Page 1

127

Vol XXVI No.11

B 72 B

CONTENTS

November 1972

No. 301

BRISTOL EXPLORATION CLUB

List of Club Officers

Page 127

1973 Annual Dinner

Page 127

Editorial

Page 128

Caves and Caving

Page 129

Smitham Chimney

Page 130

A New Climb in Black Rock Quarry

Page 131

CLUB HEADQUARTERS ‘The Belfry’, Wells Rd., Priddy, Wells, Somerset. Tele: WELLS 72126 CLUB COMMITTEE Chairman: S.J. Collins Minutes Sec: R. Bennett Members: R. Bagshaw; D.J. Irwin; M.J. Palmer N. Jago; T.E. Large; A.R. Thomas; R. Orr.

OFFICERS OF THE CLUB Hon. Secretary: A.R. THOMAS, Allen’s House, Nine Barrows Lane, Priddy, Wells, Rescue Practice in Stole Lane Slocker Page 133 Somerset. Tel: PRIDDY 269. Hon. Treasurer: R.J. BAGSHAW, 699 Wells Road, LIST OF MEMBER’S NAMES AND ADDRESSES Knowle, Bristol 4. Tel: Page 134 WHITCHURCH. 5626. Caving Sec: T.E. LARGE, 39 Seymour Ave, New Rules of the Ian Dear memorial Fund Bishopston, Bristol. Page 137 Assit. Cav. Sec. R. BENNETT, 8 Radnor Road, Westbury-on-Trim, Bristol, Monthly Crossword No.28 Page 139 BRISTOL 627813 Climbing Sec: N. Jago, 27 Quantock Rd, Windmill Any views expressed by any contributor to the Hill, Bedminster, Bristol 3. Belfry Bulletin, including those of officers of the Hut Warden: R. ORR. ‘The Belfry’, as above. club, do not necessarily coincide with those of the Hut Engineer: R. ORR (Acting for the time being) editor or the committee of the Bristol Exploration Tacklemaster: M.J. PALMER. 27 Roman Way, Club, unless stated as being the view of the Paulton, BS18 5XB committee or editor. B.B. Editor: S.J. COLLINS, Lavender Cottage, Bishop Sutton, Nr. Bristol. MENDIP RESCUE ORGANISATION Librarian: D.J. IRWIN, Townsend Cottage, Priddy, Wells, Somerset. In case of emergency telephone WELLS 73481. Publications: D.J. IRWIN. Address as above B.B. Post: Mrs. K. Mansfield, Tiny Kott, Little London, Oakhill, Bath, Somerset. _______________________________________________________________________________________ Survey of Drunkard’s Hole

Page 131

1973 ANNUAL DINNER No, it's not a misprint! We do mean 1973. Other caving club dinners are noted for various activities (bun throwing etc.) but the B.E.C. dinner usually manages to provide something in the way of ENTERTAINMENT for members and their guests. Working on the assumption that it's never too early to start planning, DAVE SEARLE has volunteered to collect ideas and volunteers for suitable jollity at next years dinner. Chris ("I'm the dreaded Fagin") Harvey has already signed up. Bring and/or send yourselves and your bright ideas to Dave at Dolphin Cottage (just up the road from the Belfry).


128

Editorial CLUB MEMBERS A feature of the November B.B. is the list of club members that is traditionally published at this time of the year. Typing out these names is usually a sad task, when one realises how many of one's old friends are no longer among those present. This year, however, any such thoughts are balanced by the fact that, for the first time that I can remember at any rate, the actual numbers top the two hundred mark. (I am open to correction here, but counting wives listed, I make it 201 in fact.) Even more encouraging is the fact that membership numbers, having just reached eight hundred; mean that a quarter of all the people who have ever been members of the B.E.C. are still, happily, with us. When one considers that the B.E.C. is about thirty seven years old, and one makes due allowance for those who join the club, only to disappear almost at once, the remaining figure causes some optimism. Although, inevitably, times change and cavers with them, and to this extent the club is bound to change too, one likes to think that the club we have today is still recognisably the B.E.C. and such that members who are no longer as active as they once were still like to keep in touch. NO TRUMPETS FOR 300? I have been asked why no mention was made in these pages of the fact that the B. B. reached its 300th issue. Alas - the sad truth - as stated recently in no less a publication that the Wessex Journal - is that no editor of any Mendip caving publication can count. Owing to a typical series of arithmetical boobs, the B.B. has not yet reached its three hundredth edition in spite of what the serial numbers might say. When this actually happens, I will let people know. _______________________________________________________________________________________ TUESDAY EVENING Caving Owing to the run down of the Tuesday night digging team in Cuthbert’s, I propose to organise a programme of caving trips on Tuesday evenings, providing there is sufficient demand. Why not drop me a line, or see me at the Belfry most weekends if you are interested? Tim Large _______________________________________________________________________________________ SHOCK TREATMENT

A snippet sent in by Jock Orr.

