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16 VOLUME

DOCILE • FERTILE • EASY CALVING • HARDY • EASY CARE • PREMIUM BEEF • NATURAL FORAGERS • PROFITABLE • MILKY • LONG LIVED

Patron: Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal


Quality with Quantity

Podehole Gypsy Game - First cow in the Breed to be Linear Classified EX95. Semen available from Podehole Fandango, Podehole Yeti, Millerston Fine Ideal and Trojan of Craigeassie. BVD Accredited since 2011, Johnes Risk level 1 since 2010 and TB 4 year testing area.

‘We wish every success to our purchasers during 2019 and thank them for their custom.’ www.facebook.com/podeholefarm Charles, Sally & Harry Horrell Pode Hole Farm, Thorney, Peterborough PE6 0QH t: 01733 270247 | m: 07860 541160 | e: podeholefarm@gmail.com | www.podeholefarm.co.uk Stockman: Roy McDonald t: 01733 844748 | m: 07961 085672


Breed Secretary’s review of 2019 Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Volume 16, 2020

Head Office: The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society The Old Dairy and Ten Stall Lamport Manor, Old Road Lamport, Northamptonshire NN6 9HF t: +44 (0) 1604 698060 e: jobailey@beefshorthorn.org w: www.beefshorthorn.org For registrations and transfers: The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Society Pavilion, Avenue M Stoneleigh Park, Kenilworth Warwickshire CV8 2RG t: +44 (0) 2477 103406 e: registrations@beefshorthorn.org w: www.beefshorthorn.org Scottish Charity No. SC010218 Editorial content: Liz Snaith Photographic credits: Adrian Legge Photography Amy Bateman Photography Ltd Anthony Mosley Photography John Eveson Photography MacGregor Photography Robert Smith Photography Tim Scrivener, Agricultural Photographer Journal design: Samphire Creative www.samphirecreative.co.uk Website design: Spot On Creative www.spot-on-creative.co.uk Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in articles where the name of the author is published are those of the author and not necessarily those of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society.

Follow us: @ShorthornUK

Despite the uncertainty over the future of the agricultural industry and the possibility of a ‘No Deal’ Brexit, confidence in Beef Shorthorn remains high and interest in the breed continues. Membership continues to grow at a steady rate and the Society welcomed a further 74 new members during 2019, representing a 10% growth in numbers on the year. A new centre record of 11,000gns for females was set at Skipton in the autumn, with the year’s highest price of 15,000gns at the February bull sales in Stirling. The new website was launched to time and to budget in September 2018 and offers the additional functionality of a live breeders’ directory and a members’ cattle for sale page. Both the website and the additional services have been well received by members. Plans are in hand to extend the facility to advertise semen. The annual Journal was revamped and the refreshed design and clearer layout was generally appreciated. On 1 July, following an extensive tender process, the British Charolais Cattle Society (BCCS) was appointed as the service provider for all registrations, transfers and DNA testing. BCCS took over from Pedigree Cattle Services on 1 July. The transition has gone smoothly and the Society is pleased to welcome Rusmi, Sue, Rebecca, Fiona and Mandy. In August, office premises in Lamport were secured for myself and Ellie, and this extra work space has made a significant difference to day to day operations. The Morrisons Shorthorn Beef Scheme continues to make good progress and the spring and autumn store sales, organised by the Society and supported by Morrisons, are now established in the calendar. For the first time at the annual dinner in Stirling, and also in the pavilion at the Great Yorkshire Show, the Society was delighted to offer Beef Shorthorn on the menu. Our thanks go to Morrisons for their generosity in giving our members the opportunity to sample the brand. Once again, Beef Shorthorns were very well represented at the shows, beginning with an almost clean sweep at the Royal Ulster taking not just Best Native Breed Pair but also Interbreed Group of Three and Interbreed Group of Five and Overall Beef Breed Champion of Champions, dominating the lines at the Royal Highland Show with the highest number of entries of any breed, attracting an excellent turnout at the Great Yorkshire Show and increasing in numbers and interest at the Royal Welsh.

Jo Bailey “The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society was

pleased to welcome 74 new members in 2019, representing a 10% increase in growth on the year.

Jo Bailey Breed Secretary t: 07399 452015 e: jobailey@beefshorthorn.org www.beefshorthorn.org

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Contents Breed Secretary’s review

1

Carlisle Spring Show and Sale (May)

84

President’s report

5

Worcester Sale (September)

87

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Directors

6

Breeders Directory

87

Stirling Bull Sale (October)

88

Skipton Show and Sale (November)

92

2019 Show Results: Balmoral (Royal Ulster) Show

96

The Royal Highland Show

98

Editorial Features: Building a sustainable business with Beef Shorthorn the backbone

8

Developing a new enterprise to meet with rising demand

12

Efficient low input, low cost systems - for now and the future

14

Farming, food and the environment

18

The UK Beef Shorthorn Championships at the Great Yorkshire Show

102

P is the letter for 2020

20

The Royal Welsh Show

110

Maximum output from minimal input

22

2019 Show Results

115

Breeding pedigree Beef Shorthorn - a profitable business

26

Calf Shows: Agri-Expo Calf Show

116

Beef Shorthorn - a perfect fit for environmental schemes

Stars of the Future Calf Show

118

30

Northern Club Rising Stars Calf Show

120

Quiet temperament = safety + time saving

34

Beef Shorthorn offers the perfect fit on the Somerset Levels

East of England Winter Stock Festival Calf Show

122

38

Beef Shorthorn in Wales

43

Regional Clubs: Regional Club Contacts

127

Introducing a three-way suckler cross increases output value

Northern Ireland Club

128

48

Scottish Beef Shorthorn Club

132

Morrisons Shorthorn Beef

50

Northern Beef Shorthorn Club

137

Should I look for Neospora in my herd?

52

Central England Beef Shorthorn Club

140

The Suckler Cow Efficiency project

54

Southern Beef Shorthorn Club

145

Why Performance Record

56

Wales and Borders Beef Shorthorn Club

149

Society News: Coates’ Herd Book rules and conditions

154

Guide to registrations

160

Merchandise

165

Membership and registration fees

165

2019 World Shorthorn Conference

166

Member News: Obituary - Christopher Marler

171

Advertisers Index

173

A guide to Beef Shorthorn Selection Indexes 58 Trace element supplementation

60

The quest is on to identify homozygous polled cattle or 100% polled individuals within the breed

64

Semen use and care in breeding programmes: AI, ET and IVF

67

Health requirements for BSCS sales

70

Sales: Stirling Bull Sale (February)

73

Carlisle Early Spring Show and Sale (March) 81 Stirling Bull Sale (May)

82

Cover image: Amy Bateman Photography Ltd

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


26

34

52

56

73

127

154

160

Breeding pedigree Beef Shorthorn

Should I look for Neospora in my herd?

regional Club news

Quiet temperament = safety + time saving

Why Performance record

Coates’ herd Book rules and conditions

Sales and show results

Guide to registrations

www.beefshorthorn.org

3


Willingham

Lieutenant Commander An exceptional, modern bull oozing power, performance and style, with strong maternal lines and EBVs to back him up.

