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Did you know? Since 1930, the City of Belleville has required that all dogs three months or older must be registered with the City and have a valid dog tag. Dog tags must be renewed annually and are available at City Hall, the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre, Belleville Water and Quinte Humane Society or online at www.Belleville.ca. In the event your pet becomes lost, a dog tag is their ticket back home. If Animal Control finds your pet and it has a tag, they will return your pet to you free of charge. If your pet becomes lost and is found by another person, that person can call City Hall and we will then contact you and let you know where your pet can be picked-up. Getting a microchip or tattoo for your pet are also great ways to make sure your pet can be identified however they are not a requirement or a substitute for a dog tag.

Find out more online at www.Belleville.ca/DogTag


Belleville Magazine

Welcome On behalf of City Council, Senior Management and all of the staff at the City of Belleville, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the spring edition of BELLEVILLE Magazine.

CITY OF BELLEVILLE 169 Front Street Belleville, Ontario K8N 2Y8 Tel: (613) 968-6481 TTY: (613) 967-3768 www.Belleville.ca

mayor

Neil R. Ellis Council

Egerton Boyce, Taso Christopher, Pat Culhane, Jackie Denyes, Jodie Jenkins, Tom Lafferty, Jack Miller, Garnet Thompson Senior Management Chief Administrative Officer

Rick Kester Director, Engineering & Development Services

Rod Bovay Director, Finance

Brian Cousins Director, Human Resources

John Martin Director, Recreation, Culture & Community Services

Mark Fluhrer Acting Director of Corporate Services/Clerk

The first edition of the BELLEVILLE Magazine was very well received and I want to thank the community for sending along such positive feedback. This publication ensures that our community is kept up-to-date on the many projects that we are completing to keep our Municipality at the leading edge of progress. In this edition, we are pleased to feature information to our residents on sustainable energy, focusing on solar, biogas and hydroelectric energies. Among the many projects happening within the City, The BUILD BELLEVILLE Downtown Revitalization project has been a very exciting initiative for the City of Belleville. Office for Responsive Environments (ORE), the design firm awarded the contract for the design proposal for downtown, has been working with city staff and members of the public in putting together a comprehensive design proposal for downtown. The first open house took place on February 19th and it was encouraging to see the amount of community members present and actively taking part. The revitalization of our downtown is vital to the growth of our entire community. Since announcing plans for the downtown revitalization project there have been several new business and development inquires brought forward. The vision behind this project is growth, not only in the downtown, but for the entire community. The project provides a vast amount of economic impact for our entire community.

Matt MacDonald Director of Emergency Services/Fire Chief

Mark MacDonald Manager, Economic & Strategic Initiatives

Karen Poste

BELLEVILLE Magazine is published quarterly by the City of Belleville. Editor - Aaron Bell abell@city.belleville.on.ca BELLEVILLE Magazine is available online and in an accessible text-only format at www.Belleville.ca Printed in Canada All information Š2014, City of Belleville. No use is permitted without written permission.

I encourage all members of the public to drop by the Project Centre, 116 Pinnacle St., to check on the status of the project and to bring your ideas forward. We are building a better Belleville for you! As always, I welcome your feedback and look forward to working together in making the City of Belleville a great place to live, work, play and invest. Warm Regards,

Neil R. Ellis Mayor

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

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Belleville

THE MAGAZINE ABOUT YOUR COMMUNITY • SPRING 2014

Contents 10 THE CITY OF BELLEVILLE IS a LEaDEr In MUnICIPaL SUSTaInaBLE EnErgY InITIaTIVES

“It is clear that we can no longer expect traditional sources of energy to provide our community with the energy that it needs.”

6

Senior Centre

7

DocFest Debut

The Senior Centre at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre is a meeting place for older adults in our community

Celebrating City Hall - the mini documentary about the renovation of City Hall 25 years ago - was featured at this year’s edition of Downtown DocFest

8

Election Time

8

Community Garden

9

OSUM 2015

4

14

Career Fair

15

BuildBelleville Progress Report

The City of Belleville is partnering with the City of Quinte West to host the Quinte Region Career & Training Fair this spring at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre

Updates on the municipality’s ongoing BuildBelleville infrastructure rehabilitation program

23

Swimming Success

24

Fleeting Fancy

26

Home Show

28

Having Impact

30 32 33

Heritage Property Profile Community Notices Events Calendar

The municipal election is coming this fall. Find out what you need to know to run

The City’s Community Gardens program is back this spring

Belleville is hosting the Ontario Small Urban Municipalities Conference in 2015

Spring 2014

Belleville Magazine

A City of Belleville employee profile on Tanya Grierson, one of the faces that have made the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre a smashing success

The City’s bus fleet has recently completed a full overhaul

The Quinte Home Builders Association Home & Renovations Show returns to the QS&WC this spring

A business profile on IMPACTO, a family business that makes a difference in our community


Spring Blooms City parks will soon be filled with colourful owers as spring starts to bloom again in Belleville. PhOTO BY AArON BELL/CITY OF BELLEVILLE


Belleville Magazine

What’s New

The Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre welcomes thousands of people through the doors every month and offers programs for virtually everyone in the community, including seniors.

