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45

Vol XXVIII No.5

B 74 B

May 1974

No. 319

QUODCUMQUE FACIENDUM : NIMIS FACIEMUS -CONTENTS-

BRISTOL EXPLORATION CLUB

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Editorial Don Coase Lecture Long Term Planning Round and About Caving Meets Free diving to 9 Letter to the Ed. Photographic Show Ian Dear Fund Crossword No. 42

The Belfry, Wells Rd, Priddy, Wells, Somerset. Telephone WELLS 72126 - CLUB COMMITTEE Chairman Minutes Sec Members

S.J. Collins G. Wilton-Jones M. Bishop, D.J. Irwin, B. Wilton, G. Oaten, N. Taylor, A.R. Thomas,

OFFICERS OF THE CLUB Honorary Secretary Honorary Treasurer Caving Secretary Climbing Secretary Hut Warden Belfry Engineer Tacklemaster B.B. Editor Honorary Librarian Publications Editor B.B. Postal

A.R THOMAS, Allen’s House, Nine Barrows Lane, Priddy, Wells Somerset. Tel: PRIDDY 269 B. WILTON, 27 Venus Lane, Clutton, Nr. Bristol. To be appointed, ADDRESS LETTERS TO THE BELFRY G. OATEN, Address to follow N. TAYLOR, Whiddons, Chilcote, Somerset. Tele : WELLS 72338 M. BISHOP, Address to follow. Tele : PRIDDY 370 G. WILTON-JONES, 17 Monkham’s Drive, Watton, Thetford, Norfolk S.J. COLLINS, Lavender Cottage, Bishops Sutton, Nr. Bristol. Tel : CHEW MAGNA 2915 D.J IRWIN, Townsend Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Wells Som. Tel : PRIDDY 369 D.J IRWIN As above BRENDA WILTON Address as for Barry

Editorial GOOD NEWS Thrupe Swallet - as many of you probably know - 'went' over Easter and has resulted in a new addition to the major caves of Mendip. Congratulations to all the diggers involved. I also have information of another site which may shortly yield a cave of reasonable size and add yet a further cave to the Mendip repertoire. Happy as this situation is, one wonders how effective any measures to conserve them - if they warrant such treatment - will be. Must new discoveries on Mendip always be balanced by the loss of irretrievable formations in the newly-discovered caves or elsewhere? Present day caving being what it is, I have no doubt of the fate of any worthwhile scenic beauty that these new caves may possess. DON COASE MEMORIAL LECTURE A write-up of this function appears in this B.B., to which I would like to add that those who missed it missed an extremely interesting, technically excellent and amusing lecture. If future Don Coase Memorial Lectures maintain the standard set by this first one, they will indeed prove a fitting tribute to Don and a credit to the club.


46 AM I WASTING MY TIME? I ask this question quite seriously, as I recently heard through the usual second or third-hand channels, that 'nobody ever reads the B.B. and that there is no point writing anything worthwhile in it, since nobody ever bothers to quote from it or refer to it.' I know that this is not entirely true, because at least those indefatigable researchers of C.T.S. refer to every source of caving information, and our exchange system (ably kept up-to-date and put where it counts most by the equally indefatigable Wig) makes sure that at least the B.B. gets into the right hands - even if those hands do not always do what we would like them to. It is, of course, possible that the occasional lack of reference to work originally published in the B.B. may occur through lack of knowledge of its source. It is even possible that this could occur through prejudice. It could also be because work published is not considered of a sufficient standard compared with, say, a slightly later account in some other publication. Whatever basis there may (or may not) be for complaints such as this one, there is no doubt that 'knocking' of the club magazine has an erosive effect. The task of persuading people to contribute becomes in any case more difficult, and there might well come a point at which an editor is forced to consider seriously whether it is all worthwhile. “Alfie� _______________________________________________________________________________________

THE DON COASE

An appreciation of the first of these annual lectures. by 'Kangy'

