasure to feature the Rogers Hometown Hockey event we were so fortunate to host in February. I would like to sincerely thank the Belleville Chamber of Commerce staff for coordinating this memorable event. The last phase of the Build Belleville City Centre Revitalization has commenced and I am pleased to provide you with a thorough update on this project along with other infrastructure projects underway. Included in the pages of this magazine you will also enjoy some business profiles, economic development updates along with a highlight on the future vision of our waterfront. As the days get longer, spring is the perfect time of year for residents of the City of Belleville to get outside and enjoy the warmer weather and take advantage of all the beautiful natural resources our community has to offer. Over the coming months, I encourage everyone to spend time outdoors enjoying our many parks, playgrounds and trails. Thank you for continuing to put your trust in me to lead our City towards future success as the Mayor of the City of Belleville. Warm Regards,

Magazine Contributors: Chris Malette, Stephen Petrick, Dana Barnett, Karen Poste and Marilyn Warren Editor - Marilyn Warren mwarren@city.belleville.on.ca BELLEVILLE Magazine is available online at Belleville.ca and an accessible text-only format is available upon request Printed in Canada All information ©2018, City of Belleville. No use is permitted without written consent.

Taso A. Christopher, Mayor

Belleville.ca

Spring 2018


Belleville THE MAGAZINE ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY • SPRING 2018

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NEW YEAR’S LEVEE Celebrating 2017 Accomplishments

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CELEBRATING NEW BUSINESSES in our Community

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MAYOR’S HISTORY HUNT Engaging Students in History

5 - 7 GREAT THINGS HAPPENING here in our Community 8

BELLEVILLE DOWNTOWN DOCFEST Continues to Grow

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HASTINGS & PRINCE EDWARD our Regiment in Downtown Belleville

10-11 WINTER DOESN’T HOLD US BACK We make the Outdoors Ours 12

TAKE TIME TO ENJOY our rich Belleville History

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BELLEVILLE TRANSIT positive changes increasing rider numbers

14-15 DOWNTOWN CONDOS draw Residents to City Core 16-17 ROGERS HOMETOWN HOCKEY a fun weekend in Belleville

Contents Lois Foster and Mayor Taso A. Christopher at the filming of Out of the Vault at Glanmore House

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QUINTE QUILTERS GUILD adds Fabric to our City

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STEPHEN LICENCE celebrates 100 years in downtown

20-21 BELLEVILLE SENATORS First Home Game November 2017 22-23 THE REPUTATION YOU BUILD determines the Success of your Business 24

IMPORTANT YEAR AHEAD for new Chamber President

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PROVINCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE studies in Belleville

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MEET THE MEAT MARKET with a twist

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PROUD HOSTS OF ANNUAL Municipal Public Works Trade Show

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BUILD BELLEVILLE revitalization nears completion

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RICK KESTER CAO, City of Belleville

30-31 WATERFRONT VISION begins to take shape 32

POSTE IT Bill 148

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BELLEVILLE WANTS YOU City employment support systems SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine


WA S A V E R Y G O O D Y E A R 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

S I G N I F IC A N T M ILESTON ES

Belleville Inclusion Committee formed Dr. R. L. Vaughan Atrium & Sports Hall of Fame Unveiled Grand Opening of New Fire Hall & Accessible New Foyer in City Hall Belleville Senators Inaugural Season Opener Renovations at the QSWC on budget & on time Shorelines Casino Opening: City will receive more than $2.5 million this year to be reinvested in Infrastructure Partnership with Hastings Historical Society we celebrated our Heritage with 6 plaque presentations in the Downtown Core YOUR ROAD PROJECTS Bay Bridge Rd / CPR Overhead Replacement & Dundas St W Rehabilitation Bell Creek Bridge Rehabilitation Bronk Rd Rehabilitation & Bridge Replacement Casey Rd Rehabilitation – Hwy 37 to Forsythe Rd Cedar St water main & Road Reconstruction City Centre Revitalization & Reconstruction (Phase 3A) Dundas St W resurfacing North Front St resurfacing Northeast Industrial Park Road Rehabilitation & Bike Lanes

Mayor Christopher and Bev Boyce cut the cake at the January 1, 2018 levee. Her husband, Gerry Boyce, joined the Mayor for the cake cutting in January 2017 to launch the City of Belleville Anniversary Year, now Mrs. Boyce helps to mark the closing of an amazing year.

PLUS University Avenue Watermain Replacement West St Watermain Relining Bike Lanes on Bridge St E West Riverside Park Completion of Paving Memorial Gardens Gazebo Structure Kiwanis East Bayshore Trail Repatriation Completion of Potters Creek, Thurlow Park & Clarence S. Bird Memorial Playground Projects

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PROUD TO ANNOUNCE In terms of services & infrastructure amenities offered to our residents, we ended the year with more than 110 million in new construction. One of the busiest construction years in the City’s history. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Vantage Food addition – 60,000 square ft & 60 more jobs Century Village nearing completion which represents another 30+ residential units in DT P & G Development/Expansion Completed Triangle F-P Development/Expansion Completed 20 New & Re-Grand Openings in the Commercial Business Sector ARTS & CULTURE Amazing, talented musicians, dancers, playwrights, artists, actors & filmmakers showcasing their talents locally & on the provincial stage. The City is proud to support their initiatives through the Belleville Community Arts & Culture Fund. Thanks to the service clubs, agencies, organizations, food banks, charities, church groups, sports groups, YMCA & the many volunteers who spend countless hours making our City a better place to live. Without your selfless acts of kindness and dedication our City would not be the same.

“2017 has been an amazing year & it is exciting to be entering 2018, knowing there are more great things ahead.” Mayor Taso A. Christopher


GREAT ADDITIONS TO OUR COMMUNITY

let’s make them feel welcome!