When Dr. Henry Oakley was studying medicine, he used to augment his frugal income from his student's allowance by serving part time as a butcher's assistant by day and as a hospital porter by night. Shortly after arriving on duty, the hospital night staff were electrified to see a newly admitted plump limbed and matronly woman of some prestige in the district running down the exit corridor, clad only in a flapping stretcher blanket, screaming at the top of her voice "What's that +?~: ?&Qi butcher doing in here?" with a wheeled stretcher piloted by Henry Oakley in hot pursuit of his daytime customer! _______________________________________________________________________________________ Odd bits of information - humorous or informative - are always very useful to fill up odd spaces in the B.B. and to prevent any waste of paper! The editor is always glad to receive anything suitable. _______________________________________________________________________________________ The Editor apologises for the delay in producing this B.B. which have been mainly because he has had a lot of work on of one sort and another.


129

Caves and Caving

A seasonal review the caving picture TIM LARGE, caving secretary. As usual, at this time of the year, I am in the process of arranging a caving programme for the coming year. Up to now I have only been able to organise meets for two to three months in advance because there is a shortage of members who are prepared to lead club trips. Those that have done so in the past have been approached by me in person.

Recently, however, a member suggested and offered to lead a series of club trips during the winter months. This offer was, needless to say, very welcome. The trips were advertised in the B. B., but when the date of the first trip arrived, nobody except the leader turned up! Now, if I don't organise club trips, members complain - and when I do nobody seems interested. This has happened on a number of occasions recently and some of the trips that have taken place have been very poorly attended. Perhaps now that members appreciate more fully the problems involved, the solution becomes obvious. If members want club trips (not only on Mendip) but further a field as well) please would they let me know what they are interested in doing. I would also like to hear from any one who is willing to lead any particular trips. After all, this IS your club, and I think it would be a much more united organisation if everyone took a more active interest in club events. Because of the various access arrangements for a large number of caves nowadays, it is essential for me to have plenty of notice for trips. Below, I have listed the access arrangements for the more popular caves:LONGWOOD Keys held by Dave Irwin and Tim Large. RHINO RIFT Key held by Tim Large. G.B. CAVERN At least ONE MONTH’S notice required to book key with U.B.S.S. Charterhouse Caving Committee Permits are necessary for all the above holes. I have the application forms, so make sure that you get a permit before descending any of the above. RESERVOIR HOLE CHEDDAR CAVES LAMB LEER AGEN ALLWEDD OGOF FYNNON DDU O.F.D. II & III DAN YR OGOF YORKSHIRE

DERBYSHIRE

Trips can be arranged, but the party is limited to FIVE. Trips can be arranged with Gough's Caves during the winter months (November to February). At least ONE MONTH’S notice is required. I can obtain the key at short notice. At least THREE TO FOUR WEEK’S notice is required, together with names and addresses of everyone in the party. The club has its own leaders for O.F.D.1. They are Roy Bennett; Mike Palmer; Tony Meadon and Dave Irwin. Leaders are not required, but a few weeks notice of the trip to S.W.C.C. is desirable. Several of the above leaders are familiar with these parts of the cave. Leaders are required. The club has its own leaders who are: - Andy MacGregor, Colin Priddle and Phil Kingston. Some of the caves are controlled by the N.C.C.C. e.g. Easegill Caverns, Lost John's System, Penyghent Pot, Hut Pot & Lancaster Hole. These need as much notice as possible - maybe as much as six months because of their popularity. Also some caves are closed during the grouse breeding season. (April to June approx.) I have a copy of the Northern Cave Handbook which gives full details of access to all Yorkshire Caves. Some caves are controlled by the D.C.A. so plenty of notice is required to complete the necessary arrangements


