Page 1


DEPARTMENTS

05 07 27 30 32

CSPA CORNER SHOW RESULTS NEWS BYTES SALE RESULTS ADVERTISER INDEX

contents 12 20 29 16 success at every level

T HE SPECKLE PARK SECRET IS OUT

4 tools for “beefing” up

your cow herd & your pocketbook

colour coding 5-steps: how to

make more money from your bull sale

O N

T H E

C O V E R

C O DI A K A C R E S , A R D R O S S A N , ALTA PHOTO © Natalie Jackman, have-dog.com

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

3


THE SPECKLE PARK JOURNAL | 2014 EDITION | ISSUE 3

EDITOR

Laura Bodell C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R S

Natalie Jackman Jamie-Rae Pittman CONTRIBUTORS

Amanda Radke Rod Remin

Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc. 551 Woodbridge Way, Sherwood P a r k A B T 8 A 4 G 9 | 7 8 0 - 6 4 0 - 1 6 1 2 | b e l l a s p u r. c o m

2 015 A DV E RT I S I N G R AT E S

FULL PAGE: $1,150 HALF PAGE: $600 QUARTER PAGE: $425 BUSINESS CARD: $150 Premium placements, please email ads@bellaspur.com A DV E RT I S I N G S P E C S

FULL PAGE: 8” x 11.75” trim + .125” bleed / 7” x 10.75” live area HALF PAGE: 7” x 5.25” QUARTER PAGE: 3.325” x 5.287” BUSINESS CARD: 2.125” x 1.5” Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc. will accept ads in composite form or as a computer file—Adobe InDesign, Adobe Portable Document Format (pdf), Adobe Photoshop, other image format recognized by Photoshop or InDesign. Advertisements sent as computer files must be in Mac format, uploaded to www.hightail.com/u/bellaspur and must be sized accordingly. Please be sure to include any fonts or typefaces used in your ad. Camera-ready ads submitted in the correct format and to size specifications will be given a 5% discount.

Booking deadline July 15, 2015 Ad copy deadline July 17, 2015 Camera-ready ad deadline August 12, 2015

Canadian Speckle Park Association PO Box 773, Crossfield, AB T0M 0S0 t 403-946-4635 f 403-946-4635 e info@canadianspecklepark.ca w www.canadianspecklepark.ca

CSPA DIRECTORS PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT DIRECTORS

MEMBER AT LARGE

Josh Vogel Scott Sauter Barry Ducherer Ken Malterer Joseph Stookey Rod Remin Andrew Metcalfe

The Speckle Park Journal is the official publication of the Canadian Speckle Park Association, owned and published one time annually by Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc. of Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada, distributed at no charge by the CSPA. The Journal is for the purposes of promoting the growth and development of the Speckle Park breed, publicizing the news and successes of CSPA members, and printing educational articles and information of interest to them. The Speckle Park Journal hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or all inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Speckle Park Journal and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer or its payment for the said advertisement, the running of a corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any errors must be made in writing within 30 days of distribution of the magazine.Advertising copy received after deadline will not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in all editorials are those of the writer or persons interviewed and not The Speckle Park Journal. The Speckle Park Journal does however reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectable in content. No material or part thereof may be reproduced or used out of context without prior, specific approval by Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc. and with proper credit to The Speckle Park Journal and Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc.


C S PA

C O R N E R

Welcome to the 2014 edition of The Speckle Park Journal! If Speckle Park are new to you, thank you for picking up this year’s Journal and taking the time to consider what Speckle Park cattle and their breeders have to offer. Growth is the evidence of stability. Speckle Park are experiencing another great year of growth since the last Journal. Individual Speckle Park registrations increased 40 percent, and transfers increased 35 percent. Membership in the Association has also increased significantly. As of the Annual General Meeting in June, inclusive membership was 112, which represents a 35 percent increase in two years. The best perhaps is the number of junior members who own, breed and are selling Speckle Park. The future of Speckle Park is assured. The Quality Beef Competition at the 2014 Calgary Stampede again has Speckle Park at the top. Both the Reserve Grand Champion and third place carcass honours were awarded to Speckle Park steers. Each competition provides more evidence of the consistency of Speckle Park – consistency in carcass size, marbling, large loin and ideal fat covering. This October, the Herd Builder Sale will be the first public offering of purebred and commercial Speckle Park in Ontario. It is a momentous occasion for the breed in Canada, being the first Speckle Park auction outside of provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta. Speckle Park have been in Ontario for almost two decades, and it appears their time has

come. Recently, the number of Speckle Park breeders in Ontario has been steadily growing. The demand for Speckle Park is very strong as cattle producers everywhere look at alternative solutions to ensure profitability. This exciting sale is being held in conjunction with provincial Shorthorn and Hereford sales. More details are available in this issue of the Journal. The established Speckle Park sales in Canada’s West have enjoyed great success and recordsetting prices since the 2013 Journal. The number of calls received in the Association’s office from people looking for bulls and females indicates the demand for Speckle Park is increasing. We have not been able to meet the demand. With the increased demand comes the need of increased vigilance on the part of all breeders to ensure the improvement of the Speckle Park breed in all the traits important to the industry. The office of the Canadian Speckle Park Association exists to promote Speckle Park by serving the Association’s members and “friends of Speckle Park.” Whatever your question, we are happy to try to find an answer for you. We can supply you with a comprehensive breeders’ directory to help you find the Speckle Park breeder nearest you, or answer your questions about the registration of Speckle Park. All Speckle Park breeders also love to talk about Speckle Park. Don’t wait for an invitation, invite yourself over to view their cattle and have a conversation about Speckle Park and how they can work for you.