The Seniors Centre in the QSWC offered free Healthy Living Workshops for Seniors in February and March. The Healthy Living Workshops focused on how healthy eating, physical activity and other small changes can produce big results. Seniors also have the opportunity to enjoy special physical activity programs, as well as social func-

tions like Classic Movie Nights, that are geared to local seniors. “The Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre is a terrific place for seniors in our community,” said Tanya Grierson, Recreation Program Supervisor. “They can meet new friends while learning how to make small changes that can have a big impact on their health.” To find out more about the Seniors Centre, contact (613) 966-4632, go online at www. quintesportsandwellnesscentre.ca or visit the customer service desk at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre.

Belleville Community Profile Recognized by Economic Developers Council of Ontario Belleville’s 2013 Community Profile publication was recognized with an Honourable Mention for Marketing Excellence in Ontario (Publications, Communities less than 50,000) by the Economic Developers Council of Ontario (EDCO) at their annual awards ceremony in Toronto in February. Belleville’s Community Profile is published by Belleville’s Economic Development and Strategic Initiatives Department and was designed by Fine Line Design. 6

Spring 2014

“We’re really honoured to receive this recognition from EDCO,” said Angela Allen, who oversees the publication for the City. “We wanted to develop a publication that did a great job of showcasing the wonderful assets that we have in this community and are happy that we were able to accomplish that,” she adds. The Community Profile is distributed to businesses and people that are considering relocating to Belleville.

Belleville Magazine

Belleville’s Community Profile received an honourable mention at the EDCO Marketing Excellence Awards in Toronto in February.

Photo: Karen Weichenthal

Seniors Centre Open at QSWC


Belleville Magazine

What’s New

The City of Belleville has increased their fundraising efforts for the United Way every year since 1999 and have set a new milestone that they are hoping to reach in 2014. “We’re going for 14 in ‘14,” said Angela Allen, the City’s United Way Committee Chair. “We raised over $12,000 last year and have targeted $14,000 as our fundraising goal this year.” The City raises funds for the United Way through payroll deductions, donations, charity

Belleville Councillors Garnet Thompson and Pat Culhane volunteering at a City Hall United Way BBQ last summer.

Bar-B-Q’s in the summer and an annual United Way auction at City Hall in November. “The United Way supports so many worthwhile causes,” said Allen. “We know that the work we do to help with their fundraising goes a long way in our community.” The first United Way BBQ is May 15 in Market Square behind City Hall.

City Hall Film Screens At Downtown DocFest The City’s short film Celebrating City Hall was one of the local features at this year’s edition of the Downtown DocFest in February. Celebrating City Hall was written and directed by Communications Coordinator Aaron Bell and produced by the City of Belleville to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the major renovation of City Hall. “It was tremendous to see this movie included in the lineup of terrific documentaries at DocFest this year,” Bell said. “We had a great turnout and the feedback was very positive.” DocFest enjoyed a successful third year; with a

sold-out crowd attending the opening night at the Empire Theatre, and all of the weekend event passes selling out. DocFest featured more than 50 films; including 15 by local filmmakers. Celebrating City Hall can be viewed online at Belleville.ca.

City Hall Up For Designation Retired architect and engineer Bill White, who was responsible for the renovation of City Hall 25 years ago, has applied to the Ontario Association of Architects to recognize Belleville City Hall with a “Landmark Designation.”

Photo Courtesy of Community Archives

Belleville Working Towards United Way Fundraising Goal

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

7


Belleville Magazine

What’s New

Community gardening is a recently emerging trend across North America and Belleville is playing along with a pair of Urban Garden locations. Belleville currently has two gardens located in Ponton Park on Dundas St. W. and in West Hill on Octavia Street. There are 41 raised bed plots that are wheelchair accessible and provide members of the community with an ideal location to garden. “Residents saw a movie at DocFest (in 2012) about urban gardening and asked if we could do that here as well,” said Melanie Zeitz-Morrish, Green Program Coordinator for the City. “We looked into it and saw that it was a terrific community program.” 8

Spring 2014

Zeitz-Morrish said that the plots were used by many different age groups in the community last year. Applications for garden plots will be accepted until April 11 and can be made online at www. Belleville.ca, picked up at City Hall, the Public Library or contact Melanie Zeitz-Morrish (mmorrish@city.belleville.on.ca or 613-968-6481 x3219) for more information.

Belleville Magazine

Municipal Election Coming This Fall to Belleville The 2014 Municipal Election will be held in Ontario on October 27th. In Belleville, elected offices include the Mayor and eight City Councillors (six in Ward 1 - Belleville and two in Ward 2 - Thurlow). Candidates must file their nomination papers

in the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall between January 2 and 2:00 p.m. on Nomination Day - September 12, 2014. Candidates can find information about nomination forms as well as a Candidate’s Guide online at www.Belleville.ca.

Long Time Mayor’s Assistant Retires From City Hall After more than three decades and four mayors, long-time City Hall employee Ann Gray retired from her post as Mayor’s Assistant in November. Gray worked for the City for 35 years in different roles and was the Mayor’s Assistant for Belleville Mayors George Zegouras, Ross McDou-

gall, Mary-Anne Sills and most recently Neil Ellis. “We will miss Ann very much at City Hall,” Ellis said. “She has been a big part of what makes City Hall tick for a long time and her work here has been greatly appreciated. All of Council and Staff wish her the best.”