130 From time to time, articles on the lead mining industry on Mendip have appeared in the B.B. We thought that members might therefore be interested in the state of the only remaining example of a lead smelting chimney and print a letter recently received from the Mendip Society. I thought you might like to know of the efforts we are making on behalf of Smitham Chimney. I am sure you will know the public concern expressed about the condition and fate of this scheduled building from the publicity it has been given on television and in the newspapers. Smitham chimney is the sole surviving example on Mendip of the once flourishing lead mining and smelting industry. It is a notable local landmark, visible against the Forestry Commission’s trees in Frances Plantation, as one approaches from the Castle of Comfort to Compton Martin. It was renovated in 1919 because it was valued at that time as an important local feature. However, since then its condition has gradually deteriorated, particularly with regard to the upper third of the brickwork. For your interest, I enclose a report on the chimney by Dr. Buchan of Bath University. This report formed part of our submission to the Ministry of the Environment when the Society applied for the chimney to be scheduled as a building of architectural and historic importance. This was subsequently passed. At that time, an attempt was made to raise funds for its renovation and although some progress was made, this was not sufficient and it was then our intention to use funds from the Mendip '71 exhibition which took place last autumn. However, the exhibition only covered its costs and the Society hoped that monies would be available from the publiation of its book ‘Man and the Mendips’. Sales are progressing but it will probably be a year or two before enough books have been sold. Following a recent fall of brick, the Parish Council called a meeting of all interested parties. Concern was expressed by everyone of the danger not only of the chimney being destroyed but of there being a danger to anyone who might be passing by when another fall occurs. A public footpath passes along the foot of the chimney which is also the sole access to a farm. It is therefore a matter of urgency that this problem is resolved within the next month. It was agreed at the meeting at East Harptree that an extensive fund raising effort should be made. A quotation was obtained from a local firm, J. Dawson & Sons of Clutton, Chimney Builders, who estimated that a sum in the region of £1,400 would be necessary to renovate the whole of the structure. The building obviously cannot be allowed to remain as it in this unsafe condition, and funds are urgently needed. The Mendip Society intends inserting an inscribed plaque into the base of the chimney describing its history and significance, together with the names of those who have been kind enough to contribute. Donations have already been promised from the trustees, the Mendip Society, M.A.C. Builders Merchants Ltd. and the Mendip Trust, a body formed from the National Trust and the Mendip Nature Conservancy and many separate individuals. I feel reluctant to approach another organisation so like our own, but it may be that the B.E.C. or any of its members might wish to make a contribution to this, and really any amount would be welcome. If so, I wonder if cheques could be sent to me (Dr. N.P. Blakeney-Edwards, Cyder Cottage, Kent Street, Cheddar, Somerset.) and made payable to the Mendip Society. I will keep you fully informed of the state of events. Editor's Note: Members may like to know that the Mendip Society was started by the B.E.C. Alan Thomas called an inaugural meeting, largely attended by B.E.C. members and the Mendip Preservation Society - as it was first known was formed as a result. It is interesting to note how many things have been pioneered by the B.E.C.!


131 A guide to some climbs near Bristol, by ALAN TRINGHAM

A NEW CLIMB AT BLACK ROCK QUARRY - WESTON-IN-GORDANO

Black Rock Quarry is reached by a lane which leads off the main Portishead to Clevedon road. The entrance to the lane is opposite a row of dark grey council houses about two miles from Portishead.

This cliff was first visited by myself and Tony Dingle in December 1971. We saw that the main feature of the quarry is a slab about a hundred feet high set at quite a high angle. To the left of this slab is a large corner with a dangerous looking block wall on one side and an impressive sheer red wall on the other. On this occasion, we climbed a ridge to the right of the slab. We returned in February of this year with Pete Sutton to climb the main challenge of the quarry, which is the slab itself. We managed this by climbing a slight groove on the left side of the slab, giving a very fine sustained climb. Since then, the quarry has been visited by Nigel, Gerry, Derek and others. The following is a guide to the climbs so far done, from left to right:Phantom Grober - V.S. and A.2. Climbs on overhanging flake on the red wall and then the groove above. Climbed by Nigel and Gerry. Slab, Left hand Route - V.S. Climbs a slight groove to a ledge, then the slab direct to the top. Climbed by Alan and Pete. Slab, Central Route - Mild V.S. Straight up the centre of the slab to a small tree on the right, or on to the top. Climbed by Nigel and Gerry. Slab, Right Hand Route - Severe. Up a crack and then tunnel to a small tree belay. Slab, Right Hand Ridge Route - V. Diff. Up the stepped ridge. At forty feet, either move left on to the slab and up some flakes, or move right and climb a loose corner. Climbed by Alan and Tony. About forty feet to the right of the slab is another stepped ridge. This gives a variable route to the top. About V. Diff. if you keep to the right, but harder if tackled direct. Climbed by Alan and Pete. To the right of this, in the corner, is a thirty foot diff. route which can be used for descent. _______________________________________________________________________________________

Drunkard’s Hole Survey

The survey was undertaken as one stage in the effort to produce a complete survey record of the caves in the area of Burrington. The field work occupied a three hour trip and was undertaken by G.O. Williams and D.L. Stuckey on Sunday, September 10th. A reproduction of the survey desorbed in these notes will be found on the next page of this B.B.