The future is bright | The future is white

Sire: Tofts Wing Commander | Dam: Willingham Catriona Rosebud Helen | MGS: Alta Cedar Perfect Storm

Semen now available Alan Haigh - 07940 309553 ahaighshorthorn@gmail.com www.willinghambeefshorthorns.co.uk 4

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


President’s report It was a huge honour to be elected President of the Society in February 2019. Interest in the Beef Shorthorn breed continues to grow, and by the end of 2019, the number of new membership applications will have boosted the total to over 1,000, almost triple the number of members in 2005. This trend reflects the demand for a modern functional suckler cow excelling in all the important traits such as docility, fertility, milkiness, feed efficiency, structural soundness and longevity. The Beef Shorthorn ticks all the boxes. A growing society brings challenges and changes, some more easily overcome than others. My thanks must go to the Vice-President, Charles Horton for his unwavering support and the Directors for their loyal and conscientious work and involvement in keeping the breed moving forward. The decisions made by the Board may not always meet with the full approval of all the members, but they are not taken lightly, and it is vital that we do not lose sight of what the Beef Shorthorn is. We are a maternal breed and we need to continue to maintain the breed characteristics. When we first started recording with ABRI we inherited the Terminal Sire Index, which was in use with other breeds. Thanks to the research, time and effort by Carey Coombs, the Society has recently adopted the new Maternal Index to run alongside the updated Sire and Terminal Indexes, which is more in line with the requirements of the Beef Shorthorn as a maternal breed. The new partnership with the British Charolais Cattle Society at its Stoneleigh HQ is progressing very well and the team is working hard to resolve any outstanding issues. The number of Beef Shorthorns coming forward at shows has also continued to increase and it is very encouraging to see so many new members successfully showing their cattle. Congratulations must go to all exhibitors and in particular to the breed champions of the major shows: Tom McMillan with Trowbridge Tessa Linsay both at the Royal Highland Show and Great Yorkshire Show, Messrs Park Baird and Hamilton with Wenmar Perfect Pride W36 at the Royal Welsh Show and Duncan McDowell at the Balmoral (Royal Ulster Show) with Ricketstown Lovely 191, who went on to win the interbreed breed championship. Notably at the Balmoral Show the Beef Shorthorns went on to win the interbreed best native pair, best group of three and best group of five. What an achievement! Calf shows are also going from strength to strength with good entries and a few younger faces to be seen. Thanks are due not only to all the exhibitors, judges and stewards but also to the members who have manned stands and taken stock to events to support the Beef Shorthorn breed. Our successful partnership with Morrisons continues and thanks go to Andrew Thornber and the Morrisons team for their continued support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Jo Bailey for her hard work and dedication as Breed Secretary and Ellie Doak, her very able assistant. Thanks also to Morna Bell for helping to keep our finances and governance in order. The Society is planning a roadshow/members day in May 2020 - date and venue to be announced in the New Year, and I look forward to meeting up with members at this event and other events, shows and sales in the coming year.

“The number of Beef Shorthorns coming

forward at shows has continued to increase and it is very encouraging to see so many new members successfully showing their cattle.

Cathryn Williamson President, Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Directors Our current board of directors, shown below and opposite, cover the whole of the UK. They are here to represent members and you’ll find their contact details below.

Patron: HRH The Princess Royal

President: Cathryn Williamson t: 07816 322280 e: cathrynw54@gmail.com

vice-President: Charles Horton

Š Catherine MacGregor www.macgregorphotography.com

t: 01285 850905 e: poultonfields@gmail.com

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Scotland Major J P O Gibb (Honorary) t: 01575 582227 e: glenislashorthorns@yahoo.co.uk Donald Biggar OBE t: 01556 660205 e: djbiggar@aol.com Carey Coombs t: 01899 810273 e: careycoombs@gmail.com Shona Calder t: 01887 840462 e: shonamclean@live.co.uk David Dickie t: 01659 67384 e: daviddickie@farming.co.uk

Northern England Caroline Ivinson t: 01768 881343 e: caroline@sandwickshorthorns.co.uk Tim Riley t: 07812 075568 e: stoneyroyd@icloud.com Steve Johnson t: 07940 064991 e: gil7venshorns@btinternet.com The Hon. Gerald Turton (Honorary) t: 01845 537932 e: turtongerald@hotmail.com

Southern England Charles Horrell t: 01733 270247 e: charles@horrell-podehole.co.uk Tim Coles t: 07811 165104 e: silsonbeefshorthorns@gmail.com Ian Rickatson t: 07789 691474 e: rickatsonian@gmail.com

Wales Martin Reynolds t: 07966 371558 e: martin.shorthorn@gmail.com

Northern Ireland David Alexander t: 02825 685168 e: davidalexander24@hotmail.co.uk Richard Henning t: 02830 821345 e: richard.henning@lakeland.ie

Past Presidents Geoff Riby t: 01262 602747 e: ribyslivestock@gmail.com Sally Horrell t: 01733 270247 e: sally@horrell-podehole.co.uk www.beefshorthorn.org

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Building a sustainable business with Beef Shorthorn the backbone Barrockend Farm, Armathwaite, Carlisle 840 acres inc 350 acres arable 100 pedigree Beef Shorthorn cows and followers 1,000 breeding ewes

Paul Coates “We are aiming to develop a uniform herd to a specific type a Barwood cow, within the breed’s top 10% for maternal traits.”

Beef Shorthorn is the backbone of Barrockend’s suckler enterprise where Paul Coates and his father, Peter, farming in a joint venture agreement with Morrisons are focused on building a sustainable business producing quality stock. “We are farming a modern functional suckler to meet with growing market demand for a low input, hardy cow, one that’s easy to calve, milky and has a quiet temperament; every individual within the 230-cow herd is working for its money and we are continually attempting to make improvements; it’s all about efficiency,” he explains. “We are breeding a medium size cow around the 700kg mark and we’re finding it’s not always the biggest cows that produce the most efficient calves. Last year the entire herd calved within nine weeks and it recorded 96% PD in calf and 92% rearing rate. Whilst we’re pleased with the results so far, we are focused on continually improving performance.” See table 1. “For example, we’ve successfully just moved from calving heifers at 30 to 24 months. Heifers are readily reaching 450kg with sufficient frame at 14 months; 90% are calving themselves. They go on to reach 700kg target mature weight.” See table 2. Next up and Paul says he is interested to introduce pelvic measurement as another tool to aid calving ease selection.

Twenty month old in calf heifers

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


“Our Beef Shorthorns are also demonstrating they are great foragers. Once the grazing season is up in mid-October, we iodine bolus and introduce cow and calves to winter forage crops. We grow, in total, 90 acres of stubble turnips, fodder beet and forage rape on what is essentially light land, which enables us to outwinter the entire herd and subsequently make huge savings in feed, labour and other input requirements. Outwintering also helps the cattle to remain healthy. “We are farming cattle with a very quiet temperament and they are really easy to manage - values that are important on this farm where we employ only one full time worker.