Rod Remin, Business Manager Canadian Speckle Park Association

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

5


6

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L


grand champion bull

reserve champion bull

EXHIBITED BY Notta Ranch, Spots ‘N Sprouts, Gerald & Karen Watchel

EXHIBITED BY River

grand champion female

reserve champion female

Uneeda Zapper 13Z

River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z

Notta 60W Photo-Finish 1Z

Hill Farm

Star Bank Theta 42T

canadian western

EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch, Can-Am Alliance

EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch

agribition

heifer calf champion River Hill Nothing Fancy 93A EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

reserve heifer calf champion River Hill 25M Alyxia-Jade 59A EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

junior champion female Notta 60W Photo-Finish 1Z EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch, Can-Am Alliance

reserve junior champion female River Hill 26T Zniquewa EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

senior champion female Star Bank Theta 42T EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch

reserve senior champion female P.A.R Wonder Bra 66W EXHIBITED BY P.A.R. Ranch

bull calf champion River Hill 50U All In 60A EXHIBITED BY River

D AT E

NOVEMBER 13, 2013

Hill Farm

reserve bull calf champion P.A.R. Ace in a Hole 66A

L O C AT I O N

REGINA, SASK JUDGE

LANCE LEACHMAN MAIDSTONE, SASK

EXHIBITED BY P.A.R. Ranch

junior champion bull Uneeda Zapper 13Z

EXHIBITED BY Notta Ranch, Spots ‘N Sprouts Speckle Park, Gerald & Karen Watchel

reserve junior champion bull River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

senior champion bull Ravenworth Kleos 3Y EXHIBITED BY Ravenworth

Cattle

reserve senior champion bull Six Star Royal Flesh 101Y EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch

SHOW

RESULTS T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

7


grand champion bull

reserve champion bull

EXHIBITED BY River

EXHIBITED BY Notta Ranch, Spots ‘N Sprouts, Gerald & Karen Watchel

River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z Hill Farm

grand champion female

Uneeda Zapper 13Z

reserve champion female

P.A.R Wonder Bra 66W

River Hill 64S Urban Angel 35U

lloydminster

EXHIBITED BY P.A.R.

Ranch

EXHIBITED BY Redneck

Ranch

stockade round-up heifer calf champion River Hill 50U All-A-Long 6A EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

reserve heifer calf champion Ravenworth Northern Star EXHIBITED BY Ravenworth

Cattle

junior champion female Redneck Zahara 7Z EXHIBITED BY Redneck

Ranch

reserve junior champion female Melissa III OF P.A.R. 561Z

D AT E

OCTOBER 31, 2013

EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

senior champion female P.A.R Wonder Bra 66W EXHIBITED BY P.A.R. Ranch

reserve senior champion female River Hill 64S Urban Angel 35U EXHIBITED BY Redneck

Ranch

bull calf champion River Hill 50U All In 60A

L O C AT I O N

LLOYDMINSTER, SASK JUDGE

Hill Farm

ROB GARNER

reserve bull calf champion River Hill 12X Artic Chill 09A

SIMPSON, SASK

EXHIBITED BY River EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

junior champion bull River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

reserve junior champion bull Uneeda Zapper 13Z

EXHIBITED BY Notta Ranch, Spots ‘N Sprouts Speckle Park, Gerald & Karen Watchel

senior champion bull Six Star Royal Flesh 101Y EXHIBITED BY Notta

Ranch

reserve senior champion bull Ravenworth Kleos 3Y EXHIBITED BY Ravenworth

8

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

Cattle

SHOW

RESULTS


grand champion bull

reserve champion bull

EXHIBITED BY MX

EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

MX Big Gun 105Z

Codiak Putnam GNK 61Y

Ranch

grand champion female

reserve champion female

P.A.R Wonder Bra 66W

River Hill Ayzia-Nabob 50A

farmfair EXHIBITED BY P.A.R.

Ranch

EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

international

heifer calf champion River Hill Ayzia-Nabob 50A EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

reserve heifer calf champion Codiak Annie GNK 7A EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres D AT E

NOVEMBER 6, 2013

junior champion female Morning Star Zag 2Z EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

reserve junior champion female Codiak Zana GNK 3Z

EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres L O C AT I O N

EDMONTON, ALTA JUDGE

KYLEY DENSCHIKOFF THORSBY, ALTA

senior champion female P.A.R Wonder Bra 66W EXHIBITED BY P.A.R. Ranch

reserve senior champion female Ponderosa Tiffany 06T EXHIBITED BY Heartridge

Ranch

bull calf champion River Hill 106Y Ace-One 06A EXHIBITED BY River

Hill Farm

reserve bull calf champion P.A.R. Ace in a Hole 66A EXHIBITED BY P.A.R. Ranch

junior champion bull MX Big Gun 105Z EXHIBITED BY MX

SHOW

RESULTS

Ranch

reserve junior champion bull Codiak Tycoon Cat GNK 12Z EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

senior champion bull Codiak Putnam GNK 61Y

EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

reserve senior champion bull Codiak Eagle GNK 46Y EXHIBITED BY Codiak Acres

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

9


legacy_cspaAd.indd 1

2014-08-01 8:08 AM


success at

It appears the secret is out. Transfers of Speckle Park cattle have gone up by 35 percent over the past year, as more people around the globe are introduced to this breed and its attributes. BY LAURA BODELL B E L L A S P U R I N N O V AT I V E M E D I A I N C .

