Issuu on Google+

Issue 1, ss13


editors notes... Welcome to BeExposed, a new online magazine which supports emerging

different backgrounds and levels of success; some with degrees and some without to ask them ‘Was it worth it?’ They have given you their opinion, but what do you think? We would love to hear your thoughts, so email, tweet, leave us a Helen & Tiffany xx

Issue1/01

Issue1/02


editors notes... Welcome to BeExposed, a new online magazine which supports emerging

different backgrounds and levels of success; some with degrees and some without to ask them ‘Was it worth it?’ They have given you their opinion, but what do you think? We would love to hear your thoughts, so email, tweet, leave us a Helen & Tiffany xx

Issue1/01

Issue1/02


Issue 1

contributors

Issue 1

contributors

Jewellery

Bwoy Wonder Jade Mellor Models

helen@beexposed.co.uk

tiffany@beexposed.co.uk

Editors

Helen Butcher Tiffany Baron Photography

Diana Patient Mark Witney Danny Augustine

Alexa Watson Antoine Allen Kate Spooner Nathan/AMCK Models Lucinda Sinclair Ashton/AMCK Models Chelsea Baird Designers

Joanne Stoker Julian Hakes Nike

Toni Stott Genevive Sweeney Deimante Millune Henry Marie Lucie Halley Joanna Pybus Alexander Antoniou Nicola Froud Alice Oluyian Amanda Salway Katie Darlington Jody Shafton

Issue1/03

Issue1/04

Video Maria Irujo de Codes Videography

Hair and make up

Holly Davies Millinery

Dinu Boddiciu Footwear


Issue 1

contributors

Issue 1

contributors

Jewellery

Bwoy Wonder Jade Mellor Models

helen@beexposed.co.uk

tiffany@beexposed.co.uk

Editors

Helen Butcher Tiffany Baron Photography

Diana Patient Mark Witney Danny Augustine

Alexa Watson Antoine Allen Kate Spooner Nathan/AMCK Models Lucinda Sinclair Ashton/AMCK Models Chelsea Baird Designers

Joanne Stoker Julian Hakes Nike

Toni Stott Genevive Sweeney Deimante Millune Henry Marie Lucie Halley Joanna Pybus Alexander Antoniou Nicola Froud Alice Oluyian Amanda Salway Katie Darlington Jody Shafton

Issue1/03

Issue1/04

Video Maria Irujo de Codes Videography

Hair and make up

Holly Davies Millinery

Dinu Boddiciu Footwear


Fleur de Cerisier

Photographer: diana patient Photographers assistant: Maria Irujo de Codes hair and make up: holly davies Models: antoine allen and Alexa watson Location: ross nye stables

Tailcoat: Helen Butcher, Body: Stylists own


Fleur de Cerisier

Photographer: diana patient Photographers assistant: Maria Irujo de Codes hair and make up: holly davies Models: antoine allen and Alexa watson Location: ross nye stables

Tailcoat: Helen Butcher, Body: Stylists own


Jacket and overalls: Henry marie

trousers: tiffany baron, body: stylists own

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Issue1/08


Jacket and overalls: Henry marie

trousers: tiffany baron, body: stylists own

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Issue1/08


KNitted dress and knitted suit: deimante Meilune


KNitted dress and knitted suit: deimante Meilune


Dress: lucie halley

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Dress: lucie halley

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Silk top and skirt: Toni Stott, Necklace: topshop, shoes: joanne stoker, hat: dinu bodiciu. suit: models own

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Silk top and skirt: Toni Stott, Necklace: topshop, shoes: joanne stoker, hat: dinu bodiciu. suit: models own

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Issue1/14


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knitted vest and cardigan: Genevieve sweeney, hat: dinu boddiciu, DOg: max the poodle


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knitted vest and cardigan: Genevieve sweeney, hat: dinu boddiciu, DOg: max the poodle


dress: toni stott

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dress: toni stott

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Dress and corset: vivienne westwood, clear plastic skirt: toni stott, hat: dinu boddiciu, suit: models own


Dress and corset: vivienne westwood, clear plastic skirt: toni stott, hat: dinu boddiciu, suit: models own


1. Mac extra Dimension pearl finish eyeshadow in mauve. I love these metallics washed over the eyelid for a glossy eye look, they are also great to use wet, for a more intense colour and look.

2

1

2. Mac Dazzleglass lipgloss is a disco ball for the lips and transforms a simple make up look into a more glamorous one. 3. Illamasqua blusher duo, £26. The pigments in Illamasqua products are amazing, one sweep will be enough to give your cheeks amazing colour.

Video

on the eyes is really on trend this season, and suits all eye colours.

11

face (cheeks/brow bones) to make the skin look radiant and healthy.

3

6. Mac fix plus spray, £12.50 is a great product if your skin is dry and dehydrated. As well as refreshing the skin it's a great medium to use on powder products to make them fluid.

5 4

7. Mac Studio fix fluid is one of the best for cover and longevity. The product is oil free and comes in over 40 different shades, so you are guaranteed to find a perfect colour match. 8. Mac mineralise skinfinish £21. Containing over 77 minerals and vitamins, it 8

darker than your skin tone to use as a contour for the cheek bones.

10

6 7

trend this summer so try other shades of pink such as ‘candy yum-yum’, ‘girl about town’ and ‘pink plaid’. 10. Mac black eyeliner.

9

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1. Mac extra Dimension pearl finish eyeshadow in mauve. I love these metallics washed over the eyelid for a glossy eye look, they are also great to use wet, for a more intense colour and look.

2

1

2. Mac Dazzleglass lipgloss is a disco ball for the lips and transforms a simple make up look into a more glamorous one. 3. Illamasqua blusher duo, £26. The pigments in Illamasqua products are amazing, one sweep will be enough to give your cheeks amazing colour.

Video

on the eyes is really on trend this season, and suits all eye colours.

11

face (cheeks/brow bones) to make the skin look radiant and healthy.

3

6. Mac fix plus spray, £12.50 is a great product if your skin is dry and dehydrated. As well as refreshing the skin it's a great medium to use on powder products to make them fluid.

5 4

7. Mac Studio fix fluid is one of the best for cover and longevity. The product is oil free and comes in over 40 different shades, so you are guaranteed to find a perfect colour match. 8. Mac mineralise skinfinish £21. Containing over 77 minerals and vitamins, it 8

darker than your skin tone to use as a contour for the cheek bones.

10

6 7

trend this summer so try other shades of pink such as ‘candy yum-yum’, ‘girl about town’ and ‘pink plaid’. 10. Mac black eyeliner.

9

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1. Mac studio fix fluid, £20.50. This gives buildable coverage and a flawless finish.

product is a MUST for this summer. Use it to highlight the cheek bones using the lighter colour, then the darker to contour. This product gives a super polished, high gloss look to the skin (especially under flash photography).

1

2

3

Video

3. Mac Pro-longwear blush, £19. These are not only highly pigmented but give a 4. Mac Pro-longwear paint pots, £14.50. These come in a variety of colours and are a creamy product that can be used as an eyeshadow base or on it's own as a cream eyeshadow. Use straight onto the eyelid and it not only keeps your eye shadows on longer but makes the colour stronger.

4 7

8

the inner corner of the eye and work outwards using darker colours in the crease of the lid. 6. Mac black kohl pencil liner in 'feline' £14. Use it on the inside or outside of the eye. For a quick smokey eye, use all over the eyelid and blend out using an eyeshadow brush.

6

5

7. Mac waterproof false lashes mascara, £18. This mascara is volumising and lengthening and gives lashes a false lash look. Use one or two coats to give a 8. Mac false lashes, £10. If mascara alone is not enough for you to get that sexy evening look, then add a pair of false lashes to finish off a smokey eye. For best results curl the natural lash and apply a coat of mascara to blend.

Issue1/23

Issue1/24


1. Mac studio fix fluid, £20.50. This gives buildable coverage and a flawless finish.

product is a MUST for this summer. Use it to highlight the cheek bones using the lighter colour, then the darker to contour. This product gives a super polished, high gloss look to the skin (especially under flash photography).

1

2

3

Video

3. Mac Pro-longwear blush, £19. These are not only highly pigmented but give a 4. Mac Pro-longwear paint pots, £14.50. These come in a variety of colours and are a creamy product that can be used as an eyeshadow base or on it's own as a cream eyeshadow. Use straight onto the eyelid and it not only keeps your eye shadows on longer but makes the colour stronger.

4 7

8

the inner corner of the eye and work outwards using darker colours in the crease of the lid. 6. Mac black kohl pencil liner in 'feline' £14. Use it on the inside or outside of the eye. For a quick smokey eye, use all over the eyelid and blend out using an eyeshadow brush.

6

5

7. Mac waterproof false lashes mascara, £18. This mascara is volumising and lengthening and gives lashes a false lash look. Use one or two coats to give a 8. Mac false lashes, £10. If mascara alone is not enough for you to get that sexy evening look, then add a pair of false lashes to finish off a smokey eye. For best results curl the natural lash and apply a coat of mascara to blend.

Issue1/23

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Look

1... Pretty in pink..

<----------- “Get the look ”

We have been working with you on various fashion jobs for quite a few years now and you impress terms of makeup? There are a number of things that inspire me about the fashion Secondly, the impact and boundaries that are pushed and its influences. What really excites me is being able to create models as well as the high-octane environment give me something of a buzz. Like fashion, makeup plays a huge part not only on catwalk or editorial but also to high street consumers. I love to be able to mix up my look depending on what mood I'm in, by altering the style of my hair and makeup - for me that is the beauty of fashion.

Look

2... Smokey & Sultry...

Assuming Makeup is your plan A in career choice what would be your plan B? I don't have a plan B, plan B are for people who are too scared to believe their achievements will happen. Persistence and self-belief is key

Issue1/25

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Look

1... Pretty in pink..

<----------- “Get the look ”

We have been working with you on various fashion jobs for quite a few years now and you impress terms of makeup? There are a number of things that inspire me about the fashion Secondly, the impact and boundaries that are pushed and its influences. What really excites me is being able to create models as well as the high-octane environment give me something of a buzz. Like fashion, makeup plays a huge part not only on catwalk or editorial but also to high street consumers. I love to be able to mix up my look depending on what mood I'm in, by altering the style of my hair and makeup - for me that is the beauty of fashion.

Look

2... Smokey & Sultry...

Assuming Makeup is your plan A in career choice what would be your plan B? I don't have a plan B, plan B are for people who are too scared to believe their achievements will happen. Persistence and self-belief is key

Issue1/25

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Who would be your dream person to work on or company to work with?

My dream person to work with or assist would be some one like Val Garland. She is a makeup genius and has been in the fashion makeup industry of over 20 years. She has lead Fashion Week shows all across the world! She has an amazing way of using product, colour and placement like no

BeExposed always looks out for your instagram updates, as we love the way you push the boundaries of makeup styles. What style of makeup excites you the most?

as her in the industry one day. In terms of whom I would dream of working on, it would have to the likes of Rihanna.

Right now my favourite style of makeup to create is very dewy, highlighted and contoured

of makeup, especially right now with the

makeup and a bold lip colour - such as orange which is very in this season. I think keeping the eye makeup to a minimal gives a really healthy, fresh look for summer.

not afraid to express herself through her hair and makeup styles.

Makeup seems like such a fun industry to be In terms of keeping on trend and knowing new products, it is vital for me to be aware of what's going on socially and culturally. It sounds inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by these key factors, it's important to know why certain trends are happening. I use a lot of social media such as Tumblr and YouTube to look at reviews on new products on At Mac I learn what looks are going to be on trend for the coming season and as Mac being the leading makeup authority world wide, they London Fashion week to really get an insight as to what's going to be hot!

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you got to work for MAC. I started my career in makeup 3 years ago and moved to London to do my degree in makeup. more experience and knowledge but also to give myself a regular income. Freelance alone some stability. Since being there I have gained ages all sexes and all races, which is invaluable experience. Selfridges is always very busy so to the fashion industry as you never have long to create makeup looks. I then freelance the but I do see Mac as a stepping-stone to bigger

Issue1/28


Who would be your dream person to work on or company to work with?

My dream person to work with or assist would be some one like Val Garland. She is a makeup genius and has been in the fashion makeup industry of over 20 years. She has lead Fashion Week shows all across the world! She has an amazing way of using product, colour and placement like no

BeExposed always looks out for your instagram updates, as we love the way you push the boundaries of makeup styles. What style of makeup excites you the most?

as her in the industry one day. In terms of whom I would dream of working on, it would have to the likes of Rihanna.

Right now my favourite style of makeup to create is very dewy, highlighted and contoured

of makeup, especially right now with the

makeup and a bold lip colour - such as orange which is very in this season. I think keeping the eye makeup to a minimal gives a really healthy, fresh look for summer.

not afraid to express herself through her hair and makeup styles.

Makeup seems like such a fun industry to be In terms of keeping on trend and knowing new products, it is vital for me to be aware of what's going on socially and culturally. It sounds inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by these key factors, it's important to know why certain trends are happening. I use a lot of social media such as Tumblr and YouTube to look at reviews on new products on At Mac I learn what looks are going to be on trend for the coming season and as Mac being the leading makeup authority world wide, they London Fashion week to really get an insight as to what's going to be hot!

Issue1/27

you got to work for MAC. I started my career in makeup 3 years ago and moved to London to do my degree in makeup. more experience and knowledge but also to give myself a regular income. Freelance alone some stability. Since being there I have gained ages all sexes and all races, which is invaluable experience. Selfridges is always very busy so to the fashion industry as you never have long to create makeup looks. I then freelance the but I do see Mac as a stepping-stone to bigger

Issue1/28


out of it that's counts. I gained a first honors degree in makeup, would I have been where I am today and known everything I do purely with it? in my line of work? No. But I definitely do not regret doing it. I think in life if you have a degree out of it was that it got me used to working to deadlines and briefs.

“...Most

importantly be passionate and love what you do!....”

Do work for free to gain experience and exposure but know your self worth, don't let the industry use you and only do it when you know you are gaining

improve. Look professional with a friendly the industry has no room for make sure you know your trends and products as this industry evolves very quickly.

As fashion is always evolving and makeup running hand in hand with fashion tell us what the future or future trends are in the makeup game? Right now key trends for spring summer are Nu-ance, Sig-nature Puri-tan and Sche-delic. Less is more on the skin but making the eyes and lips making the statement. Eye makeup consists of bright colours in a 60's/70s inspired manner. A wash of metallics and pastels across the eyelid paired with minimal use of eyeliner to keep the face looking fresh. In terms of skin the look is dewy, balmy, glowing, sun-kissed skin with the use of minimal product and highlighters and contouring to create a sculpted look. Lips are bright, with orange and pink tones being most popular.

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Artist: Holly Davies Pride of a lion body paint

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out of it that's counts. I gained a first honors degree in makeup, would I have been where I am today and known everything I do purely with it? in my line of work? No. But I definitely do not regret doing it. I think in life if you have a degree out of it was that it got me used to working to deadlines and briefs.

“...Most

importantly be passionate and love what you do!....”

Do work for free to gain experience and exposure but know your self worth, don't let the industry use you and only do it when you know you are gaining

improve. Look professional with a friendly the industry has no room for make sure you know your trends and products as this industry evolves very quickly.

As fashion is always evolving and makeup running hand in hand with fashion tell us what the future or future trends are in the makeup game? Right now key trends for spring summer are Nu-ance, Sig-nature Puri-tan and Sche-delic. Less is more on the skin but making the eyes and lips making the statement. Eye makeup consists of bright colours in a 60's/70s inspired manner. A wash of metallics and pastels across the eyelid paired with minimal use of eyeliner to keep the face looking fresh. In terms of skin the look is dewy, balmy, glowing, sun-kissed skin with the use of minimal product and highlighters and contouring to create a sculpted look. Lips are bright, with orange and pink tones being most popular.

Issue1/29

Artist: Holly Davies Pride of a lion body paint

Issue1/30


to create each piece. My favourite piece is probably be the ‘Bed spread’

we asked some of the talented designers featured in fleur de cerisier to tell us a bit more about them and their amazing work.

and linen to create high fashion garments. My aim was to bring these

Diemante Meilune

embellishment.

www.deimantemeilune.com A: Every day we hear what damage consumerism does to us and our planet. There is no future with fast fashion, which destroys, kills and harms. I intend to use mostly natural and organic, as well as recycled materials;

Genevieve Sweeney

www.genevievesweeney.com

Q: Who do you envisage wearing your clothes? A: Someone who wants unique designs of the best quality and is interested in sustainability in garments. It does not necessarily have to be someone living an ecological lifestyle, in fact the opposite, I would love my

Q:Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Why knitwear? My grandma taught me how to knit when I was 5 and

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying fashion? A:‘Think what you would like to do, what career you would chose if you could have everything you ever wanted. This is what you have to do.’ That was the best advice I’ve received. I would say the same for the future fashion students. When I have doubts about my own business, I think of the quote ‘The biggest mistake in life, is being afraid to make one.’

childhood.

but travelling lines evoked my fabric development by use of travelling cables and engineered ribs. The use of colour was extremely important to me as I wanted

Deimante’s graduate collection

villain. The use of red portrays the true nature of the character developing in the film. I was sponsored by Novetex yarn Mill for my final degree show. I was extremely lucky to be able to use so many beautiful luxurious yarns such as Cashmere.