SIGNAL BREWERY

NEW ELECTRIC CANADA

BAYSIDE ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY CENTRE

June 17, 2017 Pizza Nova

94 College St W

July 4, 2017

Belleville Youth Centre

QSWC

July 10, 2017

Lighthouse Wealth Management

6835 Hwy 62

July 27, 2017

LCBO Grand Opening

400 Dundas St. E.

Summer 2017 Signal Brewery

86 River Rd.

Aug 8, 2017

199 Bell Blvd

Sept 21, 2017 She Thrives

161 Front Street

Oct 13, 2017

Beauty Works Day/Medi Spa

615 Sidney St

Nov 27, 2017

KOR Hair Studio

14 North Front St

Dec 5, 2017

New Electric Canada

2-51 Adam St

Jan. 25, 2018

Bayside Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Centre

208 Bridge St E

SHE THRIVES

Planet Fitness

Just to name a few! 3

SPRING 20178

BELLEVILLE Magazine


LAUNCHING THIS SPRING Student Passport to the First Annual

MAYOR’S HUNT FOR HISTORY Designed to help students discover the historic people and places of Belleville

Mayor Taso Christopher is pleased to be working with the Hastings County Historical Society on an exciting new initiative, created to encourage Belleville youth to learn more about the rich history here in their community. Reaching out to local schools, they have invited all students in grades five, six, seven and eight in the City of Belleville to be a part of this historical adventure.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES

Student passports for the Mayor’s Hunt for History will be made available at each student’s school. The passport contains pictures of historical sites in Downtown Belleville along with the title of the historical plaque located at each site and the address.

A draw will be made from all the completed, correct Passports returned and an exciting list of amazing prizes is soon to be announced!

Each page includes one or two questions about the respective historical sites drawn from the plaque, along with space to fill in the answer or to circle the number of the correct answer. The students are asked to visit each historical site, read the story on the plaque and from this, answer the questions correctly. Students are to return their completed passports to their school by May 15th.

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G R E AT T H I N G S H A P P E N I N G

in our Belleville community

Queen Victoria students created brochures that contain symbols or artifacts that represent Canadian identity and culture to share with the Mayor & newcomers to the area.

Bridge Street United Church Bell Ringers

Riverside Rumble Cyclocross

Mayor accepts generous $10,000 donation from Belleville Garden Club at new Memorial Park gazebo - a contribution toward the re-development of Memorial Gardens at corner of N. Park St. & Bell Blvd. Belleville.ca

SPRING 2018

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Launch of Heart & Stroke Month

Local artist, Emebet Belete at Prince of Wales Public School for the unveiling of an art project created by students and made possible through an Ontario Arts Council Education Grant. Peace Pole Presentation

Two classes from the Loyola English as a Second Language program visit City Hall.

City of Belleville & OLG Community Celebration Event

Filming ‘Out of the Vault’ at Glanmore National Historic Site.

Veridian Community Sponsorship Fund presented $500 to the Open Door Cafe program at Eastminster United Church.

Albert College students & faculty participating in Sleep Out so Others Can Sleep In fundraiser.

Queen Victoria students visit City Hall to explore municipal politics.

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Puck Drop at Belleville Bearcats Tournament, Wally Dever Arena

Mayor Christopher presents $500 from Veridian Community Fund at the Coldest Night of the Year Walk; Victoria Ave. Baptist Church

Feed the Meter Cheque Presentation

CP Holiday Train

Mayor drops puck for Bantam Major AAA Junior Bulls playing against Harbin County China.

Christmas at the Pier Lighting Display Launch

Cops & Kids Ice Fishing Derby

Santa Claus Parade

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SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine


HOW BELLEVILLE DOWNTOWN DOCFEST

continues to grow

Several years ago, a group of documentary film buffs from Belleville got together to work on launching a festival that would help draw people to the downtown core. Belleville Downtown DocFest launched in the spring 2012 and about 2,000 tickets were bought by spectators to attend shows. The next year, the festival returned and was a little bigger. By 2013, it was a community staple. The 2017 edition of DocFest sold a record number of tickets, at just under 5,400, and continued a trend of about 15 per cent growth every year.

“We have a great group of volunteers,” said Holly Dewar, who chairs DocFest’s 10-member organizing committee and oversees the work of about 50 volunteers. “We’re pretty dedicated. It’s very much a grassroots organization.” In keeping with a recent theme, this year’s festival started with an opening gala on the Friday night at the Empire Theatre and the event blended music with film. A green carpet was rolled out for guests to enter to watch Rumble: The Indians Who Rock the World. Following the film, Juno-award winning blues artist Derek Miller and his band performed. The festival concluded on Sunday afternoon with the Empire’s showing of The River of My Dreams; A Portrait of Gordon Pinsent.

Heading into the seventh Docfest, held Friday March 2 to Sunday, March 4, 2018, organizers were expecting the growth trend to continue. This year’s festival showed more than 60 films at five different venues. Bridge Street United Church was a new venue for screenings, complementing the traditional four venues; the Empire Theatre, the Belleville Public Library, the Core Centre and the Pinnacle Playhouse. Of the films shown, 13 were promoted under the Local Spotlight banner, as being made by a local director. These films showcased the work of Gerry Fraiberg, Doug Knutson, Tess Girard, Tony and Rhonda Wannamaker, Aaron and Angela Bell, Sean Scally, Peter Lockyer, Brian Long and Brock Kirby, Brittany Ollerenshaw, James Reid and Dale Morrisey. Work by Loyalist College students in the television and new media program was also featured.

The festival is run with support from the Belleville Community Arts & Culture Fund, an Ontario Arts Council grant and several sponsors. Some of those sponsors pledge support for an individual film and introduce it to spectators upon its start.

While putting the festival together is a lot of work each year, Dewar says it’s worth it, when seeing the excitement on the faces of spectators. “It’s so rewarding to hear people talking about the films. That’s why we do it.”

The festival contributes to both the culture and the economy of the city; as it annually encourages thousands of people to experience downtown Belleville for a weekend. It’s also a perfect example of how everyday citizens can come together and do something special for their community. SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine

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HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD REGIMENT

in the Heart of Our City

Nestled in the heart of downtown Belleville is the stately stone armoury, home of the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, fondly known as the Hasty P’s. This Regiment holds a special place in history as the military unit awarded more Battle Honours during World War ll than any other Canadian Infantry Regiment. At the beginning of World War ll, the Regiment trained in Britain and saw combat in France, Italy and NorthWest Europe. After the Second World War, the Hasty P’s raised a contingent, as part of Nato 27 Brigade, to return to Europe for service in West Germany. Hasty P’s have served all over the world including, Korea, Angola, Bosnia, Sierra Leone, the Congo, Haiti and Afghanistan. As a military reserve unit, members volunteer to become a part of the Regiment. Those choosing to join make a commitment of one night each week and one weekend each month and are compensated by the Canadian Armed Forces. The current unit is an intriguing mix which includes a chiropractor, OPP officer, carpenter, plumber, painter, transportation dispatcher, teacher, Metro Toronto Police Officer and numerous high school and college students. Two members are presently serving a voluntary six months in Latvia.