Photo: Aaron Bell

Photos: Melanie Zeitz-Morrish

Community Gardens Return This Spring


Belleville Magazine

What’s New

Wellness Centre Welcomes Huge Crowds The Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre has only been open for 19 months but it has already become a focal point for thousands in our community. During peak season more than 30,000 people visited the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre each week and more than 18,000 people have registered for Wellness passports. “We knew that there was going to be a lot of interest in this facility once it opened but it is exceeding all of our expectations,” said Mark Fluhrer, the City’s Director of Recreation, Culture and Community Services and the driving force behind the construction of the $35 million facility. 52,000 people have taken ad-

vantage of public swimming in the facility’s pools and nearly 7,000 people have enjoyed public skating. “This facility caters to virtually everyone in our community,” Fluhrer said. “With the different

facilities, groups, activities and events, there really is something for everyone.” Find more information, facility hours and schedules online at QuinteSportsandWellnessCentre.ca

Belleville hosting OSUM Conference in 2015 The City of Belleville is proud to announce that it will be the official Host City for the 62nd annual Ontario Small Urban Municipalities (OSUM) Conference in 2015. This three day event will be held April 30 - May 2, 2015 at the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre. What is OSUM? The Ontario Small Urban Municipalities is the small urban municipal voice of the Province. OSUM is an integral part of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) and has a number of its Board members which also serve on the AMO Board of Directors. Policy

and research activities are undertaken by OSUM through the staff at AMO. A delegation from Belleville will be attending the 2014 OSUM conference in Parry Sound, ON at the

end of April to promote the 2015 conference in Belleville. During the 2015 conference Belleville will welcome up to 400 conference attendees consisting of municipal politicians and staff. www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

9


Belleville Magazine

Sustainable Energy

Solar Powered Savings The City of Belleville is taking a proactive approach to developing renewable energy sources including several solar farms that generate hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue for our community.

Harnessing the Sun Belleville has solar farms on several City owned buildings including this one on Pinnacle Street

By Laura Voskamp

Sustainability comes in a variety of ways, shapes and forms to impact both the world at large as well as each individual community. For the City of Belleville, solar farms have proven to be a key up-andcoming resource in the pursuit of renewable energy. Just a few years ago, one of it’s first initiatives was a rooftop solar farm atop of the Property Management building on Pinnacle Street, a visible project aimed at igniting a discussion about solar energy in Belleville. Since then, the City has been consistently increasing its efforts to use solar energy as much as possible. Right now, Belleville is home to the largest municipally-owned rooftop solar farm in Canada. As you enter the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre at 256 Can10

Spring 2014

“The solar farm atop the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre can power 45 houses for up to 20 years.” nifton Road, you may not yet be aware of all of the new construction’s highly energy efficient features; namely, the 2,132 solar panels spanning the rooftops of both the Yardmen and Wally Dever Arenas. While the facility itself makes use of natural light, waste heat recovery and water conservation technologies, the open roof space silently does its part to reduce energy cost and consumption. All of the power created by this

Belleville Magazine

farm is funneled back into the energy grid, making a significant dent in the city’s reliance on carbon based fuels. This just goes to show that sustainable initiatives don’t have to be visible to passers-by in order to make a major impact on community well-being. As you enjoy your visits to the Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre, its solar farm quietly produces green renewable energy throughout the year. “Solar pays back very well,” says Joel Carr-Braint, Property Manager for the City of Belleville. “This farm alone is able to create enough energy to generate between $350,000 and $400,000 per year for the City,” he adds. In concrete terms, the farm atop the Sports and Wellness Centre can power about 45 houses for


Belleville Magazine

Sustainable Energy

Power Generator The Quinte Sports and Wellness Centre houses the largest municipally owned rooftop solar farm in Canada Photo: Ted Marecak

up to 20 years. The return on investment is major for solar farms. Carr-Braint says that farms such as this pay back within 8-10 years, meaning 10-12 years of profit over a contract of 20 years. Areas like the rooftops of large buildings, such as the Wally Dever and Yardmen arenas, are a prime location for the construction of these farms due to the large

amounts of land needed to host a utility scale farm producing energy on a commercial level. The difference is that, on land, one of the potential downfalls of solar farms is the compromisation of natural habitats and farmable land, but this issue is solved by making use of roof space. The Sports and Wellness Centre has one of the largest rooftops in

Metered Success The solar farm at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre has already generated enough energy to power 6,018 light bulbs for one year. You can follow the progress online by clicking “Solar Panels” on the “City Hall” tab at Belleville.ca 12

Spring 2014

Belleville Magazine

the area, which is why it became the ideal spot for this project to be realized. The panels atop the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre use Solar Photovoltaics (PV), a technology which converts sunlight into electricity. PV is very efficient in colder temperatures, making it well suited for the Canadian climate. Additional, PV technology is a reliable


Belleville Magazine

Sustainable Energy

source of energy in the long term, lasting longer than any other energy sources. The City is also making use of solar thermal technology, which heats the fresh air coming into the police station rather than drawing in ice cold air, which takes more energy to heat. Carr-Braint says that two applications are currently in for approval by March of 2014, which would see another 100kw system on top of the Veridian building, and a 200kw system atop the water treatment facility. In the meantime, the City is partnering with Veridian and is now looking at two more locations for solar projects on the Public Works buildings on both Wallbridge Crescent and Ritz Road. For Belleville, this means clean, renewable energy that will sustain the health and well-being of future generations in years to come.

