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Daniel Libeskind / Emilio Vicedo Ortiz / Manuel Lill Navarro / Dsign - Vertti Kivi & Co / RPBW / Piero Castiglioni / Aitao - Ren Rui / Cheng Taining / He Jingtang / Jiangsu Institute of urban Planning and Design / Foster + Partners / archi5 / Basalt Architecture / ACMH : Pierre Bortolussi / L’Atelier à Kiko / Giulio Ceppi - Total Tool / Autogrill Group - Design & Architecture Dept. Stefano Carmi e Patrizia Bernardi / Enrico Botta Architect / Giancarlo Marzorati / Simone Micheli / Dario Torralbo / Natalia Santafe / Ignacio Maillol

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English edition

I. 2014


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Incontroluce

I. 2014

Dear readers, Incontroluce Six-monthly international journal of lighting culture

the history of this industry features positions adopted with the intention of emphasising the importance of correct lighting. We did this with our advertising campaigns, starting with “Lighting Italians” from 1982, and then “With iGuzzini against light pollution” from 1993 and “Better Light for Better Life” from 2002. Through these campaigns, the lighting sector learned, with us, to focus on the big issues of the relationship between city, architecture, life and light. If we want to improve the environment and the society we live in, we must be aware of how light, if used correctly, can make a real difference to quality of life. What’s more: we believe that nowadays light is the driving force, the tool for true social innovation, so from 2014, Light First.iGuzzini is the new ideal, tangible platform around which our community intends to convey the most crucial, fresh, scientifically and morally advanced progress in our companies. Light First means lighting all of the places where we live, work, love, take care of one another, grow, show. Light is for people and their spaces. Without light there is no development. Without light there are no objects, bodies, stars. Bringing about social innovation means putting into practice ideas (products, services and models) which meet the needs of people and societies, in a more effective way than the existing alternatives and which at the same time create new relationships and new collaborations, using light to improve life, to innovate society: we want to dream of a better future, based on sustainable development and vital energies, on high quality technologies and know-how. “Thence we came forth to rebehold the stars”, is the final line of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy: it is a forecast of the new path of light and hope after the difficult times we have lived through. It isn’t just something we want for ourselves and for the world, it’s a social commitment that we make and which we want to inspire our work.

year XVI, 27 Editorial office Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com 071-7588453 video Graphic design Studio Cerri & Associati Editor iGuzzini illuminazione spa Contributions to this edition were provided by iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH iGuzzini illuminazione France iGuzzini illuminazione Iberica S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini Finland & Baltic Oy iGuzzini Lighting (China) Co. Ltd IGuzzini Middle East Cover photograph Bitter Bredt

Light first. Adolfo Printed: March 2014 Tecnostampa, Recanati

The editorial team is not responsible for errors and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by collaborators. Any additions or corrections will appear in the next issue. II

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Contents

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Leader

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Lighting design Light in the architecture of Daniel Libeskind Graphic lighting: futuristic, but...

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Projects The promenade dedicated to David Ferrer “Grace”, an eco-friendly ship Le Albere and the MUSE. Renovation work on the former Michelin area Special Exhibition Hall of the Nanjing Museum Queen Alia International Airport Marsan media library The “Denis Diderot House of Lights” Baselworld 2013 Villoresi Est Ostfildern’s conversion to LED lighting Women’s museum B4 - Boscolo Hotel

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Laser Blade - Line to Circle Range, concept and development

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Company culture Guzzini Benelux moves Renzo Piano celebrated in New York and appointed Life Senator in Italy Training meetings at iGuzzini Iberica Environmentally-friendly lighting for Pistoia Nursery Park Alaia Anello wins the Janus award ADI Design Index 2013 ENERGY. Oil and post-oil architecture and grids

I. 2014


Design

Light in the architecture of Daniel Libeskind taken from “Constructing Lighting”: Great Hall of Milan University 12 April 2013

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“Constructing Lighting” is the title of the gathering held in the Great Hall of the University of Milan, with architect Daniel Libeskind, lighting designer Dean Skira and art director Giancarlo Basili, organised by iGuzzini and part of the INTERNI ‘Hybrid Architecture & Design’ show. The term “constructing” refers to a series of practices, materials, technologies which implement an architectural project and which the project itself helps to innovate. It has a sense of solidity and concreteness which seems to contrast with the intangibility of light. With the use of lighting the visual spaces of temporary architectural projects, such as those

proposed by Hybrid Architecture & Design, can define innovative areas not just in terms of expressions but also technologies, materials and practices: in constructing lighting. The chairman of the gathering, Matteo Vercelloni, introduces Daniel Libeskind by referring to a piece in which the Polish-born architect reflects on lighting: “Lighting implies the presence of darkness, and by that I don’t mean that light is the opposite of darkness. The builders of churches and cathedrals have always known that some things would be left hidden away from the light, in darkness. They knew that the light from candles would only allow people to see up to a certain point”.

“When you think about a city, you think about its lights rather than its buildings: you can’t swap the lights of Milan with those of New York. So... when you go into the cathedral and see the light from the rose window, or you see a temple in Athens bathed in light, or the lit-up skyscrapers of metropolises, all of these different forms of lighting also tell us about the history of the place. It isn’t light that is simply in the space, but light that is in the eye of the beholder, like beauty. We need light for everything. Matter doesn’t rule light, matter which is mathematical, physical. Light is also eternal, so it has something absolute about it. Just think of its speed…

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How have I used light in my buildings? Let’s start with the Jewish Museum in Berlin. It was conceived with light, in light, but starting from the darkness of history, from catastrophe. The museum is an indication of a story to be told. I think that every building tells a story. For example, when I designed the museum I was thinking of the building immersed in darkness, but obviously we then had to design the lighting for the offices and display areas. I thought that the lights of the building should create a pattern that gives hope to a city that was at the centre of catastrophes… every city has to keep hope alive… So, in the building in Berlin you go down towards the darkness of the lower levels through emptiness, then you come up through light which gives atmosphere, creates it, and allows you to find a new way through the underground spaces and blind alleys of the museum, so that you can arrive at a dramatic, extraordinary light. The quantity of light also determines the quality of light. These are photographs showing the atmosphere created. They show what reaches our soul, but what words can’t describe… it can only be conveyed through lighting, for example the sense of isolation. From the inside of the museum you can see the exterior, but also the darkness and the vegetation. So, lighting and the impact of lighting on colours, on materials outside and inside the building, are extremely important.

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Photographs: Bitter Bredt 1. The speakers at “Constructing Lighting� 2. Daniel Libeskind in the Courtyard of the University in front of the work produced for Interni Hybrid Architecture &Design 3.4. Inside the Jewish Museum in Berlin

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Design

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Light in the architecture of Daniel Libeskind

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Let’s talk about the Denver Art Museum extension and the reference to the Rocky Mountains with dramatic lighting… On the left is the building which creates the plaza, on the right is the light. The residential zone is to the left. People make time for art, but also enjoy the new district, perfectly integrated with the museum. At any time of day the lights, the blue sky of the Rocky Mountain area give off light, energy. Opposite is the building designed by Gio Ponti, a leading architect who used glass tiles to light the museum. Thanks to the lighting and the extension, this space takes shape and from dawn until dusk the interior is transformed… you can see the spaces, the bridges, these raised structures in this area for public events. You see the effects created with this drop from dizzying heights down into the museum with its circular structure… this movement is extremely powerful… This is the San Francisco Museum of contemporary art. The blue pattern is part of the steel used, a material which reflects the light of San Francisco in a very special way, and at the same time can create that important link with the sky, the sea, the water, according to a biblical idea of life.

