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ISSUE 2


ISSUE2/01

PHOTOGRAPH BY RIPLEY & RIPLEY


Editors Note

issue

#2

For most of us, our smart phone is an alarm clock, a reminder of a million emails we have to reply to that day, as well as a regular updater on our commuting struggles from savvy travel apps before we have even stepped out of bed. However, whilst hibernating from the cold this winter we have come to realise just how much we rely on technology to keep us entertained, informed and used as a much needed survival tool (sometimes we actually have to walk; so thank God for Google maps!) It’s not just our virtual social lives we have been contemplating recently, but also how technology can and will continue to affect and enhance our everyday lives. In this issue we discuss such notions with designers, artists, musicians and technological geniuses to get the low down on how this technology is being utilized within the creative industries. Spare a thought for our columnist Harriet Dixon who endured a torturous 24 hour digital detox, read about her plight on page 46. Being digital junkies ourselves we documented our behind the scenes antics from our “Acid” fashion editorial, which you can see on this page and for the full story of our high fashion shoot on pages 24-34 The inspiration behind our “Acid” shoot was how fashion might look in the future; we explored the reality of this in our ‘Tech couture’ feature on page 17 where we discovered the benefits of 3D printing, lasers and silicone. If you fancy recreating the futuristic look yourself then take note of the hottest new designers in our ‘Get the look feature’ (page 8) and check out our street style on page 51 Last but not least, if you are looking for some inspiration to take you into the New Year then look no further than our quarterly BeInspired feature where we chat to a successful creative about their career journey. Check out what designer, artist, tutor and generally inspirational lady Sian Mooney had to say on page 48.

Helen and Tiffany ISSUE2/03


be Features 6. The reali’ity’ of the catwalk 13. Fabio illustrations interview 16. Knitwear interview – Sophie Ho 17. Tech couture 46. Jpeg generation

BeInstyle 24. Editorial 36. Make up and new products 8. Get the look 35. Cover star

BeInspired 48. Sian Mooney interview

BeHeard 41. Future beats 43. Interview with Complexion 44. Soundcloud playlist

BeSpotted 51. Street style


CONTRIBUTORS

Harriet Dixon Features writer

liam farrelly make up artist

On page 46 read about Harriet’s technology free 24 hour challenge

Liam reveals the products needed to get the look from our acid editorial on pages 36-39

tony tk smith photographer

triona ishola street style photographer

We had a great time shooting our editorial with Tony on pages 24-34

See Triona’s first BeSpotted feature on pages 51 & 52 Keep your eyes peeled for her regular blog spot on BeExposed.co.uk

ISSUE2/05


Once upon a time the fashion show was exclusive. Coco Chanel, Dior, Balenciaga and the like held exclusive and intimate shows for press, buyers and key celebrities; the followers of the fashion world would wait. Wait, until the designs were ready to be sold the next season and the garments would appear (having never been seen by the public) in the department stores and boutiques. It is said that the modern phenomenon of the catwalk was started in 1943 with the launch of ‘press week’ by a publicist named Elanor Lambert. Elanor had hoped to pull the attention away from the couture houses of Paris and promote new American fashions to a wider audience. How things have progressed; 60 years ago high fashion was not so readily available to the masses, but now we only have to log on to Style.com to see that morning’s shows in pictures and be inspired by the musings and advice of fashion writers. This easy access to fashion can empower a brand’s follower to feel part of the club, but how much is too much? When does using technology to give away what was once exclusive access devalue a brand and leave the consumer cold?

‘When does using technology to give away what was once exclusive access devalue a brand and leave the consumer cold?’ Since Alexander McQueen streamed his SS10 live show and gained 3.5 million hits in doing so, other brands have been picking up on how technology within fashion can maximise the customer’s experience. While high end brands such as Burberry are trying to appear more down to earth (such as filming and streaming their show on an Iphone 5), the high street brands are pushing the boundaries to interact with their consumers, creating a feeling that they play a key role in the company; which of course they do! I have 3 different examples of how technology can alter the experience of fashion shows; each example has a video to explain further as let’s face it, what better way is there to explain technology than with technology?

ISSUE2/06


The week before their AW14 show, Topshop launched a live video initiative; an outline of events and online coverage explaining their collaboration with Google+. This build up to the show was released on Google+ and their social media platforms, creating momentum even before the first model’s step on to the catwalk.

‘Topshop used data from the Google hangout app to help decide which pieces they would manufacture for retail’ It seems augmented reality may, in fact, become more of a reality in the not too distant future. Just as the iPads did at the HEMYCA show, Blippar allows users to bring objects such as print media and advertising to life by holding up their smartphone to visual ‘markers’. The objects then become 3D and can promote exclusive content and interactive services to the customer.

After the show Topshop used data from the Google hangout app to help decide which pieces they would manufacture for retail; giving the customer the power in the buying process and tailoring their collections like never before. During September’s fashion week we attended luxury label HEMYCA’s presentation which used an augmented reality experience by teaming up with digital creative studio Holition to interact with their guests. HEMYCA’s intention in using this technology was to be able to ‘reach a global audience, bringing the unpredicted designs to your fingertips’.