An ex-W.D. prismatic compass and an Abney level of Japanese manufacture were used and these, plus two spirit levels were mounted on a dural plate to form a surveying head. This surveying head was hand held and the instruments read to the nearest 0.5°. Lengths were measured by means of a 10 metre Fibron tape which was read to the nearest centimetre. Passage details were taken at stations and mid-station points, and roof heights estimated where measurement proved impossible. A permanent survey station, marked with a cold chisel on a boulder in the floor of the bottom rift was made and taken as the datum origin of the survey, with co-ordinates Eastings 0.; Northings 0.; O.D. 157.6 m. The compass calibration was carried out by the method established for the East Twin survey (1) and the co-ordinate calculations processed by an I.B.M. 360/50 computer. The line co-ordinates were plotted on


132 metric graph paper with the passage outlines plotted by direct measurement. The final layout was then drawn on ‘Permatrace’ film.

Details of the surface survey carried out to establish the height of the entrance above O.D. will appear in a future B.B. A C.R.G. Grade 5D is claimed for this survey (2). Statistics:

Total surveyed passage length Total depth Entrance height above O.D.

44m 19.5m 175m


REPORT OF

A RESCUE

133 This is an account of a rescue practice on 29th Feb. this year by KEN GREGORY, Secretary of the West London Cave Club.

PRACTICE IN STOKE L A N E S L O C K E R.

Having our H.Q. on the doorstep of Stoke Lane Slocker has given us a particular interest in that cave. Over the years, the subject of rescue through the passages of Stoke I has often been a debating point, and we therefore decided to try a practice rescue.

To make our problems as difficult as we thought practical, we selected as our victim a stout gentleman weighing about twelve stone with caving kit. The victim wore ordinary caving clothes with a goon suit on top. The intention had been to start the rescue from the sump, but owing to the girth of the victim, he could not get beyond the Nutmeg Grater, so the carry was started from there. The rescue team consisted of two bods moving ahead smoothing out obstructions, such as boulders in the streambed; another two on the drag rope; two more with the victim and another two bringing up the rear and carrying any other tackle. All these positions were held by the same persons throughout the rescue. The rescue was started with the victim lying just upstream of the Nutmeg Grater and facing downstream. Immediately before the Nutmeg Grater is a small chamber, and the victim was lifted back to this and then put into the carrying sheet. There would have been sufficient room here for some first aid to have been administered, although there was not enough room to turn the victim round. Because of this, progress through the next few feet of narrow passage was made with the victim travelling feet first. At the first widening of the passage, just downstream of the Corkscrew, the patient was turned round without too much trouble. Progress through the Corkscrew was slow, but by no means impossible - the main impediment being the bulk of the victim and the carrying sheet catching as it was dragged along. Once through the Corkscrew, progress became much easier. Fairly long drags could be achieved, with the victim riding toboggan fashion. The frequent low sections caused little bother as they were each short. The only problem between the Corkscrew and the Duck was the portion of the passage where a large boulder blocks all but a very narrow portion of streamway. Here, it was necessary to lift the victim across the obstacle. It was decided to try the Duck, which itself was no problem under fairly low water conditions. One person could float the victim through. On exit at the other side it is possible to turn right at water level and follow a rift which comes out at the wider passage before the duck. From this point, it becomes necessary to lift and pass the patient through the squeeze in the boulders which leads back to the main stream. For this operation, one person needed to be underneath the victim, supporting him with his back until the victim was in the squeeze, where at least three others are needed to pull him through and back down to stream level. The remainder of the route through the streamway was straightforward - simple dragging being practical. The entrance, as we had anticipated, caused us our greatest problem. Prior to going underground, we had diverted the stream down the rear water entrance, but this proved to have been quite useless as the water issued into the entrance tube anyway. To get the victim up into the entrance tube, one person laid down to form a ramp over which the victim was then dragged. As the majority of the water flows around the boulders at the right angle in the entrance passage, it was no problem to pull the patient round into the tube. The final eight feet of passage caused many problems. Once in the tube, it was only possible to pull the victim. Due to the irregular floor, a straight pull was ineffective and, on pulling the victim two feet forward, his bulk dropped into a depression in the floor. The patient's position was quite intolerable, with water running very close to his breathing orifice. The only thing to be done was to drag the patient back and release him from the drag sheet in order to get him out of a rather damp situation. On any further rescue through the entrance tube, the floor will have to be made as even as possible with, we suggest, an infill of stones or sandbags. It may even be practical to install a plank to drag the patient on to. Also, it might be necessary to dam the stream further upstream when the victim is in the vicinity of the entrance. The whole operation took about three hours.


