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English edition

I. 2011


Editorial

Dear readers, Italy is celebrating 150 years of unification. From a “geographical expression” as it was defined at the start of the nineteenth century by Klemens Wenzel von Metternich, plenipotentiary of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, today Italy is a modern nation with an important role in the world. This was achieved thanks to its history, the beauty of its landscapes, its thousand-year-old culture and the greatness of the artistic masterpieces produced throughout the centuries. In the last 50 years the international image of our country has also spread thanks to the creative and productive capacities of companies: products Made in Italy. Today, outside our country, the term Made in Italy is synonymous with passion and culture, above all bringing to mind beauty, quality and creativity. These are terms associated with Italian production by more than 70% of Chinese and U.S. opinion leaders interviewed for a recent survey commissioned by Comitato Leonardo. For many, these terms are associated with traditional sectors - textiles and food - but they have gradually spread to more modern sectors, in particular those of furnishing and design. The roots of products Made in Italy go deep in our country. To find them you have to know Italian territories, cities, towns, “savoir faire” and expertise of the entire production chain network. It is this “network” system which is characteristic of contemporary Italian production, consisting of the coordination of small businesses around a specific territory. Today, Made in Italy is the only production system in the world where the designer is involved at all stages of the design cycle: devising, production, distribution and, above all, consumer processes. Even if they come from another country, any designer, once they have worked with our system, becomes “Italian”. The international architecture projects we have presented over the last 13 years of “Incontroluce” are examples of Made In Italy around the world in the sector in which our company operates.

Adolfo Guzzini


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Incontroluce

Contents

II

Editorial

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Design Italian light for the Chinese Ministry of the Environment

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Projects Rolex Tower Lighting for a new Sanofi Aventis building

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Northbridge Piazza

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The German National Museum and the permanent exhibition “Renaissance - Baroque - Enlightenment”

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Faraone Store

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International School of Zug and Luzern

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Official presentation of the new MACRO

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The Briggait

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A biodynamic light for the frescoes of Villa Farnesina

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Design Museum Holon

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Headquarters of the Banco Nacional de España

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New Opera District Desigual Store

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La Porta del Parco Auditorium

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Luxury for offices in Boulevard Saint Germain

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Woodland Trust HQ

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Shirvanshahs Palace Complex

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Domestica showroom

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New Pirelli building

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IBM Software Executive Briefing Center

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Company culture Ron Arad: Restless

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Anticorpi / Antibodies Fernando and Humberto Campana 1989-2010

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LED - Lighting Exhibition Design iGuzzini Denmark

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Dean Skira guest of the iGuzzini Workshop “Light, art, technology”

I. 2011


Design

Italian light for the Chinese Ministry of the Environment Beijing, China

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Building 4C is the site of the Chinese Ministry of the Environment. Designed around the concept of sustainability in its many forms such as: adaptability, recognisability, energy sustainability and accessibility, this building helps to enhance the local identity. Adaptability to the environment and harmonious inclusion in the urban context influenced its architecture. Through the architecture, the building takes on recognisable aesthetic and formal features, making it easily identifiable in the urban landscape of the capital. The lighting adds to this, highlighting its distinctive architectural features. The north facade represents closure, due to the need to screen the building from the busy road network, protect it from cold northerly and north-westerly winter winds, and the client's specification that this view should have a serious appearance. The facade appears monumental and compact. Occhiuto, the architect, designed a huge parallelepiped, suspended on a two-storey glazed area, created using large stone slabs and marked by horizontal and vertical slashes which expose the openings. The basic grid is interrupted and given dynamism by the presence of large-scale elements: two double-height balconies and one single-storey balcony which accentuate the idea of emptiness, and a glazed cut (the crash room) extending vertically through the entire building and coming out of the facade, representing the idea of fullness.

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Client Chinese Ministry of the Environment

Structures and plants FMi- Favero & Milan ingegneria S.r.l. a.

Architectural design mOa - Mario Occhiuto Architetture

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione iGuzzini illuminazione China

Lighting designer Francesca Storaro

Photographs: LV Hengzhong rendering by kind permission of Francesca Storaro portrait: Rino Malgrande 1. Building 4C lit according to the colours of “The Four Seasons” 2. Design rendering “The Four Seasons” 3. Rendering “The Earth”

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Design

Francesca Storaro An architecture graduate, since 2007 Francesca has been a lecturer and member of the managing committee of the Accademia della Luce (Academy of Light). She is a member of the leading associations of Lighting Designers: AILD (Italian Association of Lighting Designers) AIDI, PLDA, (Professional Lighting Design Association), IALD (International Association of Lighting Designers). Since 2009 she has taught level 2 European Social Fund Masters courses for architectural and artistic lighting engineering experts at the Faculty of Architecture in Venice. Also since 2009 the international architectural lighting review “Mondo Arc” has included her firm amongst the 50 most important Lighting Design firms in the world. Her most prestigious and most recent work includes: lighting conception, architectural design, lighting engineering and supervision of works for the Venice Biennial Exhibition, the 55 th Exhibition of Cinematographic art, the lighting of Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, for fashion week, the lighting design for Palazzo d’Arnolfo in San Giovanni Valdarno, the lighting design for Castello Visconteo and Piazza Sant’Antonio in Locarno, Switzerland, the lighting of the Correggio domes in Parma, lighting for the Villini delle Fate in Rome's Coppedè district, and lighting for building 4C in Beijing, the site of the Chinese Ministry of the Environment and for building B2 at the Shanghai Expo 2010, both projects by Mario Occhiuto Architects. She has also worked with architects such as Massimiliano Fuksas, engineering firms such as Favero & Milan, and artists such as Mario Ceroli, as well as working on the set-up for many exhibitions dedicated to Vittorio Storaro.

Italian light for the Chinese Ministry of the Environment

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Francesca Storaro highlighted these four elements with different shades of colour, inspired by the four seasons, representing an evolving environment. They generate changes in the environment, following an evolutionary, climatic and colour sequence. The lighting idea is therefore to show the environment and the architecture which represents it in this building through the four seasons and their symbolic colours. The seasons are a symbol of the regular renewal of nature and are closely linked to the astrological tradition of celestial influences on the sublunary world; they follow the rhythms of nature and human life; they express a cyclical idea of time. In Greek and Roman mythology the gods of Olympus for the seasons were: Flora for spring; Demetra for summer; Dionisis for autumn; Saturn for winter. The seasons also correspond to the basic stages of our lives: birth (spring), maturity (summer), decline (autumn) and death (winter). In contrast, in China the four seasons are represented by: the chrysanthemum (autumn), the plum (spring), the peacock (winter) and the lotus (summer). Francesca Storaro represented each architectural element with a specific season. So, she attributed to the vertical windows, which express movement, growth, development, the value of Spring, of the element Air and represented it with the colour Dark Blue, which is the colour of thought, freedom, sensation, intuition. The horizontal windows represent stability, the line of the earth, the horizon, or a resting person, a static form, like the Autumn and the element Earth. Autumn is represented with the colour Orange, which is the colour of growth, love, the family unit, passion and emotion. These horizontal and vertical windows are lit with Glim Cube RGB luminaires, curved in the horizontal windows and linear for the vertical windows.

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4. Rendering “The Moon” 5. The building with the colours of “The Four Seasons”, from various angles

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The Crash room is a solid area projecting out from the building facade, representing fullness and prosperity. So it is associated with Summer, with the element Fire and the colour Red, a symbol of vital energy: the sign of all things positive, impulses, power and conquest. The red is created by Linealuce RGB. The balconies have lost portions, they are created by subtraction, empty spaces which represent something missing, aridity. So they are likened to Winter, to the element Water and the colour Green, the symbol of knowledge, mystery, destiny. In this case Platea RGB spotlights were used. The building's government function made it necessary to give the facade an official and monumental look. The two parts anchored to the ground on either side, representing stability, and the triangular feature on top of the building, a symbol of solemnity, become the fifth element, the quintessence, the joining element. They are the sum of the cyclical idea of time, expressing the year, and they are represented by the colour White: pure light, the colour of all colours since it encompasses them all. It has always been the symbol of Purity, Candour and Wisdom. It is the colour of energy. Since the seasons are closely linked to the astrological tradition of celestial influences on the sublunary world, when the cycle of the seasons is finished, dynamically controlled, the architectural elements featured in the building (horizontal and vertical windows, empty and full areas) will all be lit by the symbol of the Moon, the colour Light Blue, until midnight. Then from midnight to dawn, said elements will be returned to the symbol from which the environment comes, the Earth, symbolised by the colour Orange. The colour changes and phases are managed by the MasterPro Lighting Management System.