City taking a leadership role with sustainable energy sources While solar energy has clearly been the primary focus of the City of Belleville’s Sustainable Energy Plan, it doesn’t end there according to Mayor Neil Ellis, who is championing several sustainable energy projects including a biogas generator and hydro-electric dams that will help ease the City’s reliance on non-renewable energy sources. “It’s clear that we can no longer expect traditional sources of energy to provide our community with the energy it needs moving forward,” Ellis said. “We are working with other municipalities and upper levels of government to make sure that we are reaching those objectives as quickly as possible.” Biogas is a renewable energy and is produced when organic matter breaks down in an oxygen free environment. Hydro-electric dams create energy from falling water to

turn a propeller-like component called a turbine. The turbine converts the flowing water into mechanical energy. Recent advancements in hydroelectric technology allows smaller sources of water (like the Moira River) to produce enough energy to provide a return on investment of the equipment. The City also continues to monitor energy cutting opportunities throughout the organization. “We have been very active here (with the Green Energy Act)” says Joel Carr-Braint, Property Manager for the City of Belleville. “We have increased insulation to save energy costs and some parks have been using natural water for sprinkler systems instead of City water. Every time we change a light, we put an efficient bulb in, and the same goes for heating systems.”

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

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Belleville Magazine

Career Fair

Quinte Career Fair Connects Employers and Job Seekers The City of Belleville is partnering with the City of Quinte West for the Spring Quinte Career & Training Fair on Thursday, April 24 from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. www.QuinteCareerFair.ca

Thursday April 24 • 11:00 am to 7:00 pm

By Gerry Fraiberg

Whether you’re looking for your first job or just lost the one you’ve had for years due to downsizing, a career fair can provide a one-stop job hunting experience. With up to 2,000 job seekers, it can be a bit daunting, however your day will be more enjoyable if you come prepared. Nancy Lewis, Executive Director of Meta Employment Services, has some tips to help make your job hunting experience more productive. The number one item is to have really good quality resumés with you. “If you’re interested in different jobs, you should have different resumés ready for those positions,” Lewis says.

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Spring 2014

“And you’ve got to be on top of your game. You want to make sure you’ve reviewed your resumé, dates and employer names so that if you’re chatting with an employer at the career fair, you’ll have the answers to their questions. You might want to walk around the floor first to see who’s there and decide who you want to approach.” Lewis suggests you should treat the career fair like a job interview and dress appropriately for the job you’re after. She says if you’re looking for a construction job, then it’s appropriate to wear clean jeans, clean shirt and a reasonable pair of shoes. Business casual is appropriate for an office type job.

Belleville Magazine

Thursday April 24

She advises against She also recommends 11:00 a.m. that, - 7:00 bringing young children if you p.m. get a business with you because it is dis- card from a potential tractingQuinte and you’re being & employer and they accept Sports Wellness Centre sized up by the company your resumé, you should (Gymnasium) representatives 265 staffing send an email or note Cannifton Road the different tables at the thanking the individual Belleville job fair. In fact, Nancy for the time they took in recommends going on speaking with you about your own, even if you the job. have a friend or spouse “It’s the little things who is also looking for that are sometimes the a job. She states “you’re difference between somethere to sell yourself.” body remembering you or “Prepare yourself with not, and making a decigeneric questions that sion on whether to call would be appropriate you in,” Lewis says. • for any employer such as; what’s their hiring process? How long do Employers can register they keep applications on for the Quinte Career & file? Could you follow up Training Fair until April 10. at designated periods of Please visit time so you could find out www.QuinteCareerFair.ca if there are any openfor more information. ings,” Lewis says.


SPRING 2014


PROGRESS REPORT MARCH 2014

Project Progress Report Downtown Revitalization Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Issue Construction Contracts

Construction

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Issue Construction Contracts

Construction

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Issue Construction Contracts

Construction

NorthEast Feedermain Issue Construction Contracts

Construction

Bay Bridge Phase 1

(Surcharge Contract)

North Park Gardens Road Projects Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Complete Design

Issue Approvals Construction Construction Contracts

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Upgrade North East Industrial Park Roads

Old Madoc Road

Bay Bridge Road / Dundas Street West - Phase 2

Boundary Road

College Street Extension

Maitland Drive

Tracey St./Sidney St. & Bell Blvd/Sidney St. Intersections

Bronk Road & Bridge

Herchimer Avenue

Old Highway 2

2014-2015 Projects Police Services Facility Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades Environmental Remediation for Gasification Plant

Complete Design

Issue Approvals Construction Construction Contracts

Mineral Road Farnham Road Foxboro Bridge / Ashley Street Grass Boulevard

Follow our progress online at www.BuildBelleville.ca or on Twitter - #BuildBelleville


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Design Direction takes shape for Do More than 200 people came to the BuildBelleville Project Centre to take part in the first open house for the Downtown Revitalization Project on Feb. 19 and many of them walked away impressed by the direction the City is taking with it. Representatives from Office for Responsive Environments (ORE),

the architect and designers that have been retained by the City for this project, were on hand to present several design concepts for the Downtown streetscape and revitalized environment to a large group of Downtown stakeholders and other members of the community. The City also presented an Eco-

nomic Impact Report that outlined several projections for the Downtown Revitalization Project. “This is a critical moment in the process since this is the first opportunity for our team to show the public the design directions that we have taken in the early preliminary design work,” said Josh Fullan