134 BRISTOL EXPLORATION CLUB - MEMBERSHIP LIST 786 745 741 20 392 617 618 390 214 720 734 145 364 336 751 707 687 756 713 777 778 679 785 655 748 385 211

D.B. Avis J.H.S. Abbott J.M. Bacon Bob Bagshaw Mike Baker R. Bater Mrs Bater Joan Bennett Roy Bennett Martin Bishop E. Bishop Sybil Bowden-Lyle P. Blogg Alan Bonner T.A. Brookes R. Brown Viv Brown Tessa Burt D.A. Byers Ian Calder Penelope Calder R. Chandler P.A. Christie Colin Clark M. Clark Alan Coase Clare Coase

780 89 377 727 585 680 609 405 350 423 710 164 779 771 322 232 496 269 783 404 569 469 468 765 709 459 769 752

J. Coleman Alfie Collins D. Cooke-Yarborough W. Cooper Tony Corrigan Bob Cross I.M. Daniels Frank Darbon Mrs Davies Len Dawes Colin Dooley Ken Dobbs Jim Durston P. Eckford Bryan Ellis C. Falshaw P.G. Faulkner Tom Fletcher D. Foxwell Albert Francis Joyce Franklin Pete Franklin Keith Franklin R.T. Gage R.C. Gander Keith Gladman S.J. Gazzard E.M. Glanville

1972

Southington, Stapleford, Nr. Salisbury, Wilts 28 St. Pauls Road, Manningham, Bradford, Yorks. The Old Post Office, Kinnerton, Nr. Chester 699 Wells Road, Knowle, Bristol, Avon 22 Riverside Gardens, Midsomer Norton, Bath, Avon 4 Butterfield Close, westbury-on-Trym, Bristol 4 Butterfield Close, westbury-on-Trym, Bristol 8 Radnor Road, Wesbury-on-Trym, Bristol 8 Radnor Road, Wesbury-on-Trym, Bristol Islay, 98 Winsley Hill, Limpley Stoke, Bath, Somerset Islay, 98 Winsley Hill, Limpley Stoke, Bath, Somerset PO Box 15, Iganga, Busoga, Uganda 5 Tyrolean Court, Cheviot Close, Avenue Road, Banstead, Surrey Crags Farm Close, Little Broughton, Cokermouth, Cumberland 87 Wyatt Road, London, SW2 33 Green Court, Leagrove, Luton, Beds. 3 Cross Street, Kingswood, Bristol 66 Roundwood Lane, Harpendon, Herts. 301 Cressex Road, High Wycombe, Bucks Plas Pencelli, Pencelli, Brecon Plas Pencelli, Pencelli, Brecon 6 Blackcap Close, Southgate, Crawley, West Sussex 9 Prory Way, Tetbury, Glos. 186 Cranbrook Road, Redland, Bristol 41 Mawney Road, Romford, Essex 6 Meadow Mead, Rectory Road, Frampton Cotterell, Bristol 5 Mandalay Flats, 10 Elsiemer Street, Long Jetty, N.S.W. 2262, Australia Orchard House, Bunwell, Norfolk Lavendar Cottage, Bishop Sutton, Nr Bristol, Somerset Lot 11 McKay Crescent, Orange, New South Wales, Australia 259 Wick Road, Bristol 48a Talbot Road, Knowle, Bristol 4 122 Pearson lane, Bradford 9 Handsworth, Pilgrims way, Chilham, Canterbury, Kent 2106 14th StreetPO Box 325, Vernon, British Columbia, Canada Camp V, Neighbourne, Oakhill, Bath, Somerset 223 Southwark Park, Bermondsey, London SE10 497A City Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham 17 85 Fox Rd., Beacon Heath, Exeter, Devon 7 Estuary Park, Combwich, Bridgwater, Somerset 80 Wilton Gardens, Shirley, Southampton 7 School Lane, Combwich, Bridgwater, Somerset 23 Hallam Grange Crescent, Sheffield 65 Broomfield Crescent, Middleton, Manchester 11 Cow Lane, Bramcote, Nottingham. 870 Kebourne Road, Brentry, Bristol 22 Hervey Road, Wells, Somerset 12 Avon Way, Portishead, Bristol 12 Avon Way, Portishead, Bristol 6 Kings Street, Avonmouth, Bristol 15 Chandag Road, Keynsham, Nr. Bristol 2 Rock Street, Croscombe, Wells, Somerset 29 Shenfield Road, Brentwood, Essex 8 Woodbridge Road, Knowle, Bristol Jocelyn House Mews, Chard, Somerset


757 647 648 790 478 582 432 735 739 104 304 581 4 719 773 373 736 743 744 793 387 588 770 631 97 150 363 540 753 51 560 438 285 567 316 542 413 762 667 656 657 796 574 58 495 550 591 763 788 662 415 106 558 704 782 717 791 774 308