Every segment of the industry is experiencing the added value Speckle Park offer. Seedstock producers find themselves in a high-demand market for females, and with growing commercial bull sales as ranchers realize both the terminal and maternal merit of the breed. With their natural marbling ability, the cattle are an unrivaled fit for quality beef. Wade and Sherry Meakin have been operating Wrangler Farms at Westlock, Alta., for 30 years, and now breed purebred Speckle Park alongside their established Charolais herd. “Seeing some of the top cattle in at Northlands really caught my eye,” recalls Meakin. “I decided that having another breed in my bull sale would be a nice fit. They’ll work as good heifer bulls because of their low birth weights.” He had also heard Ken Stanley praise how the Speckle Park performed in his nearby feedlot, and commercial cattleman Beau Lyons had been using them successfully as well. Lyons’ program is strictly commercial; their family runs Angus-Simmental cross cows, taking a very hands-off approach. “I calved ninety heifers bred Speckle Park this year, and only hand pulled three of them,” says Lyons. “The temperament is also good. With kids around, you need to be aware of safety, and it’s important to have docile animals.” His initial exposure to the breed was a calf that arrived with a liner-load of cows, which Lyons noticed did really well. He then bought his first bull in 2010, and by 2014, 10 of their 20 bull battery were Speckle Park. Lyons notes the Speckle Park calves’ vigour at birth is excellent. After calving out their first set of replacement heifers this spring, they are also noticing the females’ fleshing ability. “They’re at least one condition score higher than the SimmentalAngus,” Lyons says. The heifers have been attracting attention; they took home reserve champion honours in a people’s choice pen show with more than 500 spectators. That recognition has translated into financial reward. “Everyone wants Speckle Park females right now,” says Lyons. In March, they sold a group of 770 lb. heifers for $1,410.

“I thought they could add benefit to our program.”

photo © Natalie Jackman, have-dog.com

12

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L


every level Their steers are backgrounded to 900 lb. and sold online, often to repeat buyers. “The carcass quality is really the thing about Speckle Park,” notes Lyons. Greg Holtby agrees. When the Canadian cattle business took a hit from BSE in 2003, Holtby Farms decided to try finishing some of their own cattle from their commercial herd at Marshall, Sask. They were able to develop a small market, selling through their local abattoir in Lloydminster, Sask. Around that time, he recalls beginning to hear more about Speckle Park. “They were winning steak tasting competitions in Camrose (Alberta) and carcass competitions at the Calgary Stampede,” Holtby says. “I thought they could add benefit to our program.”

Greg and Tami Holtby, HOLTBY FARMS

Taryn Holtby and Brennan Schachtel, HOLTBY FARMS

It wasn’t long after that Holtbys saw the opportunity to launch a locally-sourced food store in Lloydminster, calling it Harvest to Home. It now provides three avenues to market their beef: as fresh cuts at the store’s counter, as an ingredient in their ready-to-eat meals and catering dishes, and as sides through the abattoir. “We are just getting to the point where we can supply our customers with Speckle Park beef all year,” Holtby says. They raise and finish most of their own stock, but also support other local farms by purchasing animals to fill demand. Of their own cattle, close to 50 percent are now Speckle Park-influence. “When I started with Speckle Park, it was as a terminal cross for their meat,” says Holtby. “The past three to four years, we’ve taken a bit of a twist and are keeping more females. They winter really well, and are nice cows. We’ve also sold a few, with the market being so good.”

Christy and Beau Lyons with children Denver and Willow, LYONS FARMS

With daughter Taryn and son-in-law Brennan Schachtel now leading the herd’s management, they have recently developed relationships with a small number of established purebred breeders to begin implanting embryos into some of their commercial cows. “We’ve started small, building our herd that way,” shares Greg. “It’s been fun getting to know all the people in the breed. There is such opportunity for Speckle Park.” Wade and Sherry Meakin, WRANGLER FARMS T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

13


WITH YEARS OF DATA from feeding cattle to supply one of Central Alberta’s best-known meat shops, we know exactly how our genetics perform in the feedlot and on the rail. It’s been proven with more than a dozen top-ten carcasses in Calgary Stampede’s Quality Beef Competition. You can trust Ponderosa cattle to work from BIRTH TO BEEF.

TANIA & KEN MALTERER • Box 12, Site 3, RR 4 • PONOKA, AB T4J 1R4 Tel: 403-783-2001 • Fax: 403-783-2081 • ponderosafarms@cciwireless.ca

4B (Wild Willy x Ursula 7U)

4B (Codiak Calvin x Moofassa)

2B (Codiak Calvin x Moofassa)

8B (Moofassa x Paddy 33B)

FIFTY-TWO YEARS of dedication to the seedstock industry has taken us through many fads and challenges, but this breed truly offers what the beef business is all about. 2B & her mother on summer pasture

Watch for our private sale catalogue offering bulls and heifer calves

BOX 52 • MAIDSTONE SK • S0M 1M0

DAVID & ARLINDA

[t] 306-893-2714 [c] 780-205-4630 jsf3@sasktel.net

JUSTIN & AMBER

[t] 306-893-2667 [c] 306-248-1305 jsfbulls@hotmail.com


RAVENWORTH KLEOS 3Y

2013 CWA Sr Champion / 2012 CWA Jr Champion Bull

RAVENWORTH NORTHERN STAR 101A

2013 Stockade Lady Speckle Park Breed Class Winner

Thank you

to all of our buyers, bidders and supporters over the past year.

RAVENWORTH HORIZON 103A

PLEASE STOP BY THE FARM, OR OUR STALL AT STOCKADE ROUNDUP & AGRIBITION

High Selling Bull - All Canadian Speckle Park Sale THANKS TO PUR A VIDA ACRES

Garry & Donna Berting and family | Middle Lake, Saskatchewan | 306-231-7567 | garry@ravenworth.com Raising Speckle Park Since 2009 Find us on Facebook


5 - S T E P H OW T O

make more money from your bull sale Filling the ag publications, cramming your mailbox, taking over the online feeds – everywhere you look, there’s bull sale propaganda.

If yours is in the fray, you have probably lain awake after checking cows in the middle of the night, wondering how you can compete with the thousands of other bulls that are going to go through the ring? BY LAURA BODELL B E L L A S P U R I N N O V AT I V E M E D I A I N C .