Extent of Current Reconstruction

Church Street

tion Sta eet Str Pinnacle Street

Pinnacle Street

Victoria Avenue

NORTH STATION THRESHOLD

Fro

nt S tree t

LIBRARY TERRACE

Front Street

FRONT STREET TERRACE

a oir

M

RIVERFRONT COMMONS

er Riv

DOWNTOWN

BELLEVILLE

UP FRONT

R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N OFFICE for RESPONSIVE ENVIRONMENTS

with

LEA Consulting Engineers Golder Associates UFORA Arborist

Geotechnical


Downtown Belleville Revitalization “I think this is a very exciting time for the City of Belleville. There is a lot of work that has preceded this.”

from Office for Responsive Environments. “We show people the design directions and get feedback from the public - who are really the stakeholders in this project - then we take that back and refine the vision.” Guests watched presentations from the City and ORE and had a chance to ask questions and view several design concept boards during the open house. “I think this is a very exciting time for the City of Belleville,” said Paula Finkle from Finkle Electric, (cont’d on next page)

Extent of Current Reconstruction

Dundas Street East Market Street

McAnnany Street

Bridge Street East

Campbell Street

Pinnacle Street

SOUTH DUNDAS THRESHOLD

RY ACE Extent of Current Reconstruction

Front Street

Front Street

FOUR CORNERS THRESHOLD

RONT ONS

CITY HALL COMMONS

er Moira Riv

N

Extent of Current Reconstruction

DES IG N DI R E CT I ONS

D O W N T O W N B E L L E V I L L E R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N SCALE

1 : 500


Downtown Vision Coming Together in Revitalization Plan (cont’d from previous page)

who also sits on the Mayor’s Task Force for Downtown. “There is a lot of work that has preceded this. I’ve been involved for quite a long time and to be here tonight and listen to the high level of thinking and vision that Belleville has done, I think is very commendable.” Downtown Belleville currently has more than 500,000 square feet of retail, commercial and office space and more than 2,000 employees and entrepreneurs currently work Downtown. More than 6,000 residents live within 750 meters of Downtown. The BuildBelleville Downtown Revitalization plan is expected to drive new construction, employment and residents that are conservatively estimated to result in more than $220 million. “This isn’t about putting lipstick on a pig and spending millions of dollars on something that

“This isn’t about putting lipstick on a pig and spending millions of dollars on something that is going to fail.” is going to fail,” said Belleville Councillor Jack Miller. “This is an all-encompassing project that deals with the social issues, the cleanliness of Downtown, the services and then ultimately have a Downtown that will be vibrant and have a positive economic impact on our community.” The next Open House will be held on April 9 (doors open at 6:30 p.m./presentation at 6:45). •


A Revitalized Downtown links our community together The BuildBelleville Downtown Revitalization project is about much more than just fixing up the run down aspects of our main street, according to the chair and vicechair of the Mayor’s Task Force committee that has been trusted with the task of redeveloping Downtown Belleville. “Downtown is a barometer of the health of our entire community,” said Mayor Neil Ellis, who struck the Mayor’s Task Force in 2010 to study the current state of Downtown and develop a revitalization plan. “It’s the core of our city and we need to ensure that it’s a positive reflection of who we are and who we want to be as a community.”

Councillor Jack Miller is the vice-chair of the Mayor’s Task Force and says that the key to transforming Downtown into a vibrant and successful area is to attract people to live and work in Downtown. “If somebody puts up a building, if somebody improves a building - we want to see another thousand people living Downtown - which will bring along the business side of things,” Miller said. “We’ve gotten to the point where we have conceptual drawings of not just what the Downtown can look like but what the Downtown can be while addressing what the impetus for all of this is the improved infrastructure.” •

“Downtown is a barometer of the health of our entire community. We need to ensure that it is a positive reflection of who we are as a community.” Find more information online at www.BuildBelleville.ca


Bay Bridge Project Underway The first phase of the Bay Bridge Road/Dundas Street West project includes constructing the new south approach for the proposed structure. The subsequent phase includes:

• Replacement of 450 diameter watermain constructed in the 1930’s • Intersection improvements to the realigned Bay Bridge Road/Dundas Street West intersection including two left turn lanes southbound • Two left turn lanes on the structure for westbound traffic • Landscape enhancements on the existing south approach

• Gateway features at Bay Bridge Road/Dundas Street West intersection • Construction of a new recreation trail

Bytown Engineering, in partnership with Sanchez Engineering, have been chosen as the design team. Design drawings are proceeding to the 60% complete stage. A Public Information Centre (PIC) will take place this spring where final designs will be available for public viewing. •

Bay Bridge Phase 1

(Surcharge Contract)

Bay Bridge/ Dundas St. W. Phase 2

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Issue Construction Contracts

Construction

Hire Design Team

Public Consultation

Design

Approvals

Issue Construction Contracts

Construction


Belleville Magazine

Working for You

Tanya Grierson rECrEaTIOn PrOgraM SUPErVISOr

rECrEaTIOn CULTUrE & COMMUnITY SErVICES

Exciting. Tanya Grierson says that’s the word most used by staff to describe the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre when the facility opened in 2012. That excitement hasn’t died down either with more than 30,000 visits per week made during peak season. Sitting in her second floor office, Tanya beams, “I would say that we are way more successful than we ever imagined that we could have been.” The woman who oversees all of the recreation programs for the city answers requests for more programming time. “Some programs that were being offered once a week, are now offered five times a week,” Tanya said. “We increased the volume of what we’re offering and increased the number of part-time staff to run the programs.” Tanya is responsible for all recreation programs at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre - aquatics, programs in the senior centre, Youth Room, gymnasium, fitness studios and the pre-school room. She hires, schedules and trains staff, supervises programs and helps customers. And, she says, “it’s always really, really busy.” Tanya grew up around a pool and has always worked around a pool. She was a competitive swimmer and coached competitive swimming for 12 years. She has worked in recreation since high school; graduating from the Early Childhood Education program at St. Lawrence College in 1992. She moved to Belleville in 1998 to be the head coach for the Belleville Youth Swim Team and that year, she started working with the City as a lifeguard. As an early childhood educator, she says she’s learned a lot about people and the role of working with people, skills that serve her well, given the popularity of the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. Story and Photo by Gerry Fraiberg