However, while I can appreciate that technology helps us to break down some social boundaries and allows those of us who love fashion to be able to access the latest trends, analyse designers work and celebrate diversity in fashion; I am also a very tactile person. I love fabrics and textures and want to see what that cobalt blue colour really looks like against that pink in real life. Spending hours on a computer each day I want to get out and look and feel clothes, I want to be able to really appreciate the craftsmanship and hours woven into them. So for me, while it’s fun to wave around an Ipad and enjoy the novelty of Blipping I will always apply for tickets to fashion week and spend hours poring over collections in Browns; no matter if leather catsuits are #trending I will be looking in the changing room mirror and deciding that in reality, I will still look like Ursula from the Little Mermaid in it. And that’s life... real life.

ISSUE2/07-


be 1.

The bright spark:

Julian Hakes

Earlier this year Julian won‘Vogue Italy’s Accessories Designer’ Following the success of his signature mojito style heels he is now developing new shades such as this pewter, boot styles and softer soles. www.julianhakes.co.uk

get the look Achieve a modernist look this season with our pick of the new designers and collections you need to know about.

ISSUE2/08


2.

4. The overseas talent:

Caslazur

Debuting in SS13 with their Va va Voodoo collection Aussie brand Caslazur are all about the amazing prints inspired by their upbringing in Africa and in their first collections case, African folklore. If you are escaping for a winter break and need to update your wardrobe then look no further than Caslazur. www.caslazur.com

The one to watch:

Alexis Barrell

South African born, Alexis describes her aesthetic as ‘free’. Her clothes are modern, directional and elegant and we love the laid back feel, this girl is definitely one to watch! www.alexisbarrell.com

3.

The footwear designers:

Miista

Fashion forward footwear brand Miista is based in Hackney and run by designer Laura Villasenin. We love Miista for their bold, unconventional, yet beautiful style; if you are looking for something cool and well made then this is the brand for you. www.miista.com

ISSUE2/09


7. The milliner:

Dinu Bodiciu

5. The new biker:

Muubaa

Muubaa say that ‘leather never lies - so fit, cut and finish are our hallmark’ and we believe them. Update your classic biker with patent panels and slim sleeves and wear with attitude. www.muubaa.com

We have been following Dinu’s work for a while now but his Winter Lullaby collection is our favourite yet, check out his website for the pom pom styles too! www.dinubodiciu.com

6. The updated classic:

Danielle Foster Danielle's pieces carry a strong monochrome theme, drawing inspiration from 40's erotica bondage and torture. Her collections feature luxury leathers and, with an equestrian background, bridle wear is also a common focus in her work. We love her new leather and transparent plastic bags with spike studs and braided handles. www.danielle-foster.myshopify.com

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8. The Jeweller:

Daou Jewellery Daou jewellery pieces are handmade and formed from precious 18 karat white and yellow gold with diamonds, coloured gemstones or personalised engraving. Daou means ‘light’ in Lebanese and so designer Dalia Daou has looked to symbolic star shapes in a geometric, 1930’s deco inspired style. The influence of science and geometry is present in her designs due to her recent studies of gemstones and pearls at the Gemological Institute of America and has been complimented by her knowledge of crystals fascinating atomic structures. www.daoujewellery.com

9.

The collaboration:

Bench x Stooki

Bench have recently launched a new collaboration of Artist Series tees with creative trio Stooki. The London based artistic collective were last years winners of the innovative Bench Self Made competition. Featuring 3 exclusive designs, straight from the imagination of the creative collective, the tee's demonstrate the many facets that make up the Stooki ethos (music/jewellery & apparel design/creative installation) www.stooki.co.uk www.bench.co.uk

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An interview with Fabio Paolucci, the Illustrator Digital design programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator have been fundamental in the progress of fashion, art and design but has this digital generation made us creatives afraid to put pencil to paper? There is no denying the magical natural skill of the old school illustrator; one who can captivate you with a gouache masterpiece or simply a few perfectly drawn lines. BeExposed caught up with the talented 22 year old Fabio Paolucci to talk about inspirations, mediums and his views on limiting yourself by setting goals. Being avid fans of your Instagram, it is clear that you enjoy drawing the human form, but where do you get your inspiration from to manipulate them the way you do? It’s hard to say, the inspiration comes from a multitude of areas and I suppose I channel those through my work. I’ll chill, put some tunes on and just scour blogs. I don’t know exactly what I'm looking for but when I see an image and it sparks a feeling or I can some how relate to it in that moment then I'll put it on top of the 'to draw' pile. If I have to say why the figures are distorted I guess it's the way I perceive things. It gives me pleasure to draw odd-looking people, it's as if their proportions should make them hideous but deep down you can’t deny their beauty. What mediums do you use, what are your favorites and why? Right now I'm only using graphite pencils, which is rubbish of me but I love it. In the past however I have used everything from watercolour paints, gouache, chalk, oil pastels. I worked on computer a lot at uni until I almost exhausted the use of Photoshop and Illustrator. Now I love using raw tools, I was really into digital illustration and design but I feel you lose that human quality with it. You can easily go back correct your mistakes digitally but when you're using your hands you have to accept your fuck ups and go with them, make them work for you and learn from them.