Like so many others, you may feel the crunch of ever-increasing input costs weighed against the finite number of dollars that are available in the bull market. More than ever, there is tremendous opportunity in agriculture. It is always said that this is a people business, and with today’s technology you can leverage that like never before. Here are five simple steps that will ensure your genetics look their best, and your program stands out to potential customers:

1

CUSTOMER SERVICE is always number one. People buy from people they like, people they trust, people whom they feel have their best interests top of mind. Take the time to connect with your customers through out the year, rather than just in the week leading up to your sale. Call them during calving to see how it’s going, check in and find out how their calves sold, send a card when they celebrate a milestone – show you care about them and their success. It doesn’t take but an hour a year, just 60 of 525,600 minutes for each one, and you will absolutely see the results.

2

Take the time to get the bulls ready, set up a picture pen with consistent background and plenty of ground base that faces the right direction for good light, and have a crew in place that can help the photographer with moving the bulls and getting their attention. Photos that represent the cattle in their best light don’t cost money, they make money.

4

Put out a STAND-OUT CATALOGUE. When a stack of sale books in the mailbox adds to a bigger stack on the coffee table, there is a real risk of getting lost in the mix. It’s easy to look at the catalogue as your biggest expense and try to shave down the bill to save money, but it’s also the most important marketing tool in your sale arsenal. With printing industry advances, the cost of doing a colour catalogue is less than that of a full-page ad in most publications, and will likely provide better return on investment. Speaking from experience, most designers have a few tricks up their sleeve they would love to put to good use if you are willing to invest in creating a piece that will have worn, well-marked pages by sale day.

5

STRATEGIC ADVERTISING has replaced mass media. Ineffective advertising is a costly mistake that you can’t afford anymore. What does that mean? Well, if you are running a $1,000 print ad placement and getting less than 10% response, you’re wasting money. Thousands of ads are placed every year in this industry without the advertiser even knowing the publication’s circulation and demographics, and many of those ads are just money down the drain. A well-defined target audience, in-depth multi media research, and a professionally developed campaign that covers all your bases will ensure you get the most bang for your budget.

Your SALE DAY ATMOSPHERE will help set the tone for prices. How you present the offering and make buyers feel will go a long way toward determining the perceived value of your program. We’ve all been to a sale that has a paid concession, is in a cold building, and you go through all the pens without so much as a hello from the people putting it on. By the time the sale starts, it doesn’t matter how good the cattle are. Making people welcome, putting together a tidy display with helpful signage, and having staff on hand whom buyers can be confident going to for information on the bulls are small details that make a big difference.

GREAT PHOTOS are an absolute necessity. You put a lot of expense and effort into developing your genetics, managing them well, and feeding them right.

So that’s it: customer service, strategic advertising, great photos, a stand-out catalogue and creating a sale day atmosphere. Here’s to your success, and creating a sale buyers want to invest in!

3

photo © Loree Photography

16

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L


We consign to these sales:

The Western Elite Sale, The Canadian Western Agribition Speckle Park Sale, The Summit 3 Sale

River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z Stockade Round-Up, Grand Champion Bull

River Hill 64S Urban Angel 35U Owned by Redneck Ranch Stockade Round-Up, Reserve Champion Female

River Hill Ayzia-Nabob 50A Farmfair International, Reserve Champion Female

River Hill 60W Line Drive 54Z Canadian Western Agribition, Reserve Champion Bull

Calgary Stampede UFA Steer Classic, Grand Champion Speckle Park Steer / 3rd Place Quality Beef Competition Carcass Sired by River Hill 26T High Time 5Y

Calgary Stampede UFA Steer Classic, Reserve Grand Champion Speckle Park Steer / Reserve Quality Beef Competition Carcass Sired by River Hill 26T Yager 99Y


COLGAN’S CATTLE COMPANY

306-387-6357 Tony & Tammy

P.A.R. RANCH

306-823-4794 Dale 306-285-3141 Roland 4283-PB BD 24JAN13 • BW 78LBS • SIRE P.A.R. TOUCHDOWN 600T • DAM P.A.R. WONDER BRA 66W

Private treaty sales offered year round. Stop by the ranch any time.

Merl Zweifel • Frenchman Butte, Saskatchewan, Canada [t] 306-344-4787 [c] 780-205-4868 [e] moovinzpotz@hotmail.com

• www.moovinzpotzcattle.com •


“beefing” up

profits

The old adage, “You can’t manage what you don’t measure,” certainly holds true for the beef industry. With today’s sky-high beef prices, good management can help cattlemen capture every extra dollar at sale time. Here are four tools to “beef” up your cow herd and your pocketbook. one: phenotype

Phenotype is the physical characteristics an animal inherits from the genetic materials of both parents, and is an important part of a breeder’s selection process. “In the age of

20

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

the genotype, the phenotype is king,” says Dr. Mike Coffey, professor of livestock informatics at Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC). Having a keen eye and a sharp pen is important when building a breeding herd. Cattlemen must be mindful of that animal’s phenotype and be willing to cull when certain traits are lacking. “It is important that any cattle producer make the first sort on potential breeding stock with the information they already know” advises Zac Hall, Igenity technical sales manager. “Do you like the animal’s structure? Does she descend from a strong maternal line? Was there an environmental factor that may have affected how an animal grew and developed? After


the initial group of heifers are culled, DNA profiling is a great tool to start sorting what the eye cannot see, and only time can reveal years down the road.” Despite other performance markers, such as DNA profiling, it’s still important to take live weight measurements, record accurate calving information and visually evaluate an animal for specific traits such as structural soundness, foot structure, rib shape and dimension, muscle shape, udder quality, scrotal and disposition. “With the advent of genomics, at the base of it all is good pedigree recording and phenotype recording,” says John Crowley, Director of Science and Industry Advancement at the Canadian Beef Breeds Council (CBBC) and Research Associate at the University of Alberta. “We still need to record actual birth weights, weaning weights, yearling weights, scrotal measurements and fertility measures. If you want to start recording breeding values, start in a traditional way. Have your pedigrees in order and gather the information needed to start making better breeding decisions with each generation.” Crowley recommends using one of the many record-keeping softwares that can be accompanied with smart phone apps currently available in the market place to make data collection quicker and easier, without the hassle of paper and clipboards when running cattle through the chute.