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Belleville Magazine

Transit

Moving the City Belleville’s Transit system has 15 fully accessible buses that move 900,000 people around the City every year. Story & Photos by Gerry Fraiberg

“Where can we take you?” The branding question appears in the window by the front door of all Belleville Transit buses. With a fleet of 15 buses traveling nine routes, the answer is all over the city, south of the 401. Transit Manager Matt Coffey says they tried to design it so everyone is within 400 metres of a bus stop, which is less than a five minute walk. He says for $2.40, theoretically, you can get anywhere in half an hour because every bus runs on that cycle, from Monday to Saturday, with hourly service on Sunday. All buses depart from the downtown Pinnacle Street terminal. Coffey says the idea of public transit is to get people out of their cars, adding it is more noticeable 24

Spring 2014

in big cities where you have a lot of traffic congestion. “A monthly pass costs $72,” Coffey says. “Which is quite reasonable compared to a $500 monthly car payment, plus gas, oil, tires and insurance.” The 40 foot Low Floor Series white and red city coaches are made by Nova Bus, a division of Volvo bus, located at Saint-Eustache, Quebec, just outside of Montreal. They’re designed to keep working daily in all weather conditions. The structure is stainless steel, while the outside shell is made of fibreglass with thermoplastic skirt panels and the floor is made of composite, which means no costly annual anti-corrosion treatment. The roof mounted HVAC system

Belleville Magazine

“More than 900,000 people ride Belleville Transit annually” ensures riders and operators are comfortable year round. Nova designs their buses with safety in mind, they are equipped with alloy side-impact barriers, to offer superior resistance in the event of a side or rear collision, while two parallel stainless steel tubes create a protective cell for the driver in case of frontal collision. Coffey says all the buses are accessible. Each bus has a kneeling feature, which will bring the floor closer to the ground and a ramp feature that comes out of the bus and sits on the curb at a very ap-


Belleville Magazine

Transit

proachable grade. Anybody who’s in a wheelchair or has a walker and would feel more comfortable on a ramp can request that it be lowered. “Once aboard, they can lock their wheels to one of the two priority seating areas at the front of the bus,” Coffey says. The buses feature Cummins diesel engines with ZF transmission. The price tag for all of this safety and technology is $450,000 per bus. Fortunately, the provincial gas tax program and the former Ontario Bus Replacement Program, which ended in 2010 covers the capital cost of these buses. Belleville Transit employs a supervisor and three mechanics to maintain its relatively new fleet.

But they don’t do engine work in house, opting instead for a rebuild with full factory warranty. There are two fuel tanks at the Coleman Street garage and a bus wash inside. Each bus is fueled and washed nightly. Public Works trucks now use the bus wash as well. Coffey says ridership is around 900,000, annually. He notes the big employers like the Quinte Mall, Sears, and some of the call centres rely on Belleville Transit for employees to get to work. Loyalist College is the biggest destination as many students live in the city. Belleville transit also operates the mobility bus service, running the same hours as normal bus service and at the same price, but with smaller buses under contract. •

Belleville Transit provides service throughout the community seven days a week from 5:00 a.m. to 10:40 p.m. depending on the route. Please visit www.Belleville.ca for complete route, schedule and fare information.

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

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Belleville Magazine

What’s On

Quinte Home Show Returns for Spring The annual Quinte Home and Renovation Show returns to the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre on March 28-30. By Gerry Fraiberg

In the Spring, a homeowner’s fancy turns to… renovations. This will be the 43rd year that members of the Quinte Home Builders Association will host the Quinte Home & Renovation show; an event that has become one of the local harbingers of spring. From Friday, March 28th through to Sunday, March 30th, Rinks A and B at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre will showcase home builders, trades people and suppliers in a popular one stop venue. In years past the event was held at the Quinte 26

Spring 2014

Mall, the former Ben Bleecker Auditorium, then the Yardmen and Wally Dever Arenas. But Quinte Home Builders Association president Brian Garrard can’t say enough about the new facility. “Rinks A and B are nice and bright,” Garrard said. “The two arenas give us a lot of space for our needs.” Garrard praises the design and city staff. “There is great access for exhibitors to move products in and out with nice big loading doors. City staff is very good about accessibility and

Belleville Magazine

“6,500 visitors attend the Quinte Home & Renovation Show annually.” making it ready for us to set up the booths.” Garrard says the exhibitors love the show, and so do visitors, who come from as far away as Kingston and Peterborough. Even though the event is indoors, weather is still a factor in getting people out. In recent years, they have welcomed 6,500 visitors to explore booths from 100 exhibitors. Of 137 members of the Quinte Home Builders