ISSUE2/13

Fabio Paolucci


What is your ultimate career/ life goal? All I know is that I want to do what I love and express myself through what I love. That could be anything from driving, cooking, building, farming... whatever. I find that if you create 'a goal' you limit yourself and limits are like barriers to me. If you create barriers for yourself you'll never be happy. I'm open to all goals; I'll take what ever life throws at me. Who would you love to draw a portrait of and why? I’ve drawn famous people in the past but only as caricatures, I’ve never drawn one with sincerity. People in the public eye don’t interest me, their real self gets filtered through camera lenses and magazine pages but Rihanna is an exception. There’s something about Rihanna I can’t put my finger on, the girl was beaten by the man she loved and she went back to him. In my eyes if you're hurt to that degree you would never look at that person again, but she did. Things like that happen every day, it was her spirit that drove her back and I love that. Who is your idol and why? I don’t really have any idols in life because we're all different but I’ve been influenced artistically by so many. My first main inspiration was Leonardo Da Vinci. I was about 9 when I first got into him and Michelangelo. I still remember the feeling I had when I saw The Virgin Of The Rocks for the first time, the contrast was the thing that got me, the way Da Vinci made light move so quickly and softly from light to dark blew me away. Other artists include JMW Turner, Burial, James Jean, Picasso, Digital Mystikz, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Joy Division, Monet. Music is also a great source of inspiration to me. What’s your next step in the creative world? To keep on being creative and to keep on enjoying what I do. Fabio Paolucci

‘When you're using your hands you have to accept your fuck ups and go with them’ ISSUE2/14


Fabio Paolucci

ISSUE2/15


Meet the designer: Sophie Ho We caught up with knitwear designer Sophie Ho to discuss her futuristic style, Vogues fashion night out and what we can expect to see from her next collection. Why did you choose to focus your degree on knitwear? I didn’t really specialise in knitwear until the final year of my degree in Textiles at Manchester Metropolitan University. I specialised in knitwear for my final collection during which I further explored the fascinating structural qualities of knit and its potential to go beyond just the flat plane. Your designs are quite futuristic even though they are made by hand, is this a theme you will carry through your work? My passion for knitwear stems from the architectural qualities it possesses, so I guess that’s why my current designs have such a futuristic element to them and a lot of my designs will have a similar feel. However, I don’t plan to limit my skills and in fact, a piece I am currently working on is more feminine with a summer feel and is based on Baroque elements. Is there any new technology you would like to try or have tried to enhance your designs? During my degree, I experimented extensively with bleaching and dyes and have incorporated latex in the knitwear for my latest collection “Industrial Atrophy”. I am also fascinated by the current progress and applications of 3D printing and would love to have the opportunity to apply it to future collections. I once came across a review of my work on a blog which mentions how my work had “changed her perception of knitwear”, that’s when I knew I had nailed it.

You were recently part of Vogue’s fashion night out in Manchester; did you learn anything from the experience? If there’s one thing I learned from the night, it’s to make sure to have business cards sorted before any fashion event (so you can network, network, network!) and have a good set of answers prepared for your collection on the chance that someone comes to interview you. You have also been displaying your work in the Chinese arts centre in Manchester how did that come about? Having seen my work showcased at MMU’s final year fashion show, the Chinese Arts Centre asked if I could be part of their next design show. The experience was great and it was an honour to have my work showcased at a local gallery in the Manchester City Centre. What’s next for you and your brand? At the moment, I have just been creating one-offs and working on small collections for local exhibitions in my spare time away from my job as a knitwear designer for a manufacturer, so I am getting a well-rounded experience both as an active textiles practitioner as well as a commercial designer. I am also working on my latest piece for an exhibition this upcoming February at Macclesfield Silk Museum. The piece will be made with silk and reference both the Baroque and Regency periods. It’ll be a contrast to my previous collections but hopefully you’ll love it!

‘It’s all about connections. Don’t be shy, get yourself out there and have fun’ an outfit from sophie’s futuristic graduate collection, a photoshoot with ‘industrial Atrophy’ and a sketch of the outfit

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Tech

Cout ure


Exploring the technological boundaries of fashion They will soon be gone, the days when seamstresses spent weeks on meticulous hand embroidery and laborious embellishments; as a new age of machinery and tools guide us to fresh and innovative design processes we ask, will this take away the magic of Haute Couture? New technology has allowed designers to explore the wonders of laser cutting, mould� ing, 3D and 4D printing opening a new lease of life to fashion; this new movement has been dubbed “Tech Couture”.

A small studio in Bermondsey is home to one creative who has mastered the art of laser cutting. Daniel, the owner of Laser Cut Works has worked with many materials from engraving tough glasses to laser cutting the wings of a delicate butterfly, revealing evocative prose designed by Lily Cain.