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Projects

Rolex Tower

Client Ahmed Seddiqi & Sons Architectural design Skidmore, Owings e Merrill - NY office Lighting Designer BPI Shangai office - Chiming Lin

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

The first Rolex Tower in the Middle East was unveiled in Dubai, in the presence of numerous guests and journalists. The complex, with a spectacular glass facade reflecting the city's countless lights, was designed by architectural firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. The Dubai tower has 25 storeys of flats, including two penthouses, as well as 31 storeys of commercial spaces. The extremely simple parallelepiped shape seems to be covered with a veil thanks to the use of glass with a milky effect. In contrast, the upper part of the building loses its opaqueness, turning transparent with an effect similar to that of the pixels of digital images. The architects and the Lighting designer wanted to recreate the same type of pixelated effect at night. Therefore since the building was first lit up in February 2010, 800 special LED luminaires with a diversified switch, have been managed by a control system (storey by storey) set up by iGuzzini. The control system has been recreating the tower's daytime milky effect which gradually turns more and more transparent the further upwards it goes. The night-time appearance also includes more intense lighting at the top of the building, with a kind of torch effect, as if the building were crowned to resemble the Rolex logo. The final lighting was achieved after a process in which three different iGuzzini branches each developed a part of the complex project.

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Turnkey Contractor DCC -Dubai Contracting Company Partners Assistance iGuzzini China Lighting engineering design consulting service

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iGuzzini Italy Development and production of the special product and the control system iGuzzini ME Onsite support, Mock Up and installation

Photographs: Oliver Jackson Photography 1. The Rolex Tower in the city context. The torch effect wanted for the top of the building is clear 2.3. Different switch on phases for the special product

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Projects

Lighting for a new Sanofi Aventis building

Client SOGAM Architects Franco Cianfaglione SCGMA (SociĂŠtĂŠ Cianfaglione Gravereaux Maroun Architectes)

Massy, France

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This complex, initially intended to accommodate 2,500 people, is in a protected area built in rue de Paris, a road linking the motorway to the city centre in Massy. Built on a 6 hectare area, the project meets the requirements of the city of Massy: linking the business zone with the residential zones in the city centre, gradually switching from urban to non-urban, acting as a transition point between the various functions of this Essonne city. Aside from that requirement, the aim was also to find a balance between the need for visibility requested by investors for this office building and the need for urban harmony.

The design creates a break because of its size, but perfectly fits in with the town planning. It is built of the same materials that were used in the residential sector: bricks, glass and concrete. The main facade is a huge glass box and the building gradually becomes less closed and repetitive. The further you get from it, the other facades are increasingly disorderly: the brick, timber and openings are positioned randomly. The creation of 15 m wide visual faults and the addition of a glass walkway give a 250 m building that is dynamic rather than repetitive or monotonous.

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Studies office BETHAC

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France SA

Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour 1. The building's main facade

Fitter Phibor (Vinci group)

2.3.4. Rear view of the building with green areas

Landscaper Emeraude Paysage Christophe Besson

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It succeeds in avoiding noise and environmental pollution, offering a meeting place, somewhere for relaxation and wellbeing. These are the project guiding values: it was essential, for the tenant and the architect, to highlight the functionality of the work stations (clear, tranquil and restful, to promote concentration) as well as the warmth of the spaces outside the working areas. The two contrasting treatments used for the interiors also bring to mind the contrast between the geometrical, rigid and cold exterior, and the interior with its undulating curves and red colour.

Delivered at the end of 2009, the 39,000 square metre building today accommodates 1,200 employees of Sanofi Aventis. The project includes a giant hall with a well of light, a cafeteria/restaurant with a glass roof, three underground parking levels, an archive level, a landscaped garden, an area for welcoming visitors, a 350-seat auditorium, meeting rooms with mobile walls and even a gym and a locker room. In terms of lighting, during the day all of the offices are lit by natural light from the faults which run from floor to ceiling. Artificial light takes over at night.

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Projects

Lighting for a new Sanofi Aventis building

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3.4. Two architectural details

The luminaires used for the interiors are Minilaser, Pixel Plus, Laser and Pixel. The auditorium is lit with Deep Frame luminaires. The interior corridors are covered with red plates, from the hall to the garden and lit with MaxiWoody spotlights, in some cases even ground-recessed. In the hall iRoll luminaires are supplemented with Le Perroquet pendant luminaires and above the reception desk there is an indirect light Le Perroquet. The gardens have many water features and grassy areas to help integrate the building into the surrounding environment. Bliz, iWay and Pencil luminaires are mostly used in this area. At the front of the building, the glass main facade is lit by Lavinia luminaires, pole-mounted and in the wall-mounted version applied on pillars.

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Projects

Northbridge Piazza

Client City of Perth Urban Designer City Design Lighting Designer WSP Lincolne Scott

Perth, Australia

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Part of the Perth local government project to revitalise the area of the city which welcomes people with its restaurants and entertainment, Northbrigde Piazza offers an open space where they can sit and relax, partly thanks to the presence of an LED maxi-screen, even visible from the shops and restaurants which line the Piazza. The lighting design, by WSP Lincolne Scott is

linked to the sense of safety and relaxation that the zone was required to offer. Mondoluce provided the technical support needed to identify the best product for creating a welcoming atmosphere. Woody floodlights were installed on poles to light the grassy area at the centre of the piazza, giving a suitable and comfortable lighting level for the Piazza and its visitors.

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Electrical Contractor Downer Electrical

Photographs: Ron Tan 1. Lighting in the streets leading to the Piazza

Partners Assistance Mondoluce

2. View of Northbridge Piazza

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Projects

The German National Museum and the permanent exhibition “Renaissance - Baroque - Enlightenment” Nuremberg, Germany

The inauguration of the permanent exhibition entitled “Renaissance - Baroque - Enlightenment” at the German National Museum in Nuremberg since 17 March 2010 marked the official end to restructuring work on the gallery dating back to the 1920s and protected as historic and artistic heritage. At the end of a six year period of planning and construction, the biggest museum of German art and culture presents the core of its collections in new splendour. The new exhibition of treasures dating back to the period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century on the upper floor of the gallery was created by applying state-of-the-art museological criteria, adhering to an innovative contentrelated concept. The art of the early modern period, including masterpieces by Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach and Veit Stoß is displayed in the relevant historical - cultural context to promote a complete understanding of the actual culture of centuries gone by. The time period extends from the discovery of the New World around 1500 to Rococo and the Enlightenment of the late eighteenth century.

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A thousand items on display, from paintings to sculptures, textiles, coins and medals to pieces of furniture and musical instruments, bringing to life three centuries of German cultural history divided into themed categories such as “Pilgrimage”, “Reform” or “Nature and antiquity”. The Erlangen-Nuremberg State Municipal Technical Office (Staatliche Bauamt ErlangenNürnberg) was given the job of designing and implementing restructuring of the gallery and the new display architecture of the upper level. The main aim was to protect and optimise the historically important heritage items: eliminating construction elements added over

the years. As a result, the building's original architectural structure re-emerged. The designer's main objective was also to emphasise the elements displayed, making the display architecture merely functional. A presentation system with the structure of a unit or a whole makes the 33 rooms, partly extremely different from a construction viewpoint, seem like a single display body. Even the lighting design by LichtVision of Berlin was inspired by this basic principle, giving priority to the best possible visibility of the works on show, whilst the luminaires had to blend in as far as possible.