Next generation at Barwood

“We are also committed to improving the environment - the unit is currently in the Mid-Tier Scheme and each year we aim to plant up to 200 metres of hedgerow and up to 30 trees. Also, Beef Shorthorn’s low input requirements lends them to our system. Apart from a small amount of bought in protein for steer finishing diets we are self-sufficient in feedstuffs.” He continues: “Whilst managed on a pure commercial basis, the herd has Barwood pedigree status and we are breeding added value cattle - bulls and female replacements for fellow suckler producers. Eventually, we would like to supply the pedigree sector.” Steers along with heifers failing to meet with stringent replacement requirements are finished to an average 330kg target deadweight at 17 months for Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme; 75% grade R3, 4L and achieve the current 30p/kg premium and the remainder O+ 3, 4L. The Coates purchased Barrockend in 1984. “We initially invested in 420 acres however we have since doubled up the area farmed when a nearby unit came up for rent and we established sheep and arable enterprises. Our beef enterprise amounted to annually finishing over 1,200 head of bought in strong stores on a 100 day turn around until 2015 when we were approached by Morrisons to establish the joint venture to progress a pedigree Beef Shorthorn herd.

Table 1: Barrockend herd performance 2017/18

Actual

Cows in calf at PD (%)

96

Calves born alive per 100 cows/heifers put to the bull (%)

94

Calves reared per 100 cows put to the bull (%)

92

Cows calving within the first three-week period (%)

60

Cows calving within the first nine-week period (%)

100

Bulling period (cows) (weeks)

9

Average age at first calving (months)

24

Replacement rate (%)

20 Source: Barrockend Farm

Table 2: Barrockend heifer replacement performance 2017/18

Actual

Heifer weight at weaning (kg)

275

Daily liveweight gain 200 day weaning to bulling (kg)

0.8

Bulling weight at 14 months (kg)

450

Scanned in calf (%)

99

Calves born per heifers put to the bull (%)

98

Calving period (weeks)

6 Source: Barrockend Farm www.beefshorthorn.org

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“Whilst we felt we were heading in to the unknown, it was without doubt an exciting opportunity helping to progress Beef Shorthorn and I’d already had experience with the breed. We had run 24 Continental cross sucklers with a Beef Shorthorn bull that was extremely placid, so we had an idea what the breed was about. “Furthermore, interest in the breed as a modern functional suckler cow was fast gaining momentum and the trend was also fueled by Morrisons Beef Shorthorn scheme. I was aware the breed society included some very forward-thinking people who took a positive approach to growing the herdbook. All in all, I wanted to be part of the journey and since then I’ve never looked back. “We are aiming to develop a uniform herd to a specific type - a Barwood cow, within the breed’s top 10% for maternal traits, using a blend of carefully selected genetics - ones that retain the Beef Shorthorn’s unique Moving on to new grazing maternal characteristics whilst demonstrating improved eye muscle. For example, we have invested in an Australian bred poll bull to put over the heifers which is within the breed’s top 5% for both Self Replacing Index and muscle depth EBV. “The herd has twice been linear classified by the breed society’s independent classifiers. They’ve been useful exercises which I intend to repeat biennially, they’ve enabled me to see our cattle as functional suckler cows, rather than pedigree cows; I’ve been encouraged to identify those with best feet and subsequent locomotion together with udder suspension which together add up towards improved longevity. We are targeting a minimum seven calf crops.” Heifer replacements are the closed herd’s future and they are destined to have a major impact on its future profitability, he says.

A portion of the Barwood herd

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

“We have just completed a heavy cull programme during which heifer replacement rate has been running at 20%, a figure scheduled to fall to 15%; temperament, breed type, Breedplan data and soundness including locomotion are our top selection criteria together with weight for age.” He adds: “Despite the current uncertainty of the beef sector, we have confidence in our farming operations at Barrockend. The unit’s environmental management ticks all the boxes, our low input herd is continuing to evolve and improve its efficiency to meet with demand for added value breeding stock whilst we feel very positive about the development of the Shorthorn Beef brand by Morrisons, the UK’s second largest fresh food manufacturer sourcing 100% of its total fresh meat supply from British farmers.”


Award Winning Pedigree Shorthorns From the Shores of Lough Neagh.

Pedigree Beef Shorthorn and Irish Moiled herds are managed to maximise the foraging abilities of these native breeds

CherryValley Estate, 34 Diamond Road, Crumlin, County Antrim, BT29 4QX, United Kingdom +44 (0) 28 9442 2413 | +44 (0) 7469 857 072 | info@cherryvalleyestate.com | cherryvalleyestate.com

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Developing a new enterprise to meet with rising demand ~ Beef Shorthorn at Kinnermit Kinnermit Farm, Turriff 830 acres in process of organic conversion 75 commercial beef cows 15 pedigree Beef Shorthorn cows and followers 600 commercial ewes

Beef Shorthorn is destined to have a significant future role at Kinnermit, says Kenny Mair who works alongside his parents, Barclay and Lucy and younger sister, Sally; together they have established their Muiresk pedigree herd in the last two years.

Kenny & Sally Mair “We continue to develop and improve the herd’s genetics, to hopefully

“The breed is proving to have great temperament, with the ability to convert forage which lends to fitting well in to our future organic forage based system. It’s very easily fleshed and hardy, and since we’re farming light land, the herd will have the ability to out winter. We produce high quality silage preventing us from buying in expensive feed. “The cows are proving adaptable and easy to keep; they calve themselves, they look after their calves and have plenty of milk. The cows are easily managed and great to work with which suits Sally and myself fine since the unit is nowadays run solely by the family.” Farming pedigree livestock - both cattle and sheep, has always been a passion for the Mairs.

become one of the top herds in the country.”

A portion of the Muiresk herd

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Dairy cattle were farmed by the family at Kinnermit for over a century until 2018 when their 370-cow pedigree Holstein herd was dispersed for logistical marketplace reasons. “The decision left a serious hole at Kinnermit,” he says. “However, whilst working with United Auctions for two years I noted that Beef Shorthorn was a low-cost animal. The Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme’s premium makes them very attractive to both store producers and finishers. “We concluded that Beef Shorthorn is a functional suckler cow with a big marketplace; it’s adaptable to the diverse Scottish landscape, from the highlands to lowland,” he says. “Our objective is to breed bulls and surplus females for both the pedigree and commercial sector. “We also believe continuing demand for low cost, low input native bred cattle will be underpinned by falling margins. Added to that will be consumers increasing interest in quality beef and its taste, and the subsequent increase in demand for branded Beef Shorthorn.”

herds in the country. We are members of a CHeCS scheme, and test for the four major diseases,” he explains. “We have always striven for high health status stock at Kinnermit; whilst it will fit in to our new organic status, the higher an animal’s health, the easier it is to manage, and the higher the performance.” He adds: “We have started to linear classify the herd; for over 30 years we found it to be an excellent tool in the Holstein herd not only to help the selection process, but also to build up family history, identify which lines are breeding the best and those we should be breeding from. “We feel Beef Shorthorn have a solid future at Kinnermit, helping to develop an exciting enterprise to meet with current rising marketplace demand.”