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Photographs: Bitter Bredt; Michele Nastasi; Bruce Damonte 4. Denver Art Museum Stairwell Atrium 5. Denver Art Museum East Facade 6.7. Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco

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Design

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Light in the architecture of Daniel Libeskind

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This is the Maurice Wohl conference centre at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. It was, obviously, created for the students, but is also available to the public. The lighting is partly shaped by the strip of light, by the central space which creates light that is mysterious, mystical, all-encompassing, which sets up a hierarchy inside the building and outside it, telling the story of life.

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Photographs: Bitter Bredt; SLD; Hufton+Crown 8. Maurice Wohl Conference Centre Auditorium 9.10. Military History Museum, Dresden 11. One of Daniel Libeskind’s sketches for the Masterplan of Ground Zero, New York

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This is Dresden’s Military History Museum, dedicated to the military history of catastrophes in Germany. It is a 19th-century building which I wanted to break up with a strong symbol, something that would completely surprise people. This structure creates an ambiguous relationship between interior and exterior. The light is complex because of refraction and reflection... at Ground Zero in NY everything is created using light because I really wanted to make sure that those who lost their lives could have a little shade… certainly 9/11 was a huge event in our lifetime. These are the initial sketches of the light for this sight, done to outline a public area for a memorial… I think that what the Statue of Liberty is holding isn’t a torch, but the light of human spirit, the light of liberty. It creates and gives impetus to the journey out of darkness to find something truly positive.”

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Design

Graphic lighting: futuristic, but...

Since mankind ďŹ rst set foot on earth up until the advent of mass-produced artiďŹ cial light, the only light people could think of was natural light. And so, what we built always related to how the various materials, their processing and the alternating of vertical and horizontal elements created different conditions which reacted, in different ways, during the course of a day, to natural light: we were designing shade. Light and shade were used to highlight some features of the building, to underline the horizontal nature of an element, or to emphasise empty spaces and solid material. It was all linked to the actual existence of these elements. ArtiďŹ cial light brought a fundamental change in perspective: now architecture was visible at night too. But the fact that we can choose what to light, where and how to light it, means that we can create many images of the same architecture.

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Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour; Lv Hengzong 1. Strozzi Palace courtyard 2. Beaune Cathedral vaults 3. Erich Mendelsohn’s Universum Cinema 4. French Pavilion, Expo 2010, Shanghai

We can emphasise architectural features, stress them as in the case of the ribs in Beaune Cathedral. Luminaires with a very narrow optic and controlled partly using accessories restrict the light to a very narrow beam. In more modern times, lighting was used to highlight the structural lines of the shape or form of a space. At the start of the twentieth century Futurism and Expressionism helped to enhance elements of modernity. In terms of architecture it left us with the works of Erich Mendelsohn such as the Universum Cinema where light picks out the continuous curved surfaces made possible by reinforced concrete. So the architect also considers using the material, that is lighting, as a fundamental material for creating the atmosphere of a building or of the areas he designs. In other cases, this work is done by a lighting designer working with the architect or at a later stage on buildings that have already been completed.

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Design

Graphic lighting: futuristic, but...

Already in the Nineteen-Nineties collaboration between an architect like Gae Aulenti and a Lighting Designer like Piero Castiglioni resulted in the innovative use of lighting. The surface designed by Gae Aulenti for the Italian pavilion at the 1992 Expo in Seville featured large openings that almost formed a grille. Piero Castiglioni lit the openings with a blade of light effect obtained for the first time with a purpose-designed floodlight, the Edge, which for iGuzzini marked a technological innovation in the optics used. In this case the lighting wasn’t just practical, it helped to underline the building’s architectural features, using lighting like graphics: the lighting drew the surface. The same applied to Piero Castiglioni’s work on the AEM Building in Milan. Lighting highlights the openings already present in the facade.

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5. Trick effects simulation 6. Coal Company, Sokolov, Czech Republic 7. Hooked Up Installation, Dean Skira 8. AEM Building, Milan

These examples lead to a further reflection on and experimentation with the use of lighting, until we arrive at Graphic Lighting. iGuzzini had already anticipated it with Kriss luminaires, able to project onto surfaces beams of light with different widths and combined in various ways. This added a graphic element to surfaces. An example of Graphic Lighting had already been presented by iGuzzini during the 2013 edition of “Interni Hybrid Architecture”. Dean Skira developed his “Hooked up” installation: a tunnel able to project lines of light around, but also a tunnel in which external natural or artificial light creates internal lines of light. That led to the idea of a luminaire like Trick, capable of projecting lines of light from a minimal body, thanks to the development of highly innovative optics, expanding the possibility of drawing a space with light, already made possible by luminaires such as iN30-60-90.

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Projects

The promenade dedicated to David Ferrer Xabia, Spain

Promoters Generalitat Valenciana Conselleria d’Infraestructuras Territorio y Medio Ambiente Municipio di Xàbia Architects Emilio Vicedo Ortiz Manuel Lill Navarro

The old “Amanecer del Arenal” promenade in Xàbia, near Alicante, has been updated and named the “Tennis player David Ferrer Seafront”. This promenade, half-moon shaped and around 626 metres long, stretches along the Arenal beach and is one of the town’s most distinctive features. The aim of the renovation of the existing promenade was to create a pleasant space where urban elements blend seamlessly with the natural environment. Links to access zones were improved and, in accordance with project constraints, the paving was restored without altering the existing road surface. The public lighting was completely replaced and new street furniture fitted. The promenade’s lighting consists of a set of Wow and U.F.O. systems, with 9 metre tall poles, set 20-25 metres apart, aligned in such a way as to avoid obstructing the view of the surroundings. The luminaires use LED lamps and have a longitudinal asymmetrical optic. To direct the light towards the beach, Multiwoody floodlights were set on the same poles. That guarantees lighting for the promenade and extends the possibility of additional lighting for the sandy area and parking access zones.

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Engineers Asociaci贸n de ingenieros SL Building contractor Ute Rover Alcisa, S.A Construred Obras Y Servicios, S.A.

Photographs: 274km 1.2. The promenade with new lighting

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Iberica

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Projects

“Grace”, an eco-friendly ship

Client Viking Line Interior architect Dsign - Vertti Kivi & Co Partner Assistance iGuzzini Finland & Baltic

Finland

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Viking Line is a public limited company and a leading brand in the passenger traffic market on the Baltic Sea. It offers passenger services, leisure activities and cargo carrier services. “Grace” is the line’s new flagship. Every night there are shows by artists on the ship and there is free Wi-Fi to provide clients with the best possible welcome on the route from Turku, in Finland, to Mariehamn and as far as Stockholm in Sweden and back.

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Photographs: by kind permission of Vertti Kivi 1.3. Spa area 2. One of the ship’s chill-out areas.

“Grace” represents a completely new generation of ferries with its revolutionary liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel system built by Wärtsilä and with the internal set-up designed entirely by multi-award winning Dsign Vertti Kivi & co. As well as using green fuel, care was also taken to reduce electricity consumption on the ship. The lighting, which uses a lot of coloured light, is completely LED-based. iGuzzini illuminazione supplied the Deep Laser and Reflex Easy LED recessed luminaires which guarantee general lighting in the various areas of the ship.