WRITTEN BY

AMANDA RADKE A fifth-generation rancher from Mitchell, SD, Amanda grew up on a purebred Limousin cattle operation in which she and husband Tyler are active. She graduated with a degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University. She’s served previous internships with USDA’s Ag Marketing Service in Washington D.C., the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association in Denver, and BEEF magazine. She now writes for BEEF Daily, and also works as a freelance writer.

An example of a good record-keeping resource is Ranch Records from the University of Wyoming Extension and Wyoming Private Grazing Lands Team, which is free, available for smartphones, and is an easy-to-use spreadsheet available on Google Drive. Another tool available as a smart phone app is iCattleMgrPro, which can be purchased on iTunes. “We need to concentrate on easier collection of phenotypes,” Crowley adds. “Look at using RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags. Think about investing in a high-quality chute and scale. Find a data-recording package that works for you. These are really great things to have in order to accurately collect data on a group of cattle.”

two: raw data comparison In addition to evaluating the phenotype, ultrasound technology can help paint a better picture on the quality of the beef animal. Through an ultrasound, the rump fat, rib fat, intramuscular fat, back fat and ribeye size are measured. The use of ultrasound in the beef industry spans for more than 40 years, and is used to estimate the carcass retail yield and meat quality. “Since most ultrasound traits are highly heritable, genetic change through selection can be achieved rapidly through this tool,” says Shari Leachman, owner of UltraBeef

Ultrasound Services and a certified UGC technician from Maidstone, Sask. “The ability to measure the disproportionally larger number of breeding cattle relative to their harvested fed counterparts for traits that are intimately related has helped tremendously in advancing our progress selecting for end-product merit.” Leachman says that ultrasound technology is often used by breeders who hope to secure greater customer interest in their seedstock. “Purebred breeders not only use this information to make their own breeding decisions, but they also share this data with their customers when selling their cattle,” said Leachman. “It is my experience that many producers readily consider scanning their bulls, yet often question the merit of doing their females. This has always been counterintuitive to me since there are many benefits to scanning females. Garnering ultrasound data on the females that will constitute the productive base of the herd for years to come is a strong argument. Furthermore, additional data on females is always welcome based on the limited number of progeny they have the ability to produce relative to a normal herd sire. I strongly encourage breeders to ultrasound both bulls and heifers for those reasons.” It is recommended to scan seedstock cattle at around 365 days of age. Note that data is best used when comparing animals within the same contemporary group -- same breed, sex, and age, that are fed and managed under similar conditions. “Ultrasounds are good for comparing animals in a herd because they have been treated the same way, but across the entire breed, it’s a less accurate measurement,” says Crowley. “Ultimately, ultrasound data is still important and can feed back into your genetic selection.”

three: expected progeny differences (EPD) EPDs are the prediction of how the future progeny of each animal are expected to perform relative to the progeny of other animals listed in a breed’s database. For example, in the Angus breed, bull A might have a weaning EPD of +30 lb., while bull B has a weaning EPD of +20 lb. If you randomly mate these bulls in your herd, you could expect bull A’s calves to weigh, on average, 10 lb. more at weaning than bull B’s progeny (30 - 20 = 10). After artificial insemination in beef cattle became popular in the 1960s, more information was demanded of the sires with available semen for sale. In 1972, the first National Sire Summary was published, which compared EPDs of 13 sires. EPDs are utilized by many breeds and measure a variety of traits including things like calving ease direct, birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, residual average daily gain, maternal T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

21


influence, mature daughter weight and height, yearling height, scrotal circumference, direct calving ease, maternal calving ease, gestation length, carcass weight, marbling, ribeye area, fat thickness, stayability, and docility, among other specific traits, depending on the breed association. While some efforts have been made to synchronize EPD values, the numbers cannot be compared from breed to breed. However, EPDs can compare the genetic merit of animals of the same breed and can indicate the differences expected in the progeny. EPDs are not constant -- meaning they change as more progeny of the animal are reported. They also can be manipulated if one animal was raised in a more favorable environment than another -- a better milking cow or a higher nutritional program, for example. Regardless, EPDs are a great selection tool, if used wisely. “After calculating EPDs, we can index them for economic importance,” says Crowley. “For example, some traits such as feed efficiency and weaning weight are more heritable than things like calving interval and survivability. So if you want to define an important trait, it’s merely defined by its economic importance. For each trait, you can put a dollar value on it.”

With the advent of genomics, at the base of it all is good pedigree recording and phenotype recording. Have your pedigrees in order and gather the information needed to start making better breeding decisions with each generation.

Crowley warns against singletrait selection when evaluating EPDs and cites the dairy industry’s hard-learned lesson as an example. “In the dairy industry, everyone selected for milk production, and as a result, fertility suffered,” Crowley said. “When we select traits, we want a balance of reproductive qualities and performance traits. Many breeds have even developed multi-trait EPDs to push the breeding objective in the right direction.” Raw data collection – whether it be birth weights, weaning weights or carcass information – helps to improve the accuracy of the EPD. They go hand-in-hand. “It is important to report carcass information to increase the accuracy of the EPD for ultrasound traits,” says Leachman.

four: genomically-enhanced EPD (GE-EPD) In 2009, the bovine genome was mapped, opening the door to use DNA as the new yardstick to estimate genetic merit in cattle. With a sample of hair, blood, semen or skin, a DNA test can be performed, and depending on the trait, a genomic test can provide the same amount of accuracy as if the bull had already sired 7-20 calves. “The EPDs appear the same as what breeders are used to, except after the genomic