So far, the Mairs have built their Muiresk herd to nine cows and nine young heifers with plans to grow to 20 breeding cows and followers. “We have selected proven genetics – sires and dams that have been seen to be doing well in the show or sale ring. Those that have a balance of a good set of Breedplan figures and have great locomotion; a well-balanced square body has also been key. “Heifers are calving at 24 to 26 months and will wean calves 50% of their bodyweight, and we are confident our Beef Shorthorn will stand the test of time and rear a minimum of six calves in their lifetime,” Kenny explains. “Apart from buying in new sires, we plan to keep a closed herd once fully established and we will have a strict replacement policy with heifers coming in. This way we can continue to develop and improve the herd’s genetics, to hopefully become one of the top

Kenny and Sally Mair

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Efficient low input, low cost systems for now and the future Beef Shorthorn playing an increasing role as an added value functional suckler cow Braes of Grandtully, Grandtully, Aberfeldy 640 acres LFA inc 420 acres permanent and rough grazing, 100 acres silage and hay, 10 acres brassicas, 25 acres barley 40 pedigree Beef Shorthorn breeding females, 27 followers

Shona Calder

31 Beef Shorthorn cross suckler breeding females, 26 followers 250 breeding ewes producing store and finished lambs

“We find smaller cows are more efficient workers, they wean calves at a higher percentage of their weight. Less input, more output.”

Efficient low input, low cost systems are for the now and the future, says Shona Calder who is finding that Beef Shorthorn is playing an increasing role as an added value functional suckler cow on her family’s LFA unit at Braes of Grandtully, Aberfeldy. “To run a profitable enterprise, we need healthy livestock that are able to convert forage and thrive on low intervention management, and we’ve found that modern Beef Shorthorn cattle are best suited to this hill farm; they have good growth and easy fleshing without the use of large amounts of expensive input and equally important, they meet with a ready market demand.” The Calders - Donny, Shona and their son, John run together two closed, split calving herds - one commercial producing their own suckler replacements with surplus heifers traded and the second, the Grandtullybrae pedigree herd producing heifers for fellow

Four month old pedigree Beef Shorthorn calves at Braes of Grandtully

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


breeders and bulls for pedigree and commercial producers. Steers and heifers failing to make stringent requirements for breeding purposes from both herds are eagerly sought after by finishers for Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme. “Take both the commercials and pedigrees, they are great foragers out on rough grazing rising to 1,100’ until mid-October, after which the weather dictates the winter regime. Adult cattle thrive throughout the winter on ad lib pure forage diets - straw, silage and hay; and we don’t feed any supplements other than minerals. If the ground is hard the cows remain outdoors. Unfortunately, the milder winters restrict where we can supplementary feed forage, consequently some cattle are fed in an outside court but they still have access to grazing. “Both herds are proving to be fertile, for example currently 83% of spring herd and 86% of the autumn herd calve within the first six weeks; they’re both on target to reach at least 95%. “Overall, both commercial and pedigree cows and heifers calve themselves. New born calves are soon up and their mothers encourage them to quickly suckle quality milk which is reflected in 40 week weaning weight. Typically, they record between 43% and 59% of the dams’ weight, and our mature cows are averaging 650kg. We find smaller cows are more efficient workers, they wean calves at a higher percentage of their weight. Less input, more output.” Furthermore, the Calders are calving their heifers at two years – to save time, save money and improve efficiency. “We’re finding heifers are reaching 460kg target weight at 14 months, they calve down at an average 540kg and get back in calf to calve the following year providing a quicker return on the investment.

In fact, progeny from one of our sires is outperforming this target with calves reaching 410kg at 10 months and 480kg to 510kg at 14 months.” It was not only the breed’s low input requirements, but also its temperament and easy-care nature that encouraged Shona to develop the pedigree herd which was established over 20 years ago, after the Calders acquired an additional seasonal let and decided to invest in cattle. “We initially purchased a mix of native and Continental cross suckler cows and tried various sires to produce weaned calves for selling through the store ring before being introduced to Beef Shorthorn by John Redpath, Alyth. At the time, I knew very little about the breed, however I immediately took a shine to these cows which were quite happily feeding round a straw ring feeder seemingly oblivious to atrocious November weather - horizontal rain and a biting wind. “After a bit of haggling we managed to persuade John to sell us Knowehead Lorraine, our first pedigree Beef Shorthorn cow, or heifer to be exact. Four weeks later she calved outside by herself, she had plenty of milk and was totally at ease with us around her calf. We kept the calf as a bull and 18 months later put him over some of our cross cows and heifers. We went on to purchase more pedigree Beef Shorthorns in the following years, and retained our own replacements to build to current herd size, and the rest is history. “Our objective continues to breed sound working animals that are fit for all terrain. We use Breedplan which helps us select replacements and monitor herd performance. When looking for a bull I use EBVs to select on the traits I require for herd improvement along with percentage accuracy. However, this information has to be tempered with visual assessment. Continued over

Donny, Shona and John www.beefshorthorn.org

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“Cows and calved heifers are also linear classified which helps me look at the animal more acutely taking into account each part of the cow rather than seeing her as a whole. If there is a repeating fault in the animals I know to look for a bull that might improve this weakness. I was generally pleased with the outcome from the first classification assessment and most had a respectable score for their age.

“Whilst Scotland and the UK as a whole is not self-sufficient in beef production, I also believe that demand worldwide for quality Scotch beef will continue to grow leaving us in the strongest possible position in these uncertain times.”

“We also take herd health very seriously; both herds are members of a CHeCS scheme and we annually test for Johne’s, IBR, Lepto and BVD.” Shona says demand for Beef Shorthorn continues to escalate from both the pedigree and commercial sector. Grandtullybrae bulls have been sold in to both pedigree and commercial herds as far and wide as Pappa Westry to Norfolk. Meanwhile, the suckler herd has focused on Beef Shorthorn genetics. “We tried various Continental bulls however they didn’t fit for various reasons including impact on cow size and calf growth rate. Furthermore, Beef Shorthorn sired stores were commanding market prices similar to Continental crosses whilst Beef Shorthorn cross heifers were starting to make inroads as suckler replacements, consequently we decided to replace the Continental bull with a Beef Shorthorn which has enabled us to produce a medium size cow, improve temperament and increase milk and motherability. “It’s these qualities and the ability to economically produce beef which are giving us and other suckler producers confidence in the sector at time when we really don’t know exactly what lies ahead in terms of support and trade opportunities,” she says.

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Pedigree Beef Shorthorn heifer with four month old calf at foot


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Martyn Moore

Wenmar Beef Shorthorns, Warren Farm, Lulsley, Knightwick, Worcestershire, WR6 5QT.