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Projects

Le Albere and the MUSE. Renovation work on the former Michelin area

Le Albere Client Castello Sgr Spa Architectural design and lighting design RPBW

Trento, Italy

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The new “Le Albere” district, designed by RPBW, stretches for an area of 11 hectares along the banks of the river Adige. It includes around 300 flats, 30,000 m² of office and shop space, squares, roads, pedestrian and cycle paths, as well as a network of canals, 5 hectares of public park, a multi-purpose centre and the MUSE Science Museum. The entire project has been designed to ensure environmental sustainability, environmental friendliness and energy savings. A trigeneration (combined cooling, heat and power) plant, specially developed for Dolomiti Energia, has been installed to supply the whole complex with hot and cold

fluids. The residential and service industry buildings have a passive energy design with low energy consumption levels certified by CasaClima, while the museum and future conference centre are LEED Gold certified. Various areas in the district fall under iGuzzini and Renzo Piano’s partnered project to regenerate the former Michelin industrial zone in Trento. These include the museum, the office buildings, private homes and outdoor lighting in areas for both pedestrians and vehicular traffic. The overall aim has been to achieve simple, comfortable lighting with minimally invasive luminaires and uniform formal solutions for both outdoor and indoor

contexts, including the museum. Delphi luminaires with LED lamps have been used for all outdoor lighting. Delphi is a cut off system that eliminates light pollution completely. Different optics can be fitted easily to suit the tasks the luminaire has to perform. These vary from optics for street lighting to optics for parks and gardens. On roads with vehicular traffic, 9 metre high poles have been installed, featuring luminaires with a street optic and a special arm. On the paths within the residential complexes, the poles are around 7 metres high, whereas in parks and gardens, shorter 3 metre poles have been used. LED Balisage luminaires

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Design Team The MUSE S. Scarabicchi, D.Vespier MUseo delle ScienzE (partner and associate in charge) (Science Museum)

Lighting design Piero Castiglioni

Structures Favero & Milan

Client Museo Tridentino di Scienze Naturali

Project coordination Twice/Iure

Architectural design RPBW

Project coordination Iure

Photographs: Enrico Cano 1.2. Images of the district’s park and residential roads

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have been installed in the parks and gardens to create an effect that is both highly atmospheric and non-invasive. Residential and office buildings are lit with iPro, surface-mounted, medium body, 16W LED luminaires. This is a special, surfacemounted product with a glass diffuser screen, and it has been used particularly in high traffic areas, such as porticoes, to achieve diffused, even, noninvasive lighting as well as guaranteeing safety. The balconies on the residential buildings are also lit with surface-mounted, LED iPro luminaires, but with a small, 9W body, instead, and a Fresnel diffuser lens combined with a flood optic to create diffused

lighting with a limited number of luminaires. Inside the residential complexes, the stairwells play an important role as, being made of glass, they help to create the rhythm and flow of the architecture that is reinforced by the green wall sections. The stairwells are indirectly lit by Primopiano 9W LED Wall Washer luminaires with a special fitting that allows them to be attached directly to the metal structure, while the driver is positioned remotely. The same luminaire is used on the top floors of the stairwells, but with a different, equally special connecting system, that fastens the device directly to the ceiling via an aluminium rod and base.

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Projects

Le Albere and the MUSE. Renovation work on the former Michelin area

The MUSE Science Museum building is split into 2 underground and 5 above ground levels. The basic aim, here, has been to use specific materials to create a sense of continuity between the interiors and exteriors, the service and residential areas, and the new and old buildings in Trento’s historic town centre. This is why bush-hammered Verdello stone has been adopted not only for all the pavements, kerbs, and water feature edges, but also for the floor inside the Science Museum lobby to deliberately underline the idea of outdoor public space reaching inside the MUSE. The museum displays have also been designed to be “invisible”. In other words, their design deliberately seeks to avoid distracting attention from their contents. This concept eventually led to the idea of suspending everything - including tables, shelves, panels, monitors, photographs and exhibits - from a fine steel cable. The overall impression, then, is that everything inside the museum is suspended in space and time. An approach that encourages scientists and visitors to appreciate and respect the relationships between natural events. It is a way of saying: “Like everything else in this universe, you human being, are also suspended in this delicate balancing act.” Inside MUSE, light creates shapes and spaces. It frees the museum’s extensive surfaces, establishes a balance between the natural and the artificial and urges visitors to touch the works on display. Natural light enters from the sides and roof and its expert management is one of the stand-out elements of RPBW stunning architectural project. The artificial lighting system was entrusted to the experience and sensitivity of Piero Castiglioni.

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3. The huge central area of the MUSE 4. The greenhouse

For the exhibition halls, he opted to use mainly 20W small-body Le Perroquet spotlights with metal halide lamps and a PSU box, all mounted on tracks. For certain special areas, on the other hand, he used Reflex Easy LED devices. In addition to this functional lighting, considerable emphasis has also been given to highlighting architectural features. One example of this are the lines of light created by the Ledstrip luminaires inserted in the floor edges in the large open space of the Pyramid of Creation and in the flooring opposite the temporary exhibitions hall. This type of lighting has two purposes. Firstly, it is practical, in that it adds to the natural light from above. And secondly, it is atmospheric, as it gives a sense of weightlessness to the structure’s architectural mass. The lobby is lit with a Le Perroquet luminaire designed specially for this project. The device consists of a pendant luminaire with two 35W Le Perroquet metal halide spotlights, and a special coupling that allows it to be clipped directly onto its metal frame. Here, again, the desired effect is uniform, diffused lighting that can adapt to the type of exhibit on display and the spotlights combine perfectly with the natural light that streams in from the high lobby and windows. A number of other special luminaires have also been used, such as the special self-supporting Glimcubes on the museum’s outer walkways, and the suspended Woody spotlights in the “serra” or greenhouse. The latter is a living laboratory designed to house, cultivate and preserve a real piece of tropical forest. It is the part of the museum closest to Palazzo delle Albere and its transparent design is an ideal way of merging the two contexts of old and new.

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Projects

The Special Exhibition Hall of the Nanjing Museum

Client Nanjing Museum General Contractor Jiangsu Aitao Cultural Industry Co. Ltd Designer Ren Rui- Design Director di Aitao

Nanjing, China

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The Nanjing Museum, originally called the National Central Museum, was established as a result of a proposal by educationalist and Chinese modern democratic revolutionary Cai Yuanpei, in 1933. Building work commenced at the beginning of June 1936. The project and original design by architect Xu Jingzhi used a single style inspired by the Qing dynasty and was later altered to the style of the Liao dynasty, with the collaboration of renowned architect Liang Sicheng. Development work continued for decades until 2006, the year of the invitation to tender for the expansion and reorganisation project which gave the layout of “a six-hall museum”: starting with the Historical Hall and the Artistic Hall, followed by the addition of the Republic of China Hall, the Cultural Heritage Hall, the Digital Hall and the Special Exhibition Hall where iGuzzini’s work took place. As one of the most important halls for exhibits, the design of the Special Exhibition Hall was created with particular attention to the visitor

experience. In this hall the display set-up has to be changed quite often, meaning that a flexible lighting design was required. This demanding task was taken on by the design team from Jiangsu Aitao Culture Industry Co. Ltd (Aitao) which was awarded the design contract and was responsible for implementing the project. From June 2013, iGuzzini took part in the lighting project for the Special Exhibition Hall. After a number of on-site tests, Aitao finally selected iGuzzini as technical consultant and luminaire supplier for three themed exhibitions: “The age of Buddha”, “Great Achievements in Prosperous Times” and “Accuracy and Gorgeousness”. In these areas visitors are presented with various types of objects and materials: real porcelain, golden bowls, Buddhist products from the palaces of the Qing Dynasty and even several Chinese and foreign timepieces. The job involved lighting the rooms, the exhibit information and the objects displayed.