MEMORIAL LECTURE This, the first of an annual series, was given by Dr. Tony Waltham - Lecturer in Geology; author; editor and evidently caver. Don Coase was a caver too. As Alfie Collins said in a short tribute before the lecture, we wanted to remember Don in this fashion because he was a damn fine caver and a damn fine club member. The Wig, slightly twittery about the turnout because of the lateness of the announcement in the B.B. (A tradition, surely and entirely appropriate!) need not have worried, because the turnout, impromptu and most enthusiastic, was good. Tony's lecture, 'Caves and Altitude' was pitched at me and my lad and we both enjoyed it at our different levels. He described his searches for the cave depth record, the premise being that to find the deepest cave in the world, it is necessary to start at altitude. We were left to draw our own conclusions. We were shown slides. Slides of Mendip; Yorkshire; France; Greece; Kashmir; Nepal; Iran; U.S.A. and fresh from the printers, Canada. Tony is a travelling caving man with considerable photographic ability. Studying the slides, one became aware of the technique behind the art and I was left grinning with admiration at an effortless ladder shot which was one of the best lit that I can remember seeing. The link work was supplied by the dry throwaway style of Waltham the humorist, with a succession of tall stories of ludicrous situations which my two lads are still repeating to each other. Tony is the author of the book 'CAVES' to be publish this autumn by Macmillan which should be good. I would like to thank Dr. Waltham for his fine lecture and express my appreciation in this form. Could we have another lecture, please? Perhaps a lecture explaining why (with abseiling techniques so highly developed) the expeditions he takes part in seem to rely on the good old-fashioned ladder.


47

LONG TERM PLANNING

Graham Wilton-Jones, who is running the Long Term Planning Sub -Committee, gives us their first thoughts on what we should be doing to the Belfry site.

General Philosophies: We must make better use of the existing facilities. The comfort of users must always be considered. Most facilities show room for extension and improvement. We should improve existing conditions to as high a standard as possible before embarking on any major alterations or extensions. Such improvement is to be performed item by item, according to a particular order of priorities. Therefore a general report is to be submitted initially, outlining all the possible improvements and useful or necessary alterations. Detailed reports on each item will then be submitted before work begins on that item. In order to do this, three lists will be compiled. The first will show order of priority of groups of items since it has rapidly become clear that many items are connected in some ways, and can thus he dealt with together for convenience. The second will show the order of extent of the improvement or alteration in size of cost and labour while the third will show the order of priority of the items. The nature and extent of any improvements should be guided by our present circumstances, and determined finally in the light of past experience. However, any alterations will be determined by what we believe or can assess that the club; the members; the caving situation etc will be like in ten years' time - since this is the period set by the terms of the report. It is likely that more people will be actively caving though current rates of growth will diminish. The club will probably be bigger, and there will be more guest bookings. Under present conditions we would have more guests and fewer members using the Belfry. Guests must not take over the hut, and it must therefore be made more attractive to members. We must regard the guests as potential new club members as well as a means of helping the Belfry to pay for itself. List 1. Order of Priority of Groups of Items. 1. Comfort. (Includes heating and insulation.) 2. Rubbish storage and disposal. 3. Cooking facilities and food storage. 4. Eating. 5. Washing up, drying, cutlery and crockery storage. 6. Workshop facility. 7. Changing and drying of clothes. 8. Washing self (although the shower facility alone deserves higher priority.) 9. Charging facilities. 10. Sleeping accommodation. 11. Parking. 12. Administration facility (Hut Warden's Office/booth) 13. Library. 14. The loft. Other lists and progress on this subject will be published in the B.B. to keep members up-to-date. The Editor would like to invite any member who has useful comment to make on this subject to write to about it. _______________________________________________________________________________________ BARBECUE THIS YEAR IT WILL BE ON SATURDAY JUNE 22ND. INFORMATION, OFFERS OF HELP TO NIGEL TAYLOR


48

A Monthly Miscellany By 'Wig'