Association, 29 are builders. The rest are listed as renovators, suppliers, trade contractors and service professionals. Everything from flooring and carpeting to roofing, window covering, electrical, plumbing, heating and landscaping. You can see appliances, TVs and learn about mortgages and building permits. Returning this year is the Lifestyle area, which Garrard says includes businesses such as a day spa, jewelry, a wine company and a chiropractor. Something new this year is a directional flow. Where visitors will go


Belleville Magazine

What’s On

in the entryway and be guided through the two arenas so they will pass every booth there. “The idea is to avoid the problem of some exhibitors being missed due to visitors taking short cuts,” Garrard said. There will be three daily prizes of gift certificates from member businesses worth an average of $2,000 each day. The grand prize draw late Sunday afternoon will be for a patio dining table with six chairs. Following the show is a very busy time for builders and suppliers, says Garrard.

“People start calling for more information and price quotes,” Garrard said. “Participating in the Quinte Home & Renovation Show pays off. Amazingly enough, sometimes it’s two or three years down the road when someone will say they saw you at the home show a couple of years ago, and want to buy from you now.” Admission to the Quinte Home Show is $7.00, $6.00 for seniors, or you can buy a three day pass for $10.00, $8.00 for seniors. Children under 13 are admitted free with an adult.

Quinte Home Builders Association Members of the Quinte Home Builders Association adhere to a strict Code of Ethics. President Brian Garrard says the association is a group of businesses that will look out for the public and are committed to quality and excellence. The QHBA is affiliated with the Ontario Home Builders Association and the Canadian Home Builders Association. Members can also participate in the

nation wide RenoMark program, a brand designed to assure quality home renovations by adhering to the QHBA code of ethics as well as a renovation-specific code of conduct. RenoMark members also offer a minimum two year warranty on all work.

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

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Belleville Magazine

In Business

Impacto has a positive impact on our business community Story and photos by Aaron Bell

Impacto started almost 30 years ago as a family-run protective equipment manufacturer and despite dramatic growth that has spread to 213 countries, they remain a family-run business that continues to base their operations in Belleville. Impacto, which is on Dussek Street, was originally a small company called Belleville Protective Gear. “The business evolved from manufacturing impact and vibration absorbing gloves to protect workers working with power tools and hand tools,” said Impacto President Ed Lehtinen. Their primary distribution started in the United States and Canada but has grown to service companies around the world. “Most of our products end up in the large assembly line operations, automotive assembly lines, aircraft assembly lines and parts manufacturers,” Lehtinen said. 28

Spring 2014

“I’ve always enjoyed this area so we’ve elected to stay here and expand the business here.” Lehtinen said that he is happy to continue to base his business in Belleville even though they do business around the world. “I’ve always enjoyed this area so we’ve elected to stay here and expand the business here,” Lehtinen said. “It’s a really nice place to live. It’s a nice place for your employees to live. The cost of living is a little less so that makes it easier to employ people at competitive wages because we’re really competing against off-shore products.” Lehtinen employs 40 people in Belleville and also makes products in Markham and Watertown, NY. “It might make more sense for us to be in an area like Toronto because we have to travel everywhere

Belleville Magazine

for our sales,” Lehtinen said. “I just love the area - it’s why we stayed here and continue to stay here.” Ed Lehtinen Impacto is truly a family business. Ed’s son Eric is Impacto’s Executive Vice-President. “When I first started I worked in the plant, in the cutting room, sweeping floors and then moving on to customer service as I completed my university degree,” said Eric Lehtinen, who moved to the U.K. after graduation to develop Impacto’s business overseas. Eric now coordinates the businesses global sales and marketing efforts from here in Belleville. “Sixty per cent of our business is done out of the United States and Belleville is positioned perfectly for that,” he adds.


Belleville Magazine

Heritage Property

Meyer’s Mill

Story by Gerry Fraiberg Photo by Darko Zeljkovic

54 Station Street The iconic limestone landmark building on the bank of the Moira River is over 130 years old but it almost didn’t survive the 20th century. Known as Meyer’s Mill because of the historical designation plaque, the significance of the three story structure is that it sits on the site purchased for a grist mill in 1789 by Captain John W. Meyers. Meyers was a United Empire Loyalist and a British spy during the American Revolution. After defeat of the British, he migrated north to British territory. Meyers is considered the founder of the community, as he attracted other Loyalist refugee settlers to the area. It was named Meyer’s Creek in his honour.

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Spring 2014

Then in 1816, Lieutenant Governor Gore named the village Belleville for his wife, Lady Arabella. Originally thought to be Meyer’s first mill, historians later determined it was built around 1880 as part of an ax factory. Later it served as distillery, machine shop and woollen factory. By 1975 the stone and mortar structure had fallen into disrepair. The Moira River Conservation Authority had bought the property as the site for an ice control dam. City Council had planned to demolish what had become an eyesore in 1978 but the Hastings County Historical Society stepped in to point out the historical significance of the property, and won a reprieve from the wrecking ball.

Belleville Magazine

The building was designated a heritage property that year but despite the historical designation, the stone building stayed empty and continued to deteriorate. The roof had caved in by the time the Quinte Construction Association came along to rescue it a second time in the 1990’s. The commercial construction group was looking for a new home, and took on the restoration project, which was paid for by association members who did the work. They put on a new roof, and built a building within the stone shell of the historic structure. In the fall of 1996, the Quinte Construction Association moved in to their new office, having saved a piece of Belleville’s history.