One of Genevieve’s portfolio pages

dresses. For the modern day off duty ballerina. Q; Do you think uni helped you? How does it compare to the experiences you have had with internships/placements? A: Uni is a must in my opinion if you want a design career. I gives you all the

Q: What are you doing now? a knitwear studio and a few small design houses. I then moved to New York City for a short term contract with Knitwear Developer for Hugo Boss. It is a really business lead aspect of the fashion industry. the Fall.

Ballet Russes and French impressionist Edgar Degas and his ballet drawings. It is a fresh twist on gracefulness, for women who embody everything

T oni stott www.artsthread.com/p/tonistott

process right through to the final product. Uni also gives you a great Toni’s collection at pret a porter Paris opportunity to showcase your work through your graduate show and GFW. However nothing can compare or prepares you like the hands on experience you get from an internship. I believe both are equally

‘Gain as much experience as possible, Its a long slow process so don’t be disheartened if its something you really incredible opportunity to work alongside him has always been a dream of mine. One that did not disappointed. He is an amazing want to do just follow your dream!’

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to create each piece. My favourite piece is probably be the ‘Bed spread’

we asked some of the talented designers featured in fleur de cerisier to tell us a bit more about them and their amazing work.

and linen to create high fashion garments. My aim was to bring these

Diemante Meilune

embellishment.

www.deimantemeilune.com A: Every day we hear what damage consumerism does to us and our planet. There is no future with fast fashion, which destroys, kills and harms. I intend to use mostly natural and organic, as well as recycled materials;

Genevieve Sweeney

www.genevievesweeney.com

Q: Who do you envisage wearing your clothes? A: Someone who wants unique designs of the best quality and is interested in sustainability in garments. It does not necessarily have to be someone living an ecological lifestyle, in fact the opposite, I would love my

Q:Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Why knitwear? My grandma taught me how to knit when I was 5 and

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying fashion? A:‘Think what you would like to do, what career you would chose if you could have everything you ever wanted. This is what you have to do.’ That was the best advice I’ve received. I would say the same for the future fashion students. When I have doubts about my own business, I think of the quote ‘The biggest mistake in life, is being afraid to make one.’

childhood.

but travelling lines evoked my fabric development by use of travelling cables and engineered ribs. The use of colour was extremely important to me as I wanted

Deimante’s graduate collection

villain. The use of red portrays the true nature of the character developing in the film. I was sponsored by Novetex yarn Mill for my final degree show. I was extremely lucky to be able to use so many beautiful luxurious yarns such as Cashmere.

One of Genevieve’s portfolio pages

dresses. For the modern day off duty ballerina. Q; Do you think uni helped you? How does it compare to the experiences you have had with internships/placements? A: Uni is a must in my opinion if you want a design career. I gives you all the

Q: What are you doing now? a knitwear studio and a few small design houses. I then moved to New York City for a short term contract with Knitwear Developer for Hugo Boss. It is a really business lead aspect of the fashion industry. the Fall.

Ballet Russes and French impressionist Edgar Degas and his ballet drawings. It is a fresh twist on gracefulness, for women who embody everything

T oni stott www.artsthread.com/p/tonistott

process right through to the final product. Uni also gives you a great Toni’s collection at pret a porter Paris opportunity to showcase your work through your graduate show and GFW. However nothing can compare or prepares you like the hands on experience you get from an internship. I believe both are equally

‘Gain as much experience as possible, Its a long slow process so don’t be disheartened if its something you really incredible opportunity to work alongside him has always been a dream of mine. One that did not disappointed. He is an amazing want to do just follow your dream!’

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Fleur de cerisIer

James Vincent McMorrow Higher Love Laura Mvula - Sing to the Moon

The Staves - Facing West Tom Odell - Another Love Boris - Boy Issue1/33

Our mix inspired by the Fleur de Cerisier photoshoot

James Blake - Retrograde Disclosure - Latch ft Sam Smith Alex Clare - Hummingbird

The XX - Sunset Passenger - Patient Love Stumbliene - Cherry Blossom Issue1/34


Fleur de cerisIer

James Vincent McMorrow Higher Love Laura Mvula - Sing to the Moon

The Staves - Facing West Tom Odell - Another Love Boris - Boy Issue1/33

Our mix inspired by the Fleur de Cerisier photoshoot

James Blake - Retrograde Disclosure - Latch ft Sam Smith Alex Clare - Hummingbird

The XX - Sunset Passenger - Patient Love Stumbliene - Cherry Blossom Issue1/34


An interview with milliner dinu bodiciu

www.dinubodiciu.com

Q: Tell us about your background. Why millinery? A: My first BA was actually in pharmacy for 5 years. I was completely isolated from design really but my mother was showing in the biggest gallery in my home town. That started my passion for art and so I followed the one BA degree for free so I did a BA in graphic design while I was working as a pharmacist. I met my partner in happy there so I started designing bags to try and apply for an MA in fashion. We decided to move to London and I found LCF, the MA had fashion design and technology and so I studied there and graduated in 2011. Q: Your knowledge of chemistry must have helped with some areas of fashion in terms of fabric technology?

cotard delusion; people that suffer trauma to their heads and they don’t recognise themselves, the worst delusion

‘I have learnt that it’s important that as well as being creative you need to be commercial. In the end fashion is not for a museum and while you need to be creative, it can be hard to create something wearable and beautiful’

Q: When you help the students what advice do you give?

how they feel. Q: Do you think uni is worth it? A: Yes, I think the system in the UK is very different to Romania, you have more self discovery, it is very structured in Romania. I think the UK system is very well developed and teaches you how to develop your own skills. I think it also helps where you are; London is the best place to get PR and network, there is a lot of focus on London.

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An interview with milliner dinu bodiciu

www.dinubodiciu.com

Q: Tell us about your background. Why millinery? A: My first BA was actually in pharmacy for 5 years. I was completely isolated from design really but my mother was showing in the biggest gallery in my home town. That started my passion for art and so I followed the one BA degree for free so I did a BA in graphic design while I was working as a pharmacist. I met my partner in happy there so I started designing bags to try and apply for an MA in fashion. We decided to move to London and I found LCF, the MA had fashion design and technology and so I studied there and graduated in 2011. Q: Your knowledge of chemistry must have helped with some areas of fashion in terms of fabric technology?

cotard delusion; people that suffer trauma to their heads and they don’t recognise themselves, the worst delusion

‘I have learnt that it’s important that as well as being creative you need to be commercial. In the end fashion is not for a museum and while you need to be creative, it can be hard to create something wearable and beautiful’

Q: When you help the students what advice do you give?

how they feel. Q: Do you think uni is worth it? A: Yes, I think the system in the UK is very different to Romania, you have more self discovery, it is very structured in Romania. I think the UK system is very well developed and teaches you how to develop your own skills. I think it also helps where you are; London is the best place to get PR and network, there is a lot of focus on London.

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Q: Lady Gaga wore some of your pieces, can you tell us about that?

Q: Was the cherry piece we used for Fleur de Ceriser a one off private order?

specimen because it can mean something different to different people; I meant it to be about moths but some people have said sea creatures and some said out of space. I have used

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Issue1/40


Q: Lady Gaga wore some of your pieces, can you tell us about that?

Q: Was the cherry piece we used for Fleur de Ceriser a one off private order?

specimen because it can mean something different to different people; I meant it to be about moths but some people have said sea creatures and some said out of space. I have used

Issue1/39

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An interview with photographer

Q: Tell us a bit about your background, how did you get into photography?

diana patient

last few years of university and before that I painted. I have always been torn between art and literature and the thing that united them was stories. I actually started with film when I was 16 and then assisted some wonderful photographers for a year or so who taught me a lot. Q: You travel a lot and meet different people with your work, what is your favourite type of photography? A: I like mixing art, portraiture and photo journalism; I also really enjoy self-portraiture and being able to withdraw and create something

Q: Have you had a favourite photoshoot? favourites but the process wasn't a walk in the park. I think one of my favourite photoshoots where the process was as fun as the photographs

We have worked with Diana on several projects over the last couple of years and have always admired her upbeat obvious talent. She brings life and enthusiasm to the set and helps to shoot. We asked her to come to Ross Nye stables with us to photograph

weekend in this huge country house with a lot of vintage clothing and champagne; it was memorable. Q: Do you think studying has helped your career or do you think learning on the job has been more valuable? A: I think that learning doesn't have to happen at an establishment, however what studying at university, for example, does give you is space and financial security to explore your talent without commercial influence coming into play.

‘Fleur de Ceriser’. We asked Diana to tell us about how she got into photography,

From my series of self-portraits for designers. This project, ‘Shadow Me’, was shot for Angharad Probert in Paris. Diana patient

she would give to budding photographers. She fit well into her floral surroundings wearing a blue flower print jumpsuit and lavender Temperley brogues.

‘the most important thing for me is stories and storytelling in whatever medium’

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Q: What advice would you give to somebody who wants to be a photographer?

made me forget myself and yet depicted me so vividly’. Diana patient

passionate about, buy a comfortable pair of shoes (you're going to be walking a lot) and don't hide behind your computer go out and meet people.

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An interview with photographer

Q: Tell us a bit about your background, how did you get into photography?

diana patient

last few years of university and before that I painted. I have always been torn between art and literature and the thing that united them was stories. I actually started with film when I was 16 and then assisted some wonderful photographers for a year or so who taught me a lot. Q: You travel a lot and meet different people with your work, what is your favourite type of photography? A: I like mixing art, portraiture and photo journalism; I also really enjoy self-portraiture and being able to withdraw and create something

Q: Have you had a favourite photoshoot? favourites but the process wasn't a walk in the park. I think one of my favourite photoshoots where the process was as fun as the photographs

We have worked with Diana on several projects over the last couple of years and have always admired her upbeat obvious talent. She brings life and enthusiasm to the set and helps to shoot. We asked her to come to Ross Nye stables with us to photograph

weekend in this huge country house with a lot of vintage clothing and champagne; it was memorable. Q: Do you think studying has helped your career or do you think learning on the job has been more valuable? A: I think that learning doesn't have to happen at an establishment, however what studying at university, for example, does give you is space and financial security to explore your talent without commercial influence coming into play.

‘Fleur de Ceriser’. We asked Diana to tell us about how she got into photography,

From my series of self-portraits for designers. This project, ‘Shadow Me’, was shot for Angharad Probert in Paris. Diana patient

she would give to budding photographers. She fit well into her floral surroundings wearing a blue flower print jumpsuit and lavender Temperley brogues.

‘the most important thing for me is stories and storytelling in whatever medium’

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Q: What advice would you give to somebody who wants to be a photographer?

made me forget myself and yet depicted me so vividly’. Diana patient

passionate about, buy a comfortable pair of shoes (you're going to be walking a lot) and don't hide behind your computer go out and meet people.

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‘The dandelion field was a lucky find and a completely personal photoshoot. There is always an element of rolling with spontaneity in a photoshoot, however planned, but this find and the bike were all thought of within a split second and photographed in 30 mins. I love the scrape on her knee and the bike: it is full of hope and dreams. which is exactly how you feel when you first start out.’


‘The dandelion field was a lucky find and a completely personal photoshoot. There is always an element of rolling with spontaneity in a photoshoot, however planned, but this find and the bike were all thought of within a split second and photographed in 30 mins. I love the scrape on her knee and the bike: it is full of hope and dreams. which is exactly how you feel when you first start out.’


Q: You work as a street style photographer in Paris; what is the biggest A: I do find Paris an inspiring place, the uniform architecture, the colour of the light as it bounces off the walls. It is just a very dreamlike place. of Paris, on the whole, are more restrained than in London. I don't think anyone would really bat an eyelid if you walked around half naked with a chicken on your head in Dalston, eccentricity is almost a norm, but there are a lot less people in Paris who break the mould.

big part? A: I do prepare so that I come to a shoot feeling inspired with something to express but the way I express that is not necessarily planned. There are so many uncontrollable elements that you have to be prepared to work with the moment, otherwise you could end up flogging a dead horse and it won't be expressing the important though, it drives me to an end point so you know what you are trying to

Q: Tell us a bit about the Diana calendar A: The Diana Calendar was such a wonderful journey. I loved being able to print my work well and having people display it all over the world. It felt really right: photography is something to be enjoyed. The process was also wonderful. I photographed in Berlin, Paris, Milan and various parts of London from Kensington to The Rio in Dalston. All of the portraits are so different and unique to the subject and surrounding. It is one of the best things I have done. Q: What would be your plan B career if you didn’t do photography? A: An animator or a writer, I suppose. I can't imagine not following some sort of

Q: What projects do you have coming up that you can tell us about? Of One's Own. You can find out more about dianas work on her website

describe in words but I suppose that is why it needs to be expressed in a photograph.

‘Managing a large group of performers for Altwoode, an interior product company, campaign in Devon. DIANA PAtient

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Q: You work as a street style photographer in Paris; what is the biggest A: I do find Paris an inspiring place, the uniform architecture, the colour of the light as it bounces off the walls. It is just a very dreamlike place. of Paris, on the whole, are more restrained than in London. I don't think anyone would really bat an eyelid if you walked around half naked with a chicken on your head in Dalston, eccentricity is almost a norm, but there are a lot less people in Paris who break the mould.

big part? A: I do prepare so that I come to a shoot feeling inspired with something to express but the way I express that is not necessarily planned. There are so many uncontrollable elements that you have to be prepared to work with the moment, otherwise you could end up flogging a dead horse and it won't be expressing the important though, it drives me to an end point so you know what you are trying to

Q: Tell us a bit about the Diana calendar A: The Diana Calendar was such a wonderful journey. I loved being able to print my work well and having people display it all over the world. It felt really right: photography is something to be enjoyed. The process was also wonderful. I photographed in Berlin, Paris, Milan and various parts of London from Kensington to The Rio in Dalston. All of the portraits are so different and unique to the subject and surrounding. It is one of the best things I have done. Q: What would be your plan B career if you didn’t do photography? A: An animator or a writer, I suppose. I can't imagine not following some sort of

Q: What projects do you have coming up that you can tell us about? Of One's Own. You can find out more about dianas work on her website

describe in words but I suppose that is why it needs to be expressed in a photograph.

‘Managing a large group of performers for Altwoode, an interior product company, campaign in Devon. DIANA PAtient

Issue1/45

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Urban Refuge Issue1/03

Photographer: Mark Whitney Models: Kate Spooner + Nathan Brewer - AMCK Hair and Makeup: Holly davies Stylist: BeExposed

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Urban Refuge Issue1/03

Photographer: Mark Whitney Models: Kate Spooner + Nathan Brewer - AMCK Hair and Makeup: Holly davies Stylist: BeExposed

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Jacket and Skirt: Amanda Salway T shirt: Victate Jumper and Shoes: Stylists own

Shirt and Leggings: Amanda Salway Cropped top: Stylists own Hat: Dinu Bodiciu

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Jacket and Skirt: Amanda Salway T shirt: Victate Jumper and Shoes: Stylists own

Shirt and Leggings: Amanda Salway Cropped top: Stylists own Hat: Dinu Bodiciu

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Issue1/03

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Kate: Hat: Dinu Bodiciu Sleeveless Jacket & Leggings: Amanda Salway Denim shirt: Stylists own Shoes: Joanna Stoker Nathan: T shirt and Bag: Victate Shorts: Amanda Salway Shoes: Stylists own

Issue1/53

Issue1/54


Kate: Hat: Dinu Bodiciu Sleeveless Jacket & Leggings: Amanda Salway Denim shirt: Stylists own Shoes: Joanna Stoker Nathan: T shirt and Bag: Victate Shorts: Amanda Salway Shoes: Stylists own

Issue1/53

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Designer: Lucie Halley Photographer: Mark Whitney Models: Kate Spooner & Nathan Brewer Hair and Makeup: Holly davies Stylist: BeExposed

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Designer: Lucie Halley Photographer: Mark Whitney Models: Kate Spooner & Nathan Brewer Hair and Makeup: Holly davies Stylist: BeExposed

Issue1/55

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An Interview with the founder Edd Li

Victate London

We were introduced to the brand Victate around 3 years ago and over the years we have been impressed with how much Victate have matured their image and refined their this brand apart from your typical new streetwear label. Edd Li – founder of Victate has

Victate / vík tàyt /

enriching every ingredient needed for them to flourish.

(origin: Victorious Dicta

BeExposed caught up with Edd to hear more about the man behind the Liberty prints.