K.R. Glossop Dave Glover Jane Glover Martin Grass Steve Grime Chris Hall Nigel Hallet P. Hamm Mrs Hamm Mervyn Hannam C.W. Harris Chris Harvey Dan Hassell M. Havan Rodney Hobbs Sid Hobbs Sylvia Hobbs J.G. Hodgson Mrs Hodgson Mike Hogg George Honey B. Howe C. Howell P. Hudson J. Ifold P. Ifold Maurise Iles Dave Irwin N. Jago A Johnson Frank Jones Mrs. P. Jones U. Jones Alan Kennett Kangy King Phil Kingston R. Kitchen J.M. Knops Tim Large P. Littlewood Mrs Littlewood A.G. Leftley Oliver Lloyd George Lucy Val Luckwill R A MacGregor J. Manchip Mrs K. Mansfield I.K. Marshall R. Marshall T. Marsden E.J. Mason Tony Meaden D. Metcalf P.J. Miller G. Moore T.E. Morland J. Murray K. Murray

135 DO8205, No.4 Petty Officer’s Mess, HMS Lynx, BFPO Ships, London 24 Burnham Road, Tadley, Nr. Basingstoke, Hants. 24 Burnham Road, Tadley, Nr. Basingstoke, Hants 14 Westlea Road, Wormley, Broxbourne, Herts Letterewe, Wester Ross, Scotland 65 Valley View Road, Paulton, Bristol 73 Queensdown Gardens, Brislington, Bristol 4 11 Queens Road, Keynsham, Nr. Bristol 11 Queens Road, Keynsham, Nr. Bristol Lowlands, Orchard Close, East Hendred, Berks. The Diocesan Registry, Wells, Somerset Byways, Hanham Lane, Paulton, Nr. Bristol Hill House, Moorlynch, Bridgwater, Somerset 24 Elberton Road, Westbuty-on-Trym, Bristol Rose Cottage, West End, Nailsea, Bristol Hokerstone Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Wells, Somerset Hokerstone Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Wells, Somerset 72 Chesterfield Road, Bristol 6 72 Chesterfield Road, Bristol 6 32 Birchley Heath, Nuneaton, Warks Droppsta, 19044, Odensala, Sweden 48 Martins Road, Hanham, Bristol 131 Sandon Road, Edgebaston, Birmingham 22 Glentawe Park Estate, Wind Road, Ystradgynlais, Wales 5 Rushgrove Gardens, Bishop Sutton, Nr. Bristol The Cedars, Blackford, Nr. Wedmore, Cheddar Waterworks Cottage, Gurmney Slade, Bath Townsend Cottage, Townsend, Priddy, Somerset 27 Quantock Road, Windmill Hill, Bristol 3 Warren Cottage, Station Rd., Flax Bourton, Bristol 8 York Gardens, Clifton, Bristol 8 50 Louisville Avenue, Aberdeen Marsh Farm, Askem in Furness, Lancs. 92 West Broadway, Henleaze, Bristol 21 Rue Lionel Terray, 31 Blangnas, France 21 Longfield Road, Bishopston, Bristol Overcombe, Horrabridge, Yelverton, Devon 5 Kingsfield, Kingsway, Bath 39 Seymour Avenue, Bishopston, Bristol 22 Brockhurst Avenue, Burbage, Hankley, Leics. 22 Brockhurst Avenue, Burbage, Hankley, Leics 9 Northumberland Street, Westley, Plymouth Withey House, Withey Close West, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol Pike Croft, Long Lane, Tilehurst, Reading, Berks 8 Greenslade Road, Sedgeley hill, Dudley, Worcs. 12 Meadow Way, Theale, Reading, Berks c/o Mr Hutchinson, 1 Orwell Terrace, Edinburgh 11 Tiny Kott, Little London, Oakhill, Bath 4 Kings Drive, Bishopston, Bristol Flat 47, Cromwell Road, Bristol 6 50 The Deans, Downlands, Portishead, Bristol 11 Kendon Drive, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol Highcroft, Westbury, Bradford Abbas, Sherborne, Dorset 14 Rock Road, Peterborough. Northants. 60 Elm Tree Road, Locking, Weston-super-Mare 17 Elsmgrove, Redland, Bristol 1 Chantry Road, Wilton, Salisbury, Wilts. Latymer House, Hill Close, Wincanton, Somerset 17 Harrington Gardens, London SW7


329 330 794 754 624 557 396 755 750 722 637 22 160 499 724 337 622 481 452 668 343 701 682 712 489 787 616 784 759 240 359 747 237 577 578 482 78 213 789 764 473 276 1 38 575 365 381 60 650 572 583 772 284 348 571 711 737 699 700