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Client Germanisches Nationalmuseum N端rnberg Lighting Designer LichtVision Berlin - Thomas M端ller

Designer Erlangen-Nurmberg State Municipal Technical Office - J端rgen Wolff and Florian Kutzer (Staatliches Bauamt Erlangen-N端rnberg)

Photographs: Lothar Reichel 1.2. Set-up of the rooms

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH

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Projects

The German National Museum and the permanent exhibition “Renaissance - Baroque - Enlightenment�

3.4. Set-up of the rooms

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This idea was implemented with light ceilings using daylight and artificial light in the large rooms, together with accent lighting from Tecnica spotlights which were also fitted in the toilets where they are the main lighting, unlike in the large rooms where their effect mimics daylight. Special diffusing filters allow a delicate transition between cones of light and a harmonious effect on the display walls. For optimum reproduction of the colours of the paintings halogen lamps were used.

The lighting is combined with a complex control system which guarantees constant light intensity, protecting the items displayed. In the rooms lit from above, daylight is regulated in the roof by special plates in the air gap between the sheets of insulating glazing. Light sensors in the roof space and in the collection rooms measure the light intensity present and control the shading systems and the amount of artificial light necessary.

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Projects

Faraone Store

Client Faraone Jewellers Architectural and lighting engineering design Iosa Ghini Associati

Milan, Italy

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The concept behind the new Faraone jewellery store in Via Montenapoleone, Milan, assigned to architect Massimo Iosa Ghini, is inspired by an idea of preciousness characterised by enveloping forms which outline the space and describe an elegant, refined display. The design was guided by the quest for equilibrium, in the architect's own words: “The dry symbol of a cut, polished and limpid stone, the fluid of gold and precious metals enclosed in an elegant wooden cover… They need to be put together in the correct proportions to obtain a space which makes the most of the contents and which is pleasing to all of the senses of those working and shopping there”. The interior was created using traditional materials, with very carefully chosen sophisticated finishes: different woods presented with shades of colour tending towards grey, amber glass, brass and bronze coloured metals, soft leather for the seats. The rooms are enclosed in moulded wood panelling, which appears throughout the space.

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Photographs: Santi Caleca 1. Shop windows on Via Montenapoleone 2.3. Views of the interior

The glass display cases with square lines intersect and penetrate each other. The joints create glints of light and innovative overlaps. The perimeter walls are completely dedicated to displays and extend with luminous glass display cases emphasising the natural colour of the stones. Emerging from these long shapes there are others extending towards the centre of the space until they meet up with the sinuous bronze coloured bands. The seats are covered with soft tan leather. The upholstery is encompassed by a hand-polished band of brass. On the floor, a carpet marks out the consultation and sales areas. The atmosphere is warm and inviting. The lighting consists of three elements: the theatrical pendant luminaires made to order by a craftsman; the LED lighting for the windows, specifically to emphasise the jewels on display; the Deep Minimal metal halide recessed luminaires which supplement the other lighting and even it all out. The boutique is set on two storeys, linked by a staircase screened by an imposing wall of multiple sheets of coloured glass, in bronze and amber-yellow shades. On the first floor, the sitting rooms are for customers who prefer to have their own dedicated space and more peace and quiet. Cesare Settepassi, like a true family jeweller or a contemporary metropolitan craftsman, is always available to customers and those asking for his advice, vision and opinion. Attentive and discrete, he is always present both at the ateliers and in the jewellery store, witness to the history, a past and a future at the service of the “family� which has expanded to include all who show a love for beauty, style and good taste.

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Projects

International School of Zug and Luzern

Client Fondazione Don Bosco Architectural and lighting engineering design Germann & Achermann AG

Baar, Switzerland

The International School of Zug and Luzern (ISZL) is an important feature in Baar: around 1,200 students from 50 countries are registered at the school which uses an international syllabus. The ISZL has 3 sites: Baar, Hünenberg and Lucerne. In Baar, under the direction of architectural firm Germann & Achermann, a new secondary school building was designed and built. The main body consists of the Hall, a huge, construction which is half sunk into the ground. The three-storey school building is a wooden structure with a glass and metal facade. The entire building meets MINERGIE® standards, a quality label for new and refurbished buildings.

The label is jointly supported by the Swiss economic establishment, by the Cantons and the Confederation. That also involves compliance with special lighting requirements. The designers also had to take into account that the new buildings are divided into three different sectors: the “general zone”, indicating parts of the building such as corridors and stairwells, the classrooms and the Hall. The general zone is mostly lit with Sistema Easy luminaires using PL-R fluorescent lamps which, despite their low power, have a greater output than conventional lamps. So, with a small number of lamps, it was possible to provide the overall lighting power

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Electrical installation designer Scherler AG

Photographs: G端nther Laznia 1. The school's interior lighting seen at night

Electrical installation fitter Erzinger Eugen AG Hans M端ller AG

2. Lighting of the double-height hall, with spectacular effects on the walls

needed, at the same time ensuring optimum compliance with Minergie requirements. A Mini Light Air lighting system was used in the classrooms, automatically adjusting to exterior lighting conditions, providing only the lighting needed to supplement natural light, which was an essential factor to guarantee optimum conditions for teaching. The pendant Mini Light Air luminaires give out only 70% direct light, the remaining 30% being indirect, producing a very pleasant lighting effect. The Hall, which at eight metres is double height, had to be fitted with lighting able to allow the set-up of big exhibitions, meetings and theatrical performances. Powerful Reflex recessed luminaires were used, avoiding glare. Finally, the foyer lighting consists of LED Pixel Plus luminaires, on one hand satisfying Minergie requirements relating to maximum emission per square metre, and on the other creating lighting effects which emphasise the foyer compared with the other areas. Overall, this resulted in a building with a 4,800 square metre surface area which, with its modern structure, is a hugely effective stylistic contrast with the adjacent neo-baroque style church.

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Projects

Official presentation of the new MACRO

Client CittĂ di Roma (Rome City Authority) Works supervision CittĂ  di Roma Museum Director Luca Massimo Barbero

Rome, Italy

3rd December 2010 saw the inauguration and presentation to the public of the new MACRO (Rome Museum of Contemporary Art). Winner in 2001 of the international competition organised for that purpose, the design by architects Odile Decq and Benoit Cornette suits the district and the cultural institution located in it, embedding but not forgetting to open up to the city to promote cultural awareness. The result is a beautiful structure, with a round interior route, two openings to the roads and slipping into the sky at the roof. The museum which now opens onto two roads has two contrasting visual aspects,

the old and the new. The old entrance is from the old stables side giving onto via Reggio Emilia, the courtyard covered by glass and the two wings linked by galleries and the basement forming the museum's first building. The new entrance is under the glass bow of the new extension, pointing towards via Nizza, an extended square of a courtyard planted with Japanese ailanthuses and full of gravel, leading to the heart of the new building. Its space is gradually discovered by moving around the red monolith of the 200-seat auditorium which is the heart of the building and attracts people from all sides, located on a floor

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Architectural and lighting engineering design Odile DECQ Benoit CORNETTE architectes urbanistes Main contractor CDG

Main contractor for finishing CLM

Photographs: iGuzzini Archive 1. The foyer with the red monolith

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France iGuzzini Rome

of black basalt which was also used for Roman paving. The light filtered by the glass above cuts through the shadows of the beams and preserves the half-light. The glass roof by Simone Prouvé, creator of the fine steel frames in the layered glass, does its job marvellously, dialling down the light without making shadows. The black-painted high side walls, like the metal framework, extend the distance to the sky and close the box around the ruby block. Both mingling hall and central foyer, this tall irregular room is surrounded by a mezzanine level and crossed by silver coloured metal hanging walkways directing one's view with arrows.

The big gallery (1,200 square metres) extends at an angle below a black steel structure, whose arches are from 8 to 12 metres high. Suspended from its arches, a walkway gently climbs the space towards the upper terrace, offering visitors a view of the works displayed and ending on the terrace tiled with black basalt whose centre is dominated by the angled surface of the hall's glass roof, across which a slice of refreshing water flows, a clear reference to the fountain decorating any square worthy of its name in Rome. At the side of this “hanging” square one finds the umbrellas of a cafe restaurant.