Laser Cutting

LILY CAIN

Laser cutting has been around for many years in manufacturing and industrial industries for cutting materials such as steel, but it’s a relatively new adoption for the fashion world. The beauty of laser cutting is that you can transform the look, feel and structure of a material to create something more dynamic. Fabrics such as leather and Perspex have be creatively cut to form garments that are more like pieces of art, as we can see from ambitious designers such as Marchesa and her intricate laser-cut gowns.

MARCHESA LASER CUT GOWN

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One fashion success story that has come out of Daniel’s studio is a new jewellery brand, Finchittida Finch. The creative duo, Tida and Lisa, have been going from strength to strength selling their pieces on sites such as ASOS and running their own pop up shops around London. It is clear from their creations that their heritage roots of Lao pay heavy influences on their work, engraving patterns from temple grounds, gravestones and beautiful Buddhist references.

“Our designs are really intricate so lasercutting is a great tool for us, it opens up endless possibilities. For us, laser-cutting is just the tip of the ice berg, there’s so many other techniques that we can’t wait to explore too, so watch this space!”

“The software for 3D printing is a completely different kettle of fish to the software we use for laser-cutting, to make the most out of it you really have to understand it!” ISSUE2/19


MOULDING For this issues editorial we have featured a fresh, young designer who was also the winner of the Innovation and Womenswear awards at Graduate Fashion Week. Hannah Williams debut collection (recently shown at London Fashion Week) is made up of hand moulded silicone shapes in a pastel shades. She has pushed construction to a new level, experimenting with unusual materials to create sculptures for the body to carry.

ISSUE2/20


3D PRINTING The hot topic in fashion technology right now is 3D printing. Imagine being able to print a new pair of stilettos or even a dress, something unique that none of your friends would have. Designer Pauline van Dongen has pushed this concept to reality and created pairs of 3D-printed heels that are fluid and futuristic in design.

Along with Pauline, Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen has also been pushing the boundaries of 3D printing by experimenting with complex exoskeleton dress designs.

Iris van Herpen

“I think 3D printing is the technique of the future. It offers endless possibilities regarding construction, shape and its application.” Pauline Van Dongen

Iris van Herpen

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4D PRINTING If you thought that 3D printing was cutting edge, we are now developing technology even further as we welcome 4D printing to the fashion world. Watch the “Kinematics” video designed by “Nervous System” to witness the possibilities of 4D design and how a 3D printed structure can shape into a flexible structure seamlessly.

With the help of science and clever coders will we witness the death of cut and sew? In the not too distant future we could see fashion studios and science labs working in harmony to create products our grandparents would have said were impossible.

What do you think or hope the future of fashion will be? Hashtag #techcouture to join the con� versation ISSUE2/22


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At Laser Cut Works we are happy to work with both individuals and businesses alike to see that all of their ideas come to life. We have a background in the architectural and creative industries which means that we have an invaluable insight into the need for quality, timely and within budget results.

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Photographer: Tony TK Smith Model: Lucinda Sinclair hair and Make up: Liam Farrelly Location: University of East London

mix monochrome with acid green for a minimalist, look to the future

T-shirt: Joanna Pybus, Perspex bracelet: Sarah Angold, PVC stockings: Stylists own


boots: Jean Michel Cazabat

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Skirt and jumper: Somewhere Nowhere, Bag: Joanna Pybus, Shoes: Stylists own

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Earrings: Sarah Angold

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NECKLACE: SARAH ANGOLD


NECKLACE: SARAH ANGOLD


Coat and leggings: Tiffany Baron


White trousers, shirt and coat: HEMYCA


Coat and glasses: Lauren Golding, Bag: Somewhere Nowhere, Shoes: Stylists own

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ISSUE2/33


White silicone dress: Hannah Williams

ISSUE2/34


Cover star Our cover star, Lucinda Sinclair has just been signed to Nev’s Model management. Not only that but she has her own brand, Sanctus and is amazingly creative, super mega lovely and of course, gorgeous. She answered some quick fire questions for us about her loves and life.

My life is warehouse hermit meets hectically rushing around London, endlessly creative, living in the moment, precious… The difference between being a signed and un-signed model is scarier clients… Just kidding! For me, I'm not used to not being able to throw some colour into my hair when I feel like it, so that's new. The craziest thing I have had to do on a shoot is posing with food in my mouth for a beauty shoot recently; that's difficult to avoid looking slightly explicit. My perfect day would be 24 hours when I don't think about work. If not, a good hair day, all you can eat sushi and a front row seat watching my brother perform Jazz and blues. My brand is Sanctus, which is all about exclusivity, symbolism, fluid silhouettes and dark elements. My style icon is currently Rick Genest. I keep healthy by running and gluten and dairy free! Also minimum of 3 bottles of wine at the weekend, very important for your health. My best beauty tip would be Korean BB creams, I swear by them.

photography: Nadiyah Nadene

My advice to aspiring creatives is don't compromise.