Plowing Through

City staff worked around the clock for much of the winter to clear snow from more than 500 kms of roads and 200 kms of sidewalks. We experienced near-record amounts of snow and ice and City Staff appreciates your patience with the clean up efforts and cooperation in keeping cars off the streets overnight. PhOTO BY AArON BELL/CITY OF BELLEVILLE


Belleville Magazine

Notices

Leaf and Yard Waste Collection residents receive one spring and one fall free curbside pickup of yard waste. Place leaf and yard waste to the curb by 7:00am on the designated date for your area. If your residence is located: West of Moira river & South of CNr Tracks - May 3 West of Moira river & North of CNr Tracks - May 10 East of Moira river & North of Victoria Avenue - May 24 East of Moira river & South of Victoria Avenue - May 31 Place material in kraft paper bags; Plastic bags are not accepted. Materials can be placed in cardboard boxes, canisters and bushel baskets at no charge. These items will be emptied and left at the curbside. Brush and Tree Limbs must have no more than a 2 3/4” trunk diameter, and no longer than 4 feet and they must be securely tied in small bundles. acceptable Material Leaves Grass clippings Flowers Plant material Gardening maintenance material Brush and tree limbs Yard waste paper bags

Unacceptable material Lumber Manufactured wood products Food waste from kitchens Food service/ processing/ handling material

residents are reminded BY-LAW No. 98-175 prohibits depositing of leaf & yard waste on public streets.

Yard Waste Depot

75 Wallbridge Crescent (Open April 22 to december 5) hours of Operation: Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri - 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Wednesday 8:30 am - 7:30 pm Closed for Statutory holidays City residents may dispose of leaf and yard waste at no charge in the designated area at the north side of the Public Works building located at 75 Wallbridge Crescent, from mid-April to November. For more information please visit www.Belleville.ca

Spring Clean Up Time for roads City of Belleville crews will be out this spring sweeping and cleaning up the roads and sidewalks. Please remember that overnight parking is prohibited on curbed streets in the City.

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Belleville Magazine

How can we help you? The City of Belleville’s Environmental & Operational Services provides a 24-hour service to the community. • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sewer problems Tree issues Sign Maintenance Traffic Lights Leaf & Yard Waste Thurlow Landfill Winter Control - sidewalks & roadways Dead animals on roadway Garbage & Recycling issues Road & Sidewalk Maintenance Street cleaning Flooding

after hours service line (613) 968-6482

If you have the following concerns after hours or on the weekend, please call (613) 968-6482 and your request will be forwarded to an answering service who will contact the person on call. If your concern is during regular business hours - 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, please call the direct line (613) 967-3275 for assistance.

Household Hazardous & Electronic Waste Drop-off 75 Wallbridge Crescent 2014 Spring & Summer Hours (april - October) Tues. 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm Wed. 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Thurs. 9:00 am - 4:00 pm First Saturday of the Month 9:00 am - 4:00 pm (April 5, May 3, June 7, July 5, Aug. 2, Sept. 6, Oct. 4) re-Use Days (give-away Days) 10:00 am - 2:00 pm (incl. paint, stain, household cleaning solutions and more) April 11, May 9, June 13, July 11, Aug. 8, Sept. 12, Oct. 10 All materials are “first come-first served” while quantities last. No drop-off of materials during this time. hazardous Waste is now accepting: microwaves, toaster ovens, hand held power tools, motor oil and cooking oil.


Belleville Magazine

What’s On March 21 22 23

Dog Show

27

Seniors Information & Active Living Fair

The Belleville & District Kennel Club Dog Show at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. www.bellevilledistrictkennelclub.com

The Seniors Information & Active Living Fair is at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. Info 966-4632

7

Quinte Home and Renovation Show

Country Rocks the Square

Empire Square Live is hosting its first Country Rocks the Square with George Canyon and more this June. www.empiresquarelive.com

7

Strut for Strays

City Council

March 24 April 14 / April 28 May 12 / May 26 June 9 / June 23

Planning Advisory Committee

March 3 April 7 May 5 June 2

Find more meeting information, agendas and minutes online at Belleville.ca.

Zwick’s Park www.fixedfurlife.com

14 28 29 30

Upcoming City Meetings

June

Cops N’ Kids Fishing Derby Victoria Park

The Annual Quinte Home Builders Show returns to the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. www.quintehomebuilders.com

April 5

Healthy Living Expo

The Healthy Living Expo returns this year to the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. 9:00 am - 5:00pm www.thehealthylivingexpo.ca

12

Wood Carvers Show

Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre.

May 3 4

Kiwanis Walleye World Fishing Tournament

The Kiwanis Walleye World Fishing Tournament returns to the Bay of Quinte this spring. www.kiwaniswalleyeworld.com

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Dancing with the Stars

29 30 31 1

Plein Air Festival

Dancing with the Stars Quinte at the Quinte Sports & Wellness Centre. www.viq.ca

The Plein Air Art Festival returns to Downtown Belleville this spring. www.bellevillepleinairfestival.com

www.Belleville.ca

Spring 2014

33


Harbour Hockey

Pond hockey fans loved the cold weather that we experienced in Belleville this winter. hundreds took advantage of the Victoria Park ice rinks in February. PhOTO BY AArON BELL/CITY OF BELLEVILLE



Belleville Magazine - Spring 2014