68. Thrupe Swallet. The great news of the Easter weekend was that Thrupe Swallet 'went' on Good Friday. The explorers - Tony Dingle et al. broke into a deep rift which leads to the cave which will be described. Thrupe Swallet is one of the large stream sinks which has not, until now, given up its secrets. Originally dug about 1936 by the Mendip Exploration Society, who entered two small chambers, it was later abandoned due to difficult conditions and instability. The next recorded account appears about 1968 when George Pointing and Dave Berry together with Norman Tuck, started work again. From then on, the site has been dug more or less continually, Tony Dingle working it in the later stages. The find would appear to be a major Mendip discovery. A brief description is as follows:- A 30' dug shaft leads to a 150 - 200 ft long rift involving general shuffling and some traversing and drops some 50' to the head of Perseverance Pot. Below this pot is Perseverance Rift, up to 40' high and similar to Manor Farm rift. This gives access to Cowsh Crawl - some six horrible feet long! After this crawl, a left fork leads to a rift series of passages up to 80' high with some shafts in the area. To the right, one enters Butt's Chamber (name of farmer) a sizeable place where the stream enters. Some 30' above the floor, a sand crawl leads for 30' to Marble Chamber, smaller than the previous chamber. At the bottom of this chamber, a crawl through unstable boulders regains the stream which falls down an impressive aven. The way on lies along a Yorkshire type rift for about 150' when suddenly the head of Atlas Shaft - some 170' deep - is reached. The dimensions of Atlas Shaft are quite something even by Yorkshire standards. It is about 50' by 60' at the top. A short climb of some 30' via an oxbow gives way to a 120' ladder pitch, and then a 20' scramble at the bottom leads to a further 300' of passage believed to end in a sand choke, though the explorers are not yet allowing cavers beyond the head of the big shaft. The Wessex are gating the cave at the moment, and it is believed that they intend to hand the access control over to the Council of Southern Caving Clubs Limited. 69. Charterhouse Caving Permits. The period permits are issued to club members on a five year basis and are valid as long as the member pays his subscription - hint! No permits are issued to members or indeed anyone under the age of 16 or to married minors. Permits are issued at the Belfry or a 'Wig's' and may be obtained from any of the following: - Caving Sec., Hut Warden, Librarian. Forms must be countersigned by a parent if the member is under 18. 70. Wookey Hole. The planned extension to the show cave into Wookey 9 is well under way. The tunnel from 3 has been blasted through and now requires a concrete walkway to permit access to the weegees and a further excuse for the management to make an extra charge! 71. St. Cuthbert' s Minery Ledger. Now in the hands of the club has made fascinating reading matter. A fuller note will appear as a separate article in a later edition of the B.B. 72. Climbing and Caving Logs. Members are required to enter all trips made by them as a record of club activities. I know that at the moment the level of activity is not at full blast, but future members would like to know what was done. Many members are actively digging at least three sites on Mendip and not one of them has been mentioned in the log - SO PLEASE ENTER YOUR TRIPS UP. Editor's Note: It is appreciated that some degree of secrecy often surrounds digs. Even so, if diggers could keep a record - and if necessary chuck it in the B.B. box after the dig has either 'gone' or been abandoned - it can find its way into club records. 73. Practice Rescues. Roy Bennett and 'Wig' are discussing a short series of practices. Two are to be arranged for this year. Longwood (Great Chamber) and a full Cuthbert’s.