After 28 years in the Regular Force, LCol C.D. Chris Comeau transferred to the Army Reserve in 2015 and was promoted to command of the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment in 2016. “This has been a wonderful opportunity for me and I wouldn’t trade it for the world. The Reserves have given me a sense of value and fulfillment I’d never before experienced. I’ve developed an appreciation and empathy for the Reserves and I believe that enables me to approach command from a different perspective. These individuals choose to make this volunteer commitment in addition to their jobs, families, schooling, etc. and we need to use flexibility and respect to provide an environment that supports and compliments their lives.” The Government of Canada has mandated the strengthening and revitalization of the army reserves. In December 2017 the Canadian Army directed the Regiment to assume the new role of Assault Pioneers, directly supporting the Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) to provide mobility and counter mobility support. They are the only reserve unit in Ontario to have this role. They are responsible for the construction of tools for infantry soldiers to cross natural and man-made obstacles as well as breaching enemy

fortifications. Members also have the opportunity for advanced tactical nuclear response training. The presence of the Regiment can be felt throughout the region. They are active participants in emergency response efforts such as flood and fire. The Unit promotes the Canadian Armed Forces Indigenous programs combining Indigenous cultural elements and teachings with military training. Their involvement in community organizations and to non-profit initiatives such as delivering food hampers, the Cops and Kids Fishing Derby, Friends of the Library and Hometown Hockey are noted and valued. The Armouries have opened their doors on numerous occasions for Open Houses and non-profit fundraisers. Youth often approach the Army Reserve to gain transferrable skills such as time management, problem solving, teamwork and leadership. Once involved they see the opportunity to gain advanced training in areas such as operational planning, defensive driving, dangerous goods and helicopter operations. The opportunity for students to secure full-time summer employment while building a skill set which strengthens them as individuals and potential employees is an attractive option.

“The Army Reserve is without question, the ‘most different’ part-time job you will ever find. We lead a life less ordinary – world-class training, amazing opportunities – there’s nowhere else you can do what we do here.” LCol C.D. Chris Comeau

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WINTER DOESN’T HOLD US BACK we make the outdoors ours

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take time to explore our rich BELLEVILLE HISTORY If you’ve never participated in Doors Open, this is the year to start. Doors Open is a program promoted and planned by the Ontario Heritage Trust to open doors on Heritage structures and places. This gives the public the opportunity to tour and discover the story behind the doors of locations that are of interest to them. Heritage Belleville is excited to be participating again this year. They have chosen Saturday, September 22 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to hold their event. This year, Heritage Belleville will introduce people across Ontario to buildings throughout the community connected with Henry Corby. Arrangements have been made for those attending to have access to The Core Arts & Culture Centre, (the site of the original Belleville Public Library which was donated to the city by Mr. Corby); Signal Brewery (one of the warehouses from the old Corby Distillery); Henry’s Place (which has an original antique bar and was part of the Corby buildings); Ekort Realty (site of the Corby Bakery which is still in the basement); Corby Rose Garden; Corby Bed and Breakfast; Glanmore House (they have Henry Corby's chair); The Corby Block (current home of She Thrives); The Belleville Public Library and The Hastings Community Archives (which will highlight Corby historical information).

Heritage Belleville launched their Heritage Week program on February 22 at The Core Arts & Culture Centre, 223 Pinnacle Street. Guest speaker Richard Hughes, President of the Hastings County Historical Society, spoke on ‘Belleville: Amazing History/ Amazing People/ Amazing Buildings.’ Heritage Belleville followed with a presentation which highlighted several historical buildings in the City. At the launch there were three Outstanding Achievement in Heritage Revitalization awards presented. The recipients were Studio 237, She Thrives and Signal Brewery. Winners of these awards are nominated by members of the public as businesses they feel have contributed to the revitalization of a heritage building or property in the Belleville community. These awards are a wonderful opportunity to recognize the efforts of individuals who have demonstrated a commitment to either restoring or revitalizing an historical building or landmark. In addition to these awards, a plaque was presented to Ryan Fabricius to recognize the Heritage Designation of 338 Charles Street. SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine

There will be sites in addition to the Corby-themed locations included in the Belleville event and for updates you are encouraged to visit: doorsopenontario.on.ca

Those wishing to participate can contact: Janna Munkittrick-Colton munkittrick43@hotmail.com

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This background photograph was taken in the Core Arts & Culture Centre on Pinnacle Street, the original Belleville Public Library.


POSITIVE TRANSIT CHANGES result in increased rider numbers

“2017 has provided amazing opportunities for improvement and advancement of public transit in Belleville. 2018 promises continued progress with these initiatives and to allow us to build on our successes and make Belleville Transit your preferred ride choice.” PAUL BUCK MANAGER OF TRANSIT OPERATIONS AT THE DOWNTOWN TERMINAL BUS SHELTER TWITTER: @BUSBELLEVILLE

out the City. These shelters are spacious and bright, providing a comfortable place to get out of poor weather during the short wait for a bus.

2017 continued to see an increase in ridership, with a 9.37% increase over 2016, averaging 83,000 rides per month for a year-end total of 996,794 riders. All indications are that ridership will continue to increase in 2018, in fact February 2018 monthly passes sold out on February 1st with 1,100 passes – a first in Transit staff memory.

JUST SOME OF THE CHANGES TO COME New fareboxes were purchased in 2017 and will be installed in early 2018. Transfers will be printed at the time of fare payment, eliminating the need for drivers to punch and tear transfers. Each transfer will be in large print and scanned by the next farebox. When the fareboxes are installed a new Smart Card payment system will be rolled out, eliminating paper tickets and passes. The smart cards can be loaded by the customer via computer, telephone or at one of our point of sale terminals. The cards can hold individual trips or passes or an e-purse amount. A 30day pass is activated on the day it is first swiped. It is not bound by a calendar. Watch in late 2018 for yet another improvement in fare payment – the ability to pay with debit card, credit card or electronic device.