22

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

information is incorporated into EPDs, the accuracy rises to reflect a more accurate prediction,” explains Hall. “The most common places ranchers are utilizing this technology are in their registered replacement heifers, sale bulls and donor females.” Currently, six breed associations in the U.S. use GE-EPDs including Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Simmental, Gelbvieh and Limousin. In Canada, Angus is the only breed to use GEEPDs, with other breeds pending the release of their GE-EPDs. “Today, the Speckle Park breed can utilize the power of the Igenity profile which includes 12 traits (ADG, Residual Feed Intake, Tenderness, Quality Grade, Marbling, Yield Grade, Backfat Thickness, Ribeye Area, Stayability, Maternal Calving Ease, Heifer Pregnancy Rate and Docility),” adds Hall. “While this information does not go into an EPD, breeders can still utilize the information to make smarter mating and selection decisions. Breeders can obtain inside information on the strengths and weaknesses their cattle possess and utilize that knowledge going forward. It makes sense to profile replacement heifers and bulls because they are the building blocks for a breeder’s program.” “A practical use for genomic tools is parentage verification,” says Crowley. “For example, a commercial cattleman who runs multi-sire pastures can do a DNA test to find out which sire raised the good calves and which bull needs to be culled.” GE-EPDs combine pedigree information and performance data from the animal, its relatives and progeny with genomic information. GEEPDs are able to more dependably rank animals for less risky and more profitable selection decisions. This information becomes more accurate as more cattle are entered into the DNA data base. For example, the American Angus Association has an estimated 8,000 bulls that have been profiled, and the American Hereford Association has 1,200 bulls in its data base. “Genomic-enhanced EPDs allow breeders to discover the genetic potential their cattle possess and utilize that information going forward to aid in making more educated decisions when it comes to mating their cattle,” says Hall. “In addition, they will see reduced risk as the EPD accuracy on non-parent animals can rise to a level that would take years to achieve.” While the Speckle Park breed doesn’t have EPD and GE-EPD data available yet, the tools available for commercial and purebred breeders are great. However, adapting to the use of these management tools – whether it’s studying phenotype a little closer, keeping more accurate records, or collecting raw data via ultrasound – can increase profits and “beef” up your cowherd.


photo Š Natalie Jackman, have-dog.com

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

23


Codiak GNK 24X

Codiak Eagle GNK 46Y

Codiak Putnam GNK 61Y


Austraia’s Fnest

Dale Humphries

Phone: 0429 360 419 | Email: dale@wattlegrovespecklepark.com.au

www.wattlegrovespecklepark.com.au


$44,000

$17,750

P.A.R. Ace in A Hole 66A

Codiak Annie GNK 7A

record-setting bull SOLD BY P.A.R. Ranch

SOLD TO Colgan’s

Cattle Company (Lashburn, Sask.) $22,000 for half interest and half possession.

record-setting female SOLD BY Codiak Acres

SOLD TO Nova

Creek Farm (Barrhead, Alta.)

Record-Setting Sales

F O R

photo Š Natalie Jackman, have-dog.com

M O R E

S A L E R E S U L T S S E E P A G E 3 0


By-Law

Ammendment

OFFSPRING OF SOLID BLACK SPECKLE PARK

At the Canadian Speckle Park Association’s 2014 Annual General Meeting, the members voted in favour of a proposed amendment to the By-laws, Sections 15-1 and 15-2, as well as Section 17-6, subject to the approval of the federal ministry responsible for the Animal Pedigree Act. These by-laws are in regards to registration of the progeny of solid black appendix and percentage Speckle Park. Under current by-laws, solid black offspring of registered, purebred parents are recorded in the Speckle Park Appendix. The appendix Speckle Park and their offspring retain their calculated percentage of Speckle Park blood; this will not change. Present rules of eligibility require that offspring of Appendix Speckle Park be classified as percentage Speckle Park, and are therefore not eligible for purebred registration until three successive generations exhibit the breed characteristic colour patterns (speckled, leopard, white with black points). The proposed amendment removes the three successive generation requirement for calves exhibiting the breed characteristic colour patterns. A second amendment would also remove the three-successive-generation requirement for percentage Speckle Park animals that meet the other requirements of eligibility. When approved, the amendments will be applied for future registrations and will not be retroactive.

CSPA

newsbytes

Two commercial, straight-bred Speckle Park bulls were placed on test at the 2014 Posthaven Bull Evaluation 2014 in Alma, Ont. These bulls started the test against ten older, larger bulls of another breed, and there was concern about how they would perform because of the significant spread in age and size between the two bulls and their pen mates. They faired very well. One of the two ranked first in ADG at 4.20 pounds per day during the 100day test. The other Speckle Park bull was a close second in WPDA with 3.30 lb., especially impressive for a June-born bull compared in a pen of January-to-April-borns. I nformation supplied by CSPA Member Jordon Underhill, S t . Wi l l i a m s, O N. T h e te s t e n d e d A p r i l 8 , 2 014 .

ON test

Speckle Park Proven Again&Again After last year’s champion and reserve carcasses, Speckle Park have proven themselves again in the Quality Beef competition at the Calgary Stampede. The 2014 Reserve Grand Champion and third place carcasses in the all-breed competition were Speckle Park steers. Congratulations to River Hill Farm of Neilburg, Sask., and Wranada Farms, New Sarepta, Alta., respectively. Neither exhibitor is new to this event; River Hill Farm is a multiple winner of the carcass competition, and both have been awarded Speckle Park championship honors in the UFA Steer Show. This year, Wrubleski and Ducherer swapped titles by winning the Championship and Reserve Speckle Park live steer competition.

QUALITY BEEF CARCASS COMPETITION 2014 SPECKLE PARK

MARBLING GRADE

RIB EYE AREA

CARCASS WEIGHT

FAT COVER

Res.Grand Champion

AAA 70

97 sq. cm

736 lbs.

7 mm

Third Place

AAA 50

95 sq. cm

786 lbs

8 mm

More details about Speckle Park carcass quality are available from the office of the Canadian Speckle Park Association, as well as referrals to people finishing Speckle Park on feed. T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

27


KEN STANLEY & RITA, LILLY, EME ARTEMENKO • Box 5922 • Westlock, AB T7P 2P7 Tel: 780-349-4840 • Email: sunriseranch2@gmail.com


white with points white with points or leopard

white with points

colour coding

l e o p a rd

The characteristic colour patterns of Speckle Park.