“Korean BB creams, I swear by them”

ISSUE2/35


The Lady is a vamp

Follow Liam’s top tips to bring out your inner vamp.

Magic metallics Start fresh

Pro eye makeup remover, Mac. Perfect any imperfections with this mini version of a M.A.C favourite, removes the most stubborn of liners.

Passionate

Passionate eyeshadow, Mac. Perfect matte, full colour pay off eye shadows; layered on top of our Kryolan paints gives you an incredible blend of almost oil slick looking colour.

Purple metallic aqua colour paint, Kryolan. Use this paint dry with your fingers and press into the skin to create beautiful blown out metallics on the eyes or face.

4D lips

Be Frosty Parfait amour eyeshadow, Mac. My favourite frosty shade of eye shadow, applied with Kryolan metallic paints and matte shadows helped create our blown out purple blend.

Contour the sockets

Refresh Il uminate

We applied this strobe cream on legs and arms to create luminous skin.

Highlight

White frost eyeshadow, Mac. A frosty highlight for the eyes, use on the highest plains of the eyes to brighten and lighten.

Velvet skin

Studio fix fluid foundation from Mac. Full coverage, matte, velvety skin, perfect for bright lights and long days working, no touch ups necessary.

Correct and protect

Atlantic blue & Fresh water eyeshadow, Mac. My favourite blue shadows of mine, ideal for strong contouring through the sockets.

Fix + spray, Mac. Spray, re-fresh, re-work....this revolutionary spray is a gives life to tired and over worked skin. Apply before, during and after makeup application.

Select moisture cover concealer, Mac. Correct under eye concerns whilst adding a bucket load of moisture with this lightweight concealer. This can also be used as a base for eye shadow.

Metallic purple lip crème, Mac. Helped create a 4D lip that stays true for hours.

Mineralise

Mineralized blush, Mac.

Doll face

Barbie loves Mac, blush from Mac.

Creme de la crème

Aqua colour, white, Kryolan. Frosty and beautiful, angel like crème body paint. Apply dry with fingers.


The Lady is a vamp

Follow Liam’s top tips to bring out your inner vamp.

Magic metallics Start fresh

Pro eye makeup remover, Mac. Perfect any imperfections with this mini version of a M.A.C favourite, removes the most stubborn of liners.

Passionate

Passionate eyeshadow, Mac. Perfect matte, full colour pay off eye shadows; layered on top of our Kryolan paints gives you an incredible blend of almost oil slick looking colour.

Purple metallic aqua colour paint, Kryolan. Use this paint dry with your fingers and press into the skin to create beautiful blown out metallics on the eyes or face.

4D lips

Be Frosty Parfait amour eyeshadow, Mac. My favourite frosty shade of eye shadow, applied with Kryolan metallic paints and matte shadows helped create our blown out purple blend.

Contour the sockets

Refresh Il uminate

We applied this strobe cream on legs and arms to create luminous skin.

Highlight

White frost eyeshadow, Mac. A frosty highlight for the eyes, use on the highest plains of the eyes to brighten and lighten.

Velvet skin

Studio fix fluid foundation from Mac. Full coverage, matte, velvety skin, perfect for bright lights and long days working, no touch ups necessary.

Correct and protect

Atlantic blue & Fresh water eyeshadow, Mac. My favourite blue shadows of mine, ideal for strong contouring through the sockets.

Fix + spray, Mac. Spray, re-fresh, re-work....this revolutionary spray is a gives life to tired and over worked skin. Apply before, during and after makeup application.

Select moisture cover concealer, Mac. Correct under eye concerns whilst adding a bucket load of moisture with this lightweight concealer. This can also be used as a base for eye shadow.

Metallic purple lip crème, Mac. Helped create a 4D lip that stays true for hours.

Mineralise

Mineralized blush, Mac.

Doll face

Barbie loves Mac, blush from Mac.

Creme de la crème

Aqua colour, white, Kryolan. Frosty and beautiful, angel like crème body paint. Apply dry with fingers.


High octane Acid

Contour

Strada matte blush from Mac helps create a natural contour for the face, eyes and cheekbones.

Prep and prime

All the products and tips you need to create a slick, futuristic look.

This Ultra facial moisturiser from Kiehls is a favourite of mine it perfectly preps and primes the skin for both day and night

No smudge, won’t budge Boot black liquid liner, Mac. Precision black liquid liner in an instant ... Smudge and budge proof.

Plastic fantastic

Face and body foundation, Mac. Apply this to the face or body with your fingers to create perfect, plastic looking skin.

Flawless coverage

Studio fix fluid foundation from Mac. This is a flawless coverage foundation, super matte with SPF 15, what more could you ask for?

Professionals secret

Strobe cream, Mac, a favourite between professionals, apply to legs, arms and face for seducing dewy skin.

All in one

Studio finish concealer palette, Mac. Contour, highlight, correct...the possibilities are endless. This palette is a whole make up kit in one, use it how you like.