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General project and architectural design Cheng Taining He Jingtang Jiangsu Institute of urban Planning and Design

Partner Assistance iGuzzini Lighting (China) Co. Ltd

Photographs: YeaStudio 1. The outside of the Nanjing Museum 2. Great Achievements in Prosperous Times

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Projects

The Special Exhibition Hall of the Nanjing Museum

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LED luminaires were chosen, to guarantee protection of the items displayed. The colour temperature was carefully assessed and varies from 4000K in the visitor area to 3000K and 2700K on the surfaces of the items on display. All of the luminaires are DALI and are managed using a Light Management System. The general lighting for the rooms was created with more than 250 recessed Reflex Easy LED and Deep Laser luminaires with 4000 K colour temperature. Linealuce Mini with a special white finish were used to highlight some architectural features on the ceiling.

iGuzzini also used 200 Palco DALI spotlights with CRI90 LEDs and with three different optics, which in some cases were modified with refractors. To light the exhibits in the glass cases, the designers were looking for a new method, not simple downlighting. After suggestions and testing in the field, the lighting of the glass cases became the central feature of the entire lighting design proposal. iGuzzini supplied Laser Blade, the world’s first linear recessed luminaire, with a colour rendering index of 85, and a 34° optic. The 500 luminaires installed have a unit power of less than 5W.

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3.4. Lighting for the “Great Achievements in Prosperous Times� area

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The luminaire, which does not produce glare, did an excellent job in terms of providing visual comfort for visitors. They are hardly even aware that the lights are on, but at the same time the objects on show are lit in an appropriate fashion. Laser Blade Wall Washers supplemented the background lighting. More than 1,200 recessed single LED 2.2 W Express luminaires were installed in various types of glass cases to provide accent lighting on the works and were specially adapted for installation in the small spaces available.

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Projects

Queen Alia International Airport

Client Queen Alia International Airport Architectural design and lighting design Foster + Partners

Amman, Jordan

Partner Assistance iGuzzini UK iGuzzini Middle East

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A unique combination of the traditional and the modern, Queen Alia International Airport epitomises the soul of Amman, a modern, cosmopolitan city and one of the oldest gems in human history. The design was inspired by local architecture and tradition. The whole project aims to celebrate Bedouin tradition and culture: from the convex roof, reminiscent of the local architecture and of the billowing black fabric of

a tent, to the geometric designs applied on every intrados on show and the tree-filled courtyards. The squares aren’t there just in honour of the Bedouin custom of gathering at the airport in large groups to see off loved ones, but are also a natural way of filtering pollution and pre-conditioning the air with plants and trees. As a result of Amman’s climate, the high-tech building was built mainly using concrete, a material which helps with natural

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Photographs: Nigel Young, Foster+ Partner 1. The new airport seen from above 2. Inside the terminal

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regulation of the interior temperature, reducing energy consumption. The design makes the best possible use of daylight and highlights the colours and shades of the surrounding countryside so as to avoid an artificial effect. From the terminals, endless views of the desert and the daylight streaming into the atrium give passengers waiting to board a relaxing experience, whilst those who have just landed are guaranteed a first glance of

the country from a wonderfully integrated position. To maximise the natural effect, integration with the context and the sense of openness, light plays a central role in the design. iGuzzini UK worked closely with Foster+Partners to light the main departures floor, inside and out. 150W HIT MaxiWoody spotlights were fitted in openings in the skylights, pointing down to give 200 lux of very even lighting on the ground below.

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Queen Alia International Airport

The sinuous roof was a challenge to light. At night, the departures hall looks very different to its daytime appearance. The problem was ďŹ nding the right positions to ďŹ t the lamps for indirect lighting, so that each would bathe the ceiling vaults in the same level of light, for a uniform overall look to the departures hall. A series of 70 and 150W HIT iGuzzini iPro asymmetric ood lights were mounted on top of retail cabins, within signage totems and also on top of the check-in desk structures. These limited locations provided the design team with a real challenge in terms of delivering a consistent lit effect. The layout of the lamps installed in the departures building was also replicated in the two wings alongside the main structure, and outside, where the vaults cover the stopping area in front of the main terminal building. Queen Alia International Airport is an excellent example of cooperation and teamwork between the international network and the company, since the project was completed with the help of iGuzzini Middle East, the regional branch which supplied all on-site support and guidance to make luminaire installation easier.

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3.4. Various areas of the airport

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Projects

Marsan media library

Client Communauté d’Agglomération Le Marsan Architectural design Archi 5

Marsan, France

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The media library is close to the centre of Mont de Marsan, in the Bosquet barracks area, where it fits in perfectly thanks to the pure geometric lines of the new building. However, its corner opening tones down its severity. This opening begins a rotating movement and creates a pull starting from Avenue du Maréchal Foch. One of the strong points of the design is also the quality of the public space created, since the area around the building is freely accessible. The media library facades differ only in their orientation: there isn’t a single main facade. Instead there are four. Jacques Sebbag of the firm Archi5 designed the artificial lighting based on the architecture and the atmosphere of the various spaces formed by the furniture and

natural light. The basic idea is that of gradually passing from a type of lighting with a lot of natural light, to softer, more intimate lighting, of the kind you find in a home, at the consultation tables, and on to practical lighting for choosing books in the shelving area. The media library is completely glazed, so the main aim was to create a balance with the constant presence of natural light. When evening comes, the media library becomes an “urban lantern”, lighting up the surrounding greenery, pathways and reading areas. That means that it also contributes to the quality of the public area. Pencil bollards and glass Ledplus groundrecessed luminaires light the zone around the

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Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France

Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour 1. Night-time view of the building 2. Outside reading area

media library, whilst the inside of the double skin is enhanced by MaxiWoody oodlights with metal halide lamps. Inside, around a hundred iSign luminaires are graphically arranged on the ceiling and some Tray pendant luminaires alternate above the reading and working areas. As well as its cultural mission, the Media library is a place for relaxation, information, social integration, educational support and document preservation. Exhibitions, conferences, workshops, ďŹ lm showings are held all year round, making it an essential place for city life.