49 74. Swildons Shatter Series. On Easter Sunday a mixed party bailed and succeeded opening the 'U' tube. The party, essentially S.M.C.C., worked the buckets of liquid mud back up the small tube and tipped the spoil into the crack in Crossways Chamber. 'Butch', always in need of careful skin treatment, managed to get a magnificent mud bath as he almost sumped the mud pool to get through to the downstream side, losing helmet and light in the process! 75. Easter Weekend Again. Martin and Liz Bishop, plus Ken, James, Dog, and members of C.C.G. spent their holidays in Ireland caving in the Clare area. Mike Palmer, Nig Taylor, Andy Nicholls, the Wiltons and others made off to Derbyshire land among the holes visited were Giants to the bottom and Knotlow Mine including the shaky new extension. The Bennetts spent the weekend walking Snowdonia, and according to Joan the weather was the best they'd ever known it. Dave Turner spent the weekend, it is reported both underground in Cuthbert’s and above ground ballooning. Stan Gee and Chris Falshaw have both been around the Belfry and as far as I can gather Chris will be down again in the near future for a Cuthbert’s trip while Stan Gee's comment was" Well, life at the Belfry hasn’t changed since I was last down!" 76. Manor Farm. Roy Bennett writes "After being defeated in Hunters Hole, the Tuesday/Wednesday night diggers have been pushing the depths of Manor Farm under the watchful eye of N.H.A.S.A. The cave originally ended in a fork, the left hand passage ascending to boulders while the right hand passage ended in an impassable rift. First, the boulders in the left hand fork were passed to an aven with a boulder roof, while the rift was chemically widened to give access to a wider section with a hole leading off to another boulder choke. The aven was then pushed further by a combination of delicate banging and luck, with the boulders becoming increasingly restive and aggressive. The team were considering giving up when a breakthrough was made on the 17th April 1974 to a small collapse chamber on the side of a sizeable rift. This runs back up cave along a fault and contains large masses of calcite. There appears to be no open way on, and further digging will have to be resorted to. Unfortunately the best site, high at the Southern end, is occupied by a rather nice stalactite grotto. This has been taped off, and other points of attack will be looked into. Anyone contemplating a look round should be very careful in the boulder ruckle. Work will continue every Wednesday and careful volunteers are welcome. Around the holiday periods it is best to phone Roy (Tel: 0272-627813) after 6 p.m. A plan and section sketch of the area will be found on the opposite page. 77. Cuthbert’s. Ray Mansfield and others have recently removed all fixed aids in the Maypole Series as agreed and left the pitches rigged as is Pulley Pitch. Also, the ladder in the entrance shaft has now been removed and a chain installed. 78. Cavers' Books worth buying. The Mysterious World of Caves - E. Bauer. Published by Collins International Library Series. Price, £1.50. 129pp and many coloured illustrations and photographs. In many ways a better buy than 'Radiant Darkness'. Available from Smiths or any bookseller. The Caves of North-West Clare. Ed. Tratman. Published by David and Charles, Newton Abbott, Devon. 255pp and many surveys and photographs. A caving classic. Price £6.00 though thought by some to be now £7.00. A tour to the Caves - John Button. A reprint of this 1780 work. It describes a journey through the Yorkshire dales and of the known caves. S.R. Publishers Ltd. Price £1.50. Postojna (English Edition). A photographic record of this great cave. Available from Tony Oldham, 17, Freemantle Rd, Eastville, Bristol. Price £3.00 79. Bryan Ellis retires. Though Bryan has long since retired from regular caving, he was the main source for caving publications. After serving the caving community for 14 years, he is now only handling SMCC, BCRA & Descent.


50

CAVING MEETS JUNE 22nd. (Saturday) Cil Yr Ychen and Llygad Llwchwr. One Day Meet. Apply to Caving Sec. for Details. JULY 13/14. Forest of Dean. Staying at the Gloucester Hut. AUGUST 23-26. Yorkshire. Birk's Fell and Sleets Gill. For further information on these meets, and any others that may be in hand, apply to the Caving Sec or 'Wig'.