2. Some of the hanging walkways seen from above

An extension of the mezzanine level and on the line of a staircase, the cafeteria is in the bow, dominating the entrance, with one eye on the road and the other on the entrance courtyard. The red-lacquered irregular polyhedron of the auditorium surprises with its matching interior. With a satin-finish exterior and gloss interior, it is lit with Linealuce luminaires hidden in the ceiling and directed at the speaker. The MACRO lighting design was created in close collaboration with architect Odile Decq and museum director Luca Massimo Barbero, who provided details of the requirements for displays and management of the spaces.

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Projects

Official presentation of the new MACRO

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With technical advice from iGuzzini, the museum's technical sponsor, but above all a partner company in the true sense of the word, the most suitable luminaires for the different needs of the various areas were identified. In the “Black Room” black iPro 150W discharge luminaires were used for diffuse light and black Metro pendant trackmounted discharge luminaires for lighting the items displayed. The “Small White Room” was lit using white fluorescent Linealuce luminaires, managed

by a control system, for diffuse light and by white Tecnica halogen spotlights to light the works of art. There are also white fluorescent Vela luminaires for a wall washer effect. Communal areas are lit with black Le Perroquet halogens and black fluorescent Linealuce luminaires. The hall linking the old MACRO with the new MACRO is lit with white fluorescent Linealuce using a control system. The entrance hall uses iRoll 65 discharge luminaires with up/down

lighting. The “Art and Video” room is lit with Deep Minimal luminaires managed by a control system. For the exteriors we used ground-recessed Ledplus luminaires and for grazing light on the interior of the roof Radius discharge spotlights. Thanks to our role as technical sponsor, iGuzzini also made available to the museum a number of Tecnica halogen spotlights and Parallel discharge luminaires which can be added for impromptu exhibitions.

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3. The “Small White Room� 4.5. Scenes from the press conference

Some questions for Odile Decq

Where does the MACRO design come from? The MACRO design came from the city, not just because it was the client, but because its structure, composition and essence got inside the MACRO to create this design with the front square and the upper square and between them the walkway, the pathway, the route, perfectly reflecting the way the city of Rome is laid out. So that you can wander from one square to the next. For me, that is the essence of Rome, of the city, which went into the museum. Also, the basalt floor is the same used for the roads of Rome. So, the city goes into the museum and the museum is open to the city.

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There is a lot of light in here. What were you thinking in terms of artificial and natural light? Nowadays museums, especially museums of contemporary art need natural light, so we had to make sure that it could easily enter everywhere in the museum. That's why in the exhibition rooms you find these huge windows. But at the same time, we need to protect against too much natural light when an artist wants to work in more artificial conditions, or when night falls. That's why artificial light was also necessary, so that we could light the entire space, in particular the exhibition rooms, allowing exhibitors to focus attention on certain points, depending what they most wanted to do. But things are different here in the foyer: this is a communal area, with works of art. So in some places we have to focus the light, but generally speaking the museum is immersed in natural light, and in particular in an environment in which little by little artificial light substitutes the natural light, but can't be too different.

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Projects

The Briggait

Client WASP Foundation WASP’s Artist 1 Studios, Glasgow Sculpture Studios City of Glasgow Architectural Design Nicol Russel, Broughty Ferry

Glasgow, Great Britain

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The Briggait, the popular term in Glasgow for this building which is the old fish market along the river Clyde, is next to a seventeenth century bell tower that is a distinctive feature of the Glasgow skyline. Glasgow architects Clarke and Bell produced the original design for the Briggait, inspired by Les Halles, the great market in Paris built between 1845 and 1854. Inaugurated in 1873 as a fish market, it was extended east in 1899 and in 1903. When the fish market transferred outside the city at the end of the ‘70s, the Briggait was no longer needed and the Municipal Council thought about pulling it down. But the charity called the Briggait Trust was set up to save the building and convert it into a shopping centre, although within a few years it had fallen into disuse. The Council is currently applying an overall strategy for the city, the “Housing the Visual Arts Strategy”, also supported by Scottish Arts Council Lottery funds, which has seen the refurbishment of this building, which will house 11 organisations working with visual arts and will create a dynamic artistic district. The Briggait consists of three large halls from the former fish market, which have been empty for a decade. The building can accommodate around 250 artists, in 71 affordably priced, good quality studios, a purpose-built sculpture laboratory, and multimedia structures, a specialist library and a series of creative industrial units. Electrical consultancy Buro Happold asked iGuzzini to help with the specifications for the lighting of the main hall and exterior lighting on this project. The inside of the main hall is lit with iRoll luminaires.

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Electrical installation consulting Buro Happold

Photographs: Peter Iain Campbell 1. Facade lighting

Electrical installation Mitie

2. Main hall lit with iRolls

Main contractor Morris and Spottiswood

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They are columns mounted on the original iron columns whose rustic charm is due to their basic style and irregular finish. Ambient lighting is obtained using these product in the compact fluorescent and metal halide versions. The cylindrical shape reflects that of the columns and the product is more functional than showy. The exterior lighting covers two very different facades. Along the river (Clyde

Street), the columns are lit with Light Up Professional ground-recessed luminaires. Their light flow combines with that of the Miniwoody CDMTC luminaires fitted behind the columns to increase the illusion of depth. On the Bridgegate side Light Up Professional recessed luminaires are again used to emphasise the columns, together with Linealuce and Miniwoody, as well as some Radius floodlights for the three windows at the top of the facade.

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Projects

A biodynamic light for the frescoes of Villa Farnesina

Director of the National Roman Museum at Palazzo Massimo alle Terme Rita Paris Technical Director Mauro Petrecca

Rome, Italy

The new set-up of the section dedicated to the frescoes of Villa Farnesina is part of the framework for updating the exhibition criteria at the National Roman Museum at Palazzo Massimo alle Terme. The main aim was to create, in the correct chronological and philological order, a visual route in which the different sections are independent zones of experience, treating them as chapters of the same story but which are independent of each other. The huge quantity of works and finds which are so diverse in terms of materials, techniques, size, colouring and state of preservation can guide

the public through Roman history and art according to themes. This museological approach also allows experiments with a correct museological system: in the various sections the different nature of the finds is tackled with the correct lighting engineering tools, the right wall colours, the most suitable supports, the clearest captions and all other measures necessary to put the works into context and facilitate the visitor's experience, in terms of emotion, teaching, a critical or interpretative approach.

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Architectural design and lighting design Stefano Cacciapaglia Carlo Celia with Anna Marcucci and Marco Tondo

Graphical Design Monica Cola with Raffaella Cola

Photographs: Roberto Lucignani

Displays by Fabrizio Meloni S.r.l.

2. One of the rebuilt spaces

1. Reconstruction of the large triclinium, with illuminated barrel vault

Lighting engineering consulting service Carolina de Camillis and Riccardo Fibbi

In Villa Farnesina the layout of the rooms was redesigned with the aim of recreating, as far as possible, the original sequence of perceptions: the positioning of the rooms, of the frescoes and the mosaics follows (as far as is allowed also by the new internal layout of a museum space) a plausible sequence. From the long fresco of the Cryptoporticus, its pattern marked by the painted decorations (in which unfortunately the gaps are much larger than in the frescoed parts, but which was deliberately put back together to include large spaces) the visitor reaches, thanks to a rich didactic element, the large hall housing the reconstructions of two Cubicula and the Triclinium. Here the positioning of the rooms and the perspective and chromatic sequence allow one to relive the perceptions of the space in a way very similar to the original condition. The coverings of the areas and the walls are grey and the geometry is absolutely basic to avoid interfering with the colours of the frescoes, above all with the large black fields of the triclinium. The crucial choice in designing the display for this section relates to the criteria for lighting the works. The designers decided to continue what was started with the rooms of the Villa di Termini, where ‘shadowless light’ was successfully used, and with the painted garden of the Villa di Livia, which was the site of the first experiment with ‘biodynamic’ light: artificial lighting used to reproduce the variability of natural light which affects the perception of the colours of frescoes. In the large triclinium a heat-stretched sheet with shape memory was used to recreate the geometry of the barrel vault, deconstructed in the contemporary way. From this sheet, forming an artificial ceiling, diffuse light rains down, ‘without shadows’, so that the grain of the material does not predominate the preciousness of the paintings.