CHANGES MADE Route 10 is now providing better passenger service to Loyalist College, Quinte Mall and Walmart. The new Late Night Route 11 service started on January 2, 2018 and continues to increase ridership week by week. Route 11 is a unique service in that it operates on a fixed route covering the City of Belleville, but ‘flexes’ or ‘deviates’ off the route on request to pick up or drop off passengers at any bus stop in the City. Customers can call the dispatch weekdays between 8:30AM and 4:00PM and request a pick up. The dispatcher provides a pick up time at the passenger’s nearest bus stop and the booking is provided to the driver. While the driver completes the route, as they get close to the location, they deviate from the route to the booked passenger pick up. It works the same for a drop off, as the passenger boards the bus, they provide a drop off location and the driver flexes the bus route to drop off at the bus stop closest to the passenger’s destination.This service has been excellent for shift workers in the industrial park area. They know they have regular bus service until midnight seven days a week.

A team project involving Belleville Transit, Pantonium Scheduling Software developer, the Ontario Center for Excellence and the University of Toronto will review transit routes in Belleville and identify an area that could benefit by utilizing a transit on demand booking app. Passengers will have an app on their electronic device that would allow them to enter their trip information, receive options and select the one that is best for them. This selection is then electronically booked to the bus. Less empty buses driving around, more people on board going where they want to go.

Transit partnered with area businesses and introduced the Park and Ride Belleville Senators Game Day Shuttle. 2017 saw the installation of ten new bus shelters through-

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Electric buses, a seasonal tourism bus - endless options are being explored. The possibilities ahead promise continued exciting progress in our Belleville Transit system.


R E A LT O R S E A N M C K I N N E Y G I V E S

guided tour of downtown Century Village

There’s been a lot of buzz for the past year and a half about the exciting new Century Village condominium development happening in the heart of downtown Belleville. Sean McKinney, a local realtor and one of the three investors initiating this venture, takes us on a tour to showcase this great new location now in demand as a place to call home. Century Village offers 38 luxury residential condominium suites, underground parking and locker storage, a common room, access to a workout facility, a roof top patio for socializing and full and partial balconies in every unit. It is perfectly situated within walking distance of the city’s corporate community, the riverfront trail, unique retail shops and some of the best dining this area has to offer. In addition to the 38 residential condominiums on the upper three floors of the five story building, there have been upgrades of the common areas as well. Commercial condominium ownership is also an option for units on the first two floors. As a second generation realtor with a deep commitment to the downtown core, Sean was aware of the challenges of filling this building in the commercial manner for which it was initially designed. However, he felt the strong 70’s structure had the potential to become something much more. Belleville.ca

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Joined by investors Peter Knudsen and Ross McDougall, Century Village Limited was formed. They took their plans to local architect Brian Clark and with his expertise created a new vision to extensively renovate and modernize the well-known Century Place originally designed by Ed Zeidler.

“My father had his real estate office downtown and as a second generation realtor in Belleville I grew up with a deep commitment to the City’s core. These roots make the success of this project extremely gratifying.”

What began as a creative idea has evolved into a resounding success. All 38 condos have been purchased two thirds by owner occupants and one third by investors. The third and fourth floors are fully occupied. From their modern condos residents are just steps away from the year round activities and events found in the downtown core. Live entertainment, fresh produce from the Farmers’ Market, art galleries, festivals and the list goes on.

Sean McKinney

The response to this new development is yet another example of our community’s belief in our City centre and their desire to be a part of the exciting years ahead. For Century Village details visit: centuryvillage.ca

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BELLEVILLE Magazine


ROGERS HOMETOWN HOCKEY EVENT

received warm welcome from community The City of Belleville was proud to welcome Rogers Hometown Hockey Tour for a celebration of hockey on February 24 and 25. The weekend featured broadcast hosts Ron MacLean and Tara Slone, meet-and-greet opportunities with NHL alumni such as Andrew Raycroft and Kyle Wellwood, live local entertainment and engaging activities for the whole family. As part of the weekend festivities, musical super group, the Trans Canada Highwaymen, performed on-site and as part of the broadcast on Sunday. The two-day hockey festival began Saturday at noon, in downtown Belleville and concluded Sunday evening following the Rogers Hometown Hockey outdoor viewing party. The evening’s broadcast kicked off with a special pre-game show hosted live on site by MacLean and Slone from the Sportsnet Mobile Studio on Sportsnet and Sportsnet NOW, followed by a showdown between the Edmonton Oilers and the Anaheim Ducks. The energy and hockey pride our community shared in downtown Belleville was captured by the evening’s broadcast, showcasing our wonderful City.

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BELLEVILLE Magazine


Q U I N T E Q U I LT E R S G U I L D adds fabric to our City

About every three years the guild holds a massive show in Belleville to showcase the work of members and quilters from other nearby communities. Last May, the group hosted a show at the Quinte Curling Club, which showed the work of approximately 900 quilters from across Ontario. The theme of the show, in keeping with Canada 150 celebrations, was ‘what does Canada mean to me?’

People of Belleville can take comfort in knowing the Quinte Quilters Guild is here to keep the community warm. The Guild has added to the fabric of the community by hosting shows and donating quilts for people in need since 1989. Its Friendship Quilters program allows members to make quilts to donate to organizations such as the local Children’s Aid Society, Three Oaks and The Salvation Army. Its Quilts of Valour program also helps get quilts into the hands of injured soldiers.

Twamley says the next big show will likely occur in 2019 or 2020. In the meantime, quilters will continue to meet monthly and encourage each other to work hard and create great quilts.

Today, the club boasts more than 100 members, who meet on the first Wednesday of every month at the Salvation Army Church at 7 p.m. There, they share ideas and participate in challenges. For instance, a quilter can be assigned certain colours of fabrics and a theme. At the next meeting, they come back and show how they have tackled the task.

“Some quilters can make a small quilt within a day. Others may choose to work on long-term projects, involving intricate patterns. That’s the great thing about quilting; it’s a skill that allows people to display their style and personality. It’s now a form of art expression.”

But the quilters really meet to share a passion for quilting; an age-old skilled and creative hobby that in some cases, is passed down from one generation to the next in a family. “There’s a continual learning and creative process involved in quilting,” says Jo-Anne Twamley, a past president of The Guild. “There are many different kinds of quilts and people create them for different reasons.”

Jo-Anne Twamley For more on the club visit: quintequiltersguild.ca .