51

FREE DIVING TO NINE

Colin Priddle, the first man to free dive to the ninth chamber in Wookey, sends us this letter and account

After the plea by the editor and by Dave Irwin in 'Round and About', I have photocopied articles by myself which were published in C.D.G. Newsletter No 30 for January 1974. It is C.D.G. policy for anyone to copy articles provided the Hon. Sec. is asked for permission. As I am the Hon. Sec., I give you permission as long as we get a plug and a note quoting the source. The plug is that the C.D.G. Newsletters are published every 3 months at a price of 20p for about 30 pages. They contain all the diving reports and diving finds from all the caving areas. The Newsletter is obtainable form the Hon. Editor, Dr, O.C. Lloyd, Withey House, Withey Close West, Bristol BS9 3SX. A remittance should be sent with the order. Cheques and postal order to be made payable to the Cave Diving Group. _______________________ The intention of the trip was to explore a new passage above the 8th and 9th chambers. John Parker, wearing a single 40, laid a line to 5 and I free dived though climb directly out of the water into 5. The dive from 3 to 4 is very easy (6ft long and 2 ft deep). The dive from 4 to 5 is probably 18 feet long and 6 feet in depth. John Parker then dived to 9 and came back overland to the top of 5. He then lowered a string halfway to the water, to which I attached a ladder. John then belayed and I climbed. Six was crossed by an awkwardish traverse followed by a small passage to 7. This was a direct traverse and climb down about 60 ft to the water. The lower part of this climb I found very difficult. I would recommend for future trips that a ladder from 5 should be used for this climb. A quick swim along the lake’s length and a twenty foot ladder climb brought the view of the 8th chamber. A crawl through a hole; a wall traverse; a free climb down; a twenty foot swim and a twenty foot ladder climb brought us to the upper part of 9.1. The two twenty foot ladders we used were left by John Parker in his trip to 5. One of the N.C.B. divers then climbed up the ladder to us but decided that, as time was running short, we ought to be going out. So he went back down to 9 and I went to 8. John Parker coiled the 8 ladder as I connected the 7 ladder to the nylon rope acting as a Tyrolean across 7. John belayed the 7 ladder from 9 so that I could climb down to the 7 water level. Once there, he coiled the 7 ladder whilst swimming, also releasing the belaying rope for me in 9. John then dived to 5 while I climbed and crawled to 5. The ladder in 5 was lengthened from above so that the belaying rope could be used to belay the ladder round a stal from below. Once down, the ladder was lowered, leaving the belaying rope round the stal for future trips. The lines were taken out from the sumps at the end of the five hour trip. This trip was repeated later, and the ladders to 8 and 7 were belayed before the trip in an earlier dive. By using a ladder on the long drop into 7 from 5 the route was much easier. Even so, the party of three (Clive Westlake, John Parker and myself) took nearly five hours. The push above 9.1. yielded nothing. The time taken to dive from 5 to 9 is of the order of three minutes, so as far as time saving is concerned, the overland route is not advantageous,. Editor's Note: Colin tell us that, after May 31st, his address will be:C.J. Priddle, c/o 19 Stottbury Rd, Horfield, Bristol BS7 9NH. _______________________________________________________________________________________ Have YOU done anything interesting lately? Why not write it up for the B.B.


52

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4,Albion Terrace, Upper Bristol Rd, Bath.