Mobile: 07767 608012 Email: martyncmoore@manx.net www.beefshorthorn.org

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Farming, food and the environment, a 20-year success story with Beef Shorthorn Delivering public goods for public support - a future template Abbots Reading, Ulverston, Cumbria 400 acres, all in HLS, including some SSSI 50 purebred Beef Shorthorn cows and followers 10 Highland cows and followers

Tony Wood “We also run a farm education programme, talking through the food and farming chain. For the majority of town children it’s their first visit to a farm.”

100 ewe flock inc Herdwick and Ryeland

Tony Wood has living proof for over two decades that farming, producing food and managing the environment are complementary on his Cumbrian unit, and he believes that Beef Shorthorn has an integral role to play. “Beef Shorthorn are hardy functional suckler cows and they thrive on forage on our low input unit which could be described as challenging. Whilst 70 acres are dedicated to silage to which we apply a minimal amount of fertiliser, the rest of the unit comprises a mix of peat, rushes, and rough grazing running from Morecambe Bay estuary to 500’; it’s wet, with an average 40” annual rainfall, and it’s all in an HLS agreement.

Beef Shorthorn make for ideal functional suckler cows at Abbots Reading; they are hardy, healthy, medium size, docile animals that look after their calves really well

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


“We manage the farm as naturally as possible, and the way we produce beef should be carbon neutral; I firmly believe this is the way to farm this type of unit,” he says. “The farm attracts an abundance of wildlife, Egrets, Kingfishers, dragonflies, we’ve butterflies in abundance, an array of wildflower species and invertebrates, and Ospreys nest in two nearby locations. “Rewilding is currently a bit of a hot topic focused on restoring land to its natural uncultivated state. Instead I believe, it is possible to farm, produce food and work hand in hand with nature - it’s something we’ve been successfully doing for more than 20 years.” He continues: “I believe demand for Beef Shorthorn is going to continue to escalate, consequently from 2020, I’m going to bring a new focus to the herd in terms of pedigree breeding with the intention of selling more heifers. That means potentially starting to Breedplan record to help select more carefully for female traits and also introduce linear classification.” Tony plans to continue to put the unit’s eggs in more than one basket in order to maximise market options. “I’ve crossed the lower end of the herd to a Limousin and we’re getting some cracking calves. We sell through the local auction and we’re finding them in real demand from repeat buyers - heifers as herd replacements and steers for finishing.” The unit’s final string to the bow is a small Highland fold which is crossed to the Beef Shorthorn with progeny retained for finishing on a sole forage based diet at 24 months. “I’m also intending to return to finishing some pure Beef Shorthorn steers at an average 400kg deadweight and market as branded Beef Shorthorn meat at the farm gate or in an on-line box scheme.

Whilst I think people are going to eat less red meat, at the same time they are going to look for more of an eating experience and I’m confident that traditional forage reared high quality Beef Shorthorn with its characteristic marbling will be very attractive and fit the bill.” Abbots Reading used to run a Continental cross suckler herd, selling the entire annual crop of Continental sired calves in the store ring and buying in heifer replacements. “Back in 1994, we agreed to invest in Beef Shorthorn in order to breed our own replacements,” he explains. “We decided to introduce a breed that would cope with the conditions on this farm. “We had already been dabbling in Beef Shorthorn, and found they were hardy, healthy animals, medium size in the 600kg to 650kg range, and a lot cheaper and easier to keep. For example, we found we could keep the cows and followers outdoors until the end of November, after which they would winter indoors solely on forage and without any concentrate. We agreed they made for good functional suckler cows.” For Tony, the rest is history, the last bought in female to arrive at Abbotts Reading was in 2000, and since then, he has focused on building the purebred Beef Shorthorn herd to current its size. “Cows are easily calved - they just get on with the job, they are achieving an average 96% calves reared, and they look after their calves really well; if a cow isn’t milking then she goes. The great thing about Beef Shorthorn is the breed’s docility which is really important for us.” Farming is very much a family affair for the Woods - Tony’s 82-year-old mother, Carol helps to move the cows, whilst his wife, Sharon and children, Jake, 15 years old and Molly, 11 years all help out. Continued over

www.beefshorthorn.org

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“We manage a small glamping enterprise so there are always visitors around the farm during the season; they come from towns and cities throughout the UK, and we enjoy talking to them about that we do, they seem to have a big appetite to find out more about the everyday things we take for granted on a farm and I think they’ll find our home reared Beef Shorthorn beef attractive too. “We also run a farm education programme. Sharon has 20 years of teaching experience, and we organise 12 annual junior school visits. For the majority of these town children it’s their first visit to a farm. We talk through the food and farming chain, tell them our story and explain how we manage our farm, not just for cattle and sheep but also for wildlife.”

Abbots Reading Hayley with her four month old heifer

He adds: “Whilst we really don’t know what the future holds for farming businesses, we are aware that we at Abbots Reading can make more from our own resources with added value Beef Shorthorn farmed in a low input system, conducive to environmental schemes - the type the Government is currently badging as delivering public goods for public support.” Four month old Limousin cross Beef Shorthorn calves

‘P’ is the Year Letter for 2020

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


www.beefshorthorn.org

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Maximum output from minimal input on a hard hill unit Developing a three-way cross functional suckler cow Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim Doldy Farms, Eastmill Farm, Glenisla, Perthshire 2,500 acres LFA inc 600 acres in-bye 140 suckler cows, inc 24 pedigree Beef Shorthorn breeding cows

Pamela Nicol “Beef Shorthorn has introduced that essential hardiness to our cows and I could quite quickly step up the breed’s influence with the three-way cross Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim, making up 100% of the herd.”

1,000 Blackface ewes

Introducing Beef Shorthorn to a Sim Lim suckler herd is providing a solution for Doldy Farms’ farm manager, Pamela Nicol. “My objective is to produce easy fleshing, quality weaned calves off a low input, low cost forage based system with minimal concentrate supplement and developing this three-way cross cow is giving us an opportunity to do just that - we are achieving maximum output from minimal input. “Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim cows currently make up 30% of the herd, they are robust, easy calving - 99% calve themselves; 75% calve within the first nine weeks, they have plenty of milk and are rearing 94% calves, and they have good udders which makes for longevity - they are lasting for 10 to 12 calf crops compared with the Continental cows nine to 10 crops,” she explains.

A portion of the pedigree Eastmill herd

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“Beef Shorthorn brings extreme docility into the herd which is vital to me since these days there are less people on the ground. The ability to work with these cattle with minimal fuss is a key feature as to why this breed was selected for Doldy Farms. “Calves are reared on milk and grass with minimal concentrate supplement, they are weaned in November at an average nine months and 330kg, all steers and those heifers not retained for replacement purposes go straight to Stirling on the same day. We are pleased to say that the Beef Shorthorn crosses now have a better value in the store ring thanks to the Morrisons Shorthorn Beef Scheme which is raising awareness that they can efficiently finish. “We used to buy in replacements, however for health reasons in 2003 we decided to close the herd and breed all our own. We currently keep about 40% Beef Shorthorn crosses as replacements. These heifers are reaching 450kg at 12 to 13 months, I’m calving them at 24 months to the Beef Shorthorn bull, the calves just pop out and they are achieving 98% calves reared.”

Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim performance 650kg mature weight 99% calving unassisted 94% calves reared Calving 24 months 10 to 12 calf crops

Eastmill Meadowsweet Envy with her bull calf, Eastmill Nexus

Doldy Farms is a typical hard hill unit running between 800’ and 1,250’. “The herd grazes in-bye until late-January before being housed, breeding females are over wintered solely on home produced silage, and turned out once the grass starts growing in mid-May on to a rotational grazing system. We introduced a reseeding programme - a 10-year mix including plantain and we soil test every five years to keep the ground in better health. “Whilst I’m very focused on improving the in-bye grassland, the grazing season is short, however, if in future we need to further drive down costs, then there is potential here to save on all bought in straw and outwinter the entire herd. Beef Shorthorn has introduced that essential hardiness to our cows and I could quite quickly step up the breed’s influence with the three-way cross making up 100% of the herd.” Fourteen years ago, Pamela succeeded her father, David Nicol who retired after spending a lifetime career at Doldy. “I was 32-years-old, and taking over as farm manger was a pretty daunting experience,” she says. Today she is managing the two units, Doldy and neighbouring Eastmill.

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Pamela Nicol with her Eastmill herd

It was David Nicol who was initially inspired to introduce Beef Shorthorn to Eastmill after Doldy Farms’ owner, James Ivory invested in the second unit in the early 1990s, and a new suckler enterprise was established. “Dad eventually settled for a Lim Sim suckler, however he felt he wanted a cow that was more robust, easier fleshing, could calve outside, withstand any weather and depend totally on forage. Beef Shorthorn entered the frame in 2005, the breed fitted the bill then, and it’s here to stay.” Pamela found herself not only taking over the three-way cross suckler herd, but also introducing a pedigree Beef Shorthorn herd. “I’ve always been involved in pedigree livestock of some sort and given the opportunity to buy Beef Shorthorn, I had a notion a pedigree herd would do well here,” she explains. Eleven years ago, she established the Eastmill herd with help and advice from former assistant manager, Scott Marshall, initially investing in a Dunsyre bred cow with heifer calf at foot, after which foundation females followed in rapid succession from Glengoy, Lowther, Ballylinney and Maralin.

Next generation, 18 month old Beef Shorthorn cross in calf heifer

For example, my current stock sire is Fern Josh, an ET by the Australian Kevlyn Downs Embassy, and selected in particular for early growth and easy fleshing. “Pedigree breeding provides me with the opportunity to use homebred bulls in the commercial suckler herd; I can test my own genetics and also eliminate the risk of buying in disease.” Pamela is equally focused on breeding bulls for the pedigree sector. “So far, I’ve sold to 7,000gns with Eastmill Lord leading the trade in Stirling May 2019, however I set the bar the previous year when I privately sold my Royal Highland entry, Eastmill Laird, by the US sire, HC Free Spirit 6Y to Cowford Farm; Laird is now within the breed’s top 10%.”

“These females soon proved to be good and solid producing a quality calf with minimum input,” she says and the rest is history. “I’m looking to breed a medium sized cow in the 650kg to 700kg bracket with a little bit of shape and weaning a nine-month-old calf at least 50% her body weight - Eastmill calves are achieving an average 350kg to 400kg. She must calve by herself, be correct on her legs and demonstrate easy fleshing. Good udders are a must, otherwise she is down the road,” she explains.

The show ring is also among her passions. “I really enjoy showing - it provides a great opportunity to showcase the breed, and I found fellow Beef Shorthorn exhibitors to be so welcoming, they very quickly included me on the circuit. I’m now in my ninth show season and whilst I’m always happy to bring home a ticket, it was a great thrill to land the championship at both Angus and Alyth and I’ve always been lucky enough to be in the final line up at the Royal Highland.”

“I’m continually seeking to improve the Eastmill herd selecting sire and replacement heifers ideally within the top 10% for maternal trait EBVs. My 2018 crop of heifers averaged SRI +26, and 2019 crop SRI +28. And to get to where I want to be, I am always striving to do something different; I think it’s worthwhile introducing new genetics to the UK - an outcross to extend what is a relatively small national genetic pool, it was an idea suggested by Scott Marshall.

To the future, Pamela says: “Doldy Farms solely depends on farming for its income, there are no diversification opportunities and environmental schemes are very, very challenging to enter. It’s a case of working to the strengths of the unit, maintaining a happy balance and potentially getting more out of the grass. That’s where low input Beef Shorthorn already plays an important part in our strategy and offers the potential for a significantly bigger role.”

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Senior Sire Jason of Upsall Semen for Sale

NEW Junior Sire Podehole Rock Master

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Breeding pedigree Beef Shorthorn a profitable business Transitioning from niche breed to mainstream Pits Farm, Silverstone, Northants 120 acres grassland 39 pedigree Beef Shorthorn breeding females

Tim & Katy Coles “We believe agricultural shows provide a great environment for the children to grow up in, learn new skills and have fun together.”

30 Blue Texel ewes

Breeding pedigree Beef Shorthorn has rapidly evolved from a hobby in to a profitable business delivering three different income streams for Tim and Katy Coles. “Our story reflects Beef Shorthorn transitioning in the last 15 years from a niche breed, to becoming mainstream,” Tim explains. “We are trading bulls to local suckler producers who are turning away from Continental breeds; they’re now thinking Beef Shorthorn. “These commercial farmers are looking for more milk, a small to medium sized cow that can thrive on grazed grass and forage and can subsequently reduce input costs, and they are eager for quiet cattle - temperament is a big thing. They also have the back-up that their steers and any heifers not kept for breeding purposes will be in demand for Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme.

A portion of the Silson herd

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“We are selling all our purebreds not selected for breeding, including the steers, in Thame Mart averaging 500kg at 12 months and compared with same age Continental crosses, we can vouch that we are achieving a higher price paid by local finishers supplying the Morrisons initiative. “Finally, we are finding a ready market for surplus heifers from fellow breeders including start up herds; we never have to advertise.” Added together and the income generated from Beef Shorthorn is turning in profit, says Tim who helps out on neighbouring farms, whilst Katy, a ruminant nutritionist, works part time for a regional farmer buying group and is chair of the breed Society’s Central Club. “It’s essential we make the most from a relatively small grassland farm which is scheduled to enter Mid-Tier: Countryside Stewardship scheme in 2020.

Silson cows with six month old calf

The Coles Beef Shorthorn journey began back in 2005 whilst they admit to still being in their twenties. Interest sprang from Katy’s lifelong passion for the breed. “I grew up next door to a farm that had Beef Shorthorn roan cows, I really liked them and eventually agreed to invest in our first heifer. She came from the Hootens herd, followed by the next from Tamhorn, and then another from Greenley; each had a heifer.