T.W. Neil Mrs Neil A. Nichols G.E. Oaten J. Orr D. Palmer Mike Palmer A. Pardoe D. Parfitt A.E. Pearce J. Pearce Les Peters Norman Petty Tony Philpott Graham Phippen Brian Prewer Colin Priddle John Ransom Pam Rees I. Rees A Rich N. Rich J. Riley Mrs Riley G.G. Robinson I.P. Rogers Rushton C. Sage Miss Salisbury Alan Sandall Carol Sandall D.R. Sanderson B. Scott Dave Searle Kathy Searle Gordon Selby R.A. Setterington R. Setterington N.K. Shaw M.B. Slade Dave Smith J.M. Stafford Harry Stanbury Mrs I Stanbury D. Statham Roger Stenner Daphne Stenner P.A.E. Stewart D. Stuckey P. Sutton Derek Targett Nigel Taylor Allan Thomas D Thomas N Thomas M. Thomas M. Tilbury Buckett Tilbury Anne Tilbury

136 Woodville Lodge, Laigton Road, Worthing, Sussex Woodville Lodge, Laigton Road, Worthing, Sussex 121 Wyndhams Court, Commercial Road, Southampton 32 St. Marks Road, Bristol 5 c/o The Belfry 29 John Wesley Road, St. George, Bristol 3 27 Roman Way, Paulton, Nr. Bristol Church Cottage, Church Road, North, Portishead, Nr. Bristol, Somerset 11 Johnson Close, Wells, Somerset 22 Tiverton Drive, New Eltham London, SE9 5 Colmer Road, Yeovil, Somerset 21 Melbury Rd., Knowle Park, Bristol Avon Bankside Road, Brislington, Bristol 3 Kings Drive, Bishopston, Bristol, Avon Rock Cottage, Rock Road, Wick, Bristol East View, West Horrington, Wells, Somerset 40 Ralph Road, Horfield, Bristol 7 21 Bradley Rd., Patchway, Bristol, Avon c/o The Belfry 20 Broad Street, Presteigne, Radnorshire Box 126, Basham, Alberta Canada Ballyochyle Estate, Sandbank, Dunoon, Argyll 12 Lawley Place, Deakin, Canberra, Australia 12 Lawley Place, Deakin, Canberra, Australia 49 Elton Road, Bishopston, Bristol 6 56 Charlton Lane, Brentry, Bristol Sgts. Mess, RAF Coningsby. Lincoln 17 Westbourne Road, Downend, Bristol 24 Belvoir Road, St. Andrews, Brsitol 6 43 Meadway Ave., Nailsea, Avon 43 Meadway Ave., Nailsea, Avon 23 Penzance Gardens, Harold Hill, Romford, Essex Merrymead, Havestock Road, Winchester Hants Dolphin Cottage, The Beeches, Priddy, Wells, Somerset Dolphin Cottage, The Beeches, Priddy, Wells, Somerset 2 Dodd Avenue, Wells, Somerset 4 Galmington Lane, Taunton, Somerset 4 Cavendish Road, Chiswick, London W4 Queens Head Walk, Wormley, Broxbourne, Herts 31 Hilburn Road, Bristol 5 14 Severn Way, Tilehurst, Reading, Berks. Bryger, Bagworth, Somerset. 31 Belvoir Road, St. Andrews, Bristol 74 Redcatch, Knowle, Bristol The Bungallow, North Barrow, Yeovil, Somerset 38 Paulton Road, Victoria Park, Bristol 3 38 Paulton Road, Victoria Park, Bristol 3 11 Fairhaven Road ,Redland, Bristol 6 34 Allington Road, Southville, Bristol 3 75 Bredon, Yate, Bristol 16 Phyllis Hill, Midsomer Norton c/o Langley, Moors farm, Berkeley, Frome, Somerset Allens House, Nine Barrows Lane, Priddy, Somerset Mantons, 2 St. Pauls Road, Tupsley, Hereford Holly Lodge, Norwich Rd., Salhouse, Norwich, Norfolk. 5 Woolcot St. Redland, Bristol 6 9 Easton Terrace, High Wycombe, Bucks. 256 Cressex Road, High Wycombe, Bucks 256 Cressex Road, High Wycombe, Bucks


Gordon Tiley Roger Toms J.M. Postle Tompsett M.J. Dizzie Tompsett E. Towler Phil Townsend Jill Tuck Steve Tuck Tony Tucker Dave Turner P. Turner S. Tuttlebury J. Upsall Mrs Upsall R. Voke Mrs D. Waddon R. Wallin G. Watts Eddie Welch Bob White P. Wilkins Barry Wilton Brenda Wilton Graham Wilton-Jones Alan Williams G.C. Williams R.F. Wing

502 692 80 74 326 544 157 328 768 678 646 635 775 776 654 175 652 627 592 553 594 559 568 721 549 781 738