Victate)

Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Where are you studying? I am Taiwanese. Came to London when I was six and stayed here ever since. My father’s job means as a family different countries every three or six

choose these different paths and not concentrate on one industry? Where would you say your heart lies within these different industries? Of course the day-to-day tasks are vastly different but there

(two words you don't want to see together huh!) I never chose to do fashion, it was never a conscious decision I made one day. It all began as a hobby of mine that people like what we create. Designing, materialising my ideas is one of the most thrilling experiences for me. Why have I not decided just to choose just the one to focus Well the reason is truly because I enjoy both. Neither would

King's College London as an undergraduate. Three years in, two more years to go!

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I really enjoy the sciences and always have done, it just so of! Victate flourishes with the freedom I give it, working organically to a workflow that fits me and the team. This way our products are genuine to our lives and truly are items we are proud of.

Issue1/58


An Interview with the founder Edd Li

Victate London

We were introduced to the brand Victate around 3 years ago and over the years we have been impressed with how much Victate have matured their image and refined their this brand apart from your typical new streetwear label. Edd Li – founder of Victate has

Victate / vík tàyt /

enriching every ingredient needed for them to flourish.

(origin: Victorious Dicta

BeExposed caught up with Edd to hear more about the man behind the Liberty prints.

Victate)

Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Where are you studying? I am Taiwanese. Came to London when I was six and stayed here ever since. My father’s job means as a family different countries every three or six

choose these different paths and not concentrate on one industry? Where would you say your heart lies within these different industries? Of course the day-to-day tasks are vastly different but there

(two words you don't want to see together huh!) I never chose to do fashion, it was never a conscious decision I made one day. It all began as a hobby of mine that people like what we create. Designing, materialising my ideas is one of the most thrilling experiences for me. Why have I not decided just to choose just the one to focus Well the reason is truly because I enjoy both. Neither would

King's College London as an undergraduate. Three years in, two more years to go!

Issue1/57

I really enjoy the sciences and always have done, it just so of! Victate flourishes with the freedom I give it, working organically to a workflow that fits me and the team. This way our products are genuine to our lives and truly are items we are proud of.

Issue1/58


What stage are you at now in terms of study and/or career? What’s next for you and Victate?

For our Private Stock we are working on smaller but more cohesive capsules of items that really focus on garments that peak my interests. Our streetwear will feature a few more traits of sportswear and have details trickled down

Just be hardworking there really is no other way. Being honest with yourself is very important too. Really gauging what you are good at, what your limits are and then finding out how to overcome those and working with those who have forte's in what you don't have. With all that in mind, you have to be really good at what you think are good at. Earn respect from those around you, the right people to surround yourself with will naturally emerge and stay as long term friends. What tunes are doing it for you this week? CHVRCHES - Mother We Share

as an integral part of our street wear and as the intricacy and level at which we create graphics is something we are very proud of. Who inspires you? VERBAL the rapper/designer/business man is someone I almost idolise. He's a Korean heritage, Japanese grown, American educated beast who is part of m-flo, Teriyaki Boyz, founder of AMBUSH designs and is also head Have you had any training in fashion design or taken up any internships/placements?

does for the USA). He's got mad style, confidence and is a great example of someone conquering all fields that he wants to play in.

Not formally. I would really like to but my

Who would you love to see wearing your clothes?

I would like to learn more about fabric How I picked up how to do things was a lot of trial and error as well as lots of great people giving me advice. An aspect that has helped me greatly is to treat fashion design as product design visualising garments as an object. What's great if that you can always test it out on yourself since we all have our own bodies. I actually quite enjoy that I haven't had formal training. My thought process and design stages are not have taught, something I am not wholly convinced by. I believe the best form of training in this field would be serious with a wealth of real knowledge, working

VERBAL! Of course the classic answers like Pharrell and Nigo would be mad dope too! Reggie Yates would be cool for someone in the UK! ups through your own experiences? My student loan is actually my float, I use it as my buffer. All the money from each season just goes Be smart about maximising what you get back from the money you spend. Understand what is important to you and your business idea. Be smart

What is the best piece of advice you have been given? “Start copying what you love. Copy copy copy copy. At the end of the copy you will find yourself.” - Yohji Yamamoto How can one be different if they don't know who or what they are? Different is the natural outcome if you are confident and sure of who or what you are.

your skill set). It's about knowing where on the scale you are at this present moment.

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What stage are you at now in terms of study and/or career? What’s next for you and Victate?

For our Private Stock we are working on smaller but more cohesive capsules of items that really focus on garments that peak my interests. Our streetwear will feature a few more traits of sportswear and have details trickled down

Just be hardworking there really is no other way. Being honest with yourself is very important too. Really gauging what you are good at, what your limits are and then finding out how to overcome those and working with those who have forte's in what you don't have. With all that in mind, you have to be really good at what you think are good at. Earn respect from those around you, the right people to surround yourself with will naturally emerge and stay as long term friends. What tunes are doing it for you this week? CHVRCHES - Mother We Share

as an integral part of our street wear and as the intricacy and level at which we create graphics is something we are very proud of. Who inspires you? VERBAL the rapper/designer/business man is someone I almost idolise. He's a Korean heritage, Japanese grown, American educated beast who is part of m-flo, Teriyaki Boyz, founder of AMBUSH designs and is also head Have you had any training in fashion design or taken up any internships/placements?

does for the USA). He's got mad style, confidence and is a great example of someone conquering all fields that he wants to play in.

Not formally. I would really like to but my

Who would you love to see wearing your clothes?

I would like to learn more about fabric How I picked up how to do things was a lot of trial and error as well as lots of great people giving me advice. An aspect that has helped me greatly is to treat fashion design as product design visualising garments as an object. What's great if that you can always test it out on yourself since we all have our own bodies. I actually quite enjoy that I haven't had formal training. My thought process and design stages are not have taught, something I am not wholly convinced by. I believe the best form of training in this field would be serious with a wealth of real knowledge, working

VERBAL! Of course the classic answers like Pharrell and Nigo would be mad dope too! Reggie Yates would be cool for someone in the UK! ups through your own experiences? My student loan is actually my float, I use it as my buffer. All the money from each season just goes Be smart about maximising what you get back from the money you spend. Understand what is important to you and your business idea. Be smart

What is the best piece of advice you have been given? “Start copying what you love. Copy copy copy copy. At the end of the copy you will find yourself.” - Yohji Yamamoto How can one be different if they don't know who or what they are? Different is the natural outcome if you are confident and sure of who or what you are.

your skill set). It's about knowing where on the scale you are at this present moment.

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An interview with designer amanda salway

Q: Tell us a bit about you; why fashion design? A: When I started college I was all set to study law when I decided that it was important for me to follow my passion as my career; I to give menswear a go and I haven't looked back since; with

be more considered.

‘uni is an environment where you can make mistakes and learn from them safely.’ ’

inspired by French street style and French culture. I actually went to Paris for research and spent the day trawling through boxes in vintage markets for photographs of how young French boys used to dress in early 1900’s France.

Amanda’s full graduate collection shown at GFW

doors on a global level.

80% of silk! I tried to work with it in new ways such as bonding it navy blue, floral printed short sleeved shirt; the collar was inspired by the vintage photography I found in Paris and I think perfectly captures my favourite elements of youth and femininity but Q: What are you doing now, what is next for you and the brand? At the moment I’m working as a freelance menswear designer and work for as they have a lot of resources which you wouldn't necessarily have access to as a young designer. I'm also freelancing for a company called The Archivist which develops garment trend An outfit from Amanda’s graduate collection

have had success in the Japanese market which opens up so many

Issue1/61

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying fashion I also think that internships are massively important and I would encourage employers are looking at what experience you have before they employ you. I’d also say that it’s important to not just gain ‘studio’ internships but also not to overlook high street companies as these are the companies that have and snobby about working for high street in favour of ‘high fashion’ but the All experience is valuable and you should make the most of it, whoever your target market is. You can hear more from Amanda on her blog: www.saidonetoanother.blogspot.co.uk

Issue1/62


An interview with designer amanda salway

Q: Tell us a bit about you; why fashion design? A: When I started college I was all set to study law when I decided that it was important for me to follow my passion as my career; I to give menswear a go and I haven't looked back since; with

be more considered.

‘uni is an environment where you can make mistakes and learn from them safely.’ ’

inspired by French street style and French culture. I actually went to Paris for research and spent the day trawling through boxes in vintage markets for photographs of how young French boys used to dress in early 1900’s France.

Amanda’s full graduate collection shown at GFW

doors on a global level.

80% of silk! I tried to work with it in new ways such as bonding it navy blue, floral printed short sleeved shirt; the collar was inspired by the vintage photography I found in Paris and I think perfectly captures my favourite elements of youth and femininity but Q: What are you doing now, what is next for you and the brand? At the moment I’m working as a freelance menswear designer and work for as they have a lot of resources which you wouldn't necessarily have access to as a young designer. I'm also freelancing for a company called The Archivist which develops garment trend An outfit from Amanda’s graduate collection

have had success in the Japanese market which opens up so many

Issue1/61

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying fashion I also think that internships are massively important and I would encourage employers are looking at what experience you have before they employ you. I’d also say that it’s important to not just gain ‘studio’ internships but also not to overlook high street companies as these are the companies that have and snobby about working for high street in favour of ‘high fashion’ but the All experience is valuable and you should make the most of it, whoever your target market is. You can hear more from Amanda on her blog: www.saidonetoanother.blogspot.co.uk

Issue1/62


What made you decide to move to New York? What’s next for you and your brand?

modern take on an ancient technique. Her diffusion line named - “Lucy Halley Boy” We caught up with her to hear what she had to say.

It was a wonderful experience, but definitely not for the faint hearted, if your not 100% involved and 100% hungry you will get eaten up! So yes uni was worth it.

Tell us a bit about you: I am originally from a small town in Wales near Cardiff. I then studied in Bristol for a on to specialise in fashion. Fashion became the obvious choice, it combined my love of art, drawing and 3d design.

it taught me about dyeing fabric which has now become my style. I was always more interested in working on my own

a BA hons at Kingston University in London.

create my diffusion line. I didn’t want the press that I received at Graduate Fashion week to just disappear and I just couldn’t stop designing even if I tried! So I created my diffusion line – Lucie Halley Boy – this unisex line consists of bespoke hand dyed pieces in clean and easy

source a fabric sponsorship from a high-end design house in London. This was amazing it allowed me to be able to produce the

and unique. Since launching the line, I have had a wonderful response from people in the fashion industry and built up a strong cliental.

afford it. So I decided to use the dyeing which I had been playing around with but never imagined it would be good enough to compete with digital prints. However, once the fabrics had been cut out my dyeing came to life and my style was born.

I moved over bringing my diffusion line with me. New York is a great place to meet people and network, since moving over the label has gone from strength to strength and we have new fans such as Shaun Ross who is now wearing it adding New Yorkers to our Lucie Halley Boys. The LH Boy word is spreading and I am looking forward to seeing what New York will hold for my brand. This year I am hoping to bring the line into the my designs into stores. I hope to expand the line as a designer.

Do you think uni helped you and was it worth it? How does it compare to the experiences you have had with internships/placements?

my print techniques, that for me has been more helpful then any internship.

Kingston was great I like to think of it as military school for fashion. I came out if there as a complete workaholic. I would work to the bone, but I love what I do so it was easy to push on through the really hard and stressful

I am inspired by people who do. People who create, who don’t follow, who

In our second year we were given design projects from companies such as Banana Republic. This gave us a really strong understanding of ‘the client’ and their needs. In my final year I did a personal design project for Paul Smith and we had a project set by the

London director James Courtenay has been

My dyeing also came round due to my budget, I always wanted to use digital

Who do you envisage wearing your clothes? My target customer is someone who appreciates independent designers and who seeks for the new, rather than the Rihanna to wear my clothes I feel she (or who is ever behind her styling team) afraid to show true personality and style. What’s the best piece of advice you have been given? To be a yes man… (Woman).

I have never worked so hard and had so much fun in my life.

Videographer: James Courtenay

I have many people around me who are talented and have worked hard for their

me to become who I am today. His constant hard work in his own field has shown me that dreaming big and believing in who you are will take to you to where you want to be.

“...if your not 100%%involved and 100% hungry you will get eaten up!..” Issue1/63

Issue1/64


What made you decide to move to New York? What’s next for you and your brand?

modern take on an ancient technique. Her diffusion line named - “Lucy Halley Boy” We caught up with her to hear what she had to say.

It was a wonderful experience, but definitely not for the faint hearted, if your not 100% involved and 100% hungry you will get eaten up! So yes uni was worth it.

Tell us a bit about you: I am originally from a small town in Wales near Cardiff. I then studied in Bristol for a on to specialise in fashion. Fashion became the obvious choice, it combined my love of art, drawing and 3d design.

it taught me about dyeing fabric which has now become my style. I was always more interested in working on my own

a BA hons at Kingston University in London.

create my diffusion line. I didn’t want the press that I received at Graduate Fashion week to just disappear and I just couldn’t stop designing even if I tried! So I created my diffusion line – Lucie Halley Boy – this unisex line consists of bespoke hand dyed pieces in clean and easy

source a fabric sponsorship from a high-end design house in London. This was amazing it allowed me to be able to produce the

and unique. Since launching the line, I have had a wonderful response from people in the fashion industry and built up a strong cliental.

afford it. So I decided to use the dyeing which I had been playing around with but never imagined it would be good enough to compete with digital prints. However, once the fabrics had been cut out my dyeing came to life and my style was born.

I moved over bringing my diffusion line with me. New York is a great place to meet people and network, since moving over the label has gone from strength to strength and we have new fans such as Shaun Ross who is now wearing it adding New Yorkers to our Lucie Halley Boys. The LH Boy word is spreading and I am looking forward to seeing what New York will hold for my brand. This year I am hoping to bring the line into the my designs into stores. I hope to expand the line as a designer.

Do you think uni helped you and was it worth it? How does it compare to the experiences you have had with internships/placements?

my print techniques, that for me has been more helpful then any internship.

Kingston was great I like to think of it as military school for fashion. I came out if there as a complete workaholic. I would work to the bone, but I love what I do so it was easy to push on through the really hard and stressful

I am inspired by people who do. People who create, who don’t follow, who

In our second year we were given design projects from companies such as Banana Republic. This gave us a really strong understanding of ‘the client’ and their needs. In my final year I did a personal design project for Paul Smith and we had a project set by the

London director James Courtenay has been

My dyeing also came round due to my budget, I always wanted to use digital

Who do you envisage wearing your clothes? My target customer is someone who appreciates independent designers and who seeks for the new, rather than the Rihanna to wear my clothes I feel she (or who is ever behind her styling team) afraid to show true personality and style. What’s the best piece of advice you have been given? To be a yes man… (Woman).

I have never worked so hard and had so much fun in my life.

Videographer: James Courtenay

I have many people around me who are talented and have worked hard for their

me to become who I am today. His constant hard work in his own field has shown me that dreaming big and believing in who you are will take to you to where you want to be.

“...if your not 100%%involved and 100% hungry you will get eaten up!..” Issue1/63

Issue1/64


own business? From my experience, there are many people who study fashion as the ‘cool’ thing to do. It is hard and you have to be prepared to allow it to take over your life for the next three years. You have to be hungry enough and if you are then it will be the best thing you will do. I was once told that you could only make it in fashion if you are born into, or marry into money. I believe that anyone from any financial background can become who they want to be if they are hungry enough. My advice is don’t let anyone tell you you cant. And if they do, use it as fuel. Also to any of my fellow dyslexics out there - dyslexia is not a disability it is simply a different way of thinking. What would be your plan B career?

Stills of Lucie Halley from her video Videographer: James Courtenay

“......dyslexia is not a disability it is simply a different way of thinking...” Issue1/65

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own business? From my experience, there are many people who study fashion as the ‘cool’ thing to do. It is hard and you have to be prepared to allow it to take over your life for the next three years. You have to be hungry enough and if you are then it will be the best thing you will do. I was once told that you could only make it in fashion if you are born into, or marry into money. I believe that anyone from any financial background can become who they want to be if they are hungry enough. My advice is don’t let anyone tell you you cant. And if they do, use it as fuel. Also to any of my fellow dyslexics out there - dyslexia is not a disability it is simply a different way of thinking. What would be your plan B career?

Stills of Lucie Halley from her video Videographer: James Courtenay

“......dyslexia is not a disability it is simply a different way of thinking...” Issue1/65

Issue1/66


Video

Photographer: Mark Witney Model: Chelsea Baird hair and make up: holly davies

Dress: Katie darlington necklace: jade mellor


Video

Photographer: Mark Witney Model: Chelsea Baird hair and make up: holly davies

Dress: Katie darlington necklace: jade mellor


Issue1/69 suit: katie darlington, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: joanne stoker

Dress: katie darlington, jewellery: jade mellor

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Issue1/69 suit: katie darlington, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: joanne stoker

Dress: katie darlington, jewellery: jade mellor

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Video

Top, cardigan and skirt: All Jody shafton, Jewellery: jade mellor


Video

Top, cardigan and skirt: All Jody shafton, Jewellery: jade mellor


dress: Jody shafton, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: Joanne Stoker

Top, caridgan and skirt: all Jody shafton, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: Joanne Stoker

Video

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dress: Jody shafton, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: Joanne Stoker

Top, caridgan and skirt: all Jody shafton, jewellery: jade mellor, Shoes: Joanne Stoker

Video

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An interview with jewllery designer

inspire you?