Whilst their Silson herd started out as a hobby, before long the Coles had managed to persuade Tim’s parents, Peter and Heather to swap the unit’s commercial Continental suckler herd for pedigree Beef Shorthorn. “To cost effectively grow the herd with the sort of Beef Shorthorn we wanted, we made a head start by flushing our high genetic merit foundation females and we bought in 10 high health recipients for the job.

“Beef Shorthorn were soon proving they were the sort of cattle we wanted to breed - they were easy to manage and easy to calve which was important to us when we both had off-farm part time jobs, and they had market demand - we could see the breed’s popularity was growing. We also wanted to develop a herd that we could come home to at nights and be proud of, one that we can put our own stamp on for the next generation.”

“We have since used Breedplan to help identify genetics consistently performing within the breed’s herdbook; we select for ease of calving, milk, 200-day weight and udder suspension, however we also use our eyes, we want to breed cattle we like the look of, with good locomotion and easy fleshing.”

Silson herd summary • Heifers average 460kg at 13 to 14 months • 100% heifers calve at two years • Mature bodyweight target 650kg to 750kg • Entire herd calves within six weeks • Minimal, if any assistance at calving • Average 98% calves reared • Weaning eight months and 50% of dam weight • Averaging 10 calf crops • Paddock grazing March to November; breeding females maintained at Body Condition Score 3 • Winter on silage and hay Continued over

Tim Coles with stock bull, Sleightholme Rubus www.beefshorthorn.org

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Health status is also of paramount significance to the Coles, says Katy. “Apart from buying in new sires, we maintain a closed herd, it is a member of a CHeCS scheme and has Elite status being accredited for BVD, IBR and Lepto and Johne’s Level 1. Health status is amongst the most important criteria that our commercial customers ask for.” Tim adds: “To the future, our objective is to develop a herd consistent for legs, feet, milk and fleshing ability, whilst maintaining good temperament. And given the opportunity, yes, we would like to expand cow numbers confident that the current demand trend for Beef Shorthorn will continue.”

…to the next generation Seven-year-old Harry Coles, and Rosie three years already have the farming bug. “They love being around on the farm with us and helping out with jobs that are within their safety zone, whilst Harry is keen to start showing cattle; he’s already really proud of his success in the sheep showring,” says Katy. “In fact, we want to encourage more kids to take an interest in livestock, capture their enthusiasm and take forward the next generation, and I believe that developing activities around the showring is one way to go. “We like to put a show team together each year and head off to the Royal Welsh, Royal Three Counties and Bucks County, primarily to promote the breed, however there’s the social aspect - we’ve made some good friends within the Society, and these shows are now our holiday. We also believe shows provide a great environment for the children to grow up in, learn new skills and have fun together.”

Tim and Katy Coles with Harry and Rosie

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS IN BEEF SHORTHORNS QUALITY

CHARACTER

BREED TYPE

MILK

FLESH

BREEDING TWO OF THE OLDEST COW FAMILIES IN THE BREED ~

F LOSS & A UGUSTA

THANKING ALL MY CUSTOMERS AND THE MANY FRIENDSHIPS MADE OVER THE THREE DECADES

JAMES NELSON ~ Tel: 07961 725261 Email: jamesnelson1963@hotmail.co.uk

Visitors always welcome

GLENBRAE EST 1990

BEEF SHORTHORNS 21 Carnduff Road, Carnduff, Larne, Co. Antrim BT40 3NJ 28

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Fearn Monique K1469

with a son of Fearn Godfather at foot

Fearn Jimmy

FEARN MUNRO 2018 BORN BULLS AVAILABLE FOR SALE OFF FARM Fearn Norseman

2019 born Fearn Godfather Son

Photo: Campbell Skinner.

PERFORMANCE RECORDED HIGH HEALTH PEDIGREE AND COMMERCIAL LIVESTOCK. BEEF SHORTHORN AND LUING. BREEDING MALES, FEMALES AND SEMEN AVAILABLE FOR SALE.

Annual ‘Great from Grass’ breeding sale

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FRIDAY 28TH OF AUGUST 2020

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Annual on farm sale of breeding rams, Aberfield, Texel, NZ Suffolk and Beltex plus commercial breeding females.

To book email: fiona@fearnfarm.com

“Forage bred, performance led”

Fearn Farm, Tain, Ross-shire, IV20 1TL, Scotland M: +44 (0) 7770 863 506 T: +44 (0) 1862 832 522 / 832 205 E: info@ fearmfarm.com

www.fearnfarm.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beef Shorthorn - a perfect fit for environmental schemes - for now and for the future Cut Thorn Farm, Burnopfield, Newcastle upon Tyne 360 acres grassland 51 pedigree Beef Shorthorn cows and heifers, plus followers

Donna & Alastair Gibson “We are on the winning side. I believe that support for environmental schemes is likely to continue post Brexit, along with demand for high welfare, high quality grass reared beef.”

300 ewes with all lambs finished off grass Diversification: glamping and ‘farm to fork’ retail beef

We headed to the Beef Shorthorn’s native North East of England to meet with Alastair Gibson, a National Trust tenant on the Gibside Estate who is finding that his Cutthorn pedigree herd is conducive not only to an exemplary low input management system and the Higher Level Stewardship scheme, but also fitting with the farm’s diversification enterprises. Profitability and sustainability go hand in hand for Alastair and Donna Gibson who say their diverse business is for both the now and the future. The Gibson’s livestock enterprise is supported by their farm diversification projects tourism and retailing Shorthorn Beef direct from the farm gate. “Added together, they enhance our links to our landlord, the National Trust and its Gibside Estate.” The property is a 600-acre historic garden annually attracting over 300,000 visitors. “Once intensively farmed, the land is now sympathetically and extensively managed to achieve a diverse environment for our livestock and to promote a rich and diverse flora and fauna,” explains Alastair who is the third generation of the family to farm Cut Thorn. “We entered 150 acres in to the Higher Level Stewardship scheme back in 2013, and our livestock continue to help the National Trust’s conservation plan. The support, including a supplementary payment for stocking a pedigree native breed, is ploughed back in to the business as future investment. The Beef Shorthorn herd is a commercial enterprise rather than an interesting sideline and it has to wash its own face - our objective is to breed useful bulls for commercial producers and in-calf heifers to fellow pedigree breeders. Overall, the breed fits like a glove; it makes for an ideal modern functional suckler. “We’ve found Beef Shorthorn to be such low input cattle, they cost very little to keep on

Beef Shorthorn look after their calves and make great mothers

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Cutthorn cows and calves


pure forage diets; they make for great natural grazing animals on an extensive set stocking system, and overwinter on grass silage and mineral supplements. They literally calve themselves, the calves naturally get up and suck, and their dams make for good mothers, they want to look after their calves. “Docility is another asset. Beef Shorthorn are quiet and easy to work; which makes life easier when I’m working on the farm single-handed. Docility is also important when the public are around and about most of the time - the cattle simply ignore them; our seasonal glamping enterprise attracts up to 2,000 guests a year whilst thousands of National Trust visitors frequent the public footpaths which crisscross the farm.”