137 Jable, Digby Road, Sherborne, Dorset 22 Lancing Gardens, Edmonton, London N9 11 Lodge Avenue, Great Baddow, Chelmsford, Essex 11 Lodge Avenue, Great Baddow, Chelmsford, Essex 5 Boxbrove Gardens, Alwick, Bognor Regis, West Sussex 20 Lime Close, Prestbury. Cheltenham, Glos. 48 Wiston Path, Fairwater Way, Cwmbran, Gwent, Wales 3 Colles Close, Wells, Somerset 64 Calcott Road, Knowle, Bristol Moonrakers, Brewery Lane, Holcombe, Bath 11 Harper Court, Honnington, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire 28 Butts Road, Alton, Hants. 82 Eastland Road, Yeovil, Somerset 82 Eastland Road, Yeovil, Somerset 8 Pavey Road, Hartcliffe, Brsitol 3 32 Laxton Close, Taunton, Somerset 164 Bryant’s Hill, Bristol 100 Chesterfield Road, St. Andrews, Bristol 6 18 Station Road, Filton, Bristol The Old Bakery, Croscombe, Nr. Wells, Somerset 6 Effingham Road, St. Andrews, Bristol Valley View, 27 Venus Lane, Clutton, Bristol Valley View, 27 Venus Lane, Clutton, Bristol 17 Monkham’s Drive, Watton, Thetford Hendrew Farm, Llanderaied, Newport, Mon. 90 Grenville Street, Southville, Bristol Penzance Gardens, Harold Hill, Romford, Essex *

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RULES OF THE IAN DEAR MEMORIAL

We print the rules as amended by the 1972 A.G.M., so that members may know how they now operate.

FUND 1. The fund shall be known as the Ian Dear Memorial Fund. 2. The bequest shall be used to set up a fund to assist certain members to visit caving or climbing areas abroad. Further donations may be added to the fund. 3. The fund will be administered by an Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee. This will consist of the Hon. Treasurer; the Caving and Climbing Secretaries and two other members who will be elected, annually at the same time and by the same procedures as the general Committee. The previous year’s ordinary members would be automatically nominated and would carry on in office if no other nominations were received. The aforesaid committee will report to the Annual General Meeting. 4. Any club member under the age of eighteen may apply. Members over eighteen years of age may be considered in exceptional circumstances. 5. Applications should be received by any member of the Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee two months prior to the date of the proposed trip. A report, suitable for publication in the B.B. must be received by the Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee within one month of the completion of the trip. 6. The maximum amount of monies allocated in any one year shall be left to the discretion of the Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee. The maximum amount allocated to any individual is unlikely to exceed £20 per trip. 7. The fund to be invested at the discretion of the club Treasurer, and the interest to be retained within the fund.


138 Note: At present, the two ordinary members of the Ian Dear Memorial Fund Committee are M. Palmer and R.A. Setterington. ______________________________________________________________________________________

BUILT IN NON–OBSOLESCENCE!

An interesting ‘snippet’ sent in by JOCK ORR

Chatting about the merits and deficiencies of various forms of lighting. Alan Fincham mentioned that he still used the same NiFe cell for his caving in Jamaica that he had purchased whilst at Leeds University. He still gets a regular 10 to 12 amp hours out of it. When I asked him how long he had had the cell, he stopped and thought for a moment while he did some mental calculations. With an expression of surprise he then exclaimed "Good Lord! That was in 1956, sixteen years ago. It would seem that NiFe cells are a good buy! _______________________________________________________________________________________

Every endeavour will be made to get the Christmas B.B. into the hands of members before Christmas. At present there is a small shortage of articles, and any last minute contributions will be very welcome. _______________________________________________________________________________________

Solution To Last Month’s Crossword R C

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139 MONTHLY CROSSWORD – Number 28. Across: 1

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3. Found in nearby pub. (3) 5. Tire car in some caves? (7) 6. Describes cold water cave? (3) 8. Climbing aid. (6) 10. Companion to ensure safety? (6) 11. Lamb Leer insect. (3) 12. Bod rule found in most caves. (7) 14. Comes round once a year! (3) Down:

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1. Get a caving trip organised. (7) 2. Tin five hundred with the French for illumination. (6) 3. Here in France, they make bang. (1,1,1) 4. Any negative arrangement. (3) 7. Surveyed Lake Chamber, perhaps? (7) 9. Loos arrangements of 13 across. (6) 11. Mendip Swallet. (3) 12. Mendip gorge with alternative does not flow. (3)

Belfry Bulletin Number 301  

New Rules of the Ian Dear memorial Fund Page 137 Smitham Chimney Page 130 CLUB HEADQUARTERS ‘The Belfry’, Wells Rd., Priddy, Wells, Somerset...

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