Speckle Park animals are one of the following colour patterns or variations between these categories:

white with points The animal is white with black ears, nose, hooves and pigmentation around the eye. leopard

leopard

leopard or speckled

The sides of are broken into a series of spots so that neither the black nor the white predominates. The spots vary considerably in size.

speckled

l e o p a rd

The animal displays black sides with white topline and white underline with speckled hips and black or black frosted faces.

variations Variations between these categories occur because the black sides may be broken into a series of spots of varying size and distance apart. These are then the leopard pattern. When exactly a speckle becomes a leopard and a leopard a speckle is really the opinion of the breeder who registers the animals. A similar point can be made for the distinction between a leopard and a white with coloured points. Thus in the table some animals are described as “leopard or speckled” or “white with points or leopard.”

speckled

speckled

solid black When purebred Speckle Park produce solid black offspring they are registered as Appendix or percentage Speckle Park. T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

black

29


salesRESULTS october 26, 2013 // neilburg, sask

march 29, 2013 // edmonton, alta

This was the third event for the consignors in the Western Elite Speckle Park Sale. The highselling heifer calf was Notta 15R Lightning Lady 1A, purchased by Spots N’ Sprouts Speckle Park of Neilburg, Sask., for $7,500. MacNeil Farms, Brantford, Ont., took home the cow off the top pair, Spots ‘N Sprouts 18X. Her calf, Spots ‘N Sprouts 11A, was selected by Cary Ford, Busby, Alta., for a total of $6,700. Star Bank 48R was the high-selling bred cow, purchased by Todd Zwicker, Barrhead, Alta., for $5,700.

The average of the Summit 3 Sale increased again, by $1,865, to boast an increase of almost $3,000 in the sale’s average since its 2011 inception, and also set a new record for the sale price of a Speckle Park female.

Western Elite Speckle Park Sale

5 cow/heifer calf pairs averaged $6,120 17 bred cows averaged $4,478 3 heifer calves averaged $5,250 CONSIGNORS: NOTTA RANCH • RIVER HILL FARM • SPOTS ‘N SPROUTS • RAVENWORTH CATTLE

november 13, 2013 // regina, sask

National Speckle Park Sale

Wrangler Farms of Westlock, Alta., purchased both of the top females in the National Sale at Canadian Western Agribition. The high-selling heifer calf was offered by Johner Stock Farms, Maidstone, Sask.; JSF Essence 10A sold for $10,500. River Hill Walkers-Nabob 50Z was the high-selling bred heifer, consigned by River Hill Farm, commanding $9,500.

3 yearling heifers averaged $7,700 7 heifer calves averaged $7,100 1 flushes sold $6,400 18 embryos averaged $977/embryo 20 units of semen averaged $130/straw

The sale grossed $94,500 with 10 live lots averaging $7,280.

march 26, 2013 // neilburg, sask

All Canadian Speckle Park and Angus Bull and Female Sale

Ravenworth Horizon 103A was the high-selling bull, going to Pura Vida Acres, Saskatoon, Sask., for $7,000. The high-selling heifer was Ravenworth Lightning Lady 122A at a valuation of $5,000, purchased by Michael Luciak, Glendon, Alta.

4 mature bulls averaged $3,600 7 yearling bulls averaged $3,386 15 2-year-old bulls averaged $3,180 5 open heifers averaged $3,960 3 embryos averaged $750 4 semen pkgs of 10 units averaged $462/pk

CONSIGNORS: NOTTA RANCH • SPOTS ‘N SPROUTS • RAVENWORTH CATTLE

30

T H E S P E C K L E PA R K J O U R N A L

Summit 3 Sale Results

The high-selling bull was Codiak So Long George GNK 6Z, purchased by Minnamurra Station and Six Star Speckle Park in Australia for $20,000. The yearling bulls were topped by River Hill 12X A-Man 94A, who sold to the partnership of D.A.M. Dots and C Speckles of Unity, Sask.. The breed’s newest record-setting female was Codiak Annie GNK 7A, selling to Nova Creek Farm of Barrhead, Alta., for a value of $17,750.

13 extra-age bulls averaged $7,865 13 yearling bulls averaged $5,462 4 open heifers averaged $12,375 7 embryos averaged $1,157/embryo

The sale grossed $230,850 on 32 lots to average $7,425 on the 30 live lots. CONSIGNORS: RIVER HILL FARM • CODIAK ACRES GUEST CONSIGNORS: CLARK HAVEN FARM • WATTLE GROVE SPECKLE PARK

april 6, 2013 // lloydminster, sask

The Source Sale

The Source Sale set a new world record price for a Speckle Park bull with P.A.R. Ace in A Hole 66A fetching $22,000 for half interest and half possession, purchased by Colgan’s Cattle Company of Lashburn, Sask., and consigned by P.A.R. Ranch, Neilburg, Sask.. The high-selling female was Amped Up of MX 154A from MX Ranch, Neilburg, Sask., who sold for $11,750.00 to Wrangler Farms, Sturgeon Country, Alta..