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A control system manages the short lighting cycles, which in a hundred seconds simulate the natural variation of the colour temperature and intensity of daylight throughout the day (2700K - 6500K), with the corresponding variation in perception of the colours of the frescoes. This means that the visitor can appreciate, in these one hundred seconds, the colour changes that take place in an entire day. As regards preservation of the articles, the presence of the translucent sheet allows a significant reduction in harmful radiation corresponding to UV and infrared wavelengths.

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Projects

A biodynamic light for the frescoes of Villa Farnesina

3. Cubiculum 4. One of the connecting areas

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The biodynamic lighting was set up using lamps with different colour temperatures varying between 2700K and 6500K, managed by the Light Equalizer control system. In the Cubicula the work was made more ambitious by the difficulty making both the frescoes and the stucco-work on the vaults clear: reconciling in the same space the need for diffuse light and grazing indirect light. Again, the translucent sheet was used to recreate the ‘artificial ceiling’, ideal for reading the frescoes, with the system for reproducing the daytime cycle, make this even more spectacular given the rich and precious colours of the walls. A linear system

with LED lamps, completely hidden from view, completes the lighting equipment, using preset timers to supply grazing indirect light on the stucco-work of the vault, accentuating the relief features thanks to the photometry, the orientation and the positioning chosen. In the connecting areas between the reconstructed rooms full of frescoes and teaching materials for the entire section, the same “biodynamic” lighting system is applied, with the invention of diffusers having a ‘cuttlefish’ shape which, reproducing the shape of the frescoes, produce a soft wall washing effect on the painted surfaces, whilst the dispersed flow is absorbed by the grey background of the walls.

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Projects

Design Museum Holon

Client Holon Municipal Authority Architectural design Ron Arad Architects Architect Waxman Govrin

Holon, Israel

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In 2003 the Ron Arad Architects firm was asked to design the first national Design Museum to be built in a recently developed area of the city of Holon, a few miles south of Tel Aviv, intended to become the new cultural and educational centre of Israel. The local authority commissioned the Ron Arad Architects firms to design a museum that would comply with international standards, having the important role of promoting design and architecture in Israel, but also abroad. The Design Museum at Holon (DMH) occupies a 3,700 square metre area. The large square to the north is a public area, as well as the access route for the Museum.

The features of the platform-style site are split by the museum layout on two staggered levels, linked by an outside sculptural ramp, the main route around the museum. In this way, the path through the museum becomes more experimental, since it leads the visitor through a series of spectacular interior visions crossing the museum's internal courtyard. The idea of creating and exploiting tension between an interior layout of efficient “boxy� spaces and the dynamic, curving outer shell is the guiding principle of the design of the entire museum. The largest part of the building is encircled by five separate ribbons of Cor-Ten

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Structural design Harmel Engineering

Photographs: Uzi Porat 1. Museum exterior

Partner Assistance Lighting System Italy (1982) ltd

2. One of the rooms

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steel which ripple and snake into, out of and around the building's internal spaces. These ribbons are the structure's spine, supporting most of it structurally and at the same time dictating its position relative to the surroundings. The horizontal positioning of the ribbons is further emphasised by the tones of the treated coatings and the wear and tear on the steel with the passage of time: both bring to mind the geological structure typical of the Israeli desert. The ribbons are always visible to the visitor and act as the visual thread running through the entire museum.

The museum's two main galleries provide an opposite and diverse base for the curator's work: the largest gallery, at 500 square metres, uses the power of Israel's constant natural light and is lit with track-mounted Tecnica spotlights. The second, smaller gallery, measuring 200 square metres, offers a black box, allowing additional flexibility. Exhibits can also be displayed along the museum routes (two additional “mini-galleries�) and in the exterior areas surrounded by the Cor-Ten ribbons. Other spotlights used are Parallel luminaires as well as recessed Reflex, and iSign. Outside Platea, Kriss and Linealuce luminaires are used.

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Projects

Headquarters of the Banco Nacional de España

Architectural design Eduardo Adaro and Severiano Sainz de la Lastra (nineteenth century) Lighting engineering design Intervento

Madrid, Spain

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione España

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The current headquarters of the Banco de España (Spain's Central Bank) was established at the end of the eighteenth century to give the Banco Nacional a site more befitting the importance of its functions, such as issuing coins and banknotes to the whole of Spain, feeding and clothing the armed forces or making the Crown's payments abroad. It is located in Plaza de Cibeles, at the heart of Madrid, where Calle de Alcalá and Paseo del Prado meet. This symbolic building was designed by architect Adaro and inaugurated in 1891.

Since then it has undergone two major transformations: in the 1920s the Banco Nacional was extended according to the Yárnoz design and in 2005 the final addition was made, designed by architect Rafael Moneo. The building had a traditional lighting system with old lights installed on the long balconies of the main floor, using mercury-vapour lamps. In 2001 Banco de España invited three firms which handle lighting, including Intervento, to take part in a competition to provide ideas in line with the following requirements: use of

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Photographs: Tomรกs Antelo 1.2. Different views of the building

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modern technology and the most advanced technical resources for both lamps and control systems; minimum emission of light flow skywards, integration of the luminaires with minimum visual impact, general use of supporting and fixing systems which do not compromise the integrity of the monument. The design created preserves the old lights, but substitutes their metal halide lamps with compact fluorescent lamps equipped with electronic transformers for regulating the light flow.

This type of lighting was backed up with a line of light obtained by installing Linealuce luminaires on the eaves running the length of the building. Although the system angles the light upwards, there is zero light pollution because the beam of light is very narrow and the eaves screen the light flow and reflect it downwards. The building's coping and decorative elements were also put to good use, such as the balcony railings and the roof light, not forgetting the symbolic golden globe on the clock mechanism, lit by Maxiwoody 100 W

sodium lamps. The lighting system is based entirely on LED lamps. Each luminaire can be adjusted, allowing different looks to be created. The control system is the Master Pro. The new system installed has brought a reduction of 33.5% in the rated power and 49.7% in the maximum power. Last but not least, given the long working life of the lamps (50,000 hours), system maintenance is reduced to just two checking and cleaning operations on the luminaires per year.

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Projects

New Opera District Desigual Store

Client Desigual - Abasic S.L.U. Architectural design Turull - Sorensen Arquitectos SL Interior Design Federico Turull Neddermann

Paris, France

The store that Desigual has opened in Paris, in the Opera district, has become the brand's new “flagship” in the French capital. Its more than 1,700 square metres, spread over three floors and located at the centre of the city, therefore deserving of this epithet. The distinctiveness of the interior features is highly accentuated. The continuous striving and desire for innovation which are characteristic of the brand bring new features to the interiors, where the clothing is more than ever the star and an integral part of the decoration: trees made from T-shirts in different shades, giant fabric flowers, bundles of material scraps stacked on the shelves, walls covered with clothes from floor to ceiling. Fruit crates become tables for displaying new creations as if it were a market. Blackboards with messages such as “the T-shirts say Hi” or customised mannequins with the photocopied faces of employees attract attention in an entertaining way inviting passers-by to go into the shop and enjoy its real surprises.