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Marsan media library

3. One of the areas with shelving and magazines 4. A perimeter corridor

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Projects

The “Denis Diderot House of Lights” Langres, France

Client Maison des Lumières Denis Diderot Architectural design Basalt Architecture ACMH: Pierre Bortolussi Museological design L’Atelier à Kiko

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Thanks to the “Denis Diderot House of Lights” it has been possible to safeguard an important French heritage site, l’Hôtel du Breuil (from the 16th and 18th century), which has been converted into a museum. The extension, which creates a reception area, is austere and opens into the garden. The spaces are simplified, the rooms being the same size on all floors. The original materials, stone walls, Versailles parquet and beamed ceilings, blend with more recent work, such

as the revamped stairs, the new blanched oak parquet and the glass panoramic lift. An important job done by L’Atelier à Kiko was achieved using lighting; to present the works and to show off the building at its best. There were two types of constraints on the lighting. On one hand those in charge of the museological design wanted to maintain an interior perception of the places which would not present visitors with any barriers to the garden areas. On the other, it was also necessary

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Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France

Photographs: Daniel Rapaich 1. The outside of the museum 2. One of the rooms with decorative wooden ceilings

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to consider the special preservation conditions for the type of objects displayed (mostly on paper) which require less than 50 lux. Given the various requirements of this museum, dimmable Primopiano and Tecnica trackmounted luminaires were chosen. The tracks hung below the old ceilings. Natural light was limited by curtains which intercept 80-85% of the radiation. A major area of the park was lit with LED luminaires which guarantee good colour rendering.

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Projects

Baselworld 2013

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz

Basel, Switzerland

Baselworld is the world’s leading event for watches and jewellery, and in 2013 its popularity led to a record 122,000 visitors. After several years of careful preparation, this completely overhauled edition of the World Watch and Jewellery Exhibition entered a new era. In line with the slogan «Brilliance Meets», in 2013 the aim was to create more space for innovative ideas. For a whole eight days, 1460 exhibitors from the sector from 40 countries presented their most exclusive new products and top of the range collections. In this sector the choice of lighting is really crucial. To emphasise even the most precious and subtle details, intense lighting with a very high colour rendering index is called for.

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Photographs: Gunter Laznia 1.2.3. Parts of the Bucherer stand

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Projects

Baselworld 2013

The intensity of the lights must be from four to ten times greater than those normally used in retail. Many exhibitors decided to light their areas with LED luminaires, which have minimum visual impact and are highly efficient as well as extremely flexible. The products were used to achieve very different effects: emphasis on the jewellery and watches in small glass cabinets, a relaxing, welcoming atmosphere in the lounges and spectacular effects on the outside of the stands. iGuzzini was tasked with lighting a total surface area of more than 10,000 square metres. A stand-out zone in that area was the around 1,000 m2 occupied by the impressive stand of Swiss watchmakers C.F. Bucherer, set up to celebrate its 125 of business, as well as the Vulcain, Jaermann & Sübli and Oris stands.

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4.5. The outside of the Vulcain stand

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Projects

Villoresi Est

Client Autogrill Spa Architectural design Total Tool- Giulio Ceppi

A8 Motorway, Italy

The creation of this service area marks a crucial step towards Autogrill motorway restaurant sustainability, the A-future Roadmap. Villoresi Est represents the Group’s international bestpractice for protection of the environment. The design, by architect Giulio Ceppi of the Total Tool firm, was guided by the LEED protocol and its energy efficiency and ecological footprint standards. It was implemented in partnership with Starching and Geoenergia. The role of LEED consultant for the work, at the design stage and during construction, was assigned to ICMQ (Institute for Certification and Quality

Marks for products and services for structures). The new Autogrill is in the shape of a volcano, gradually rising from the ground to a height of 27.5m. The whole building covers a surface area of around 2,500 square metres, with a skeleton entirely made of laminated timber from sustainable forests, and the whole structure is made of environmentally-friendly and recyclable building materials. Villoresi Est’s technological revolution starts with joint use of a solar roof which harvests energy from the sun and a closed-circuit geothermal plant able to supply 380kW of geothermal energy.

Lighting design Autogrill Group Design & Architecture Dept. Stefano Carmi and Patrizia Bernardi

This allows the production of around 45% of the electricity needed for heating and air conditioning, roughly equating to the amount of energy 40 families use in a year. The system for collecting rainwater and groundwater for use in the air conditioning, green irrigation, toilets and fire protection system, allows for savings of approximately 25,550 cubic metres of water per year, the equivalent of the average domestic consumption of 128 families. Given the building’s low energy impact, all of the luminaires chosen, both for the interior and exterior, are LED.

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Photographs: Federico Brunetti, by kind permission of Autogrill Spa 1. The volcano’s cone, lit in red. 2. View inside the volcano, with Front Light and Ledstrip spotlights. 3. Coffee bar area with special curved tracks

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Autogrill was one of the first clients of iGuzzini to decide to switch to luminaires using this new source. Outside, the most important work related to the lighting of the volcano shaped cone at night, so that it becomes a landmark, drenched in red, Autogrill’s trademark colour. The colourwash effect is achieved thanks to the Linealuce luminaire, which in this case was specially made for this project using only red LEDs. A lot of care was taken to give customers a sense of safety and comfort: outside an increasing perception of lighting was created, so that visitors are gradually guided from the lighting level out on the road to the lighting intensity in the building. Pole-mounted

Wow luminaires illuminate the roads in the external area, whilst the shelters are lit with iPro floodlights. Inside, Front Light luminaires are used on special curved tracks in the Motta coffee shop and over the tables. On the the curved edge of the self service restaurant area, there are recessed Reflex Easy and Pixel Plus luminaires. The bar counter features a combination of a very special long Hub and Pixel Plus luminaires. Inside the volcano, Front light luminaires are placed close to the opening through which natural light comes in and, to avoid interrupting the height, Ledstrip luminaires help to illuminate the part of the cone above the spotlights.

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Projects

Ostfildern’s conversion to LED lighting

Client Ostfildern Municipal Authority Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland

Ostfildern, Germany

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The small town of Ostfildern, with 36,000 inhabitants, not far from Stuttgart, is a typical German residential town. In fact, it was created by the merger of 5 existing villages and so covers a huge area with good links for vehicular and pedestrian traffic. In 2011 the town started a plan to convert the old mercury vapour lighting system to new LED luminaires. The study and assessment of various proposals from a number of

luminaire producers took a substantial amount of time until Wow luminaires arrived on the market. Designed by Piano Design and highly efficient, this was the client’s final choice which led to the replacement of the optical assemblies whilst keeping the poles previously used. The optical assembly used is that of the small-body Wow with street optic. Warm white LEDs were chosen and thanks to a Light Management System

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Photographs: Guzzini Archive 1. Residential streets with new lighting 2. Streets in Ebersbach

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which optimises luminous ux, from 10 p.m. until 4 a.m., electricity consumption is cut by 60%, as well as the consequent reduction in CO2 production. Use of this luminaire also guaranteed uniform lighting throughout the town. The town was able to take advantage of a government subsidy for this important work and the level of appreciation of the new lighting amongst residents seems to conďŹ rm the success of the measure.

Residents particularly like the more uniform lighting, as well as the visual comfort provided by the colour temperature selected. Even in the nearby town of Ebersbach, major upgrading of the centre has been carried out, with restructuring of the central square and adjacent roads. Again, all of the new lighting was set up with new LED luminaires. U.F.O., Light Up, Cut Off and Archilede illuminate all areas evenly and without glare.

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Projects

Women’s museum

Client Women Museum - Rafia Ghubash Architectural design Enrico Botta Architect Partner Assistance iGuzzini Middle Est

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

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The Women’s Museum is the first institution created in Dubai which is entirely dedicated to the emancipation of women. The museum is housed in Bait al Banaat, (Kids’ house), in the old gold market, one of the city’s liveliest zones. In the 1950s it was the home of the Ghanem sisters and was recently renovated to house the first museum to celebrate and show the different roles played by Arab women and their fundamental impact on society.