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STEPHEN LICENCE BICYCLES & HOBBIES celebrates 100 years in downtown Belleville How do you keep a family-owned business running for a full century? It’s a question few can answer, but Belleville’s Bongard family is an exception. The year 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of Stephen Licence Bicycle and Hobbies, a downtown store that has been connected to the family for the last 61 years. As the name implies, it was originally owned by Stephen Licence in a building on the east side of Front Street. In 1957, Licence’s son-in-law, Gerry Bongard, purchased the business and he has helped keep it a staple of the community ever since. Although the store’s location has changed five times, it’s always been on Front Street and for the last 17 years it has been at 288 Front St. The weathered yellow sign above the doors that shows old-fashioned bicycles is iconic to the downtown. Guests who enter may be greeted by Gerry’s son Kevin, who now runs the store with his wife, Anne. Their son, John (Gerry’s grandson), is also involved in the store when not at school. And Rudy, the family’s 10-year-old Corgi, may welcome customers with a friendly bark.

Gerry Bongard (left) and his son Kevin

On the left side, bicycles and kid-friendly wagons are on display. Further back, there are products for figure skaters. On the right side are products for hobbyists, such as model airplanes and trains. Near the bicycle service area there’s also a comfy chair for Gerry, who at age 88, still contributes to the store as an advisor and is happy to share stories about a life fully lived in the Friendly City.

Kevin also believes a key to the store’s longevity is that it isn’t run with a cutthroat business model. Instead, it’s run under the belief that it’s important to be helpful to customers. “It’s about helping people,” Kevin says, adding that staff will direct a customer to another location if they don’t have the product they’re looking for. “If anybody puts product before people, they’re putting the cart before the horse. That’s something I learned from my dad.”

Gerry said that long ago it became difficult for the store to compete with large sporting goods franchises. So “we try to keep ourselves as a destination store that people know.” That may involve offering products that can’t easily be found at a big box store.

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BELLEVILLE Magazine


CITY ROLLS OUT RED CARPET TO WELCOME Belleville Sens to 1st Home Game in November

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T H E R E P U TAT I O N Y O U B U I L D

determines the success of your business

MIKE WIDDIFIELD Partner at Alliance Custom Fabrication Part-time Professor, Loyalist College You’ll find well known industries such as Procter and Gamble, Cascades, Durabla, Reid’s Dairy and Magna on their client list. Only three to five percent of their customers are off the street. The primary clients are from local industries.

Alliance Custom Fabrication was initailly founded in 2005 by six co-workers from another company. Mike Widdifield was one of the six. Now this well established local business is owned by three of the original group and employs 27 workers. When starting out, their lot in the Industrial Park had two buildings on site, giving them a total of 2,500 square feet for operating space. As the business grew the need for more space prompted them to combine the two buildings into one large space totalling 7,000 square feet.

“In 2010 we were able to take some positive steps forward with the support of the Business Development Bank and Trenval,” explained Mike. “This made a huge difference in our ability to buy equipment and expand the building, enabling us to provide the service our growing customer base demanded. They have been exceptional to work with and their assistance, in addition to some grants, has helped us to develop the machine shop even further and hire more skilled labour.”

Those not familiar with terms such as millwright, machining and metal fabricating may not understand what keeps them so busy at Alliance Custom Fabrication. Mike explained the industrial services they provide their clients. • They install and repair manufacturing equipment. • They manufacture precision parts customized to very specific needs, measure and draw it up, make the part and then install it. They modify existing manufacturing equipment to facilitate safety or production improvements. • As metal fabricators they build structures such as stairs, railings, and dairy equipment such as mixers, tanks and process piping. SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine

Mike describes the networking within the Belleville business community as exceptional. “There are tours at different plants and valuable introductions are made. There are a lot of great people in this community and many believe, as we do, in trying to keep the work local whenever possible.”

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“We strive to provide the best service we possibliy can,” added Mike. “We rely on repeat business and in order to have our customers come to us on an ongoing basis we train our staff to always provide the service they would want to receive if paying for it themselves. We want to ensure our customers are completely happy with the service they receive.” One of the critical components for success is hiring, training and keeping a strong, skilled workforce. Those employed at Alliance Custom Fabrication completing an apprenticeship have their tuition and any expenses associated with their schooling paid for by Alliance, in addition to continuing to receive their wages while attending school. “I would like to see the government pushing apprenticeship programs more,” Mike commented. “These apprentices are required to spend huge amounts of money on tools much more than they are allowed to claim, and it would be extremely helpful to them if more grants were available.” From high school co-op students to millwright apprentices, Alliance is emphatic about giving them hands-on opportunities to experience the industry for what it really is. Based on this experience they are able to learn and determine if this is a path they want to pursue.

“We take our responsibility to our employees very seriously. Yes, we want them to be committed, long-term employees, loyal brand ambassadors for Alliance. But we understand that in order for that to happen, we need to have a work environment they want to be a part of. We want them to show up, positive and ready for a 40-hour week, but we know it is on us to make sure we are generating enough work for them to do that. We want them to be able to have a quality of life they can enjoy with a work environment that challenges them and they are proud to be a part of. We don’t like to have short-term workers so we need to bring in the work that can sustain full-time employment. When you get good employees, you want to hang on to them.”

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I M P O R TA N T Y E A R A H E A D

for New Chamber President

politicians will vie for the office of MPP and in October for the positions of Mayor, Councillor or School Trustee. Another priority on Suzanne’s list is to have the Chamber of Commerce complete the Canadian Chamber of Commerce Accreditation program. In 2004, representatives from all levels of the chamber network formed the Chamber Accreditation Council of Canada (CACC) and launched a national accreditation program designed to recognize chambers that satisfy a set of high standards and practices—chambers that seek to stand out, that look to the future. Accreditation is a formal acknowledgement that member chambers of commerce/boards of trade have been successfully evaluated by the CACC against rigorous national standards of policy, service and performance.