Jade Mellor

A: Sculpture is also a huge

Q: Tell us a bit about you

Henry Moore and the solid “spaces” of Rachel Whiteread and the beliefs of the Neo-

A: I’m from a family of makers born in the Cheshire countryside; my dad is a joiner, he converted a Victorian chapel into the family home and he and my mum grew up in the 60s where she would make her own dresses so she could choose her fabric (some of which are now treasured items of my wardrobe!). We had a lot of objects in the house made by various members of the family, I feel very lucky to have the resources of their knowledge.

and organic. Q: Who do you envisage wearing your jewellery? Who’s the customer?

Q: Do you think uni helped you, was it worth it?

A: I make my work as an expression of the research I do, but I hope that it appeals to other lovers of

A: I found university quite difficult. While I was there I suffered a back injury and it meant

discovering it. By making wearable objects that can be included in fashion, I also hope it may spark an interest in science and history, to delve deeper than the aesthetics of consumer fashion and look

so I made my own customised workshop in my student bedroom. Unfortunately, because of this need for a low workspace I didn’t really get to spend much

themselves. Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying

Most recently I have been working in a studio in the heart of Manchester so I am really be able to get an opinion or advice from those in different areas of art and design and learn from their experiences.

‘work with the materials and strengths you have.’

A: By researching processes in nature and learning WHY things are the way they are influences my work a lot as I’m not designing for manufacture elsewhere by another person, I am making it all from start to finish and the structure of minerals really interests me and I form my pieces in similar ways but

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A: By making a start you can always change it and at least you will have learned something. I would get them to think about what they like best about what they do and what they would want to be doing every day. You might like a certain aspect but you have to think about the whole package as you will be doing every role, unless you can team up with someone or delegate to an employee. Basically it comes down to: work out what you want first and then you can

‘doing something for your income is very different to being creative for your own pleasure.’ You can find out more and buy Jade’s www.jademellor.com

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An interview with jewllery designer

inspire you?

Jade Mellor

A: Sculpture is also a huge

Q: Tell us a bit about you

Henry Moore and the solid “spaces” of Rachel Whiteread and the beliefs of the Neo-

A: I’m from a family of makers born in the Cheshire countryside; my dad is a joiner, he converted a Victorian chapel into the family home and he and my mum grew up in the 60s where she would make her own dresses so she could choose her fabric (some of which are now treasured items of my wardrobe!). We had a lot of objects in the house made by various members of the family, I feel very lucky to have the resources of their knowledge.

and organic. Q: Who do you envisage wearing your jewellery? Who’s the customer?

Q: Do you think uni helped you, was it worth it?

A: I make my work as an expression of the research I do, but I hope that it appeals to other lovers of

A: I found university quite difficult. While I was there I suffered a back injury and it meant

discovering it. By making wearable objects that can be included in fashion, I also hope it may spark an interest in science and history, to delve deeper than the aesthetics of consumer fashion and look

so I made my own customised workshop in my student bedroom. Unfortunately, because of this need for a low workspace I didn’t really get to spend much

themselves. Q: What advice would you give others thinking about studying

Most recently I have been working in a studio in the heart of Manchester so I am really be able to get an opinion or advice from those in different areas of art and design and learn from their experiences.

‘work with the materials and strengths you have.’

A: By researching processes in nature and learning WHY things are the way they are influences my work a lot as I’m not designing for manufacture elsewhere by another person, I am making it all from start to finish and the structure of minerals really interests me and I form my pieces in similar ways but

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A: By making a start you can always change it and at least you will have learned something. I would get them to think about what they like best about what they do and what they would want to be doing every day. You might like a certain aspect but you have to think about the whole package as you will be doing every role, unless you can team up with someone or delegate to an employee. Basically it comes down to: work out what you want first and then you can

‘doing something for your income is very different to being creative for your own pleasure.’ You can find out more and buy Jade’s www.jademellor.com

Issue1/76


Do you favourite materials? I like working with a tannery in Italy called Bazaro which user laser cut leathers and unusual prints. I really like the horsehair too A girl can never have enough shoes; room full of Joanne Stokers best pieces. We caught up with talented shoe designer

favourite of mine! Embellishment inspires me more than print, I also love to emboss and laser cut.

fashion shoot. Joanne has a love for architectural shapes and covering them with a mixture of materials. It was that favourite designs as his work is quite graphic

You did a BA in fashion and then a MA in shoes, why did you move from fashion to shoes?

intern, which was more embroidery and was a bit crazy for clothing and I always had an interest in shoes but thought maybe they were too specialised? So I moved to London and worked for Tom Cody then decided to apply for an MA as well as working where I did a lot of model making. So I kind of combined the two, I like mixing materials so I started making shoes with architectural surface design on the uppers.

season. We are quite good friends so we just developed into working together. You have been mentored by Jimmy Choo. Has he given you some wise words and do you have any advice for others? Jimmy just said be careful with your business, get someone to overlook and double check things. I would just say there is a lot to learn about having your own business, when you factories, dealing with PR, building contacts with press etc and things in fashion are unexpected; you kind of have to go with it! Tell us what’s next? I have a design job for a big brand in America but it’s a bit of a secret so I can’t tell you yet. Watch this space.

What designers inspire you? I’ve always loved Prada shoes but art and architecture inspire me too. I do love Mary Katrantzou prints and I also love Peter

Joanne Stoker

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Do you favourite materials? I like working with a tannery in Italy called Bazaro which user laser cut leathers and unusual prints. I really like the horsehair too A girl can never have enough shoes; room full of Joanne Stokers best pieces. We caught up with talented shoe designer

favourite of mine! Embellishment inspires me more than print, I also love to emboss and laser cut.

fashion shoot. Joanne has a love for architectural shapes and covering them with a mixture of materials. It was that favourite designs as his work is quite graphic

You did a BA in fashion and then a MA in shoes, why did you move from fashion to shoes?

intern, which was more embroidery and was a bit crazy for clothing and I always had an interest in shoes but thought maybe they were too specialised? So I moved to London and worked for Tom Cody then decided to apply for an MA as well as working where I did a lot of model making. So I kind of combined the two, I like mixing materials so I started making shoes with architectural surface design on the uppers.

season. We are quite good friends so we just developed into working together. You have been mentored by Jimmy Choo. Has he given you some wise words and do you have any advice for others? Jimmy just said be careful with your business, get someone to overlook and double check things. I would just say there is a lot to learn about having your own business, when you factories, dealing with PR, building contacts with press etc and things in fashion are unexpected; you kind of have to go with it! Tell us what’s next? I have a design job for a big brand in America but it’s a bit of a secret so I can’t tell you yet. Watch this space.

What designers inspire you? I’ve always loved Prada shoes but art and architecture inspire me too. I do love Mary Katrantzou prints and I also love Peter

Joanne Stoker

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An interview with designer

katie darlington

develop it? was inspired by a photographic journal kept by my great grandfather during WWII in North Africa and Italy. The journal starts off as an official

and to keep things inspired me to design pieces of diffusing black ink. I began to bleed different coloured inks on to small samples; these were then blown up and digitally printed on to fabric. There are

Q: Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Where did you study? A: I'm a womenswear fashion designer and proprietor of KATIE DARLINGTON. I studied Fashion BA (Hons) at Kingston University London and graduated this year when I also won the Wolf & Badger Graduate Design Award for Fashion Design where I am now stocked. I had originally accepted a place at University to Study Law and Social Policy before dropping

‘go for it because in the current economic climate there's not much to loose.’ Q: What is next for you and the brand? Tell us high street. of printed shirts for A/W 13/14. The main focus now

successful in business.

‘if you don’t build your dream someone else will hire you to build theirs.’ Q: Do you think uni helped you, was it worth it? A: For me University has been completely invaluable but I guess it all depends on the

be manufactured in house, all of the garments are manufactured in Britain and high importance is placed on quality and longevity. Q: What advice would you give others thinking business?

2nd and 3rd year projects are live and linked with companies ranging from Banana Republic

A: Fashion is an amazing, challenging and inspiring

work with it, it's harder to learn that in industry when you're working with someone else's vision. Internships can be incredibly important, I've interned for TOAST and Fashion Scout not enough to prepare you for industry especially in terms of design. www.wolfandbadger.com

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An interview with designer

katie darlington

develop it? was inspired by a photographic journal kept by my great grandfather during WWII in North Africa and Italy. The journal starts off as an official

and to keep things inspired me to design pieces of diffusing black ink. I began to bleed different coloured inks on to small samples; these were then blown up and digitally printed on to fabric. There are

Q: Tell us a bit about you; where do you come from? Where did you study? A: I'm a womenswear fashion designer and proprietor of KATIE DARLINGTON. I studied Fashion BA (Hons) at Kingston University London and graduated this year when I also won the Wolf & Badger Graduate Design Award for Fashion Design where I am now stocked. I had originally accepted a place at University to Study Law and Social Policy before dropping

‘go for it because in the current economic climate there's not much to loose.’ Q: What is next for you and the brand? Tell us high street. of printed shirts for A/W 13/14. The main focus now

successful in business.

‘if you don’t build your dream someone else will hire you to build theirs.’ Q: Do you think uni helped you, was it worth it? A: For me University has been completely invaluable but I guess it all depends on the

be manufactured in house, all of the garments are manufactured in Britain and high importance is placed on quality and longevity. Q: What advice would you give others thinking business?

2nd and 3rd year projects are live and linked with companies ranging from Banana Republic

A: Fashion is an amazing, challenging and inspiring

work with it, it's harder to learn that in industry when you're working with someone else's vision. Internships can be incredibly important, I've interned for TOAST and Fashion Scout not enough to prepare you for industry especially in terms of design. www.wolfandbadger.com

Issue1/79

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Shop Review

BeExposed have been on the prowl trying to rest. Not necessarily being the worlds best couture

Their business went from strength to strength and saw the opening of their proud flagship store on Dover

46 Ledbury Road London W11 2AB retail” business – Wolf & Badger. Co-founders and brothers Henry and George Graham who had come from backgrounds in when they realised they could offer fully serviced retail space to new designers for over a month for the same price as a weekend stall at Portobello Market (light bulb moment). We are proud to congratulate one of BeExis currently stocked in Wolf & Badger but what also appealed to us about this store was that it shared the exact same mind set as us which is to help emerging designers. In their case they help new designers by

Vogue and dubbed “The Lab” was so oversubscribed the brothers decided to make their mark down one of London’s famous streets for avant-garde fashion. Wolf & Badger have now been selected as luxury retail partner for The Savoy Hotel. The Graham brothers are going from strength to strength and we are excited to see what’s up their sleeves for 2014!

and pay a retainer in return for 90% of their sales. They also can benefit by the use of varimerchandising and retail advice, press and mar-

Mayfair 32 Dover Street London W1S 4NE

burgeoning luxury brands. All in all a brilliant package for new designers!

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Shop Review

BeExposed have been on the prowl trying to rest. Not necessarily being the worlds best couture

Their business went from strength to strength and saw the opening of their proud flagship store on Dover

46 Ledbury Road London W11 2AB retail” business – Wolf & Badger. Co-founders and brothers Henry and George Graham who had come from backgrounds in when they realised they could offer fully serviced retail space to new designers for over a month for the same price as a weekend stall at Portobello Market (light bulb moment). We are proud to congratulate one of BeExis currently stocked in Wolf & Badger but what also appealed to us about this store was that it shared the exact same mind set as us which is to help emerging designers. In their case they help new designers by

Vogue and dubbed “The Lab” was so oversubscribed the brothers decided to make their mark down one of London’s famous streets for avant-garde fashion. Wolf & Badger have now been selected as luxury retail partner for The Savoy Hotel. The Graham brothers are going from strength to strength and we are excited to see what’s up their sleeves for 2014!

and pay a retainer in return for 90% of their sales. They also can benefit by the use of varimerchandising and retail advice, press and mar-

Mayfair 32 Dover Street London W1S 4NE

burgeoning luxury brands. All in all a brilliant package for new designers!

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M

OD E RN E OM ET R Y

Photographer: Mark Witney Models: Ashton/AmCK models Lucinda sinclair Hair and Makeup: Holly davies

Stripe suit: Joanna Pybus, Shoes: julian hakes top: joanna pybus, trousers: alexander antoniou, jewellery: bwoy wonder

G


M

OD E RN E OM ET R Y

Photographer: Mark Witney Models: Ashton/AmCK models Lucinda sinclair Hair and Makeup: Holly davies

Stripe suit: Joanna Pybus, Shoes: julian hakes top: joanna pybus, trousers: alexander antoniou, jewellery: bwoy wonder

G


Suit: Joanna pybus

top: Joanna pybus, trousers: alexander antoniou, Jewellery: Bwoy wonder

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Suit: Joanna pybus

top: Joanna pybus, trousers: alexander antoniou, Jewellery: Bwoy wonder

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Ashton wears: Jacket and bag: Alice oluyitan, longjohns and vest: amanda salway, trainers: Nike Lucinda wears: dress: alice oluyitan, shoes: julian hakes

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Ashton wears: Jacket and bag: Alice oluyitan, longjohns and vest: amanda salway, trainers: Nike Lucinda wears: dress: alice oluyitan, shoes: julian hakes

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Ashton wears: Jumper: Alexander Antoniou, trousers: Nicola Froud, Trainers: Nike Lucinda wears: chiffon zip through: nicola froud, body: stylists own, trainers:nike

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Ashton wears: Jumper: Alexander Antoniou, trousers: Nicola Froud, Trainers: Nike Lucinda wears: chiffon zip through: nicola froud, body: stylists own, trainers:nike

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Q: Which designers inspire you?

we asked some of the talented designers featured in modern geometry to tell us a bit more about them and their amazing work.

A: I absolutely love the crocheted textures used by Johan Ku, I was really inspired by him during my third year at DMU. Naturally I find Mark Fasts work amazing but who doesn’t? The technicality of his work and the figure hugging intricate knit is just amazing. It may sound silly, but my favourite knits are usually the jumpers and cardigans that you dig out of a basket in a charity or vintage shop. There’s something about

Paul Allimadi aka Bwoy Wonder www.lyrics4lyrics.co.uk

Will.I.Am wears jewellery by Bwoy Wonder and Paul wearing his own designs

Nicola Froud

Some of Nicola’s graduate collection

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about

‘don’t speak about it, be about it!’.

and what has inspired you recently?

www.artsthread.com/nicolafroud A: Be prepared to work long hours but all the hard work pays off! When you look at your final pieces and realise that you created that yourself, it’s the best feeling!

A: It was really a love of all things retro and especially 80's, video games included. Q: What is it about Lego that's so appealing for you to work with?

‘I was going for a colourful, chav chic’

Which are you favourite pieces and why? A: I began looking into school uniforms and typically girly stuff, pastel colours, frills, scallop hems, chiffon,

.

styling came from. I was inspired by vintage woolly cardigans for my cable textures and sportswear for the 'colourful, chav chic!' Q: Who do you envisage wearing your clothes; who’s the customer?

help to set you up for employment but I guess in a way, you are no longer a student and are let out into the real world to fend for yourself. I personally took the ethos of 'go out and get it yourself' and many have Q: Where can we find your pieces - do you stock in many shops? A: Year Zero in London, BYN in LA & Wut Berlin in Tokyo

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Q: Which designers inspire you?

we asked some of the talented designers featured in modern geometry to tell us a bit more about them and their amazing work.

A: I absolutely love the crocheted textures used by Johan Ku, I was really inspired by him during my third year at DMU. Naturally I find Mark Fasts work amazing but who doesn’t? The technicality of his work and the figure hugging intricate knit is just amazing. It may sound silly, but my favourite knits are usually the jumpers and cardigans that you dig out of a basket in a charity or vintage shop. There’s something about

Paul Allimadi aka Bwoy Wonder www.lyrics4lyrics.co.uk

Will.I.Am wears jewellery by Bwoy Wonder and Paul wearing his own designs

Nicola Froud

Some of Nicola’s graduate collection

Q: What advice would you give others thinking about

‘don’t speak about it, be about it!’.

and what has inspired you recently?

www.artsthread.com/nicolafroud A: Be prepared to work long hours but all the hard work pays off! When you look at your final pieces and realise that you created that yourself, it’s the best feeling!

A: It was really a love of all things retro and especially 80's, video games included. Q: What is it about Lego that's so appealing for you to work with?