Women like Ousha Bint Khalifa Al Suwaidi, better known as “Bint Al Arab” (daughter of the Arabs), the Arab Emirates’ most famous female poet, or Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak (Mother of the Emirates), president of the UAE General Women’s Union, supreme president of the Family Development Foundation and President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood. The museum was created thanks to the vision and efforts of Rafia Ghubash, an

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Photographs: Goldfish Photography & Video 1. The auditorium - library 2. Exhibition rooms

academic, psychiatrist and former President of the Arabian Gulf University, who wanted to highlight and tell the story of the influence and the role of many Emirati women who helped to shape and make prosperous their modern and contemporary society. With their different stories, the aim is to inspire and captivate not just the younger generations of the Emirates, but also the many expats who live in the Gulf state, offering them the opportunity to absorb the tradition and heritage of one of the fastest-growing multi-cultural societies in the world. Together with old photographs, relics and products from everyday life, the museum’s three storeys present design elements and products made by talented young artists and designers, in an effort to keep alive and vibrant the dialogue and inspiration between tradition and the future, identity and development, heritage and vision. The main display areas, designed by architect Enrico Botta, are lit with iGuzzini’s Le Perroquet and Zoom luminaires which fit in perfectly with the architecture of the space and with the works. The iGuzzini luminaires are positioned to light the narrative schemes linking the works of art, directing visitors with suggestions of charming routes through the exhibition.

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Projects

B4 - Boscolo Hotel

Client Alinvest Customer and Manager Boscolo Hotels Architectural design Giancarlo Marzorati

Milan, Italy

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The Boscolo Group’s B4 Hotel is in Milan, near the Rho-Fiera and Fiera Milano City exhibition centres and close to the future site of the Expo 2015. The new hotel was designed to overhaul, eliminate and renew the criteria for the whole category of “business hotels”. A hybrid, cross-style structure, full of different influences, a place of culture, nature and urban chic; the Milan B4 is the blueprint for hotels of the future. The exterior is distinctive and solemn, thanks to the careful work of

architect Giancarlo Marzorati, and the interior is iconic and functional, due to the dynamic flair of architect Simone Micheli. At present, the creation of a building like the B4 hotel is extremely important. First, it shows how accommodation, in all of its various forms, is increasingly subject to attention and experimentation, going beyond the most consolidated forms and formulas. This hotel is also a sign of how the hospitality sector and, in particular some Italian hotel

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Interior architectural design and lighting design Simone Micheli

Photographs: Jurgen Eheim 1. The hotel hall 2. Meeting room

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groups and chains, are again underlining the importance of architecture and design when designing contemporary hotels. In a hotel there must be no discord, only overall harmony in the design and management of the many aspects and details of which it consists, which in turn converge and create a universe of consistency. Therefore: the space, lighting, colour, use of technology, the service catering, advertising, special use of channels for courting popularity are some of the various building blocks

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Projects

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B4 - Boscolo Hotel

which have to be designed to fit together in order to build a world in which all elements are of the same kind, to transmit a single, recognisable message. The communal areas of the B4 were redesigned by Simone Micheli to make hybrid spaces, with various functions to satisfy the most diverse guest requirements: the hall isn’t just a reception and seating area, but also a shopping arcade, a chill-out zone and play area. Modular systems connect it to and separate it from the restaurant and the breakfast room. All of the spaces are linked, fluid and interactive. The entire structural and functional system of the ground floor is made up of sculptures that look like trees: varnished, polished, acid green or bright red, which are in strong contrast with the Luserna stone floor that stretches uninterrupted over the entire surface area. Sculptured armchairs, some with extra-big backrests, are dotted around the hall, forming relaxing - waiting islands. Huge, futuristic and really imaginative lampshades hang from the ceiling, taking up the entire double height space of the entrance. The lighting design uses strips of recessed Pixel Plus LED luminaires to pick out the islands, and to mark the paths to be followed. Going up to the first floor, via the stairs or the panoramic lifts, one’s gaze takes in colours and shapes designed to generally relax the senses: the fluid dynamism of the hall seems far away and the atmosphere is now serene and snug. The corridors are lit using recessed Express 3 W warm white LED luminaires. The conference rooms, technologically designed to meet many functional requirements in terms of lighting design, space and aesthetics, are on the first and second floors.

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3.4. Different types of rooms 5. The spa

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There are three small meeting rooms, also available for use as private meeting rooms, and a large plenary session room, which seats up to 450 people. Thanks to a system of internal sliding walls, the room can be split into smaller rooms for between 125 and 200 people. The island’s false ceiling, detached along the perimeter of the walls, is suspended in a halo of light, produced using Ledstrip luminaires, with 3000 K colour temperature. The stalactites alternate with recessed Reflex,

2000 lumen luminaires in Warm White. The second floor is also home to the spa, an organic space, deliberately vibrant and colourful. Fluid shapes in yellow rise up full height from the floor, with others stretching down from the ceiling, punctuated by recessed Pixel Plus LED luminaires, piercing it and bringing waterfalls down with the light. The ergonomic and practical rooms are also designed to last, to be hardwearing and easy to clean. The wardrobe stands out like a shiny, bright green totem, offsetting the

solid surface desk and suitcase stand. The shower, wrapped in a curtain of frosted glass, at the centre of the room, becomes the pivotal point of the whole space. The washbasin is directly at the headboard of the bed which extends to support it. The shower and washbasin are therefore not connected to the walls. The toilet is concealed behind a mirrored sliding door. The luminaires, recessed Express LED, are concentrated in several points, depending on the type of room.

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Laser Blade

Line to Circle

Laser Blade revolutionises the concept of the downlight. The product with miniaturised optic, providing high visual comfort, uses the physical principle of pinpoint lamps, generating circular light emission. No more rigid frameworks, but instead ample opportunities for customisation. Innovative in its simplicity, Laser Blade is the result of an integrated process involving various disciplines: the science of lighting, technology, design and culture. The system is a multiple, exible, universal tool. Laser Blade has received a number of prestigious international awards. It is a compact segment, from 44 to 56 mm high and 44 mm wide. Its compact size and shape allow it to be applied even in ceilings with limited depth (minimum installation depth from 45 to 100 mm) and make installation in small spaces easy. A patented optical unit perfectly directs and distributes light. The secret of Laser Blade Wall Washer is its patented optical unit: a combination of reectors and optical screens. Careful technological study has produced an optical layout consisting of an oblique internal reective part (which directs light as far as the upper edge of the wall) and a front refractive, prismatic surface.

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Body

Internal reflector made of super-pure aluminium with silver deposit (unbeatable reflection factor).

Ribbed PMMA diffuser screen

Diffusing film

Black raster

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Laser Blade High contrast Laser Blade General Lighting Laser Blade Wall washer Laser Blade Adjustable single Laser Blade iN30 High contrast recessed/surface-mounted/pendant 6 Laser Blade System53

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Laser Blade

Philippe Mombellet Lighting Designer Ponctuelle

Would you tell us about the first time you saw Laser Blade, when that was and what your first impression was? The first time I saw this luminaire was in Frankfurt, at the Light & Building exhibition. I remember that what surprised me was the fact that it didn’t spread light. Seen from a distance, it looked like it was switched off. It was very unobtrusive, and my first impression was that at that time it was one of a kind. You can imagine a luminaire like this in many projects, so I was pleasantly surprised. In your opinion, what is special and unique about it compared with other products you’ve seen on the market? I think its dimensions and unobtrusiveness. It’s true that we need to see light and it has to make a space visible, but you usually don’t want to see the lamp, because that means seeing glare. Also, as I already said, it’s small and can be used in a variety of contexts. I don’t think there has been a luminaire like this on the market before.