10 open heifers averaged $8,950 25 ¼ yearling bulls averaged $5,455 1 2-year-old bull sold $4,500 2 10-straw semen packages sold $70/straw

The sale grossed $233,150 on 36 ¼ live lots to average $6,349. CONSIGNORS: LITTLE ACRES • MX RANCH • MOOVIN ZPOTZ SPECKLE PARK • P.A.R. RANCH • UNEEDA FARM


thank-you to our advertisers 444 Ranch A&W Farms Andchris Farms Bella Spur Innovative Media Belmoral Farms Bouchard Livestock Bryon Wolters Codiak Acres Colgan’s Cattle Company Corp. Double CCKS Farms Farmfair International Green Hill Livestock Grant Rolston Photography Herdbuilder Sale Jencrest Stock Farm Johner Stock Farms Legacy Speckle Park Long Ash Speckle Park Matters Speckle Park Mid-Way Farm Moovin Zpotz Morland Acres

MX Ranch Notta Ranch PAR Ranch Ponderosa Farms Pura Vida Acres Ravenworth Cattle Remin Ranch River Hill Farm Second Chance Speckle Park Silver Tip Speckle Park Spots N Sprouts Steele Speckle Park Summit 3 Sale Sunrise Ranch T Bar C Cattle Co. The Source Sale Toner, Larry VJV Auction Watco Speckle Park Wattle Grove Speckle Park Wolf Lake Speckle Park Wrangler Farms

I N G E R S O L L • O N TA R I O • C A N A D A

Andrew & Christine METCALFE 662702 Road 66 RR#3 Ingersoll, ON N5C 3J6 tel 519-285-3675 cell 519-521-8761 email andchrisfarms@hotmail.com

Bulls and embryos available for sale.


A & W Farms Ltd. SPECKLE PARK CATTLE & HAY SALES Debbie Clayton and Dustin Spencer Box 145, Odessa SK S0G 3S0 306-957-2010 redneckfarrier@sasktel.net

Arlene & Wayne Gould Box 82, Islay, AB T0B 2J0 [t] 780-744-2246 [f ] 780-744-2472 [c] 780-853-7909 [e] w.gould@mcsnet.ca

Dubuc SK Darrell & Jacqui Bell • 306-877-4402 Don & Glenda Bell • 306-877-2012

www.belmoralangus.com

Purebred bulls for sale in the spring

Green Hills LIVESTOCK

Cecil, Carol, Kim-Ann & Sheldon REGULA

Glen & Barb Zerebeski

COMMERCIAL & REGISTERED SPECKLE PARK

Redwater, Alberta, Canada 780-942-3661 • kregula25@hotmail.com

www.doubleccks.ca

Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan greenhillslivestock@hotmail.com [t] 306-497-2808 [c] 306-497-7721

Mid Way Farm

Morland Acres Cattle Company

Second Chance Speckle Parks

Bryce, Janice, Grady & AJ Morland Red Angus & Speckle Park

Box 32, Major, SK S0L 2H0 306-834-2879 306-834-7336 bjmorland@sasktel.net

Andy Carter and Sue Collins Amherst, Nova Scotia [t] 902-667-6163 [c] 902-664-8873 Breeders of Speckle Park and crossbreed cattle.

Scott and Darla Sauter

Fairlight, SK [t] 306-646-2090 [e] sdsauter@sasktel.net

Dan & Heather

BRUNDIGE

Bonnyville, AB

[t] 780-573-2597 [c] 780-812-9250 [e] d_hbrundige@yahoo.ca

AUC TIONEER • RING SER VICE

BRYON WOLTERS Box 1409 Crossfield, AB T0M 0S0 Office: 403.946.4999 Brian Bouchard: 403.813.7999 Mark Shologan: 780.699.5082 Chad Lorenz: 403.896.9585 Brent Stewart: 204.773.6392 Doug Domolewski: 403.635.1840 Email: info@bouchardlivestock.com

e Full Servic ting ke r a M Livestock

[t] 780-581-8396 5840 Park Drive Vermilion, AB T9X 1V9 Brian

Mark

- Sale Managment • Consulting • Order Buying - International Export Approved Semen & Embryo Storage Facility - Livestock Video Production Services - Sale Day Big Screen Video Sales Services - DLMS Internet Online Sales Agent -

WWW.BOUCHARDLIVESTOCK.COM

LARRY TONER Kelfield, Saskatchewan [t] 306-932-4866 [c] 306-834-7652 larrytoner@xplornet.com http://stockmans.xbar9.ca

Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.

Box 1562, Vulcan, AB T0L 0V0 [t] 403-593-2217 [e] grantspix@gmail.com

www.grantspix.com


;2013 FARMFAIR INT’L;

Grand champion bull m

$50/unit

MX BIG GUN 105Z

- BW 74LBS - SIRE P.A.R. TOUCHDOWN 600T - DAM ASPEN ACRES KAABA KIN 4K

55A

Sold to Wrangler Farms

01A

n’s Sold to Colga

Roland & Melissa Chibri

BOX 12, LASHBURN SK SOM 1HO

[t] 306-285-3141 [c] 780-205-1668

rchibri@rife.com

Dale & Lynda Chibri

BOX 356, NEILBURG SK SOM 2CO

[t] 306-823-4794 [c] 780-205-0719

par.ranch@sasktel.net

W W W . PA R R A N C H . C A

CATTLE AND GENETICS SELL AT THE SOURCE SALE, AGRIBITION & BY PRIVATE TREATY.

Cattle


Source THE

the cattleman’s source for genetics APRIL 4, 2015 • LLOYDMINSTER EXHIBITION GROUNDS, ALBERTA BLDG., LLOYDMINSTER SK

elite offering of bulls and select females

CODIAK REACTION 4Y

P. A .R . AC E I N A HOL E 6 6A

A M PED U P OF M X 1 5 4 A

L A N DRY OF P. A .R . 49A

Half interest sold to Colgan’s Cattle Co

Sold to Wrangler Farms

Sold to Pathfinder Farms

P. A .R . R A NC H

M X R A NC H

U NEEDA FA R M

Dale & Lynda Chibri Roland & Melissa Chibri 306-823-4794 306-285-3141 780-205-1668 780-205-0719 www.parranch.ca

Max & Lindsay Graham 306-823-4494 306-823-7209 www.mxranch.ca

Wilf & Ruth Sunderland 780-745-2694 780-205-0378

...and select guest consignors.


2014 Speckle Park Journal  

The official publication of the Canadian Speckle Park Association, published by Bella Spur Innovative Media Inc.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you