‘I was going for a colourful, chav chic’

Which are you favourite pieces and why? A: I began looking into school uniforms and typically girly stuff, pastel colours, frills, scallop hems, chiffon,

.

styling came from. I was inspired by vintage woolly cardigans for my cable textures and sportswear for the 'colourful, chav chic!' Q: Who do you envisage wearing your clothes; who’s the customer?

help to set you up for employment but I guess in a way, you are no longer a student and are let out into the real world to fend for yourself. I personally took the ethos of 'go out and get it yourself' and many have Q: Where can we find your pieces - do you stock in many shops? A: Year Zero in London, BYN in LA & Wut Berlin in Tokyo

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Disclosure – White Noise Macklemore & Ryan Lewis - 'Can't Hold Us' Paramore - Now Micatone – Handbrake The Knife - Hearbeats Grimes - Genesis Passenger – The Wrong Direction Neon Indian – Deadbeat Summer MNEK - WHite Noise cover

DESIGNERS PLAYLIST We asked the designers from this issue to tell us which music inspires them to get creative. Have a listen to the music they chose and see if it inspires you?

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Disclosure – White Noise Macklemore & Ryan Lewis - 'Can't Hold Us' Paramore - Now Micatone – Handbrake The Knife - Hearbeats Grimes - Genesis Passenger – The Wrong Direction Neon Indian – Deadbeat Summer MNEK - WHite Noise cover

DESIGNERS PLAYLIST We asked the designers from this issue to tell us which music inspires them to get creative. Have a listen to the music they chose and see if it inspires you?

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What do you think helped more? Internships or uni? I think they are equal because uni gave me a great set of skills but internships has learnt at uni, they have real world

Q&A with up and coming, colour popping, shape throwing fashion designer Joanna Pybus.

might not be right for everyone but I think course was really fun and one of my mental and then it got a bit more refined at uni which is good if you are self Tell us about Bengt, you have been on there for two seasons now, how has it helped you progress? had commented that mine was their favourite business cards and then we had a It’s a move on from my post modernism been really good and introduce things to bloggers and media. I think their slogan is ‘keeping a close ear to the ground’ and they have a really diverse range of new designers.

Tell us about your last 5 years. worked with Giles which was really helpful London Fashion week and have a big following works. However, my internship

What is a typical day in the life of JP? Well I usually try to get out of bed; I’m a bit of a night owl. I usually plan my day the night before; my days usually involve sewing a lot of furry bags. Or doing errands, picking up fabric etc and a lot of emailing! A general day kind of involves everything and it’s a long day. I’m fine as long as I have a cup of tea!

experience because although it’s a smaller scale and its accessories it was skills based and helps to keep my skills sharp. I didn’t realise how out of touch you can easily

has given me transferable skills. Also from

hadn’t finished with post modernism yet and it had longevity so I could move it on. 80’s and this one is a bit more 90’s. I’ve also looked at home ‘how to’ books from the 90’s, which are really tacky, but I think they’re really funny. Me and my brother always say ‘that is so po mo’ in reference to

fun way. I don’t see myself as a designer who designers clothes but more like a furniture designer. I decide the shape first, its elements and shapes like building blocks being put together. Who wears it?

placements also gave me a great list of suppliers for industry, which is great to have for my own business.

Monster Clutch Bags

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There are three girls I would really love to wear it; Brooke Candy, Grimes and Azelia Banks!

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What do you think helped more? Internships or uni? I think they are equal because uni gave me a great set of skills but internships has learnt at uni, they have real world

Q&A with up and coming, colour popping, shape throwing fashion designer Joanna Pybus.

might not be right for everyone but I think course was really fun and one of my mental and then it got a bit more refined at uni which is good if you are self Tell us about Bengt, you have been on there for two seasons now, how has it helped you progress? had commented that mine was their favourite business cards and then we had a It’s a move on from my post modernism been really good and introduce things to bloggers and media. I think their slogan is ‘keeping a close ear to the ground’ and they have a really diverse range of new designers.

Tell us about your last 5 years. worked with Giles which was really helpful London Fashion week and have a big following works. However, my internship

What is a typical day in the life of JP? Well I usually try to get out of bed; I’m a bit of a night owl. I usually plan my day the night before; my days usually involve sewing a lot of furry bags. Or doing errands, picking up fabric etc and a lot of emailing! A general day kind of involves everything and it’s a long day. I’m fine as long as I have a cup of tea!

experience because although it’s a smaller scale and its accessories it was skills based and helps to keep my skills sharp. I didn’t realise how out of touch you can easily

has given me transferable skills. Also from

hadn’t finished with post modernism yet and it had longevity so I could move it on. 80’s and this one is a bit more 90’s. I’ve also looked at home ‘how to’ books from the 90’s, which are really tacky, but I think they’re really funny. Me and my brother always say ‘that is so po mo’ in reference to

fun way. I don’t see myself as a designer who designers clothes but more like a furniture designer. I decide the shape first, its elements and shapes like building blocks being put together. Who wears it?

placements also gave me a great list of suppliers for industry, which is great to have for my own business.

Monster Clutch Bags

Issue1/97

There are three girls I would really love to wear it; Brooke Candy, Grimes and Azelia Banks!

Issue1/98


Vibrant, fun and energised describes Omar’s artwork as well as his personality. Eccentric O is skilled with many mediums but his airbrushing has been the focus for customising garments and kicks of various performers. “Got to Dance” winners Chris

“..Network your bum off and try learning from the best..” for being fun, brightly coloured and references to popular figures.

with semi finalist Chuck, have all worn the threads stamped with Omars iconic owns a pieces of O’s. So what’s next for this big talent? 2013 is solely dedicated to exploring and pushing his artwork. Expect to see a series of murals in the streets of London and some new and engaging projects. EO apparel will be making a return next year with a bang so keep up to date by subscribing to eccentric-o.com or follow his

Who is your idol? I don't really have one as I never look to idolize an individual but more learn from them.

media and technique?

figures, all for different reasons stemming

I'm open to everything around me and this is the elemental

Among them are Steve Jobs, Leonardo Da Vinci, Alphonse Mucha, Robert De Niro, Will Smith, and the list goes on.

work are inspired by my obsession with symbols, colour and intricate visuals from my cultural heritage. My focus on South Asian experimental techniques with Other ingredients added on to my journey through culture concepts based on anthropological topics. What has inspired you recently?

Omar Ahmed AKA - Eccentric O

Too many things including my stack of extensive scribbles and doodles based on my thoughts. which recently took place at the biographies I'm reading. I'm a big fan biographies, which in turn triggered the beginnings 'EO Portrait Series' that explores to popular and/or unpopular figures.

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Vibrant, fun and energised describes Omar’s artwork as well as his personality. Eccentric O is skilled with many mediums but his airbrushing has been the focus for customising garments and kicks of various performers. “Got to Dance” winners Chris

“..Network your bum off and try learning from the best..” for being fun, brightly coloured and references to popular figures.

with semi finalist Chuck, have all worn the threads stamped with Omars iconic owns a pieces of O’s. So what’s next for this big talent? 2013 is solely dedicated to exploring and pushing his artwork. Expect to see a series of murals in the streets of London and some new and engaging projects. EO apparel will be making a return next year with a bang so keep up to date by subscribing to eccentric-o.com or follow his

Who is your idol? I don't really have one as I never look to idolize an individual but more learn from them.

media and technique?

figures, all for different reasons stemming

I'm open to everything around me and this is the elemental

Among them are Steve Jobs, Leonardo Da Vinci, Alphonse Mucha, Robert De Niro, Will Smith, and the list goes on.

work are inspired by my obsession with symbols, colour and intricate visuals from my cultural heritage. My focus on South Asian experimental techniques with Other ingredients added on to my journey through culture concepts based on anthropological topics. What has inspired you recently?

Omar Ahmed AKA - Eccentric O

Too many things including my stack of extensive scribbles and doodles based on my thoughts. which recently took place at the biographies I'm reading. I'm a big fan biographies, which in turn triggered the beginnings 'EO Portrait Series' that explores to popular and/or unpopular figures.

Issue1/99

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Artwork comissioned by BeExposed


Artwork comissioned by BeExposed


ted to a total of 100 www.eccentricogallery.com

how well has it prepared you for the working world? What steps did you take to get to where you are now? more about business, real life experience and actually making money from freelancing that I decided to hand in my leave papers. This was revoked two need uni to do what I wanted to. However deciding to stay turned out to be person. You don't need university for certain subjects or the route to success but that's not to say it won't benefit you. Everything that took place during my playing a big part in what I'm doing now as I met people from all over the world. I filtered thoughts on which to explore, developed independence as I living alone and had random adventures. These created

Who is a typical Eccentric O consumer? I'm privileged enough to have a wide range of customers as my line of art projects merges between different on what I create. For apparel it can be a self-exploring student who has an

Where can we find your pieces for sale? on the online shop (eccentricogallery.com), which was set up to provide my online audience and prints and selected one off pieces. A few notes of advice:

artwork, this is more popular between young and mature adults from varied to personal preference and if the to the individual for its shear visual beauty.

Maximise your presence online without it

“..Only you know what you are capable of. No one else...” EO

and I always had the support network if I needed it. It was also how Eccentric-O was born. I would say it was worth it as it was my own journey that I took advantage of. It comes down to the individual and if their willing to maximise the opportunity. If you go uni to study, you will study but if you go uni to explore, you'll find yourself in the making. Some people won't need it, but for needed to ignite the fire.

your work ready at hand for an unexpected networking spots. Don't be afraid to ask

have been your plan B career path?

Whats your favourite ice cream?

on and off canvas.

Tough call! - Probably between Mint Choc Chip or Classic Cookies and Cream. 0 www.eccentricogallery.com

Issue1/103

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ted to a total of 100 www.eccentricogallery.com

how well has it prepared you for the working world? What steps did you take to get to where you are now? more about business, real life experience and actually making money from freelancing that I decided to hand in my leave papers. This was revoked two need uni to do what I wanted to. However deciding to stay turned out to be person. You don't need university for certain subjects or the route to success but that's not to say it won't benefit you. Everything that took place during my playing a big part in what I'm doing now as I met people from all over the world. I filtered thoughts on which to explore, developed independence as I living alone and had random adventures. These created

Who is a typical Eccentric O consumer? I'm privileged enough to have a wide range of customers as my line of art projects merges between different on what I create. For apparel it can be a self-exploring student who has an

Where can we find your pieces for sale? on the online shop (eccentricogallery.com), which was set up to provide my online audience and prints and selected one off pieces. A few notes of advice:

artwork, this is more popular between young and mature adults from varied to personal preference and if the to the individual for its shear visual beauty.

Maximise your presence online without it

“..Only you know what you are capable of. No one else...” EO

and I always had the support network if I needed it. It was also how Eccentric-O was born. I would say it was worth it as it was my own journey that I took advantage of. It comes down to the individual and if their willing to maximise the opportunity. If you go uni to study, you will study but if you go uni to explore, you'll find yourself in the making. Some people won't need it, but for needed to ignite the fire.

your work ready at hand for an unexpected networking spots. Don't be afraid to ask

have been your plan B career path?

Whats your favourite ice cream?

on and off canvas.

Tough call! - Probably between Mint Choc Chip or Classic Cookies and Cream. 0 www.eccentricogallery.com

Issue1/103

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A few things I picked up over the years: First and foremost set a sight on your end goal - breakdown how you need to

and breaks boundaries. Network your bum off and try learning from the best. Expose your work to whoever is around, you never know is around the corner.

Photograph: Omar Ahmed

plan to see it fit, don't be ignorant to the results or feedback. Try not to complicate things. When things get really hard don't give up.... really don't give up. Be nice and stay humble.

What are you listening to right now? Currently exploring Mozart's and Beethoven's classics.

The Fresh Print of Motivation' By Eccentric-O Giclée Print on 310gsm Hahnemuehle German Etching Paper. (594mm x 420mm £60.00 -www.eccentricogallery.com

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A few things I picked up over the years: First and foremost set a sight on your end goal - breakdown how you need to

and breaks boundaries. Network your bum off and try learning from the best. Expose your work to whoever is around, you never know is around the corner.

Photograph: Omar Ahmed

plan to see it fit, don't be ignorant to the results or feedback. Try not to complicate things. When things get really hard don't give up.... really don't give up. Be nice and stay humble.

What are you listening to right now? Currently exploring Mozart's and Beethoven's classics.

The Fresh Print of Motivation' By Eccentric-O Giclée Print on 310gsm Hahnemuehle German Etching Paper. (594mm x 420mm £60.00 -www.eccentricogallery.com

Issue1/105

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So you have been a graphic designer for around 9 years now. What spurred the switch to children’s wear? Well I've always been style consciousness and into fashion since I was a kid them seemed a logical step for me! Plus not being able to find cool enough threads for kids was annoying.

You are now stocked in Selfridges (amazing) where

We can also be found online through our website, Amazon.co.uk and Felix & lilly's. We have a few more in the pipeline for SS14 so watch this space Finish this sentence.. Children have...... Like my nephew who told me to behave this morning for stealing one of his

fact that kids SHOULD be as cool as their parents on our city streets. baby “swag” for Mamas and Papas then give this fun brand a look. BoxPark shop launch on June 17th, BeExposed caught up with VK on a sunny day in Shoreditch to talk

pi

Harper Seven Apart from the exposure it would bring for us she's adorable and I know her parents would definitely

e

Monster’s Baby! also stock a array of

Priceless!

. .Th

BeExposed are excited to welcome “Monster’s Baby!” to London, the new cool kids/baby wear brand. Illustrated with cartoon prints designed by co- founder “VK” along with “Igor Bozovic” who are both previous winners of D&AD award.

If you could dress one famous baby who would this be?

tt

er

y n i t k i f c o ks. . r p a t te

Monster's Baby! has such a strong personality and style. Where do you

childhood and watching all those Pink Panther and Peter Sellers movies! I loved the look of the movie posters of typography you would see regularly. cheeky like me too, and using the bright

Twitter: monstersbabyltd Instagram: monstersbabyltd & vk_monster Facebook: Monsters Baby

design roots.

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So you have been a graphic designer for around 9 years now. What spurred the switch to children’s wear? Well I've always been style consciousness and into fashion since I was a kid them seemed a logical step for me! Plus not being able to find cool enough threads for kids was annoying.

You are now stocked in Selfridges (amazing) where

We can also be found online through our website, Amazon.co.uk and Felix & lilly's. We have a few more in the pipeline for SS14 so watch this space Finish this sentence.. Children have...... Like my nephew who told me to behave this morning for stealing one of his

fact that kids SHOULD be as cool as their parents on our city streets. baby “swag” for Mamas and Papas then give this fun brand a look. BoxPark shop launch on June 17th, BeExposed caught up with VK on a sunny day in Shoreditch to talk

pi

Harper Seven Apart from the exposure it would bring for us she's adorable and I know her parents would definitely

e

Monster’s Baby! also stock a array of

Priceless!

. .Th

BeExposed are excited to welcome “Monster’s Baby!” to London, the new cool kids/baby wear brand. Illustrated with cartoon prints designed by co- founder “VK” along with “Igor Bozovic” who are both previous winners of D&AD award.

If you could dress one famous baby who would this be?

tt

er

y n i t k i f c o ks. . r p a t te

Monster's Baby! has such a strong personality and style. Where do you

childhood and watching all those Pink Panther and Peter Sellers movies! I loved the look of the movie posters of typography you would see regularly. cheeky like me too, and using the bright

Twitter: monstersbabyltd Instagram: monstersbabyltd & vk_monster Facebook: Monsters Baby

design roots.

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What is the future for Monster's Baby!? We are working on a Ronzo for SS14 which is amongst the kiddies and style conscious parent alike. Obviously our aim is to grow further to maybe expand across certain waters and generally promote awareness of the brand. If you could give one piece of advice to a clothing start up company what would it be?

We are asking whether or not degrees are worth

Think about who you market is, do the research but most importantly believe in what you're doing and trying to create. Seek advice From as many industry experts as you can but remember that

views on this and have you had to take unpaid work experience in the past?

Or if learning on the job/

Studying for a degree in a uni enviroment did me no harm. I had some great

your journey and your life!

I'd say it was totally worth it. I met some great people, collaborated and won a D&AD award with a friend I met there and also learnt a lot from some great tutors! Having said that if one has the talent and works hard I'm

http://www.monstersbaby.co.uk

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What is the future for Monster's Baby!? We are working on a Ronzo for SS14 which is amongst the kiddies and style conscious parent alike. Obviously our aim is to grow further to maybe expand across certain waters and generally promote awareness of the brand. If you could give one piece of advice to a clothing start up company what would it be?

We are asking whether or not degrees are worth

Think about who you market is, do the research but most importantly believe in what you're doing and trying to create. Seek advice From as many industry experts as you can but remember that

views on this and have you had to take unpaid work experience in the past?

Or if learning on the job/

Studying for a degree in a uni enviroment did me no harm. I had some great

your journey and your life!