Backstage fave

False lashes, waterproof mascara, Mac. Full and luscious lashes are created with this backstage fave mascara; apply over and over, waterproof and long wearing.


High octane Acid

Contour

Strada matte blush from Mac helps create a natural contour for the face, eyes and cheekbones.

Prep and prime

All the products and tips you need to create a slick, futuristic look.

This Ultra facial moisturiser from Kiehls is a favourite of mine it perfectly preps and primes the skin for both day and night

No smudge, won’t budge Boot black liquid liner, Mac. Precision black liquid liner in an instant ... Smudge and budge proof.

Plastic fantastic

Face and body foundation, Mac. Apply this to the face or body with your fingers to create perfect, plastic looking skin.

Flawless coverage

Studio fix fluid foundation from Mac. This is a flawless coverage foundation, super matte with SPF 15, what more could you ask for?

Professionals secret

Strobe cream, Mac, a favourite between professionals, apply to legs, arms and face for seducing dewy skin.

All in one

Studio finish concealer palette, Mac. Contour, highlight, correct...the possibilities are endless. This palette is a whole make up kit in one, use it how you like.

Backstage fave

False lashes, waterproof mascara, Mac. Full and luscious lashes are created with this backstage fave mascara; apply over and over, waterproof and long wearing.


be Future Beats

the movement of music & production Producers, DJs and music makers are pushing the boundaries with new technologies, taking sounds to a futuristic level. With equipment such as Rolis Seaboard, new advancements have evolved and revolutionized the classic piano; keys can now be modulated with real time intuitive control of the sound dynamics, creating new possibilities for pianists and producers.

This invention has bridged the gap between acoustic and digital music along with other instruments such as the Silent Drum and the Quotidian Record.

ISSUE2/41


It’s not just the classical pieces that have been pushed and developed, but the digital world has been making its own movements too. Digital music has seen a big influx in new sampling methods taken from unusual origins to create a new wave of sounds. Stööki are a new collective on the scene who have merged their individual creative forces together to build a strong brand. Stööki Sounds are one element to this; making their mark on the Trap scene, a genre of music born from Southern Hip Hop in the early 2000’s that, with its recent resurgence, has taken control of the hip hop world. In a recent interview Stööki spoke about sampling sounds from the noises they generate through filing and making their jewellery pieces, then flipping them into a beat.

“...People began to hear the slight differences in production and the fan base grew rapidly. Making us fly the flag for UK Trap...” Stooki

The music possibilities are looking endless but this leaves us with the question; has technology made music production too easy, meaning that anybody, whether from a music background or not can create music? Has classically trained art and skill subsided to make new room for an electronic movement? Or is the way forward to merge the raw classics with the digital future, creating richer cutting edge sounds like we see from artists such as Bonobo?

Share your thoughts with us by using our hash tag #BeFutureMusic ISSUE2/42


COMPLEXION One DJ who has been inspired by the morph of old and new sounds is Complexion, the host of The Future Beats show at West� side 89.6FM. His modern interpretation of the R&B classics has created a pool of cosmic, dreamy sounds which has become his trademark. BeExposed caught up with Complexion to ask which artists he rates right now and a few wise words for aspiring DJs. Take us on a brief journey through your music career and where do you hope it takes you? I started off DJing in secondary school to impress a girl but unfortunately it didn't work and I was stuck with the equipment, so I thought why not, I'll give this a go. From there I played at a few local clubs, then onto the West End playing for Sintillate and playing around the country and abroad. I've found a new life with the 'Future' Music that I'm currently playing, it makes a refreshing change to what I was forced to play in the clubs. The next step would be for my radio show to get onto a bigger station and for the genre to get the recognition it deserves.

Which DJs and Producers are you rating right now? There's a bunch of people when I first started off Tajan, Fwdslxsh, Stwo, Phazz & Chloe Martini were incredibly helpful and showed a bunch of support. Once I really got into the scene I discovered labels such as Darker Than Wax, Larouche, Trap Door and Soulection who all have incredible rosters.

Why music?

Give us three wise statements for the aspiring DJs out there?

Because nothing else makes me feel the way music does, I can't imagine doing anything else.

1 - Be yourself; don't use gimmicks to get ahead 2 - Stay Humble 3 - If you're just starting out learn the craft, don't just depend on technology

Can you describe to us what’s involved with "Future" music and what were the starting points for developing such music?

Where can we catch your sets?

At the moment there isn't really a clear definition of what Future Music is, for me if I can imagine listening to it in space then it fits. I spend a lot of time on Twitter and especially Soundcloud searching for up and coming artists. Now that the show is being heard by a larger audience I get music sent to me, sometimes asking to get played or sometimes even just advice on where they can take the beat next.