Suzanne Hunt, the 2018 Chamber of Commerce President, and partner at Templeman LLP, has no misconceptions regarding the importance of the year ahead. The upcoming Provincial and Municipal elections will dominate conversations during her term and the Chamber will take a nonpartisan role, organizing candidate forums and creating opportunities for residents to gain a better understanding of each candidate’s platform. “This role is particularly interesting at the municipal level,” states Suzanne Hunt, “because it offers us (the Chamber) the chance to really become engaged. People want to know what the candidates will do for economic development in our area. The Chamber recognizes the value of hosting election debates. The business community can make informed decisions based upon information gained directly from the candidates.” The Ontario general election is scheduled for June 7, 2018 and the Municipal election on October 22, 2018. In June

Completion of this accreditation will ensure: • Strategic focus on core chamber activities. • Uniform practices and policies across the network. • Dependable governance procedures. • Distinctive brand identity. • A competitive edge against other business organizations. • A stronger “voice of business” in our community. • An increased role in national and international policy advocacy. Suzanne’s journey to becoming a lawyer was an interesting one. Born in Montreal, she completed her undergrad degree in Journalism at Concordia University. In time, life brought her to Trenton and in 1997 she returned to school completing her Master’s in Public Administration at Queen’s University in 2000, with a focus on organizational restructuring. Working as Director of Human Resources at a cable manufacturer which was going through non-stop mergers and reorganization, she had the opportunity to apply what she had learned completing her Master’s. In 2005 Suzanne decided to pursue her lifelong dream and returned to Queen’s to study law. She became a partner at Templeman LLP in 2016 and specializes as a Municipal Solicitor and Litigator. Time away from her career is frequently spent exploring distant lands and her passport has stamps from countries such as South Africa, Argentina, Chile, Thailand and Japan. Suzanne is married to Peter Malone and has two daughters.

“The more voices you have, the more you will be heard – there is definitely strength in numbers.” Suzanne E. Hunt Partner, Templeman LLP SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine

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Successful Public Information Centre held in December for Two New Provincial Infrastructure Studies Underway in Belleville: Replacement of Bridges and Widening of Highway 401 through Belleville and Improvements to the Highway 62 Norris Whitney Bridge

On behalf of the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO), WSP is currently undertaking two preliminary design and environmental assessment studies in Belleville and the surrounding area, both being carried out as Group ‘B’ environmental assessments under the MTO Class Environmental Assessment for Provincial Transportation Facilities document. Study area for the widening of Highway 401

The first study is reviewing alternatives for the replacement of bridges and possible future widening of Highway 401, from Wallbridge-Loyalist Road to approximately 5 km east of Highway 37, including the consideration of a new Belleville East Arterial Road (BEAR) interchange. The study includes the rehabilitation and/or replacement of aging bridges, operational improvements at the Wallbridge Loyalist Road, Highway 37 and Highway 62 interchanges, active transportation and carpool lot improvements. The second study is identifying long-term improvements to the Highway 62 Norris Whitney Bridge. With major rehabilitation work anticipated in the coming years, this study is examining alternatives to facilitate rehabilitation of the bridge, and improve traffic operations and active transportation. Alternatives being considered include: rehabilitation, widening, twinning, or replacement of the bridge.

Members of the public viewing boards at December 14, 2017 Public Information Centre

challenges in the study areas. Many comments were formally submitted which will be further considered in the study process and will form part of the environmental assessment documentation. Thank you to those who attended.

Highway 62 Norris Whitney Bridge

The first Public Information Centre (PIC) was held on December 14, 2017 at The Banquet Centre in Belleville as a joint session for both projects. The event introduced the two studies and provided interested stakeholders an opportunity to review and comment on the proposed alternatives and proposed evaluation process for each project. Members of the project team were available at the PIC to discuss the projects and answer any questions. Approximately 90 people were in attendance and offered helpful insight on existing conditions and current

Next steps for each project include responding to public and stakeholder comments received during or after the first PIC, additional consultation with agencies and municipalities; completing the analysis and evaluation of the alternatives and selecting a preferred alternative; and holding a second PIC, anticipated for summer 2018. The next PIC will present and seek input on the results of the evaluation process and the preferred alternative for both projects. To view the boards presented at the PIC, for more information and to subscribe for future project updates, please visit the project websites at: www.Hwy401Belleville.ca and www.Hwy62NorrisWhitney.ca.

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If you have any questions or wish to submit formal comments, please contact: info@Hwy401Belleville.ca or info@Hwy62Norriswhitney.ca.


T H E D E S T I N AT I O N S H O P

meat market and more It may be at the apex of what is known as the Foxboro bypass, but few meat lovers who’ve ventured inside The Country Butcher pass by this shop once they’ve tried its specialty cuts of meat.

“We want to start to source more local meat,” insists Goodfellow, “but we are steadfast that we won’t, like some places, buy frozen meat, thaw it and sell it as fresh.” Storemade sausages are a feature (up to 12 varieties), as are kebabs, a myriad of stuffed chicken features (‘jalapeno hurricane,’ spinach and feta, smoked gouda and bacon and the classic Kiev were on offer this day) and even spatchcocked, or flattened chicken in a variety of spice offerings.

The location sees thousands of vehicles passing by each day; cottagers, hunters and anglers heading north, commuters to and from homes and businesses in Belleville’s Thurlow Ward or eastern Quinte West. But, owner Doug Goodfellow says The Country Butcher has developed an avid following of dedicated customers as ‘the local butcher.’

The shop chiefly employs Goodfellow and fellow butcher Paul McGrath, who combined, have more than 60 years of butchering experience, and master baker Melissa

The Country Butcher offers an array of in-store specialty meat products, quality cuts of beef, pork, lamb, chicken and sausages, as well as baked goods. Here, from left, are the food artists themselves: Melissa Gruntz, Paul McGrath, owner Doug Goodfellow and Gavin Goodfellow.

“Our business, since we opened two years ago, has more than doubled with each passing year,” said Goodfellow, who formerly owned and operated the popular Goodfellow Meats in Picton (which carries on the Goodfellow name, still in operation there). The easily-accessed corner lot at the intersection of Highway 62 and Ashley Street features a farmers’ market vegetable stand in summer, but inside is a year-round cornucopia of mouth-watering baked goods (tarts, pies and breads are a specialty) and a dazzling array of top-quality meats, cheeses and products from a variety of sources ranging from local to prime Western Canadian beef.

Gruntz, whose mom and grandmother’s recipes are the inspiration for award-winning butter and specialty tarts, pies and loaves.

“We have people who come to us from all over Belleville, lots who live here in Thurlow and people passing by regularly on Highway 62,” smiles Goodfellow. “We like that we’re a destination shop.”

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The Country Butcher. 21 Ashley Street. Foxboro


PROUD HOSTS OF ANNUAL

Municipal Public Works Trade Show The two-day annual Municipal Public Works Trade Show is held each year in early June. The Association of Ontario Road Supervisors (AORS), together with a local Association, hosts the event. The City of Belleville is excited to be hosting this year’s show - the largest of its kind in Ontario, on behalf of the District 8 Road Supervisors Association. This is a local association in Eastern Ontario that stretches from Quinte West to the Brockville Area and north to Highway 7.