I'd say it was totally worth it. I met some great people, collaborated and won a D&AD award with a friend I met there and also learnt a lot from some great tutors! Having said that if one has the talent and works hard I'm

http://www.monstersbaby.co.uk

Issue1/109

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Jonny Erazo

Give us an insight into a typical day in the office for the social media manager of New Era, what you love about it?

New Era :

Day to day I work within the PR department, based in our Shoreditch showroom and occasionally travel to our European HQ. As the go-to person for social media, I manage content for our social media channels across Europe, Middle East and Africa. I also nurture our

Social Media Manager

seeding and keeping online tastemakers up to speed with the latest news. I connect with many different people on a day-to-day basis – from the North American team, to accounts, Flagship stores and for larger projects I also work with agencies.

Social Media plays a huge

role in reshaping the strategic

of brands in this digital age. brands connect with consumers and can almost make or break a brand in such As an individual it is a useful tool to network amongst like-minded people, hear and generally keeping up to date with the latest news. BeExposed went to New Era Head Office in Shoreditch to speak with Jonny Erazo – their social media manager with a spray can!

blogger or helping the PR

when I moved back to London so I teamed up with some friends of mine and launched a website with

There isn’t a ‘typical’ day as such and I really enjoy that.

and before I knew it I was managing a team of 20

What blogs do you find most inspiring?

and helped secure me my first digital role – managing within PR, New Era recognised the value of bringing social media in-house and created a dedicated role within the company. It felt like the natural fit for me when I saw it – given my experience and passion for the but I think my independent achievements and contact base helped give me the edge.

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A blog I check regularly is copyblogger – it’s one of the best resources I’ve found online for rom : Photos f

s ras pres E w e N d BeExpose

a keen eye on streetwear, lifestyle blogs, it’s key to what I do.

Issue/112


Jonny Erazo

Give us an insight into a typical day in the office for the social media manager of New Era, what you love about it?

New Era :

Day to day I work within the PR department, based in our Shoreditch showroom and occasionally travel to our European HQ. As the go-to person for social media, I manage content for our social media channels across Europe, Middle East and Africa. I also nurture our

Social Media Manager

seeding and keeping online tastemakers up to speed with the latest news. I connect with many different people on a day-to-day basis – from the North American team, to accounts, Flagship stores and for larger projects I also work with agencies.

Social Media plays a huge

role in reshaping the strategic

of brands in this digital age. brands connect with consumers and can almost make or break a brand in such As an individual it is a useful tool to network amongst like-minded people, hear and generally keeping up to date with the latest news. BeExposed went to New Era Head Office in Shoreditch to speak with Jonny Erazo – their social media manager with a spray can!

blogger or helping the PR

when I moved back to London so I teamed up with some friends of mine and launched a website with

There isn’t a ‘typical’ day as such and I really enjoy that.

and before I knew it I was managing a team of 20

What blogs do you find most inspiring?

and helped secure me my first digital role – managing within PR, New Era recognised the value of bringing social media in-house and created a dedicated role within the company. It felt like the natural fit for me when I saw it – given my experience and passion for the but I think my independent achievements and contact base helped give me the edge.

Issue1/111

A blog I check regularly is copyblogger – it’s one of the best resources I’ve found online for rom : Photos f

s ras pres E w e N d BeExpose

a keen eye on streetwear, lifestyle blogs, it’s key to what I do.

Issue/112


What are your views on uni v work experience? At least from my experience there’s a large gap between University and the commercial world. University for me did not prepare me for the commercial world – that I had to learn myself. Walking out of University straight into a job is somewhat of a myth these days. Some people strike it lucky and get a job straight away, but many (some of whom are equally talented) don’t. Despite this I don’t regret helped shape me as a person. At the end of the day though do what you feel is right and

pride when I

see people wearing our products...”

ing presence of baseball caps on the catwalk and within premium

although I’ve been following the scene for longer. I was into art from a young age and growing up in London, the capital’s underground music and art scenes have always inspired me. I’ve met and painted with of memorable experiences. What’s the future for Mr Erazo? I’m currently working on a digital blog in my It’s been a while since I’ve had the opportunity to do any independent projects like this – but I want to keep hands on. I hope to travel more and achieve what I set out to do. If not, I’m sure life will have some

cap?

“..I feel a sense of

have skills with a spray can! How long have you been in the street art game and how did it evolve?

-

always really inspired by the new products ideas such as the New Era x Takara Tomy Transformer Cap Bots.

Takara Tomy - Transformer cap

New Era x kenzo

instagram/Twitter: @neweraeurope

Photography: BeExposed

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What are your views on uni v work experience? At least from my experience there’s a large gap between University and the commercial world. University for me did not prepare me for the commercial world – that I had to learn myself. Walking out of University straight into a job is somewhat of a myth these days. Some people strike it lucky and get a job straight away, but many (some of whom are equally talented) don’t. Despite this I don’t regret helped shape me as a person. At the end of the day though do what you feel is right and

pride when I

see people wearing our products...”

ing presence of baseball caps on the catwalk and within premium

although I’ve been following the scene for longer. I was into art from a young age and growing up in London, the capital’s underground music and art scenes have always inspired me. I’ve met and painted with of memorable experiences. What’s the future for Mr Erazo? I’m currently working on a digital blog in my It’s been a while since I’ve had the opportunity to do any independent projects like this – but I want to keep hands on. I hope to travel more and achieve what I set out to do. If not, I’m sure life will have some

cap?

“..I feel a sense of

have skills with a spray can! How long have you been in the street art game and how did it evolve?

-

always really inspired by the new products ideas such as the New Era x Takara Tomy Transformer Cap Bots.

Takara Tomy - Transformer cap

New Era x kenzo

instagram/Twitter: @neweraeurope

Photography: BeExposed

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Jeremy Scott x New Era SS13

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Jeremy Scott x New Era SS13

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Helpful Advice for graduates.. Finishing a degree is one of the most

When is it ok not to pay an intern?

and nights piecing together coursework and preparing for exams. With the vast

Contrary to popular belief, the large majority of

graduates foot firmly on the career ladder, sadly reality is not as easy as what was originally thought. industry – especially in fashion, a poor economic climate and more hungry candidates flocking to London from overseas, our graduates are struggling more than ever. BeExposed feel passionately about this opportunity to shine. We also feel that graduates have not been given enough advice about the working world, which could have eliminated graduates being taken advantage of. We caught up with Benjamin Fletcher – HR Generalist at a global Financial Services organisation to discuss some hot topics we feel graduates need to be aware of.

Minimum Wage (NMW), which varies according This is not new, but there has long been a (which is a legally defined term) an ‘intern’ or ‘volunteer’ exempts them from NMW regula-

for a pay rise?

issues informally, and this should start with a speaking directly with the individual, or their manager, or your manager – escalate to the next level manager. You should explain your concerns and provide examples. If nothing happens, and you feel you need to formally address the statutory grievance procedure and put your

and be accompanied by colleague or trade union Whilst I would always advocate fair treatment at work and encourage employees to exercise their rights when they have been mistreated, I think it

specific government schemes. The key genuine

bullying in the workplace – unless you are being ied

(more legal jargon!) such as race, gender, sexual bodies. HMRC has started to take a firm view on

you will encounter bad managers, and are an illegally unpaid intern!).

free labour, which places entrants to the workplace from less privileged backgrounds at a disadvantage, I do understand that many graduates are willing to and want to undertake unpaid internships. In these circumstances, the ‘voluntary intern’ (which is certainly not a legally defined term) should not have mandated hours

process is complete, and they have asked you to come abroad for X amount – you should put in a request for something extra. You investment in you and want YOU to join. Frame your request along the lines of “I am really excited to have been offered the

This is untrue, however. If you are an intern or volunteer undertaking meaningful work on behalf of a for-profit business, there is a very strong likelihood that you are Worker and are -

only’ set ups.

Benjamin Fletcher: HR Generalist for Europe, Middle East and

work place what should you do?

very much looking forward to joining All ing on the Super Duper project and bringing my experience of managing high end fashion social media accounts. However, on

need to be sensible about this – so if they offer you £17k, perhaps ask for £19k. They will either (a) accept – happy days! (b) offer a offer – happy days! Or (d) pull the offer – in which case they are psychos and you should not be working there. Now, once on board, I would (as very broad guidance) say definitely not before 6 months, when you feel you have made an impact, or perhaps delivered above and beyond

rise every year, and certainly not for doing a ‘good job’. You are paid to do a good job, and can be fired for doing anything less. Doing an

turns up late they are likely to be fired… so we find ourselves back with a Worker!

Issue1/117

-

Issue1/118


Helpful Advice for graduates.. Finishing a degree is one of the most

When is it ok not to pay an intern?

and nights piecing together coursework and preparing for exams. With the vast

Contrary to popular belief, the large majority of

graduates foot firmly on the career ladder, sadly reality is not as easy as what was originally thought. industry – especially in fashion, a poor economic climate and more hungry candidates flocking to London from overseas, our graduates are struggling more than ever. BeExposed feel passionately about this opportunity to shine. We also feel that graduates have not been given enough advice about the working world, which could have eliminated graduates being taken advantage of. We caught up with Benjamin Fletcher – HR Generalist at a global Financial Services organisation to discuss some hot topics we feel graduates need to be aware of.

Minimum Wage (NMW), which varies according This is not new, but there has long been a (which is a legally defined term) an ‘intern’ or ‘volunteer’ exempts them from NMW regula-

for a pay rise?

issues informally, and this should start with a speaking directly with the individual, or their manager, or your manager – escalate to the next level manager. You should explain your concerns and provide examples. If nothing happens, and you feel you need to formally address the statutory grievance procedure and put your

and be accompanied by colleague or trade union Whilst I would always advocate fair treatment at work and encourage employees to exercise their rights when they have been mistreated, I think it

specific government schemes. The key genuine

bullying in the workplace – unless you are being ied

(more legal jargon!) such as race, gender, sexual bodies. HMRC has started to take a firm view on

you will encounter bad managers, and are an illegally unpaid intern!).

free labour, which places entrants to the workplace from less privileged backgrounds at a disadvantage, I do understand that many graduates are willing to and want to undertake unpaid internships. In these circumstances, the ‘voluntary intern’ (which is certainly not a legally defined term) should not have mandated hours

process is complete, and they have asked you to come abroad for X amount – you should put in a request for something extra. You investment in you and want YOU to join. Frame your request along the lines of “I am really excited to have been offered the

This is untrue, however. If you are an intern or volunteer undertaking meaningful work on behalf of a for-profit business, there is a very strong likelihood that you are Worker and are -

only’ set ups.

Benjamin Fletcher: HR Generalist for Europe, Middle East and

work place what should you do?

very much looking forward to joining All ing on the Super Duper project and bringing my experience of managing high end fashion social media accounts. However, on

need to be sensible about this – so if they offer you £17k, perhaps ask for £19k. They will either (a) accept – happy days! (b) offer a offer – happy days! Or (d) pull the offer – in which case they are psychos and you should not be working there. Now, once on board, I would (as very broad guidance) say definitely not before 6 months, when you feel you have made an impact, or perhaps delivered above and beyond

rise every year, and certainly not for doing a ‘good job’. You are paid to do a good job, and can be fired for doing anything less. Doing an

turns up late they are likely to be fired… so we find ourselves back with a Worker!

Issue1/117

-

Issue1/118


What is the minimum working wage in London? current UK wide rates can be seen below:

2013 (from 1 October)

£6.31

£5.03

£3.72

£2.68

2012 (current rate)

£6.19

£4.98

£3.68

£2.65

In your experience what is the most common cause for people leaving their jobs? advancement and access to more they don’t get on with their manager. How should a CV be structured? Most recruiters like to see a clearly laid out, chronological CV. It should be clear from your CV what you did on a specific project or task, and what the result was. Always try to write achievements. Don’t make empty statements like ‘impeccable interpersonal skills’ unless you can back it up, with a genuine example and avoid CV filler phrases and flowery language; you are not a ‘curator’ unless you work for the

Yes, and you should tailor it to each job you apply for. It doesn’t need to be overly long though – a few paragraphs is sufficient, and it should not simply repeat the content from your CV. You want to tell the recruiter something extra, and show a bit of personality. There are tons of good candidates, so you need to be the one that stands out – the one they can imagine sharing a desk with.

do so is the equivalent of wandering around Tescos picking up every bread based product you can find. You don’t want all that starch – you just wanted one really tasty wholemeal bagel.

‘architect’ of anything unless you design houses, bridges or helped construct the Shard. certain terminology, mimic that on your CV. systems will search for those specific terms – if you don’t use them, you won’t be found

Issue1/119

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What is the minimum working wage in London? current UK wide rates can be seen below:

2013 (from 1 October)

£6.31

£5.03

£3.72

£2.68

2012 (current rate)

£6.19

£4.98

£3.68

£2.65

In your experience what is the most common cause for people leaving their jobs? advancement and access to more they don’t get on with their manager. How should a CV be structured? Most recruiters like to see a clearly laid out, chronological CV. It should be clear from your CV what you did on a specific project or task, and what the result was. Always try to write achievements. Don’t make empty statements like ‘impeccable interpersonal skills’ unless you can back it up, with a genuine example and avoid CV filler phrases and flowery language; you are not a ‘curator’ unless you work for the

Yes, and you should tailor it to each job you apply for. It doesn’t need to be overly long though – a few paragraphs is sufficient, and it should not simply repeat the content from your CV. You want to tell the recruiter something extra, and show a bit of personality. There are tons of good candidates, so you need to be the one that stands out – the one they can imagine sharing a desk with.

do so is the equivalent of wandering around Tescos picking up every bread based product you can find. You don’t want all that starch – you just wanted one really tasty wholemeal bagel.

‘architect’ of anything unless you design houses, bridges or helped construct the Shard. certain terminology, mimic that on your CV. systems will search for those specific terms – if you don’t use them, you won’t be found

Issue1/119

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Helpful tips for start-ups! “... Work with fellow entrepreneurs...” If you have an entrepreneurial flair and own business then we praise you, it’s a scary journey but every Dragons Den millionaire had to start from somewhere! Being in control of your feeling but we realise that one of the main

Nesta

Newgen

Nesta is an independent charity to help people and

NEWGEN is more for brands that are semi established, as applicants need to have businesses that

investments and grants and mobilising research, networks and skills. They rely on the strength of the partnerships they form with other innovators,

and have a minimum of two stockists.

to provide maximum help for new businesses.

schemes. They offer catwalk designers financial support towards their show costs. Others receive sponsored

Start up Britain

and buyers from around the world.

A content rich website giving full support in every aspect of new businesses. Founded by eight individuals and business owners, launched by the Prime Minister in March 2011. Co-founder Emma Jones says: “Around 60% of new businesses are now started

Arts council England

their customers, find out what people think about their products face – to – face and work with fellow entrepreneurs to get a physical feel

company is funding. So the BeExposed team has done the of companies who provide support and funding schemes to make your dream a reality.

such as writers, performers, designers, producers, 2015 Arts Council England will invest £1.4 billion of

“showroom” their own online brand in order to take it to the next level.” Keep an eye out on their website for their event dates on how to start or grow a business.

Kickstarter

Angels Den

site and can choose to pledge money to your business idea but you will only receive the funding if

Angels Den provides a fast track to Business Funding. They have unique “Speed Funding”

guideline as an impressive 44% of projects to date have reached their funding goals. Since their launch in 2009, more than 4.3 million people have pledged over $666 million, funding more than 43,000

individuals. The site allows you to upload a video pitch and state how much funding you need within a

BeExposed shoot

mechanism with 90% of business owners finding at least one interested Angel. These events allow you to speak individually with each Angel rather than pitching to a Dragon's Den style crowd. This is a great way to build rapport and inspire an Angel to want to help your business.

Fashion Council NEWGEN is now one of the worlds

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Helpful tips for start-ups! “... Work with fellow entrepreneurs...” If you have an entrepreneurial flair and own business then we praise you, it’s a scary journey but every Dragons Den millionaire had to start from somewhere! Being in control of your feeling but we realise that one of the main

Nesta

Newgen

Nesta is an independent charity to help people and

NEWGEN is more for brands that are semi established, as applicants need to have businesses that

investments and grants and mobilising research, networks and skills. They rely on the strength of the partnerships they form with other innovators,

and have a minimum of two stockists.

to provide maximum help for new businesses.

schemes. They offer catwalk designers financial support towards their show costs. Others receive sponsored

Start up Britain

and buyers from around the world.

A content rich website giving full support in every aspect of new businesses. Founded by eight individuals and business owners, launched by the Prime Minister in March 2011. Co-founder Emma Jones says: “Around 60% of new businesses are now started

Arts council England

their customers, find out what people think about their products face – to – face and work with fellow entrepreneurs to get a physical feel

company is funding. So the BeExposed team has done the of companies who provide support and funding schemes to make your dream a reality.

such as writers, performers, designers, producers, 2015 Arts Council England will invest £1.4 billion of

“showroom” their own online brand in order to take it to the next level.” Keep an eye out on their website for their event dates on how to start or grow a business.