During this visit you’ve had the chance to see the entire development of Laser Blade so you’ve seen the versions for general lighting, wall washer, the systems, the adjustable version. Out of all of these versions, which interests you on a professional level? Actually, the version that most surprised me was the basic one. It’s often the case that when you design a product: often the first feature, the first idea that develops, turns out to be the best. After the basic version, the wall washer seems to me an interesting product. As I said, you need to have a little bit of experience using a product before you can discover all of its secrets and it’s only now that I’m finding out what the possibilities offered by this luminaire are. What do you think of the evenness of the lighting with the wall washer version? It’s surprising. The product is a true success. It has to be used according to your instructions, because it’s a luminaire that needs to be positioned in a very precise way relative to the surface to be lit.

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Photographs Jo Burridge

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Wasabi Restaurant London, UK


Laser Blade

Vogel Dental Practice Freiberg, Germany Photographs Thomas Schlenkrich

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Fabien Haouy Sales Manager Vibert Eclairage

Yannick Dietrich Architect

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? The first time this luminaire was shown to me was at iGuzzini France in Paris. It was presented to us because it had just been released, it was THE new product… very innovative, able to light like a luminaire with halogen lamps, but instead it used LEDs.

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? I think it was at a presentation iGuzzini held at our offices. I thought that this product had something magical about it: you see the light, which seems to pull you in one direction, but you don’t see where the light is coming from… you see the atmosphere created in the room. You want to stay. But the origin of the light remains a mystery…

What do you think is unique and really special about this product? The idea behind it is unique: a luminaire in a linear shape but which produces a circular beam of light. Which version do you prefer? I think the wall washer version is really interesting. It opens up new possibilities for lighting rooms.

Have you ever seen a product like Laser Blade, based on the same idea? Let’s say that what’s really interesting about this product is that it doesn’t look like a luminaire: you don’t see the lamp, so people crossing a space wonder where the light is coming from and it seems to me that with competitors’ luminaires you always see the lamp: there’s always a starting point and end point of the light.

Have you already used Laser Blade in a project? Yes, we’re using it for flats in Strasbourg. We chose it to light the corridors and we wanted to add value to the architecture and enhance the wellbeing of the occupants using lighting. Of all of the Laser Blade versions you’ve seen this morning, which do you prefer? It’s difficult to say, because I prefer the original. Out of all of the products on display in the showroom I was struck by the original, because it’s unobtrusive and the lighting is so good. I love rooms where you only light part of the area, a piece of the wall, and you want to discover the space, to go further.

What do you think of the vertical evenness of the lighting with the wall washer version? I think it gives more softness and comfort to the light from the luminaire... It’s less intense, gentler.

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Laser Blade

Philip Dickinson Architect Pritchard Fernis

Simon Marks Lighting Designer DHA Designs

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? Paul Fry came to our firm and presented the features of this product to us. I think some of my colleagues had already had the chance to see it, but that was my first encounter with it and I was impressed by the heat dissipation technology and the optics. I think that it is a truly unique product because of the glare control.

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? It was at one of the presentations at Light & Building… Terry got us involved (…) he said we absolutely had to be there, that it was about new products. We were bustled into this darkened room… and told that what we were about to see was really new and special… then they turned on the luminaires and what we saw was thrilling… we were stunned by the lighting effect, which was completely circular, and by the sheer amount of light emitted. The idea behind it was striking too taking something linear and using it to make a circle. We thought that it had a lot of potential.

Have you ever seen a product like Laser Blade, based on the same idea? No, I don’t think so… I don’t think there is anything that has downlight optics, but with a shape which isn’t that of a downlight. Of all of the Laser Blade versions you’ve seen, which do you like best? I’m a big fan of the System 53. It’s handy to have the possibility of combining products from the same family. It allows for many applications. What’s really interesting is the possibility of using a wall washer optic with the linear version.

Are you already using it in any projects? We’ve suggested it for two projects… I proposed its use as a concealed downlight in the black metal grid ceiling of a car park, the idea being that when you drive along the car park ramp you shouldn’t see the lamp from any angle even if the floor is lit as you gradually go further down… Another project we’re working on, as is your company, is one with a metal ceiling that has a folded, irregular surface, with a series of peaks and hollows. The Laser Blade was integrated in the hollows in the ceiling, using the linear form of the luminaire, but to obtain circular light distribution on the floor.

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Architectural design Natalia Santafe

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Interior design Dario Torralbo Photographs 274 km

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El Corte InglĂŠs Gourmet Experience Madrid, Spain


Laser Blade

Private flat Panama City, Panama

Photographs Fernando Alda

Architectural design and lighting design Ignacio Maillol

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See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CS0KBwmVjPw

Michael Deppisch Architect

Jörg Reimer Lighting Designer JAD Lighting Design

Hiroyasu Shoji Lighting Designer Lightdesign Inc. founder

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? I saw the Laser Blade in the 2012 -2013 new products catalogue, which was completely revamped, even in terms of the graphics. I though the product was intriguing. This almost “filigree” product fits perfectly with my philosophy for architecture: fine, simple.

Could you tell us about the first time you saw the Laser Blade product? I first saw the luminaire at Light and Building in Frankfurt. I was really pleased to see how minimal this luminaire was. Many luminaire manufacturers try to explain how the advent of the LED doesn’t guarantee compact products, because the heat sink takes up a lot of space. I think iGuzzini has solved that problem in a “new” way.

I think that Laser Blade is a luminaire for the new age. After the development of the incandescent lamp, all recessed luminaires were round. Obviously, this round shape is becoming ever smaller thanks to the evolution of lamps, but it’s still round. Laser Blade uses very small LEDs and has a linear shape. It’s compact, but can light large spaces. So, it’s a great luminaire for the architectural sector. It’s revolutionary and suitable for the LED age.

Possible developments? I think that development should move towards increasingly brighter luminaires for the retail sector, except perhaps for clothing where chains like Abercrombie & Fitch and Hollister don’t use high lighting levels. It’s in these special cases that a product like Laser Blade shows its worth.

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Company culture

iGuzzini Benelux moves

From February 2014 the iGuzzini Benelux premises will be in the Valkeniers Natie complex, the site of the company of the same name since 1906. Located in the port district, the building, renovated after the company was bought by Katoen Natie, is now a multipurpose centre, housing offices, showrooms

and artists’ studios. We have a large open space, filled with tables of the most innovative products, recently presented by iGuzzini, in addition to the “Touch the light” table: a fully equipped table where guests can learn about the main features of products by experimenting with them.

iGuzzini illuminazione SpA - Belgian Office Showroom & offices Van de Wervestraat 22 2060 Antwerpen

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Renzo Piano celebrated in New York and appointed Life Senator in Italy

2013 saw two further boosts to the career of architect Renzo Piano. From June to August 2013, New York’s Gagosian Gallery, in collaboration with the Renzo Piano Foundation, hosted “Fragments”, an exhibition of more than three decades of projects by the Italian architect. iGuzzini was the technical sponsor for lighting, supplying Le Perroquet spotlights, designed by Piano Design, a sponsorship that resulted from our long working relationship with the architect. In August 2013 Piano was also made a Life Senator by the President of the Republic, Giorgio Napolitano. The honour is bestowed on Italians who have “represented the Country with outstanding merit in social, scientific, artistic and literary fields”.

