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GABRIEL O’BYRNE

SENIORITY

ISSUE NO. 2

PROCTOR ACADEMY/

“ Y A A A Y Y Y, I m finally a senior!” ...said no one while at Proctor. Its like being a junior, but you have to fill out a college application. We hear constantly about how amazing it is to finally be in the home stretch of high school: people respect you more, you are the wisest and oldest of the school, and you finally get to think about the sweet life at college. But is that it? Other high schools have many more prestigious privileges for their soon to be graduating students, almost all of which are not seen here at Proctor. Other seniors can drive off campus for lunch in other peoples cars, they have their own lounge, and they can even go outside after study hall to socialize.

How do students feel about this? Do seniors still let themselves know that they are seniors by excluding other people? “I don't think they do” says Jaeger, “Some of my best friends are seniors and they don't exclude me when they hang out or go do stuff because of my age or because I am a sophomore.”

“The only other thing (apart privilege! We are still doing from not having study hall on school work and we are still Friday nights) I can think of worrying about our grades.” that makes the seniors at Proctor more distinguishable is Senior Project during Spring term,” says Andrew Pehl, “and even that isn't a


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! Why is it that seniors at this school are so alike all the other students? Equality. Ever since I came to this school in m y j u n i o r y e a r, P r o c t o r Academy has done the most impressive job at keeping all of the students interacting with each other and involved in the community. This gives all of the students a sense of equality amongst them and eliminates any kind of exclusion that any of them might have felt due to age or school class. It is very likely that seniors at this school could not mention all of the seniors because there is nothing that makes them distinguishable. Just the other day, all of the seniors on the mountain biking team were asked to get on the podium for a picture, and because I was a senior I joined my teammates on the stand. Once up there, I was called out by one of the coaches to come down from the podium stage because he didn't believe that I was a senior. After everyone else and I convinced him that I was actually a senior, I was allowed to be in the photograph.

“It is not about the recognition” says Speight Drummond “or letting people know that you are a senior, its the privileges that they should get once they become seniors. The whole reason schools are more sympathetic with seniors than any other class is because they are the students who have gone through all the long and hard years of school and deserve to have some type of reward for their accomplishment. Because after their last year of high school, they will have to work harder than ever before to become professionals at what they want to be.”

Although the rules of Proctor are supposed to be enforced by every teacher on every student, including seniors, some teachers believe that some students have earned their respect and have the right to have a little bit more freedom and are able to bend the rules from time to time. “I actually do give my seniors a little bit of more privileges inside the dorm and in my classes.” says Kate Jones, “I let them do their laundry and take showers during study hall, give them easy dorm jobs more often than hard jobs, and I am much more relaxed with them if they come slightly late to my class.” So, many people that belong to the Proctor community might recognize that the seniors at this school might not be as recognized as some are in other schools, but this in the end is what this school is all about. Its about making everyone feel equally accepted in what has always felt like a very big family, where no one has more power over the other.


Seniority Newspaper