Kickstarter

Angels Den

site and can choose to pledge money to your business idea but you will only receive the funding if

Angels Den provides a fast track to Business Funding. They have unique “Speed Funding”

guideline as an impressive 44% of projects to date have reached their funding goals. Since their launch in 2009, more than 4.3 million people have pledged over $666 million, funding more than 43,000

individuals. The site allows you to upload a video pitch and state how much funding you need within a

BeExposed shoot

mechanism with 90% of business owners finding at least one interested Angel. These events allow you to speak individually with each Angel rather than pitching to a Dragon's Den style crowd. This is a great way to build rapport and inspire an Angel to want to help your business.

Fashion Council NEWGEN is now one of the worlds

Issue1/121

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Graduate Fashion Week 2013 was bigger With work from over 1000 graduates on coming to watch the 22 catwalk shows and

check out the different courses on offer and talk to the tutors and students on the stand about what they can expect. Sponsored by George the top prize (Gold award) is £20,000 and a chance to make a

menswear award winner

Shauni Douglas

Q: Have you always wanted to study fashion or did you fall into it? A: I'm from Falkirk in Scotland and the majority of my family are employed within the NHS and the NHS is something I wasn't myself. Before I made the decision to study fashion my career plan was to study physiotherapy in Glasgow. Fashion was half way through my final year at school that an art teacher suggested I apply to art school.

the chance to impress top industry judges and make some really good contacts so as you if you just did internships and learnt on the job? Some big names have come out of Graduate Fashion Week including Christopher Bailey who was the winner of the first ever gold award. "We have the most exceptional design talent coming out of our Colleges here in the UK and I salute their energy, their talent and their well earned and deserved global reputation."

and pick out our favourite top talents to possibly work with in the future. We also caught up with two of the winners from the Gala show, Shauni Douglas, Menswear award winner and Dean Davies, Fashion photography award winner who told us about their work and their GFW experiences.

It is very rare that you will be surrounded in the work place from people from such a wide range of other specialisms. Having friends who are painters, jewellers, costume designers, landscape architects and photographers has been an undeniable influence on my work. ‘i think conrolled quality is powerful.’

concept stemmed from the Fletcher street urban riding club, it’s a voluntary horse-riding riding being predominately an upper class sport, so the idea tha are using this to get people off the street, off drugs e concept is about how different classes adopt each others styles in some sort of fashion. ‘enjoy it and keep things in perspective, it’s just clothes.’

jewellery and silversmithing at Edinburgh College of Art

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Graduate Fashion Week 2013 was bigger With work from over 1000 graduates on coming to watch the 22 catwalk shows and

check out the different courses on offer and talk to the tutors and students on the stand about what they can expect. Sponsored by George the top prize (Gold award) is £20,000 and a chance to make a

menswear award winner

Shauni Douglas

Q: Have you always wanted to study fashion or did you fall into it? A: I'm from Falkirk in Scotland and the majority of my family are employed within the NHS and the NHS is something I wasn't myself. Before I made the decision to study fashion my career plan was to study physiotherapy in Glasgow. Fashion was half way through my final year at school that an art teacher suggested I apply to art school.

the chance to impress top industry judges and make some really good contacts so as you if you just did internships and learnt on the job? Some big names have come out of Graduate Fashion Week including Christopher Bailey who was the winner of the first ever gold award. "We have the most exceptional design talent coming out of our Colleges here in the UK and I salute their energy, their talent and their well earned and deserved global reputation."

and pick out our favourite top talents to possibly work with in the future. We also caught up with two of the winners from the Gala show, Shauni Douglas, Menswear award winner and Dean Davies, Fashion photography award winner who told us about their work and their GFW experiences.

It is very rare that you will be surrounded in the work place from people from such a wide range of other specialisms. Having friends who are painters, jewellers, costume designers, landscape architects and photographers has been an undeniable influence on my work. ‘i think conrolled quality is powerful.’

concept stemmed from the Fletcher street urban riding club, it’s a voluntary horse-riding riding being predominately an upper class sport, so the idea tha are using this to get people off the street, off drugs e concept is about how different classes adopt each others styles in some sort of fashion. ‘enjoy it and keep things in perspective, it’s just clothes.’

jewellery and silversmithing at Edinburgh College of Art

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gold award winner

fashion photography award winner

Lauren Smith

Dean Stephen Davies

Q: We'd love to know a bit more about your background and your path of study.

The overall winner of the George gold award worth £20,000 was Lauren Smith from Edinburgh school of art. With guest

A: I grew up in Birkenhead, I studied academic happy and yearned for something a bit more

with gold sparkles falling on top of her.

degree at University of the West of England (Bristol). Due to the lack of financial backing from the University, we couldn’t afford to partake in the catwalk shows at GFW. However, we wanted stand at Graduate Fashion Week. I was awarded with the Fashion Photography Award at this year’s event. This was the first year GFW had ran this award; I think it’s brilliant that they are recognising the importance of the ‘image’ within fashion and are honouring the talents of fashion students who work within the photographic medium.

was her innocent and naive approach using the simple sketchbook as a source of adorned with oversized paper clips, intricate In a world of super serious fashionistas and put yourself out there in a fun and a range for George. Watch this space...

take different routes; learning on the job or through internships, but for me University my ideas. ‘stick to your gut and never compromise on your vision’

The womenswear award went to Hannah Williams can see why, with such an unusual clothing material

concept behind what it is I want to visually portray is the most important thing f the proposed life cycle of a modern woman upon the male form. I wanted to play around with visuals of the man as the mother, as well as marriage, old age and dependence.

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highlighted the level of detail she had achieved in her moulds including statements beads and jewels. We think Hannah will be a bright star of the future and push the boundaries in fashion technology, we can’t wait to see what she comes up with next.

womenswear award and innovation award winner

Hannah Williams

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gold award winner

fashion photography award winner

Lauren Smith

Dean Stephen Davies

Q: We'd love to know a bit more about your background and your path of study.

The overall winner of the George gold award worth £20,000 was Lauren Smith from Edinburgh school of art. With guest

A: I grew up in Birkenhead, I studied academic happy and yearned for something a bit more

with gold sparkles falling on top of her.

degree at University of the West of England (Bristol). Due to the lack of financial backing from the University, we couldn’t afford to partake in the catwalk shows at GFW. However, we wanted stand at Graduate Fashion Week. I was awarded with the Fashion Photography Award at this year’s event. This was the first year GFW had ran this award; I think it’s brilliant that they are recognising the importance of the ‘image’ within fashion and are honouring the talents of fashion students who work within the photographic medium.

was her innocent and naive approach using the simple sketchbook as a source of adorned with oversized paper clips, intricate In a world of super serious fashionistas and put yourself out there in a fun and a range for George. Watch this space...

take different routes; learning on the job or through internships, but for me University my ideas. ‘stick to your gut and never compromise on your vision’

The womenswear award went to Hannah Williams can see why, with such an unusual clothing material

concept behind what it is I want to visually portray is the most important thing f the proposed life cycle of a modern woman upon the male form. I wanted to play around with visuals of the man as the mother, as well as marriage, old age and dependence.

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highlighted the level of detail she had achieved in her moulds including statements beads and jewels. We think Hannah will be a bright star of the future and push the boundaries in fashion technology, we can’t wait to see what she comes up with next.

womenswear award and innovation award winner

Hannah Williams

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new winter princess christine kinson kingston

mapping out the future lauren bond uclan

swish swoo francesca holgado uel

rave ready neons jasmine chana uclan

badass specky four eyes lauren golding kingston

moody blues anna kim institutomarangoni

have some balls jennifer lowther northumbria

one for the boys lauren silvester kingston

Whats new pussy cat? adam jones manchester school of art

Some of the collections that caught our eye


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new winter princess christine kinson kingston

mapping out the future lauren bond uclan

swish swoo francesca holgado uel

rave ready neons jasmine chana uclan

badass specky four eyes lauren golding kingston

moody blues anna kim institutomarangoni

have some balls jennifer lowther northumbria

one for the boys lauren silvester kingston

Whats new pussy cat? adam jones manchester school of art

Some of the collections that caught our eye


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GFW 2013 Soundtrack Favourites Issue1/129

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N

The wonders of social media (Instagram to be precise) has lead BeExposed to this incredibly talented individual, Nas Abraham.

I

'The Melancholic' on pages 137-142 stopped us in our scrolling path; now we are lucky enough to feature him and his work in our first issue.

sweet tooth. Some of you may recognise his face from popular men’s style blog “Individualism”. We caught up with Nas to talk the common grounds of art,

you must have began drawing at an early age? What is your earliest Yeah, like most kids, I was annoying discovered a way to shut me up and stop me from running around by shoving a piece of paper and a pencil in front of me. I began to draw some of my favourite superheroes and characters from movies, which were then validated by my parent's humoured comments such as, "wow that's great Nas, do another one!” That's where it all began. I think my earliest memory of an art were asked to do self-portraits using block paints. I think my mum saved it somewhere. I hope it never resurfaces.

from? I'm actually born into a very musical family. I have a lot of family members and almost each member either plays an instrument extremely well or understands music to a high level. There is a core belief in God that I’ve stuck with from an early age, so I believe that's where I get it from. Tell us a bit about your background, where did you study? Wimbledon College, probably the best year of my life and met some incredible people. Then went on to London College of Fashion, great people they’re too but it was challenging to say the least.

Photography: Josh Chow

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I hear that you have more strings to your bow. about these.

wouldn't dare to call myself a producer, but it's very close to my heart. Fashion film is almost an embodiment of all of my garments, the opportunity to incorporate moving 2D prints and artwork, and of course the way it interacts with music. I haven't been able to properly explore film yet because of these other projects, but soon.

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N

The wonders of social media (Instagram to be precise) has lead BeExposed to this incredibly talented individual, Nas Abraham.

I

'The Melancholic' on pages 137-142 stopped us in our scrolling path; now we are lucky enough to feature him and his work in our first issue.

sweet tooth. Some of you may recognise his face from popular men’s style blog “Individualism”. We caught up with Nas to talk the common grounds of art,

you must have began drawing at an early age? What is your earliest Yeah, like most kids, I was annoying discovered a way to shut me up and stop me from running around by shoving a piece of paper and a pencil in front of me. I began to draw some of my favourite superheroes and characters from movies, which were then validated by my parent's humoured comments such as, "wow that's great Nas, do another one!” That's where it all began. I think my earliest memory of an art were asked to do self-portraits using block paints. I think my mum saved it somewhere. I hope it never resurfaces.

from? I'm actually born into a very musical family. I have a lot of family members and almost each member either plays an instrument extremely well or understands music to a high level. There is a core belief in God that I’ve stuck with from an early age, so I believe that's where I get it from. Tell us a bit about your background, where did you study? Wimbledon College, probably the best year of my life and met some incredible people. Then went on to London College of Fashion, great people they’re too but it was challenging to say the least.

Photography: Josh Chow

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I hear that you have more strings to your bow. about these.

wouldn't dare to call myself a producer, but it's very close to my heart. Fashion film is almost an embodiment of all of my garments, the opportunity to incorporate moving 2D prints and artwork, and of course the way it interacts with music. I haven't been able to properly explore film yet because of these other projects, but soon.

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From looking at your work it is clear you use fashion as a reference for I can appreciate a lot of things in fashion, but I think Boris Bidjan Saberi possibly because it looks like he's incorporated one of my childhood obsessions into his designs - NINJAS!

Tell us about "Melancholic". What’s the story behind these pieces and what media do you use? 'The Melancholic' was born from the desire to do something with all black styling. It was my first editorial for Individualism so I wanted to do something striking, to show what I love to do. I've had an obsession with the dark look for a while, so I partnered with my good friend and

Start of Illustration??

look of it. We selected items with specific these brilliant dark-skinned models to this project, I realised I have a real passion I want to move into in the future.

is because I use all sorts of randomness in photography, pencil, coloured pencil, conte, oil paint, chalk, graphic marker, I can't reveal exactly how I did it, that's one of my grave secrets. Actually if you ask me I’ll probably tell you.

Well I'm launching my clothing line named 'Seraph' very soon; it's primarily a menswear label with intricate prints based around the theme of the Seraphim Angels. I'm also working with different brands doing more of these photographic and illustrated look books, I want to try to encourage more brands and magazines their campaigns, I think it's more London's finest upcoming designers and stylists as well, just keep those eyes peeled.

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Nas - Work in progress

What’s next inline for Nas? Tell us what other projects your working towards.


From looking at your work it is clear you use fashion as a reference for I can appreciate a lot of things in fashion, but I think Boris Bidjan Saberi possibly because it looks like he's incorporated one of my childhood obsessions into his designs - NINJAS!

Tell us about "Melancholic". What’s the story behind these pieces and what media do you use? 'The Melancholic' was born from the desire to do something with all black styling. It was my first editorial for Individualism so I wanted to do something striking, to show what I love to do. I've had an obsession with the dark look for a while, so I partnered with my good friend and

Start of Illustration??

look of it. We selected items with specific these brilliant dark-skinned models to this project, I realised I have a real passion I want to move into in the future.

is because I use all sorts of randomness in photography, pencil, coloured pencil, conte, oil paint, chalk, graphic marker, I can't reveal exactly how I did it, that's one of my grave secrets. Actually if you ask me I’ll probably tell you.

Well I'm launching my clothing line named 'Seraph' very soon; it's primarily a menswear label with intricate prints based around the theme of the Seraphim Angels. I'm also working with different brands doing more of these photographic and illustrated look books, I want to try to encourage more brands and magazines their campaigns, I think it's more London's finest upcoming designers and stylists as well, just keep those eyes peeled.

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Nas - Work in progress

What’s next inline for Nas? Tell us what other projects your working towards.


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BOYS ABOUT TOWN

up in the “fashionable gender”. Unlike the animal kingdom us females have been the but recently we have been known to snoop out the well-groomed men of the city along with the heavily inked up boys about town, using them for best-dressed sex, we feel we should celebrate men’s fashion and embrace their efforts to be more style conscious and confident in their shopping habits.

With fashion events such as LCM mens fashion is forcing its way to the front of the fashion news, but regardless of whats “on trend” we wanted to know what piece of clothing Mr Campbell could not live without and what was a big fashion no no: “I can’t live without my hat. I feel it completes my look no matter what day, time or place. I’m not a big fan of men wearing baggy jeans with over designed loafers.” Mr Campbell has a very distinctive style, we asked him where he draws his inspiration from: “I wouldn't say that I look for inspiration but I tend to gain my ideas from old movies and old paintings. I’m a huge fan of how men use to dress in the late 1800s but I also love the way men dressed in the 1920s through to the late 60s.” Photography: Camilla Treharne for Oliver Sweeney

BeExposed caught up with Londons style guru Martell Campbell AKA Mr Flyy to pick his dapper mind and to find out his pet hates in fashion.

When asked how he felt men’s fashion has developed over the years his response was: “Men are actually taking fashion more seriously in regards to their appearance and are now becoming more fashion conscious and more aware of trends.” We agree with this statement and hope that men continueto go that extra mile to think about their outfit choices.

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BOYS ABOUT TOWN

up in the “fashionable gender”. Unlike the animal kingdom us females have been the but recently we have been known to snoop out the well-groomed men of the city along with the heavily inked up boys about town, using them for best-dressed sex, we feel we should celebrate men’s fashion and embrace their efforts to be more style conscious and confident in their shopping habits.

With fashion events such as LCM mens fashion is forcing its way to the front of the fashion news, but regardless of whats “on trend” we wanted to know what piece of clothing Mr Campbell could not live without and what was a big fashion no no: “I can’t live without my hat. I feel it completes my look no matter what day, time or place. I’m not a big fan of men wearing baggy jeans with over designed loafers.” Mr Campbell has a very distinctive style, we asked him where he draws his inspiration from: “I wouldn't say that I look for inspiration but I tend to gain my ideas from old movies and old paintings. I’m a huge fan of how men use to dress in the late 1800s but I also love the way men dressed in the 1920s through to the late 60s.” Photography: Camilla Treharne for Oliver Sweeney

BeExposed caught up with Londons style guru Martell Campbell AKA Mr Flyy to pick his dapper mind and to find out his pet hates in fashion.

When asked how he felt men’s fashion has developed over the years his response was: “Men are actually taking fashion more seriously in regards to their appearance and are now becoming more fashion conscious and more aware of trends.” We agree with this statement and hope that men continueto go that extra mile to think about their outfit choices.