An estimated 200 to 300 exhibitors of public works products and services will be registered at the trade show with approximately 2000 participants attending. This show is an opportunity for public and private sector public works employees to share information and technical developments about the materials, services and equipment required to build and maintain municipal roads and other core infrastructure.

“We are honored to be afforded the opportunity to host this annual event in 2018; absolutely the best trade show of its kind in Ontario for Public Works and Municipal Operations. Thanks to all of the volunteers, sponsors, suppliers and members of District 8 for their support in the past, present and future.” Joseph D. Reid CET, CRS-S Chairperson, 2018 AORS Tradeshow Committee District 8 Road Supervisors Association Members of District 8 Road Supervisors Association 2018 AORS Tradeshow Organizing Committee

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2018 AORS TRADE SHOW, JUNE 6 & 7 QUINTE SPORTS & WELLNESS CENTRE FOR DETAILS VISIT: AORS.ON.CA


BUILD BELLEVILLE

Information regarding City of Belleville Engineering Capital Construction Projects is available at belleville.ca/projects.

DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION NEARING COMPLETION watermains originally installed in the 1880s; the replacement of sanitary sewers and storm sewers; the replacement of the streetlight cables; and upgrades to the electrical power supply.

By the fall of 2018, the City of Belleville will have successfully completed the City Centre (Downtown) Revitalization and Redevelopment project. This project, one of the biggest under the Build Belleville umbrella, is a multiyear municipal infrastructure renewal project that involves the reconstruction of Front Street and a number of adjacent side streets in Belleville’s Downtown. Work in this project includes the replacement of aging infrastructure and the creation of a pedestrian friendly streetscape for pedestrians of all ages to use and enjoy while visiting the Downtown.

NEW STREETSCAPE On the surface, the Downtown Revitalization includes the reconstruction of roads, boulevards and sidewalks, with new asphalt, concrete and decorative brick pavements to create a new and vibrant urban streetscape. Streetscape design features include wide sidewalks for pedestrians and outdoor patios; new decorative street lights with sidewalk lighting; Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) compliant pedestrian crossings at traffic signals, street furniture, granite-curb planters for colourful summer plantings and street trees to compliment the design.

NEW UNDERGROUND INFRASTRUCTURE The City of Belleville’s Downtown Revitalization included some much needed replacements and upgrades of the underground infrastructure including the replacement of

PHASE 1 Phase 1 of the project was completed in 2015 and included work on approximately 130 meters of Station Street, from Church Street to Pinnacle Street, and 390 meters of Front Street, from Pinnacle Street to Victoria Avenue.

PHASE 3A RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY November 20, 2017 Phase 3 of the project started in 2017 with work in Phase 3A on Bridge Street East, from Pinnacle Street to the Moira River, and on Front Street within the Bridge Street East/Front Street intersection. Phase 3B, the final installment of this project, started in March 2018 and will be completed in October. Phase 3B will include work on Market Street, McAnnany Street and Front Street, between Bridge Street East and Dundas Street East.

PHASE 2 Phase 2 was completed in 2016 and included work on Front Street from Victoria Avenue to Bridge Street East, including both Victoria Avenue and Campbell Street between Front Street and Pinnacle Street.

WE’RE BUILDING A BETTER BELLEVILLE FOR YOU 28


RICK KESTER CAO City of Belleville

“It is important to me to leave things better than we found them – to be a part of positive changes being made in our community, a community where I was raised and where we raised our family.” There are no two days the same for Rick Kester, Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) of the City of Belleville, advocator, negotiator, leader, strategic thinker, advisor and manager are just some of the roles his position encompasses. On the provincial and regional levels, one day could be spent at Queen’s Park, advocating on behalf of municipalities regarding infrastructure and asset management in the ever-changing political and municipal landscape – another day could involve the Eastern Ontario Mayors’ Caucus, discussing issues of relevance to municipalities within our region, and yet other initiatives could include meetings with relevant provincial government ministries to advocate on behalf of the City of Belleville. All municipalities are competing for government resources and the CAO ensures our voice is at the table. The need to look forward is crucial. Rick works with his Executive Management Team to oversee and manage strategic planning for our community to position Belleville for ongoing success. It is not enough to deal with the present alone. It is imperative to plan for the future. Drawing on information provided by the Executive Management Team through their specific departments, recommendations are provided for the Mayor and Council to evaluate and determine a shared vision of action that will serve our community best. “We have an excellent Executive Management Team, each running their own departments and providing valuable insight and recommendations for operational best practices and the delivery of quality services with a focus on customer service excellence,” said CAO Rick Kester. This process also applies to the daily operations of the Corporation. The Mayor and Council depend upon the CAO to give them the best information possible on which to base their decisions. This information comes from not only the internal City of Belleville staff but through networking with colleagues in other municipalities, current industry practices and ensuring updated legislation details are available.

Within the Corporation itself, Rick is actively involved in the development of policies and procedures, capital and operating budget preparations, hiring, special projects, staff recognition and City representation at community events. “Whether it is extending best wishes and appreciation to staff members at their retirement ceremonies or congratulating new business owners at ribbon cutting ceremonies, I feel it is important to represent the City and show our support for their accomplishments.” Leading an organization of 500 full and part-time staff, made up of multiple unionized and non-unionized labour groups, takes a great deal of time and commitment. In his leadership role, the CAO works with the Executive Management Team to ensure staff members have the necessary resources to successfully accomplish their directives. “We strive to keep taxation as low as possible but at the same time maintain a high level of quality services within our community.” “The City of Belleville has excellent employees who all are dedicated to providing services that are important to residents as efficiently as possible. It is exciting to see the many improvements in our City taking shape now and those that we are planning for the future.” ACADEMIC CREDENTIALS & ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS University of Waterloo, Bachelor of Applied Science 1985 Licenced as a Professional Engineer in Ontario 1987 York University, Master of Business Administration 1989 University of Guelph, Master of Science 1996 Queen’s University, Master of Public Administration 2001 The Directors College (joint program between DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University & the Conference Board of Canada), received designations of Chartered Director (2016) and Human Resources & Compensation Committee Certificates (2014) 1st Vice President of the Ontario Good Roads Association, Member of the Ontario Clean Water Agency Client Advisory Board and Past President of the Municipal Engineers Association SPRING 2018