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Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione EspaĂąa iGuzzini illuminazione France

Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour 1. A detail of the display 2. The shop windows

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Lighting plays a fundamental role in creating the desired atmosphere. Suitable chromatic reproduction of the colours characteristic of Desigual articles and good lighting contrasts are essential. Use is mainly made of halogen and white sodium vapour lamps, which make the space warmer and more welcoming and enhance the colours of the clothes. The lights are spotlights, with a pendant three-phase electrified track system. Lux spotlights for the per QR111 50W halogen lamps with a superspot optic, in particular lighting the panels along the perimeters, and 100W Lux spotlights with spot optic for the sodium

vapour ("mini white sun") lamps, mainly used for lighting the furniture and some panels. The spotlights are fitted with a honeycomb glass anti-glare screen to further increase visual comfort. On the ground floor, clothes hanging from the ceiling at the entrance is one of the trademark features of Desigual stores. They are lit by spotlights using 35W dichroic lamps with 24° light cone. The shop windows are also light with spotlights, but in this case Tecnica luminaires. Some use QR111 50W halogen lamps with a spot optic, while others use 100 W sodium-vapour lamps with spot optic.

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Projects

La Porta del Parco Auditorium

Client Bagnoli Futura Spa Designers Arch. Silvio d’Ascia with Servizi Integrati and IDI Lighting engineering design Silvio d’Ascia and Servizi Integrati

Naples, Italy

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The design for La Porta del Parco (Park Entrance), an Integrated Tourism Services Complex, the first work to transform the former industrial area of the Ilva di Bagnoli steelworks, began with an ambitious and clear objective: to create a new piece of city as an entrance to the large Bagnoli Futura coastal park. La Porta del Parco was conceived as a large, open public space on several levels and without interruptions between the interior and the exterior of the complex, having big angled surfaces allowing the height difference of more than 8 metres between city level (Via Nuova Bagnoli) and the level of the future city park to be gradually overcome.

The continuity is also underlined by the use of dark grey ceramic material to cover the horizontal surfaces of this area, a reminder of the volcanic rock in public areas in Naples. The Integrated Tourism Services Complex (total surface area more than 40,000 square metres, with around 16,500 square metres of basement level parking) is divided with an interesting functional mixture of different activities: in addition to two large public squares, it houses a wellness centre with Spa, swimming pool and fitness centre totalling around 7,000 square metres, a 300-seat conference room, a 1,100 square metre exhibition area, a series of multi-functional

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Final design and works Sled SpA - Misha Rae

Photographs: Barbara Iodice 1. View of the complex showing the auditorium and the Spa dome

Works supervision Servizi Integrati S.r.l. - Nicola Salzano de Luna I.D.I. S.r.l. - Paolo Minucci Bencivenga

2. Night-time view of the auditorium

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indoor and outdoor spaces, shops, bars, offices, 600 parking spaces. The auditorium and the entrance dome of the wellness centre, two glass and steel "skylights", are the only things to emerge in the urban landscape with large angled surfaces, both lit by iGuzzini. The auditorium of La Porta del Parco - a true urban facade for the Complex on Via Nuova Bagnoli - is compact and organic, completely transparent, covered with a skin of low-emission glass “scales�. In this building the idea of transparency linked to the use of materials such as glass and steel was combined with excellent acoustics thanks to the specific studies done and to solutions

which provide functional responses for both acoustics and lighting. A series of melamine sound-absorbing tubes placed along the vertical walls of the hall, at different heights between the vertical structural girders at the metal crosspieces for the glass scales, guaranteed excellent acoustics in the space surrounded by glass, while maintaining maximum transparency towards the outside. In this way, during the day the auditorium reflects the surrounding environment, and during the night it becomes a beacon of light, always guaranteeing the best possible acoustics. In the hall of the Auditorium iTeka spotlights are applied to the arches for general lighting.

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Projects

La Porta del Parco Auditorium

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3. The dome at night 4. Auditorium hall

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The 150W luminaire with asymmetric emission is fitted in pairs, the light directed downwards and upwards so that the uplighting gives soft, diffuse lighting that adds to the direct downlighting. In the foyer, visitors are welcomed with Tecnica spotlights using 50W lamps, and large version recessed Pixel Plus luminaires with lamps having various power ratings. The design of the new multi-functional structure of the Porta del Parco complex also complies with energy saving and high environmental quality requirements: alternative energy sources are positioned on two large angled facades to

the south and south-west of the continuous surfaces. Monocrystalline photovoltaic panels guarantee self-sufficient production of more than 20% of the complex's daily electricity requirements, corresponding to around 256,000 kWh/year. The design also allows for water recovery from spa sources, to be used partly in the SPA centre treatment pools. The glazing of the two "skylights" is solar-control and reflective. Even the Spa dome is lit with iGuzzini luminaires: Platea, Tecnica and Ledplus. The recessed luminaires lighting the square are not made by iGuzzini.

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Projects

Luxury for offices in Boulevard Saint Germain

Client CRPNAC Architects Droles De Trames Architectes Eric Chazelle and Henri Raynaud BET TCE ARETEC

Paris, France

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The building, subject to a refurbishment project to create offices, is in Paris's VII arrondissement, near the Eiffel Tower and Orsay Museum. Overlooking a courtyard in a real estate complex dating back to 1886, it has significant heritage value. It is laid out over 7 storeys, covered with a Eiffel-style steel-framed glass roof resting on cast iron columns. The former offices of the Rombaldi publishing house, the building underwent many transformations (creation of flooring, a lift and a staircase by removing the cast iron columns, skylight well meshes, etc.). Droles De Trames Architectes were tasked with comprehensive renovation, to produce all the

comfort required for a luxury office building. The same principle is applied for the ground floor, first floor and second floor lighting: ceilingmounted iRoll luminaires guarantee general lighting of the central area surrounded by the cast iron columns, while the outer area, identified by a slightly lower false ceiling, is lit with recessed Wide plus luminaires. Corridors and bathrooms are grouped together behind a black service wall on each floor. The essential part of the design was to restore the perception of the central atrium, by inserting a translucent area, to be used as a meeting room, suspended in space between two floors

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Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour 1.2.3. MusĂŠe des Lettres et Manuscrits (Letters and Manuscripts Museum)

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below the glass roof. This area is lit with ceilingmounted iSign luminaires. Pendant iSigns were selected to light the area below the glass roof, forming an ideal line of luminaires which follows its structure. The basement, with no natural light, is lit using Compact Easy and Wide plus luminaires. Special attention was paid to the details of the finish and the choice of lights, to emphasize the space available. The design continues with a custom set-up for the tenant, who intends to install the MusĂŠe des Lettres et Manuscrits (Letters and Manuscripts Museum) on 2 floors, with adjacent offices.

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Projects

Woodland Trust HQ

Client The Woodland Trust Project manager Buro Four Architect Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Will Garner

Grantham, United Kingdom

The new Woodland Trust headquarters in Grantham, Lincolnshire, house the offices and a meeting area for its 200 staff. The aim of the 2,800 m2 headquarters is to create a highly functional and sustainable building, the latter being reflected by its BREEAM certification as “Excellent”. The building services strategy includes widespread use of natural ventilation, natural daylight, solar shading, lightshelves. This has then been combined with low energy

IT solutions. The unassuming exterior seems almost normal for the location - in its own way it is a classic piece of architecture on a car park in a typically English ribbon development, and it respects its environment in every way. Obviously the building was designed as a social site. The outer social “courtyard” opens directly into another social “heart”: the large entrance area, which leads directly to the high sunlit ceiling, giving onto landings on both upper levels.

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Structural engineering Atelier One

Landscape architect Grant Associates

Building services engineering Max Fordham

CDM coordinator PFB Construction

BREEAM consultant Max Fordham

Surveyor Ridge

Photography: Peter Cook 1. Outside of the Woodland Trust HQ

Clearly, in this place people are not just meant to feel that they are at work, they are also put at ease. From inside the offices the building performs one of these miracles: it seems to incorporate the immediate surrounding environment, offering splendid views: the wooden horizon that shifts gently; the church steeple; the roofs of a pretty English country town. There are many innovations, starting with the decision to use wood as the main building material: Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios calculated that the carbon saving from not using a concrete structure is the same as the first nine years of operation of the building. The client got exactly what they wanted: something inspiring, innovative and frugal original and feasible. Even what FCBS intended was done: innovation using normal materials such as wood and paint. iGuzzini illuminazione contributed by adding to the mainly natural lighting around 100 Ground Y Light lamps for direct and indirect lighting. The lamps can be controlled individually up to 50% of their power. This is definitely contributing to the reduction in energy use. The variations across the floor space, which reflect occupancy levels and personal preferences give more texture and interest to the working environment. The quality of light is superb, both on the work surface and the reflected ambience from the ceilings.