You can catch me playing at Bed Club in Nottingham on Saturdays and for all other gigs you can check out my Facebook page for the info

“...Future Music … for me if I can imagine listening to it in space then it fits...” ISSUE2/43


issue #2 playlist Kick back and tune into our chilled, futuristic soundtrack on soundcloud

Stooki sound– Geodesic

Shifty – Votre Amour

Disclosure Help me loose my mind ft London Grammar

Cuushie – I dreamt about silence

Trick ft ItsNate (produced by FraFraFra)

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Kingdon - Bank Head (feat. Kelela) Bonobo – Cirrus-

JRhodesPianist – Gluck melody from Orfeo

fwdslxsh - high tide

Submotion Orchestra Damn Hot

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10 years old (if we take Facebook as the advent of the era). Since its launch in 2004, Facebook has acquired a staggering 1.2 billion users with Twitter (founded in 2006) quickly mushrooming to an estimated 500m accounts. A survey from April 2013 suggests that almost 30% of the UK's 33 million Facebook users are on the network for at least an hour a day. These numbers don’t surprise me; a look around any train will show hundreds of commuters with their faces illuminated from their smartphones. “Facebook fuels narcissism as users hone a flattering profile to reflect their best attributes.”

Could you be separated from your phone for 24 hours? No texting, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Mail Online for a whole day? It sounds easy right? Well read on to see how our features writer Harriet Dixon fared when we set her this challenge... Words by Harriet Dixon I accepted this challenge because I’ve become increasingly aware of the amount of time I waste scrolling through my Facebook newsfeed or Mail Online’s “sidebar of shame”. Having recently imposed a “No social media after 9.30pm” rule on myself, it’s clear that I need to address my habits. My primary aim is to rid myself of checking my phone as a default – admittedly everyday life isn’t always conducive to enlightening cultural experiences, but surely speaking to friends or learning a new recipe is far more rewarding and holds greater longevity than mindlessly looking though someone’s Facebook profile? (Plus, I’m stubborn by nature and want to prove I can cope without it). Considering its ubiquity and profound influence on modern society and the ways we communicate, it’s amazing to think that social media is not even

The negative affects on our health of being glued to our iPhones/tablets are well documented, with health experts and sociologists expressing concern about the impact of such incessant use on not only our physical health (eye strain, hunched shoulders) but also on our general sense of wellbeing. At university I read at least 1 book a week, yet now I struggle to read a page without my mind wondering; too used to the 140-character limitations of Twitter and wordless Instagram images. The affect on our self esteem is also of growing concern, with a recent study by the University of Michigan finding that the more time a person spent on Facebook, the more his or her feelings of wellbeing decrease, due to envy of other’s lives and paranoia. The study also stressed how Facebook fuels narcissism as users hone a flattering profile to reflect their best attributes – a side-effect I can (shamefully) relate to! With every bad habit the birth of social media has brought about, we must also acknowledge the more positive side of its growth. Facebook has made the world a smaller place, with geographical boundaries eradicated as we can see what our friends or relatives living far away are up to on a daily basis. Twitter has revolutionised the channels of communication; news breaks instantaneously, and discussions around all kinds of social issues can genuinely inform and educate. Through only following individuals or customers we choose to, Twitter allows us to curate our own news. So how did I cope with my 24 hours sans phone? Well, a lot better than I expected. It certainly helped that I had an excursion planned with my friend but even before leaving the house I realised how much quicker I had got ready without the

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“at around 7pm I started to crack up and feel restless and anxious, proof of social media’s addictiveness” habitual checks of my phone. The overwhelming feeling of the day was of freedom; I felt more engaged with the world around me as I watched the London skyline against the autumnal sky out of the train window, and enjoyed a drink with my friend without my twitchy thumbs seeking my iPhone out to ‘check in’ on Facebook or Instagram the moment (both of which I’m guilty of doing regularly). However that’s not to say there weren’t downsides to the day; at around 7pm I started to crack up and feel restless and anxious – proof of social media’s addictiveness. Safe in the knowledge that my family and friends are safe and well, do I really need to know the minutiae of other people’s lives? It made me realise how much of my time I waste on a daily basis. If challenged to recall a Tweet or Mail Online article I’d read last week, I would struggle. This demonstrates that the majority of content I read each day is not significant or memorable. Is this really the way I want to spend so much of my spare time? No. It’s time to (literally) lift my head up, look straight in front instead of down (not least to avoid angry fellow commuters) and pay attention to the real world around me.

Top 5 annoying social media habits: 1.

Statuses with ‘hidden messages’ clearly aimed at someone. The most annoying thing about it is if trying to decipher who the target may be!

2.

Serial likers. Liking a few photos from someone’s album, sure. Liking EVERY photo – stalkerish and like a plague of locusts on our notifications.

3.

Selfies. Ok so you look hot. But you’d look even hotter if someone else took the photo.

4.

Bitstrips. A new phenomenon matched only by the speed at which it became deeply annoying.

5.

Incessant PDAs between couples. Yes, we’re happy you’re in love. But we don’t need it all over our Newsfeed to believe it. What happened to private conversations?