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BeExposed Featured Models The worst thing a male model can do is CHANGE, but unfortunately they usually do and it is the nature of the industry. As an agency we love the boys for how they arrive to us with part vulnerability and part

This season we have seen an inspiring batch of menswear designers at London away by the emerging menswear designers at Graduate Fashion week. The strong thread we have seen running throughout all of these shows has been the diverse mix of eye catching male models! BeExposed got in touch with bookers Jordan Sheil and agent Patrick Egbon-Marshall from AMCK to give us a few pointers as to what makes a top model

allows them to survive the challenges and project them further than they could ever imagine. Jordan: What are the tops 3 things you look for in a

Patrick:

Height, a great smile, and personality. Personality is key in this industry.. If a

in male models. This is a factor that had never been too strict in the London fashion scene before but with strong influences from Paris and Milan we are stepping up to what is needed to ensure that designers

good money to use a model, they have to be confident that they will get along with

keep themselves looking fresh?

The second thing needed to be a good male model is to have good skin. It is magical to find a young guy with perfect skin, as guys don’t tend to do much to their skin. Lastly is a good character, you get a feeling from speaking to a boy in the first 5 minutes if he would work well with the agency.

Drink plenty of water, especially during fashion week! Buy a good moisturiser. SLEEP! In your eyes when is a "New Face" not a new any more? When you see that modelling has changed their life and they now look at it as a full

fresh are to eat well, exercise more and party less!

show behind them gives them the confidence to believe that they can be somebody in this industry.

When a model starts telling his booker what he doesn't feel like doing anymore – that’s when a “New Face” is not so new anymore.

Finish this sentence…. "The worst thing a male model can do is….." Turn up late to ANYTHING.

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BeExposed Featured Models The worst thing a male model can do is CHANGE, but unfortunately they usually do and it is the nature of the industry. As an agency we love the boys for how they arrive to us with part vulnerability and part

This season we have seen an inspiring batch of menswear designers at London away by the emerging menswear designers at Graduate Fashion week. The strong thread we have seen running throughout all of these shows has been the diverse mix of eye catching male models! BeExposed got in touch with bookers Jordan Sheil and agent Patrick Egbon-Marshall from AMCK to give us a few pointers as to what makes a top model

allows them to survive the challenges and project them further than they could ever imagine. Jordan: What are the tops 3 things you look for in a

Patrick:

Height, a great smile, and personality. Personality is key in this industry.. If a

in male models. This is a factor that had never been too strict in the London fashion scene before but with strong influences from Paris and Milan we are stepping up to what is needed to ensure that designers

good money to use a model, they have to be confident that they will get along with

keep themselves looking fresh?

The second thing needed to be a good male model is to have good skin. It is magical to find a young guy with perfect skin, as guys don’t tend to do much to their skin. Lastly is a good character, you get a feeling from speaking to a boy in the first 5 minutes if he would work well with the agency.

Drink plenty of water, especially during fashion week! Buy a good moisturiser. SLEEP! In your eyes when is a "New Face" not a new any more? When you see that modelling has changed their life and they now look at it as a full

fresh are to eat well, exercise more and party less!

show behind them gives them the confidence to believe that they can be somebody in this industry.

When a model starts telling his booker what he doesn't feel like doing anymore – that’s when a “New Face” is not so new anymore.

Finish this sentence…. "The worst thing a male model can do is….." Turn up late to ANYTHING.

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AMCK - New Faces

Keep your eyes peeled for these 3 New Faces from AMCK - We have no doubt they will be walking down all the major catwalks next season.

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AMCK - New Faces

Keep your eyes peeled for these 3 New Faces from AMCK - We have no doubt they will be walking down all the major catwalks next season.

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AMCK - New Faces

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AMCK - New Faces

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AMCK - New Faces

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AMCK - New Faces

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Cuckoo Prints...

BOYS... style...

1. Paragraph £29.99

2. Birds of Paradise £29.99

We have pulled a couple of fresh brands we feel need to be seen in your summer wardrobe.. “Cuckoo nest clothing”

3. Murdock £55.00

5. All over farm print £55.00

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4. Tropical Murdock £55.00

6. Orgon £25.00

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Cuckoo Prints...

BOYS... style...

1. Paragraph £29.99

2. Birds of Paradise £29.99

We have pulled a couple of fresh brands we feel need to be seen in your summer wardrobe.. “Cuckoo nest clothing”

3. Murdock £55.00

5. All over farm print £55.00

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4. Tropical Murdock £55.00

6. Orgon £25.00

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Native Youth SS13...

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Native Youth SS13...

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HUTCH

job of online assistant at i-D magazine! Proves that it does pay off to take up internships. how did you bag yourself I was quite lucky, I was interning at Exclusive Promo doing PR for a few months which was great. When that came to a finish they recommended me to the guys at i-D. I sent my CV over, I went down for an interview and started enjoy myself and really feel like part of the team and was so impressed with the passion within i-D and wanted to be a part of it.

Describe a typical day in the i-D office for you. At the moment I'm working mostly on the uploading content for the i-D Online and occasionally cross over to assist the guys in print. Im also involved with the running of the monthly i-D Mix Night events, the are always a vibe.

Hutch previously ran the DnB/

Dubstep room at one of London’s best-known clubs - Ministry of sound. Since then he’s been invited to hold a residency at Pack London events. Get familiar with the name because Hutches diary is rapidly filling up with regular sets around London and Europe. Ready to set the pace this summer, Hutch has been rebooked to play at the “Run to the Beat”. His music will also be travelling with him when he lands in Vilnius the capital of Lithuania to play later on this year. His head bopping nights never fail to deliver the tunes from the very best of old school up with the floor filler and i-D magazines online editorial assistant Hutch, to talk about work and the music scene. What are you listening to right now? Im always listening to loads of different music but im really enjoying the movement of music coming out of the UK. Producers like Breach, Midland, Pedestrian, Maribou State and more house/ garage vibes of Waze & Odyssey are all doing big things and making some really great music.

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like Oneman. Purely because of their skill, the way they mix tracks and control a room full of people. I like to engage with the crowd, feel the vibe of the room and what people want to hear whilst maintaining my style of DJing and those guys are remarkable at that.

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HUTCH

job of online assistant at i-D magazine! Proves that it does pay off to take up internships. how did you bag yourself I was quite lucky, I was interning at Exclusive Promo doing PR for a few months which was great. When that came to a finish they recommended me to the guys at i-D. I sent my CV over, I went down for an interview and started enjoy myself and really feel like part of the team and was so impressed with the passion within i-D and wanted to be a part of it.

Describe a typical day in the i-D office for you. At the moment I'm working mostly on the uploading content for the i-D Online and occasionally cross over to assist the guys in print. Im also involved with the running of the monthly i-D Mix Night events, the are always a vibe.

Hutch previously ran the DnB/

Dubstep room at one of London’s best-known clubs - Ministry of sound. Since then he’s been invited to hold a residency at Pack London events. Get familiar with the name because Hutches diary is rapidly filling up with regular sets around London and Europe. Ready to set the pace this summer, Hutch has been rebooked to play at the “Run to the Beat”. His music will also be travelling with him when he lands in Vilnius the capital of Lithuania to play later on this year. His head bopping nights never fail to deliver the tunes from the very best of old school up with the floor filler and i-D magazines online editorial assistant Hutch, to talk about work and the music scene. What are you listening to right now? Im always listening to loads of different music but im really enjoying the movement of music coming out of the UK. Producers like Breach, Midland, Pedestrian, Maribou State and more house/ garage vibes of Waze & Odyssey are all doing big things and making some really great music.

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like Oneman. Purely because of their skill, the way they mix tracks and control a room full of people. I like to engage with the crowd, feel the vibe of the room and what people want to hear whilst maintaining my style of DJing and those guys are remarkable at that.

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to peruse further? I will always loving DJing and music is something that I will always pursue. So although I’m learning more and more, Djing is something I would never give up! @thatHUTCHone or whether work experience and learning on the job is a he working world? Hutch playing for i-D Mix @ XOYO

Keep this link bookmarked to stay up to date with Hutch’s music news

Djng is what you do best and has been part of you for many years. Has working in another role swayed your career goals or

I believe that experience and personality play a great individuals an edge. University helped me in a lot of ways even though I didn’t graduate. While at university, I managed to secure a job in an industry that I really enjoyed and engaged with and there were certain things that I learnt at university that I was applying to my work and eventually it felt that there was nothing more for in my degree and I haven’t looked back since. In hindsight what would you have done differently in terms or your career so far? If I was going to do anything differently I wish I had put now. I wish I had learnt more at a younger age. What advise would you give aspiring Dj’s or music graduates? Be strong, dedicated and professional - these qualiites will be vital. Meet as many people as possible and make sure you are a pleasure to work with :)

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to peruse further? I will always loving DJing and music is something that I will always pursue. So although I’m learning more and more, Djing is something I would never give up! @thatHUTCHone or whether work experience and learning on the job is a he working world? Hutch playing for i-D Mix @ XOYO

Keep this link bookmarked to stay up to date with Hutch’s music news

Djng is what you do best and has been part of you for many years. Has working in another role swayed your career goals or

I believe that experience and personality play a great individuals an edge. University helped me in a lot of ways even though I didn’t graduate. While at university, I managed to secure a job in an industry that I really enjoyed and engaged with and there were certain things that I learnt at university that I was applying to my work and eventually it felt that there was nothing more for in my degree and I haven’t looked back since. In hindsight what would you have done differently in terms or your career so far? If I was going to do anything differently I wish I had put now. I wish I had learnt more at a younger age. What advise would you give aspiring Dj’s or music graduates? Be strong, dedicated and professional - these qualiites will be vital. Meet as many people as possible and make sure you are a pleasure to work with :)

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HUTCHES SUMMER Selection

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HUTCHES SUMMER Selection

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All about new music

What is the ethos? A: Fieldview grew out of a garden party which my brother James and I used to host at the end of each was in 2005 that we had 3 bands play, the next year 150 people turned up and we had 5 bands and Oz DJ. 2007 saw us move to a family friends field and Fieldview was born with approximately 300 people. The ethos has always been about independence, community, great music, art and sustainability. performers become super successful? A: Out of all the acts Ben Howard has without doubt gained the most success, that’s not to say that we don’t feel each act performing at Fieldview has the

100% pure fieldview love Photography by Richard Shakespeare dan (right) and brother James with oz dj loving the crowd

producer Dan Cameron to hear all

Dan’s Summer 13 picks:

with his brother James; we like their eco love for emerging talent.

playing great music to great people, the whole weekend is a crescendo to Saturday night. With dance to folk, choirs to dancing workshops, people who

gentlemens dub club High Grade

‘Out of all the acts ben howard has without a doubtgained the most success’

360 Uncle Belm

Q: Is there anything that’s new for this year? A: Apart from the strength of our line up we’re really excited to finally be able to say that the event itself is run 100% on sustainable fuels; using bio fuel and

Photography by Richard Shakespeare

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sam green and the midnight heist Miles away bears den

choose them?

fvf royalty 360 playing with power

Jacob banks Worthy

Agape

are consistently working to protect endangered areas of the rain forest.

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Colour the atlas Paper Wings


All about new music

What is the ethos? A: Fieldview grew out of a garden party which my brother James and I used to host at the end of each was in 2005 that we had 3 bands play, the next year 150 people turned up and we had 5 bands and Oz DJ. 2007 saw us move to a family friends field and Fieldview was born with approximately 300 people. The ethos has always been about independence, community, great music, art and sustainability. performers become super successful? A: Out of all the acts Ben Howard has without doubt gained the most success, that’s not to say that we don’t feel each act performing at Fieldview has the

100% pure fieldview love Photography by Richard Shakespeare dan (right) and brother James with oz dj loving the crowd

producer Dan Cameron to hear all

Dan’s Summer 13 picks:

with his brother James; we like their eco love for emerging talent.

playing great music to great people, the whole weekend is a crescendo to Saturday night. With dance to folk, choirs to dancing workshops, people who

gentlemens dub club High Grade

‘Out of all the acts ben howard has without a doubtgained the most success’

360 Uncle Belm

Q: Is there anything that’s new for this year? A: Apart from the strength of our line up we’re really excited to finally be able to say that the event itself is run 100% on sustainable fuels; using bio fuel and

Photography by Richard Shakespeare

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sam green and the midnight heist Miles away bears den

choose them?

fvf royalty 360 playing with power

Jacob banks Worthy

Agape

are consistently working to protect endangered areas of the rain forest.

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Colour the atlas Paper Wings


Bubble bus babes Photography by Richard Shakespeare

Photography by Richard Shakespeare

Q: You run the event with a number of volunteers as well; can you tell us about what they do and who are your stars? A: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all volunteers, everyone on board, management and the amazing people who come and help build the event. All of the management are absolute legends, Oz has been involved and manages the second venue (the barn), Lewis and Dave supply all the design and then we have Sarah, Andy, Claire, Chris, Tom and Adam

to find out more about Fieldview or to buy tickets go to: www.fieldviewfestival.co.uk or www.facebook.com/fvfestival

handsome brother who is a CoFounder... Honestly though, everyone works so hard and these are the people that make Fieldview what it is for everyone to enjoy.

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Bubble bus babes Photography by Richard Shakespeare

Photography by Richard Shakespeare

Q: You run the event with a number of volunteers as well; can you tell us about what they do and who are your stars? A: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all volunteers, everyone on board, management and the amazing people who come and help build the event. All of the management are absolute legends, Oz has been involved and manages the second venue (the barn), Lewis and Dave supply all the design and then we have Sarah, Andy, Claire, Chris, Tom and Adam

to find out more about Fieldview or to buy tickets go to: www.fieldviewfestival.co.uk or www.facebook.com/fvfestival

handsome brother who is a CoFounder... Honestly though, everyone works so hard and these are the people that make Fieldview what it is for everyone to enjoy.

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get the look

Festival fashion We’ve rounded up some of our favourite picks from some new and some more established brands to inspire you.

lazy oaf x nasty gal rucksack £48

ilse jacobsen short rainmac £124

triwa print sunglasses £115

bench tie dye shorts £40

illustrated by BeExposed

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juju maxi shoes in green £20

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element eden vest £30


get the look

Festival fashion We’ve rounded up some of our favourite picks from some new and some more established brands to inspire you.

lazy oaf x nasty gal rucksack £48

ilse jacobsen short rainmac £124

triwa print sunglasses £115

bench tie dye shorts £40

illustrated by BeExposed

Issue1/167

juju maxi shoes in green £20

Issue1/168

element eden vest £30


Have you heard of these festivals all happening in the uk this summer? why not tread off the beaten track and try something new?

Moxham marlowe necklace £221

fieldview red or dead clothing at bank fashion £22

bench fairuzah sweat £35 red or dead clothing at bank fashion £22 www.bankfashion.co.uk

sometimes you don’t need the whole tent. Ditch the rucksack and decant essentials into this cute and may we add wipeable purse

Holi

jelly shoes are hot right now but if they remind you of children rock pooling why noT add a heel to glam them up

Triwa pink watch £185

kilian kerner senses £19

womad

element eden shorts £50 sundown

ilse jacobsen £110

ilse jacobsen £100

the taller the welly the shorter the shorts. Showing a bit of skin will help keep you in proportion

Issue1/169

red or dead clothing at bank fashion £38 Juju ‘babe’ heels in pink £25

Issue1/170

wakestock


Have you heard of these festivals all happening in the uk this summer? why not tread off the beaten track and try something new?

Moxham marlowe necklace £221

fieldview red or dead clothing at bank fashion £22

bench fairuzah sweat £35 red or dead clothing at bank fashion £22 www.bankfashion.co.uk

sometimes you don’t need the whole tent. Ditch the rucksack and decant essentials into this cute and may we add wipeable purse

Holi

jelly shoes are hot right now but if they remind you of children rock pooling why noT add a heel to glam them up

Triwa pink watch £185

kilian kerner senses £19

womad

element eden shorts £50 sundown

ilse jacobsen £110

ilse jacobsen £100

the taller the welly the shorter the shorts. Showing a bit of skin will help keep you in proportion

Issue1/169

red or dead clothing at bank fashion £38 Juju ‘babe’ heels in pink £25

Issue1/170

wakestock


Stockists For further information on our featured brands and designers please see the stockist links below: www.bankfashion.co.uk www.bench.co.uk www.bengtfashion.com www.cuckoosnestclothing.com www.eccentricogallery.com www.elementbrand.com www.houseoďŹ&#x20AC;raser.co.uk www.hubshop.co.uk www.joannestoker.com www.jujushoes.co.uk www.monstersbaby.co.uk www.native-youth.com www.neweracap.co.uk www.triwa.com www.victate.co.uk www.wolfandbadger.com


Stockists For further information on our featured brands and designers please see the stockist links below: www.bankfashion.co.uk www.bench.co.uk www.bengtfashion.com www.cuckoosnestclothing.com www.eccentricogallery.com www.elementbrand.com www.houseoďŹ&#x20AC;raser.co.uk www.hubshop.co.uk www.joannestoker.com www.jujushoes.co.uk www.monstersbaby.co.uk www.native-youth.com www.neweracap.co.uk www.triwa.com www.victate.co.uk www.wolfandbadger.com


Thank You...


BeExposed: Issue#01 - Fleur de Cerisier