2.3. Some areas of the offices with Y Light standard lamps

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Projects

Shirvanshahs Palace Complex

Client Baku Old City Municipal Authority Partner Assistance PBC Company - Giandonato Boccia

Baku, Azerbaijan

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The Shirvanshahs Palace Complex, built in the fifteenth century, is one of the pearls of Azerbaijan's architecture and since 1964 it has housed the state history and architecture museum. More recently it was declared to be a world heritage site by UNESCO. The complex is at the highest point of one of the hills of the ancient Baku fortress. Divided in a picturesque fashion over three terraces, one above the other, it can be seen from the sea and from the high ground surrounding the city.

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Photographs: Emil Khailov 1.2. Overviews of the complex

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Inside, there is a residence, the Divankhana pavilion, the Shirvanshahs tomb, the palace mosque with a minaret, a Turkish bath, the mausoleum of court scientist Seyid Yahya Bakuvi and the eastern gate which was a later addition. Since the entire complex is subject to strict conservation rules, the electrical system and installation of the luminaires were absolutely not allowed to affect the surfaces. For example, recessed Linealuce luminaires were only used

in recently constructed parts of the floor, which were not covered by the protection rules. Also, given the rich decorations of the gates, the guiding idea for the entire project was to make the most of the various entrances and gateways without the luminaires being too apparent. This resulted in the choice of floodlights located on the roofs of the various buildings in the complex. This method of installation was applied in most cases, except for the palace

porticoes, where Radius floodlights stand on the ground at the back of the columns, the cables passing through the gaps in the ancient stone blocks: a solution which left the precious materials untouched. The residence in the complex features a magnificent gate, lit by Radius floodlights, with niches having deep shadows and upper windows decorated with “shebeke�. All of the walls are uniformly lit with LED Light Up luminaires.

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Projects

Shirvanshahs Palace Complex

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The Divankhana was the site of official receptions and state meetings. At the centre there is a stone dome with pointed arches, surrounded by the portico of a closed courtyard. The more internal arcade is lit using Radius floodlights resting on the ground. In the courtyard to the south of the complex is the octagonal mausoleum of court scientist Seyid Yahya Bakuvi and the palace mosque is close to the tomb.

The minaret bears an elegant Arabic script dating the building, 1441. The domes and minaret are lit with the crossed beams of iPro 150 W and Woody 70 W luminaires, both having a spot optic. The lower part of the complex, below the palace level, includes the Turkish bath, which has been destroyed. However, the remains provide important information about the rational layout of its rooms and the expertly constructed system

for water inflow and heating. This area was also subject to the ban on wiring luminaires, meaning that it was lit by the beams of Platea floodlights. The effect is general light, without too much shadow. Another area worked on where the constraints were very strict was the passageway used to display archaeological finds from various areas in the country. In this case, the existing lighting points were substituted with new iWay luminaires.

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3. The lit up Divankhana 4. Evenly lit dig at the site of the Turkish bath

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Projects

Domestica showroom

Client Domestica Ltd Architectural and lighting engineering design Enzo Eusebi Nothing Studio Construction firm Polidano Group

Msida, Malta

Domestica Ltd has had close links to the company Berloni for more than 35 years, since the founder of Domestica began making high quality custom furniture. Before the deregulation of imports, Malta was the only country that made furniture under licence to Berloni. Today it imports the complete production range. The new Domestica showroom in Msida was designed to provide a place that would stimulate the senses and draw visitors in. Sophisticated objects exist alongside state-of-the-art technology. The visitor moves between unusual materials, in an area in which the out of scale features can prove surprising and all of the senses are involved. The outside of the Domestica complex consists

of two volumes. The first made of reinforced concrete dressed with local Franka stone. The overall effect is that of a huge block of stone which looks unstable. The second volume is made of glass and steel. The glass is of the extra-clear structural type with rectangular modules held by a system of stainless steel spiders with an opaque white steel rear structure. In the evening, the artificial lighting emphasises the contrast between the lightness of the bioclimatic glazed area, lit from the inside, and the compactness of the dark solid “rock�, only lit at some points. Through the big square opening in the facade a dynamic coloured light from

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Photographs: Enzo Eusebi Nothing Studio 1. Night-time view of the building 2. Reception 3. Display area

Linealuce RGB luminaires creates a kind of “light sign�. Circular recessed Ledplus luminaires with a wall-washer effect are fitted along the exterior routes. Behind the building Miniwoody floodlights are used in combination with LED wall-mounted Glim Cube for grazing light on the wall, plus iTeka floodlights in the car park. Inside the glazed area there are two completely white platforms with transparent extra-clear glass parapets skewered by white circular columns. Along the staircases linking the floors 100W, 4-assembly pendant Cestello luminaires hang, with dichroic lamps and flood optic, in addition to wall-mounted Y lights. All in the glass and white volume, opaque like a skeleton preserved in a glass case. To make the space less artificial, greenery is featured at the facade: teardropshaped trees with slender trunks and thick foliage, around 5 metres high so that objects at least one and a half metres tall can fit under the foliage. These trees are lit by recessed circular Lightup luminaires with a symmetrical flood optic. The reception area has satin-finish iroko wood flooring and opens onto a 5 metre high double-height area. From the entrance the Franka stone reception desk is visible and to reach it one has to pass beneath the stone-clad angled wall. The lighting consists of recessed circular Ledplus luminaires in some cases using fluorescent lamps and in others LED lamps. The display areas are lit with black, dimmable, medium-body Tecnica luminaires, in various versions with flood and spot optics having a variety of power ratings. The office areas are fitted with pendant Light air luminaires with a dark VDU screen.

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Projects

New Pirelli Building

Client Pirelli RE Architectural design Gregotti Associati International Electrical installation design Studio De Stefani

Milan, Italy

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The new building is within the La Bicocca Pirelli area. It was designed with an architecture similar to that of the other buildings there (the headquarters of Pirelli RE and the Research Centre), so that it would be in line with the group's corporate image. The planning and architectural choices for the recovery and transformation of the entire Pirelli area and its buildings were therefore made so as to emphasise the continuity of the production established there during the twentieth century.

iGuzzini luminaires were used to light the various environments. The office areas are mainly organised as open spaces, and are fitted with Lineup dark Light for the right level of comfort. The same luminaires are also used to guarantee visual continuity in those office areas separated off by partitions, to create quieter, more tranquil zones. Along passageways, communal areas and corridors the same Lineup luminaires were used, but with a Wall Washer optic.

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Photographs: Paolo Carlini 1. The building at night 2. Double-height area with gallery

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A special study was carried out on lighting for the central double-height area which is also used to host events. Here, recessed The Reflex luminaires guarantee general light, while accent light is provided with Tecnica spotlights. In the area closest to the gallery there are also recessed Linealuce luminaires, highlighting the sense of lightness and suspended nature of the gallery. Outside, the circular part of the garden is lit by several iTeka luminaires.

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Projects

IBM Software Executive Briefing Center

Client IBM Italy Architectural and lighting engineering design Iosa Ghini Associati

Rome, Italy

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The Software Executive Briefing Center in Rome was completely refurbished and significantly extended. The entire project, for an innovative and captivating reworking of the famous “stripes” of the IBM logo, is by architect Massimo Iosa Ghini and his firm. Cutting edge audio-visual technologies were carefully selected to provide guests with a comfortable environment and an experience with high added value. The new Software Executive Briefing Center

in Rome is in the same structure that houses the IBM Software Group international development laboratory. The IBM Software Executive Briefing Program was designed to offer events which are professionally managed to maximise the value of the time that clients spend with IBM. Any “briefing”, wherever it takes place, usually includes presentations and demos, to familiarise clients with the running of the events they take part it.