Are you addicted to social media? Or have you deleted your Facebook account and turned off your phone? Let us know your thoughts at info@beexposed.co.uk

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sIAN mOONEY

be In each issue we talk to experienced industry professionals about their career highs and lows, what advice they can give and what they are doing now. In this issue we caught up with Sian Mooney, a fashion lecturer at Buckinghamshire new university. photograph of sian by mark cairnes

Where did your career in the creative industries start? My Mother was a writer and English teacher and my Father was a musician who had been to art school, so it seemed natural that I would study art. However on my foundation course I realized that I had an aptitude and interest in fashion which lead me to apply for a BA in Fashion Design with Marketing.

“Learn the business when you are on someone else’s payroll” You had your own fashion label; tell us about some of the highs and lows of having the business? Having the company was very exciting, we sold to some of the leading retailers worldwide like Barney’s New York, L’Eclaireur in Paris and Isetan in Japan. The work was extremely hard and cashflow was always a problem. Manufacturing in the UK is a tough game as well, there was and is a lack of quality production units in the U.K. It was a permanent struggle but we travelled the world, met some amazing people and showed our collections internationally so that outweighed some of the darker days.

‘venus’ 2013 What lead you to write a book about making latex clothing? Why something so specific?

What advice would you give to others thinking of starting their own business?

When I had my business Fredericks of Hollywood, a famous mail order business in the US with a 60 million mailing list asked me to make a range of latex garments for them. I didn’t know how to make latex clothing but thought that it was too big a market to ignore. When I tried to find out about how to do it people were very guarded about the techniques, so I taught myself and wrote the book to help others in the same position.

Learn the business when you are on someone else’s payroll. We made mistakes which cost us financially and that really hurts! You also need to be great at networking as at the end of the day there is no point in making an amazing collection if no one gets to hear about it or see it!

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My sculptural pieces are not unrelated to what I teach to my fashion students. The materials are often reclaimed and reworked and the concepts are quite political. Fashion is a 3D art form as is sculpture. My sculpture relates to the body and especially women so there are very real synergies there. It gives me more opportunities for free expression but that can have a very positive effect on fashion thinking too. If you weren’t teaching now what would be your plan B career?

‘I’ve Been watching you’ (2012) What made you want to start teaching?

I would most definitely be a full time artist and spend every day in the studio.

I was bored being a designer at a small company so when I met an old friend by accident and she told me there were some jobs going at UEL I rang them up. I felt the need for a change in career so I did some part time teaching and when a full time job came up I applied and got it.

‘Fashion is a 3D art form as is sculpture. My sculpture relates to the body and especially women so there are very real synergies there.’

You now teach at the University of Buckinghamshire and the course has an emphasis on sustainable fashion. Do you think new technology can work hand in hand with sustainability?

What advice would you give those hoping to get a place on a fashion course? What do you look for in their portfolios and applications?

There are lots of technologies that can help make fashion more sustainable, waterless dying being one. Some fabrics can be recycled with great success and that is all down to the latest technology. Sustainability and ethics in fashion is growing on a daily basis. After the Rana Plaza disaster many companies have had to rethink their manufacturing and its impact on the environment and the workers. There is still a long way to go though so the graduates of tomorrow who have this specialist knowledge will be in demand as the market starts to call for more accountability in fashion.

If you want to impress your interviewer you need to immerse yourself in fashion and the arts. Simply being interested in Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood is not enough; you need to show a wider knowledge of your chosen subject. Original fashion does not come from looking at existing fashion; a lively interest in lots of different subjects will make you look like a candidate with potential. It is a good thing to show that you can research and develop an idea from start to finish and overcome any issues that might arise with intelligent solutions. I love looking at students’ sketchbooks; you can really get an idea of the person though them.

You studied for a PHD in fine art, what influence do you think your art education has had on your perception of other creative fields?

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ISSUE2/01


Winter fur doesn’t have to mean cigarette holders, pearls and dodgy 20’s fancy dress it can be sleek, cool or cosy. We took to the streets to find three new ways with fur and how to get the look.

be Super slick

Zara coat with fur collar £99.99

Rayban mirrored aviator sunglasses £135.00

Black, tick. Texture, tick. Attitude, tick. We love this all black ensemble which has been brought to life with smooth fur and shine added from leather trousers and mirrored aviators. Photos by Triona Ishola Jimmy Choo patent leather trainers £475.00

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FUN GRUNGE

How cute is this furry dinosaur jumper! We wouldn’t want to hide it under a coat either, so a clear plastic mac fits the bill perfectly. Add coloured hair and DM’s for a grunge edge.

Wanda Nylon clear plastic mac £557.61.

Somewhere Nowhere dino fur crop top £48.00

From Russia

We all know about Russian Cossack hats, they have been around for a few seasons. But now it’s time to take inspiration from ‘meet the Russians’, these guys are super rich and super luxe. Get the look in glossy black, designer bags and a touch of tradition to keep you cosy. Ypa!

Dr Marten ‘Pascal’ boots £95.00

Other Stories textured sweat £45.00

Marc by Marc Jacobs watch £329.00

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Saint Laurent leather pouch £395.00


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BeExposed: Issue#02 - Acid  

It’s not just our virtual social lives we have been contemplating recently, but also how technology can and will continue to affect and enha...

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