TO THE EDITOR Dear Alfie, Having just received my March B.B. together with the April issue, I have only just seen your request for suggestions etc., and felt compelled to write. First, I must congratulate you on the improvement in the printing, which is now much clearer and more legible. My March and April B.B.’s came in the same envelope and all for 3p! This immediately set me thinking about that 'hardy annual' - a bi-monthly B.B. Is it really necessary to publish monthly? Two months is considered a very short space of time these days, and what do we really gain from a monthly B.B.? For all their moans, I don't think member s would really miss a monthly B. B. and they would have twice as much to read when they did get it. This way, we could cut our postage costs in half and save on covers as well. With the rising price of paper and postage, this surely makes sense - otherwise, we shall soon be having to review our subs again! Yours, etc, Tim Large. Editor's Note: Thank you, Tim. As you say, the idea of a bi-monthly B.B. is one which has cropped up for years now, and every time the club have been asked - by sending out a questionnaire or by voting at A.G.M.'s they have always been in favour of continuing the monthly publication of the B.B. At the moment, we are coping financially - but as you point out, the rapidly rising costs of paper and envelopes with threatened rises in postal charges may well compel us to ask the club at some future date to choose between a monthly B.B. and a higher subscription rate or a less frequent B.B. and the same subscription. On the other hand, it is now reckoned that inflation may well be as high as 20% per year - as distinct from the 14% which I quoted in a recent B.B. If this rate is indeed true, then subs of all caving clubs will have to go up regularly and this inevitable increase will to some extent take care of the rising costs. It all boils down in the end as to what the club members want to see for their money. Do they want, in an inflationary age, to see subs kept below the current value of money with some inevitable cut-back in club services - or do they want to see these services maintained with the subscription jacked up at intervals to match the falling value of money? It is a straight choice, which perhaps the club ought to consider at the next A.G.M. We must bear in mind that never, since the club was founded, have we been exposed to such a rapid inflationary situation. In these circumstances, it may well be the sensible thing to set our sights a little lower. On the other hand, we did much worse then the W.C.C. in losing members when both clubs put up their subs by the same amount. Should we therefore go for better service to club members to make them feel their sub is well spent? I must confess that I don’t know the answer to this one. I have replied to your letter at some length (much longer than your letter was!) because I feel that the point you have raised is one which has greater repercussions than just the B.B. I think that it is something which club members should talk about between now and October, and I will be pleased to publish any letters on this important topic in the meantime. _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notice

Following the resignation of Doug Stuckey form the committee and as caving secretary, Andy Nicholls has volunteered to take his place. Before confirming this, the committee are taking this opportunity to advertise the vacancy. Any applications should be made to the committee.


53 VI SALON NACIONAL Y I INTERNACIONAL FOTOGRAFFICA ESPELEOLOGICA

This is a description of a cave photography show, which club members can enter.

The Speleology Delegation of the Excursion Section of the REDDIS soccer club invites photographers from all over the world to enter the I INTERNATIONAL SPELAEOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPY SHOW to be held in the city of REUS in 1974. The Theme is that of scientific and sporting spelaeology, and participants can be either amateurs of professionals and can enter either as individuals or through their clubs and/or societies. Photographs may be in black-and-white or as colour prints, up to a maximum of five, un-mounted. The recommended size is 30 x 40 cm. (16 x 12ft approx.) No works whose longest side is greater than 40 cm will be admitted. The number, title and location taken should be written on the back of each photograph as well as the name and address of the photographer. These details should be the same as those written on the entry form. Photographs may only be submitted by post as certified printed matter, and the entry forms should be sent under separate cover by air mail. (I have two copies of the entry form and the certified printed matter envelope sticker which I will give to any club member who wants to participate - Editor. Entries and photographs should be sent to the following address:O.E. REDDIS. I SALON INTERNATIONAL SPELAEOLOGICAL, PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW, P.O. Box 217, REUS, SPAIN. There will be a prize for the best black-and-white and the best colour collection (minimum of three prints - maximum of five as above). These prizes will consist of plaques - enamelled with gold, silver and bronze inlays with the name of the winner suitably engraved. Photographs will be returned within fifty days after the show closes, except the winning photographs, which will be retained. All participants must freely authorize the reproduction of their works with no right to royalty payments. A Show Catalogue will be sent to all participants. THERE IS NO ENTRY FEE. The organisers are not responsible for any loss or damage to works. Photographs will be accepted up to September 30th 1974 and judging will occur on October the 5th or 6th. The actual show will be held from November 9th to November 24th and the awards ceremony will be held on the last day of the show (November 24th). Editor's Note: Apart from the fact that I have been sent literature describing this show, which has been reproduced in the B.B. above, I know nothing about it. At first sight it may seem odd that a football club (Club futbol REDDIS) should be organising an international salon of cave photography - on the other hand, it does give club members a chance to have a go - and at least the entrance is free AND competitors get a free show catalogue. The club did debate whether or not it would be prepared to organise a club entry, but decided that there were very few active cave photographers compared to years ago, and that it was best for members to compete individually if they desired. As I noted earlier, I have TWO COPIES of the entry form and the special envelope sticker. No doubt, if more than two members wish enter, further copies can be obtained by writing to the address given. _______________________________________________________________________________________ There is always a shortage of small items to fill odd gaps such as this one in the B.B. Any small item of interest or of a humorous nature will do - as long as it is printable! If YOU can think of anything suitable, drop it into the B.B. box in the Belfry - but drop it gently or you may disturb the spider, who has made this box his home, since nobody else has used the box for ages!