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Photographs: Santi Caleca 1. Ceiling and floor featuring illuminated curves 2. Some of the areas, with the IBM logo stripes

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Projects

By listening, discussing and illustrating how new IBM technologies can help people face and solve technical and business problems, we move away from the traditional idea of top-down communication, and towards a place for useful discussion: a new Agora (Greek assembly area). Particular care was paid to these discussion areas, including the use of artificial lighting to create a comfortable environment: pendant or continuous strip Lens luminaires were used in the projection and meeting rooms. Recessed LED Laser luminaires appear

IBM Software Executive Briefing Center

3. Ceiling fitted with Reglette luminaires 4. One of the presentation and projection rooms

in addition to the Lens luminaires in the conference room. The main feature of the architectural space, that is to say, the soft lines of the areas, are emphasised with Ledstrips, actual strips of LEDs which can be adapted to the most diverse shapes. They were used both in the ceilings and the floors. In some cases fluorescent Reglette luminaires were also installed in the ceilings. Recessed Lineup luminaires were used in the reception area and above the bars in the bar area.

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Company culture

Ron Arad: Restless

Display design RonArad Associates Lighting engineering design DALD - David Atkinson

Barbican Center, London, United Kingdom 18 February - 16 May 2010

Technical Sponsor iGuzzini UK

The “Ron Arad: Restless” exhibition explores three decades of design by Ron Arad, from his initial post-punk approach based on assembling ready-made products, to his exclusive and extremely “clean-lined” furniture sculptures. The show, with dramatic display, designed by Ron Arad Associates, uses the most recent LED technology for video, but there are also architectural designs and industrial production items on display. Underlining the importance in Ron Arad's work of experimentation with processes and materials, the show offers a close look at the development of objects, from the initial idea to final production. The lighting for this exhibition is by lighting designer David Atkinson, Creative Director of DALD. iGuzzini was the show's technical sponsor.

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Photographs: James Newton 1.2. Some of the rooms 3. Detail with PizzaKobra

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Company culture

Anticorpi / Antibodies Fernando and Humberto Campana 1989-2010

Photographs: Fabrizio Marchesi 1.2.3. Images of the display

Milan Triennial Exhibition 14 October 2010 - 16 January 2011

The show illustrates the salient points of the work by the Campana brothers, intended to emphasise subjects such as recycling, the fusion of natural and synthetic materials and the integration of cultures. The show focuses in particular on their working methods, influenced by a large number of sources of inspiration: from the lushness of the Brazilian rainforests, to improvisation by travelling salesmen and the shanties of poor districts, from film to music to art. For the show the Campana brothers created a special new installation for the Triennial Exhibition. The Triennial was able to light the designers' works in the best possible way using Le Perroquet luminaires, which put the spotlight on the objects.

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Company culture

LED - Lighting Exhibition Design

iGuzzini Denmark

Second exhibition, Milan 4 December 2010 - 10 January 2011

iGuzzini took part in the second Milan International Festival of Light, setting up, for the “Led Satellite” section, a display of “art lighting” which can be used by the public for the duration of the show in Milan. The star is the Ambrosiana Picture Gallery with “Light metamorphoses” by architect and lighting designer Alessandro Colombini, a design of which he himself says: “A magical stream of saturated and enveloping colours transform the solemn proportions of the Ambrosiana Library and Picture Gallery into a changing space, and accentuate its architectural role and its importance as the setting for some of the world's most precious works of art”. A project in which light and colour blend. The bright, intense light rises from the ground and turns red, green, blue and then simply white, before starting over. Always convinced of the need for a sustainable approach to lighting engineering design, for the facade of the Ambrosiana Picture Gallery iGuzzini selected Platea LED RGB luminaires, designed by Mario Cucinella and Piero Castiglioni.

Established in 2000 in Copenhagen, in September 2010 iGuzzini Denmark inaugurated its new offices in the charming Refshaleoen area, a lively district of artists and design companies in an industrial area. A severe 1960s red brick building with an impressive view of the port and the octagonal square of the Amalienborg royal palace, it is the new base for iGuzzini DK. The second floor, a 400 square metre area, where the original industrial architecture remains untouched, features a contemporary design: visible systems and very high ceilings with big skylights lie opposite the resin floor and white walls, where large windows provide a view of Copenhagen's canals, giving a glimpse of the city's historical heritage. In the open space, the workstations and design areas are perfectly integrated with the zone where interior and exterior luminaires are on show. At the time of the inauguration the “light laboratory” still had to be set up, a room used for testing the effects of light in the different situations possible. The new Danish headquarters are also a “Partner Assistance” area: expert technicians are available with all of their professionalism and the know-how of a company with more than fifty years of experience, to identify the luminaires able to implement a top quality lighting design and to help spread an alternative energy model.

Photograph: Paolo Carlini

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Company culture

Dean Skira, guest of the iGuzzini

Workshop “Light, art, technology”

Recanati, 27 October 2010

Munich, November 2010

During the “International Lighting Meeting” training course at the iGuzzini illuminazione Recanati headquarters from 25 to 29 October, iGuzzini, which always values training, invited Lighting Designer Dean Skira to give a lesson based on his professional experience to around 40 lighting engineering designers and dealers from Hungary, Ukraine, Georgia, Greece, Australia, Egypt, Israel, Poland, Turkey and around thirty of the company's lighting engineering consultants. The title of his lesson was “Concrete, steel, wood, light and emotions”. As hinted at by the title, it was not a purely technical lecture. Light has been seen as a generator of experience that is not just biological and visual, but also and above all emotional. Dean Skira covered both the technical aspects of the discipline, such as colour rendering, colour temperature, integration with architecture, glare, direction and positioning of the products, and the emotional aspects linked to the use of light. Above all, he stressed the importance of working with the architect right from the start, to achieve perfect integration between light and architecture. The gathering also saw the presentation of “My Light”, published in Italy by Lupetti Editori.

A guided tour inside BMW Welt in Munich was one of the central points of the “Light, art, technology” workshop held in November 2010 at iGuzzini Germany. The architects and lighting designers invited were able to discuss the subjects of light in application, museum lighting and LED lighting during conferences and in the light engineering laboratory known as the “Effects Room”. The evening was dedicated to “Light and taste”: guests enjoyed a very special trip to the famous “Volkhardts Wein und Bistro” wine cellar, where a session tasting fine wines and admiring the marvellous architecture was the backdrop for pleasant conversation in a relaxed atmosphere. The two places were chosen as examples of good integration of architecture and light, thanks to the relationships established several years ago.

incontroluce 23

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Incontroluce

I. 2011

Incontroluce Six-monthly international journal of lighting culture year XIII, 23 Editorial office Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com 071-7588453 video Graphic design Studio Cerri & Associati Editor iGuzzini illuminazione spa The following companies collaborated in this issue iGuzzini illuminazione China Ltd iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH iGuzzini illuminazione Espa単a S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Middle East iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini illuminazione UK Lighting System Italy (1982) Ltd Mondoluce, West Australia (W.A.) PBC Company Cover photograph Uzi Porat Printed: April 2011 Tecnostampa, Recanati

The Editorial Team is not responsible for errors and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by collaborators. Any additions or corrections will appear in the next issue.


9.2635.000.0

Francesca Storaro / mOa- Mario Occhiuto Architetture / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / BPI / SCGMA / City Design / WSP / LichtVision Berlin / Staatliches Bauamt Erlangen / Iosa Ghini Associati / Germann&Achermann / Odile DECQ Benoit CORNETTE architectes urbanistes / Nicol Russel Broughty Ferry / Stefano Cacciapaglia Carlo Celia Anna Marcucci Marco Tondo / Ron Arad Architects / Waxman Govrin / Intervento / Turull - Sorensen Arquitectos / Federico Turrull Neddermann / Silvio D’Ascia / Servizi Integrati / IDI / Droles de Trames Architectes / Eric Chazelle / Henry Raynaud / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Will Garner / Nothing Studio Enzo Eusebi / Gregotti Associati International / DALD - David Atkinson / Alessandro Colombini

iGuzzini - Incontroluce 23  

Časopis Intcontroluce 23 od iGuzzini. Magazine Incontroluce 23 from iGuzzini.

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