BELLEVILLE Magazine


O U R W AT E R F R O N T vision begins to take shape

The possibilities for Belleville’s waterfront development potential are captured in these drawings. As a starting point, Mayor Christopher and Council have approved funding to determine servicing needs, conduct geotechnical investigations, visioning and preliminary design, including architectural concepts, regarding the waterfront redevelopment. Belleville.ca

SPRING 2018

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Freestone Point

Watch for exciting new waterfront development updates. Belleville.ca


POSTE IT BILL 148

love it or hate it – it’s a reality

“Everyone supports the

idea of a living wage, but the way in which it is being implemented is leaving many businesses struggling to adjust. KAREN POSTE MANAGER, ECONOMIC & STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Many have heard of this bill and think of it mainly in terms of what it means for the minimum wage in Ontario. On the surface one might think higher wages will be good for the overall economy, however, when you view the legislation in its entirety (at least all that has been released to date) the effect of the legislation has far reaching and dramatic impacts for business. Raising the minimum wage is likely the most easily understood and implemented section of the Bill, but it’s the other provisions which bring out frustration from local business. Love it or hate it, Bill 148 is having a dramatic impact on Ontario businesses. Not only does it change direct payroll costs for employers, it also changes the rights and benefits afforded to each employee. At this point, there are still many questions around implementation that cannot be answered for employers, and employees have been left confused by what their rights are under the new legislation. Everyone supports the idea of a living wage, but the way in which it is being implemented is leaving many businesses struggling to adjust. I have been talking with many employers – both large and small, and the one common theme is their frustration around not having the details that will allow them to determine how it will impact their operations and their bottom line. This level of uncertainty is bad for business and it makes most everyone hesitant to hire, invest in, or train their staff. For those businesses that compete with other businesses in Ontario, the shifting landscape is shared amongst the sector so the playing field is rocky but level. However, for those businesses who compete with other companies outside the Province, their level of competitiveness has taken an immediate hit and it will take quite some time to adjust. If it can adjust. Belleville.ca

SPRING 2018

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Belleville business owners tend to be generous to a fault and they support most every charity and sponsorship opportunity that comes along. We have to remember that there isn’t an endless pot of money from which these employers can draw. We all have to recognize that the extra cost of this bill has to come from somewhere and it can directly affect the profitability and competitiveness of our businesses, or their ability to support community initiatives. Our businesses are continuing to keep their attention focused on their customers and their business, but we can all help by understanding how difficult these legislative changes are – even for businesses that pay well above the minimum wage. Most will adapt and change and somehow make it all work but it is incumbent upon all of us in this community to do everything we can to support our businesses. As the living wage increases and labour legislation changes, we must support our local businesses like never before. Continuing to shop local, work hard and be positive ambassadors for the City and region will provide a stronger foundation which is necessary for these dedicated businesses to keep supporting the quality of life here we all value. Next time you have an opportunity to meet a local business owner or manager, please take the time to thank them for continuing to believe in this community and for supporting it in ways that most of us take for granted.

For further information regarding Bill 148 visit: www.ontario.ca/page/plan-fair-workplaces-andbetter-jobs-bill-148


B E L L E V I L L E WA N T S Y O U

Are you an employer who needs staff? Are you looking for a job or a new career? Have we got a solution for you! The City of Belleville has a unique program called “Work in Belleville” which is designed to help both employers and job seekers. City staff collect and keep an up-to-date database of resumes from people who are looking for work or looking for new opportunities. We categorize the resumes we receive according to the skill sets and experience of each individual and we will provide the relevant resumes to any local employer who is looking for those skills or experience. There is no cost for this service and it has helped match hundreds of job seekers with jobs in our community. If you would like us to include your resume in the database or would like access to the database when filling permanent positions, please contact us using the information noted below. This program also includes semi-annual job fairs – each spring and fall, the City of Belleville partners with the City of Quinte West to host the Quinte Region Career and Training Fair (QRCTF). This spring’s event will take place on April 24th from 10am to 5pm at the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre and it is a free event for anyone looking to hire or looking for work. Employers from across the region are encouraged to attend at no cost – simply spend the day collecting resumes and interviewing candidates. The job fair allows everyone to meet up with potential employees and start assessing their suitability right from the first interaction. The fair also allows job seekers to network with a sampling of local employers looking to hire, all in one convenient location.

Whether you’re new to the workforce, looking to progress into a new position or simply changing your career, the Quinte Region Career and Training Fair has something for you. You can easily talk with Employment Ontario staff to ensure your resume is appropriate, get a line on what jobs and careers are in most demand – even practice your interview skills if that is the job hunting stage that is most intimidating for you. If a career change and/or training is needed, come out and talk with the many local training providers that will be in attendance – whether you want to enroll in full time academics at Loyalist College or you want to train as a truck driver, hair stylist or any number of careers, the April 24th event could be a real eye opener for you – your first step toward finding a career path that suits you.

For more information on the Quinte Region Career and Training Fair, please visit our web site at quintecareerfair.ca or call our office at 613-967-3238.


APRIL

JUNE

April 6 – 9, 2018

June 3 2018

QUINTE HOME & LIFESTYLE SHOW April 7, 2018

BELLEVILLE LIONS CLUB SHOW & SHINE CAR SHOW

QUINTE REGION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY FAIR

June 9, 2018

April 24, 2018

June 10, 2018

QUINTE REGION CAREER AND TRAINING FAIR April 27, 2018

TRASH BASH

MAY May 4 - 6, 2018

ANNUAL KIWANIS WALLEYE WORLD FISHING DERBY May 5, 2018

HEALTHY LIVING EXPO May 24 – 28, 2018

ARTS EN PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL May 26, 2018

ARTS FEST ON THE BAY May 26, 2018

FAMILY ARTFEST

PRIDE PARTY IN THE PARK QUINTE TOY CON June 16, 2018

QUINTE BASS CHAMPS June 29 - 30, 2018 BERKLEY B1 FISHING TOURNAMENT

JULY July 1, 2018

CANADA DAY CELEBRATION JULY 12 - 15, 2018

BELLEVILLE WATERFRONT & MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL July 26 - 28, 2018

EMPIRE ROCKFEST July 27 - 29, 2018

WHEELS ON THE BAY

Belleville Magazine Spring 2018  
Belleville Magazine Spring 2018