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Company culture

Training meetings at iGuzzini Iberica

The Spanish branch held a series of meetings to look in-depth at several aspects of lighting. The “Light Experience” meetings took place in June and October, organised as workshops, meaning that an introduction running through the theory was followed by practical work. The first workshop was about lighting commercial spaces, with the precious help of architect Federica Sandretti and of Lisardo Mendo, a specialist in fitting out commercial spaces. On 30th October 2013, architects and designers who attended the meeting were able to carry out field experiments for lighting a cloister, thanks to the collaboration of the Museum - Monastery of Sant Cugat del Vallés.

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Environmentally-friendly lighting for Pistoia Nursery Park

27 June 2013 brought the inauguration of the first European Nursery Park, Pistoia Nursery Park by the historic nursery company Vannucci Piante. It has more than a hundred great plant specimens, amongst the most beautiful and spectacular in existence, expertly combined by variety, species, colour and height. The park was made even more picturesque at night using iPro LED floodlights. The inauguration took place together with the third edition of the international show “vestire il paesaggio”. iGuzzini was represented by vice-chairman Paolo Guzzini, who made a speech explaining the company’s continuous efforts to create environmentally-friendly products and its long experience lighting parks and gardens.

Alaia Palais Galliera, Paris 28 September 2013 - 26 January 2014 Since the end of September 2013, members of the public have been able to rediscover Palais Galliera, with its updated electric and fire protection systems, accessible route and renovated interiors. The building’s original colours, such as Pompeian red, have been recovered. The museum was re-opened to the public with an exhibition dedicated to fashion designer Azzedine Alaia, with iGuzzini as technical sponsor. We worked with lighting Designer Christian Broggini and the 3V company of fitters. iGuzzini organised a visit to the exhibition and played host to clients, architects and designers on 9 December 2013.

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Company culture

Anello wins the Janus award

In November the Anello luminaire, designed by Marc Aurel, received the Janus Award, the most prestigious French design award, assigned by the French Institute of Design since 1953 to those designs considered creative works capable of improving quality of life. A jury made up of designers, engineers, advertisers, journalists and manufacturers saw in the Anello luminaire features which meet the criteria of ergonomics, elegance, economy, ethics and emotion. The awards ceremony was held in January 2014.

Janus 2013 de la Cité

ADI Design Index 2013 La Triennale, Milan 1 October - 2 November 2013 ADI Design Index 2013 is the third volume in the three-year cycle covering goods pre-selected for the next ADI Premio Compasso d’Oro (Golden Compass Award). The award, established in 1954 by the “La Rinascente” company and then passed on to ADI, which has managed it since 1956, is the highest accolade for production and design quality of goods, services, processes and systems in the Italian design sector. Since 2009, ADI Design Index has become not just the pre-selection for the Golden Compass Award, but also an annual selection for the National Innovation Award, sponsored by the Office of the President of the Republic. iGuzzini’s Primopiano professional and Wow luminaires were pre-selected and displayed during the exhibition dedicated to the ADI design Index, held at Milan’s Triennial Exhibition.

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ENERGY. Oil and post-oil architecture and grids Rome, MAXXI 22 March - 10 November 2013 The “Energy” exhibition is split into three sections dedicated to the Past, Present and Future. They are: Stories, Frames and Visions. The exhibition is at Gallery 1 at Rome’s MAXXI museum, showing various materials: from photographs and plastics, to proper installations like the Energy Forest by Sou Fujimoto Architects. The MAXXI forecourt was fitted with a 1950s petrol station. The exhibition also includes the documentation of several pilot projects in progress in Europe and around the world, to illustrate and emphasise the increasing importance of the relationship between science and architecture. For the exhibition lighting and for the first time ever, the MAXXI museum opted exclusively for LED-based luminaires with a 4000K colour temperature to highlight white, the museum’s dominant colour. iGuzzini was the technical sponsor and provided Front Light spot lights for general lighting and Ledstrip luminaires for the display stands containing the more fragile materials.

Photographs Flaminia Nobili

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I. 2014

Dear readers, Incontroluce Six-monthly international journal of lighting culture

the history of this industry features positions adopted with the intention of emphasising the importance of correct lighting. We did this with our advertising campaigns, starting with “Lighting Italians” from 1982, and then “With iGuzzini against light pollution” from 1993 and “Better Light for Better Life” from 2002. Through these campaigns, the lighting sector learned, with us, to focus on the big issues of the relationship between city, architecture, life and light. If we want to improve the environment and the society we live in, we must be aware of how light, if used correctly, can make a real difference to quality of life. What’s more: we believe that nowadays light is the driving force, the tool for true social innovation, so from 2014, Light First.iGuzzini is the new ideal, tangible platform around which our community intends to convey the most crucial, fresh, scientifically and morally advanced progress in our companies. Light First means lighting all of the places where we live, work, love, take care of one another, grow, show. Light is for people and their spaces. Without light there is no development. Without light there are no objects, bodies, stars. Bringing about social innovation means putting into practice ideas (products, services and models) which meet the needs of people and societies, in a more effective way than the existing alternatives and which at the same time create new relationships and new collaborations, using light to improve life, to innovate society: we want to dream of a better future, based on sustainable development and vital energies, on high quality technologies and know-how. “Thence we came forth to rebehold the stars”, is the final line of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy: it is a forecast of the new path of light and hope after the difficult times we have lived through. It isn’t just something we want for ourselves and for the world, it’s a social commitment that we make and which we want to inspire our work.

year XVI, 27 Editorial office Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com 071-7588453 video Graphic design Studio Cerri & Associati Editor iGuzzini illuminazione spa Contributions to this edition were provided by iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH iGuzzini illuminazione France iGuzzini illuminazione Iberica S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini Finland & Baltic Oy iGuzzini Lighting (China) Co. Ltd IGuzzini Middle East Cover photograph Bitter Bredt

Light first. Adolfo Printed: March 2014 Tecnostampa, Recanati

The editorial team is not responsible for errors and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by collaborators. Any additions or corrections will appear in the next issue. II

III


Daniel Libeskind / Emilio Vicedo Ortiz / Manuel Lill Navarro / Dsign - Vertti Kivi & Co / RPBW / Piero Castiglioni / Aitao - Ren Rui / Cheng Taining / He Jingtang / Jiangsu Institute of urban Planning and Design / Foster + Partners / archi5 / Basalt Architecture / ACMH : Pierre Bortolussi / L’Atelier à Kiko / Giulio Ceppi - Total Tool / Autogrill Group - Design & Architecture Dept. Stefano Carmi e Patrizia Bernardi / Enrico Botta Architect / Giancarlo Marzorati / Simone Micheli / Dario Torralbo / Natalia Santafe / Ignacio Maillol

9.2985.000.0

27

English edition

I. 2014


iGuzzini - Incontroluce 27  

Časopis Incontroluce 27 od iGuzzini. Magazine Incontroluce 27 from iGuzzini.

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