54 From time to time, we receive handouts from societies whose objects are thought to have something in common with, our own. The last of these to be written up some time ago in the B.B was that of the Mendip Society in connection with their preservation of Smitham Chimney on Harptree Hill. This one is from the Somerset Trust for Nature Conservation. Publication of this type of information should not imply that the club are officially bringing the activities of these bodies to the attention of members, or urging them to contribute to them or to join them. We publish, as always, for the information of club members. THE SOMERSET TRUST FOR NATURE CONSERVATION. The purpose of the trust is to prevent the unnecessary destruction of wild life and to encourage the breeding and preservation of wild plants and animals that are use beautiful or rare, by conserving their habitats. To this end the Trust has acquired (and manages) twelve nature reserves. A descriptive leaflet is available. The Trust has established Nature Trails in its Black Rock and Longwood reserves (both open to the public) three trails on Exmoor (in conjunction with the Exmoor National Park Committee) and the National Trust, and the Pen Wood Trail near Pendomer, in association with the Forestry Commission. Twice each year it opens a Nature Trail for primary schoolchildren on Langford Heathfield Common. The Trust has prepared an ecological map of most of the county to aid the County Planning Department, Rural District Councils and other Local Authorities in mapping planning decisions. Such information was not previously available. The Trust has collaborated with the Nature Conservancy advising the Local Authorities on the establishment of Local Nature Reserves in Somerset. More than 3,250 people have already joined the subscription is £1 to Miss J.R. Taylor, Tanlake Cottage, Buckland, St. Mary Chard, Somerset. ______________________________________________________________________________________

The Ian Dear Memorial Fund

A Message from ‘Sett’ - Chairman of the Ian Dear Memorial Committee.

At this time of the year, when holiday plans are being made, a reminder to younger members about the Ian Dear Memorial Fund might be in order. Ian Dear, a member of the B.E.C., left money in his will to assist younger members of club to go caving, climbing etc. abroad. There are a set of basic rules by which grants under the fund can be made to younger members and these have been published in the B.B. some time ago. However, if any member of club is planning a trip abroad or wishing to do so, and feels that he or she might be eligible for assistance under the terms of the fund, any member of the Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee will be pleased to advise them. Members of the committee include the Caving Secretary and the Treasurer. If in any difficulty, contact me direct. My address is:R.A. Setterington, 4 Galmington Lane, TAUNTON, SOMERSET. Older members who may be planning trips abroad for caving purposes, and who would be willing to include any younger members in their party should also contact members of the I.D.M.F. Committee as well, perhaps, as advertising the trip in the B.B. Members who could benefit from a grant can then be put in touch with people who could include them in a party. Ian Dear hoped that his gift to the B.E.C. would be instrumental in enabling younger members to visit caving regions which otherwise they might never see. So far, very few people have availed themselves of the benefit of Ian's bequest to the club. It would be nice to think that this year, Ian's intentions could be better fulfilled.


55 MONTHLY CROSSWORD – Number 46. Across: 1

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Down 2. Dressed for the occasion? (4) 3. Hon. Thrill for Mendip cave. (5,4) 4. Led to great things in G.B. (6,3) 5. A cave construction makes one before caving began. (4) 11. Distinguish G.B. from Cheddar when it comes to gorges. (4) 12. One of these 6 across. (4)

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Belfry Bulletin Number 319