Cutthorn herd performance • 700-800kg mature weight Alastair Gibson

• 100% calves reared in 2019 • 95% calved unassisted • 90% calved within six weeks • Seven to eight month weaned steers 340kg to 400kg heifers 320kg to 380kg • Calving from 24 months • 10 calf crops Alastair took over the tenancy from his father in 2007. “The cattle enterprise I inherited comprised 10 cows, four of which were Northern Dairy Shorthorns and one Beef Shorthorn bull. Time spent working away from home with large suckler herds demonstrated the problems that many commercial producers face. Poor fertility, lack of milk, calving problems, dangerous cows or poor doers are just some general issues tackled by modern day herds whilst a lot of these issues can be easily overcome by this native Beef Shorthorn breed. “We began by grading up the Northern Dairy Shorthorns and made our first investment at the Annanwater dispersal in 2008; we purchased just one cow with calf at foot, which later became our stock bull, along with one maiden heifer which is still with us today. The Haliburton herd was next to join us, we bought five cows and their progeny from the previous two seasons.

“The herd has virtually been closed since those initial purchases, apart from introducing new stock bulls and the occasional heifer. Each year sees a growth in the number of cows calved, along with pleasing performance traits which are proving to be successful; 2017 saw 37 cows calved, whilst in 2019, the herd expanded to 51 cows.” Success this year has been rewarded; the herd received several accolades from the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Northern Club 2019 awards large herds category, including first place in three classes in-calf heifer, 2018 heifer calf and 2019 bull calf. “Cattle breeding is a long-term process, we’ve been steadily working away, rigorously selecting over the last 10 years to achieve uniform, healthy animals and we finally reached a point in 2018 where we had in calf heifers to sell. We are members of a CHeCS scheme, we have a preventative health plan and our vet bills are absolute minimal.” Alastair selects his breeding cattle over several criteria, but since Beef Shorthorn are natural grazing animals, a key element are good heads along with a broad muzzle to aid foraging ability, he says. Locomotion and soundness are vital to any good animal, and he is a firm believer that avoiding extremes has paid dividends. New stock sires are selected with commercial production in mind. “They must demonstrate strong maternal traits along with power, frame and easily convert grass fodder into flesh. I look for milk to achieve early growth in the calves; if they reach 460kg at 13 to 14 months to calve at two years, then that’s saving time and money.” Continued over

Cutthorn Gabby with the herd’s next generation www.beefshorthorn.org

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He adds: “Benefitting both with an increase in sales of junior bulls and breeding heifers via pedigree auctions and also private sales, it goes to show that the breed standards go hand in hand for show cattle alongside commercial enterprises.”

Beef Shorthorn beef: from farm to fork Location, location, location: Alastair and Donna Gibson have a ready retail market for Shorthorn Beef literally on their doorstep. In addition to their Mongolian yurts and shepherd’s hut providing a back to nature glamping experience, they also benefit from the thousands of visitors to Gibside’s historic gardens. “We know we have a fantastic product - Shorthorn Beef is quality, it’s succulent, tender and above all else, it tastes great. We started

Alastair and Donna Gibson

by selling boxed meat, however it has proven so popular with glamping guests that we can’t always keep up with demand for steaks, sausages and burgers. “We are currently finishing and killing just six beasts a year, however we believe there is real potential to up that number; we need to carefully work out the logistics to process all the steers and any heifers not retained for breeding purposes. As time goes on, I’d like to sell as much beef as we can from the farm gate and perhaps eventually invest in a food van to take our product directly to shows and events.” He adds: “Whilst we are producing high quality Beef Shorthorn meat with low food miles, we are operating on a ‘farm to fork’ ideology and building scale is set to become a reality.”

Beef Shorthorn are quiet and easy to work, says Alastair Gibson

Beautry Pedigree Livestock Quality Cattle Bred in the Yorkshire Dales Poyntington Himself Progeny - still leading the way Stock Bulls • Poyntington Himself • Stonehills Jackpot Exciting new Junior Stock Bull - Highlee Milo, 1st Prize junior bull GYS 2019

Beautry Shuna Liesl 11,000 Guineas Skipton 2018

First prize Group of three Royal Highland Show 2019

Photo: Adrian Legge

Photo: Amelia Threlfell

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Also Beautry Pedigree Beltex and Texel Sheep 32

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Photo: Penny Paisley


ROYALLA ROCKSTAR K274 ~ ROAN BULL ~

SEMEN NOW AVAILABLE FOR UK SHIPMENT SIRE:

ROYALLA OSTENTATIOUS G404 AUS • DAM: MARELLAN MITZI 8087L AUS

ROYALLA ROCKSTAR Photographed in September 2019

Beef Shorthorn EBV Graph for Royalla Rockstar K274

Podehole Rock Master - son of Rockstar

Podehole Isobel Naomi - daughter of Rockstar

Royalla Rockstar offspring won progeny group at Melbourne Show 2019

• New Australian genetics • Fully registered in the UK Coates Herd Book • DNA SNP sample ref G680460 • Homozygous polled and free of any myostatin variants • Top 5% of Terminal, self replacing and maternal indices • Easy calving been used on heifers and calves quick to get up and suck

Please contact Sally Horrell m: 07932 052524 | e: podeholefarm@gmail.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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Quiet temperament = safety + time saving: Beef Shorthorn’s priceless assets Balnespick, Kincraig, Inverness 111 acres grassland and arable 35 acres woodland 20 Beef Shorthorn cows and followers

Cathryn Williamson Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society p r esi d en t

“Beef Shorthorn is definitely the native breed for me, and I’d recommend to others, who like myself also work off farm,” says Cathryn Williamson, who after more than a decade’s experience with the breed established her Balnespick herd in 2017 which has since grown to 20 breeding cows and followers. “It’s Beef Shorthorn’s temperament that is so attractive; the cattle are extremely docile. Although I do have help when needed, I’m often managing the farm single handed so safety is a priority. Docility also makes for time saving which is really important when I have a busy life as a book keeper, as well as duties as the breed society’s president,” says Cathryn who was elected to the role in February 2019. “Beef Shorthorn is also suited to my low-cost system. Being such good foragers, the herd is cost effective simply because it lives solely on forage - grazing and silage. And since it’s

Cathryn Williamson with yearling heifers from her Balnespick herd

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essential this enterprise remains self-sufficient 365 days of the year, I’m planning to build the herd to just 25 high health breeding cows and followers - that’s going to be the limit for this farm.”

Breedplan performance recording and linear classification are amongst my selection tools, however I have to like the look of an animal - good confirmation and scale are equally important - I’m looking to breed a moderate size female,” she explains.

She continues: “Cows close to calving are brought inside for a day or two for ease of management and I can monitor them on cameras. They invariably calve without assistance since the calves have a relatively low birthweight, and these cows go on to make for excellent mothers with plenty of milk. Their calves are thrifty, they are up and sucking in no time at all.

“One of my herd objectives is to market heifers surplus to replacement requirements for breeding purposes for both the pedigree and commercial sector; in fact the first six heifers were sold privately last year as a Christmas present for a start-up herd, whilst my first entries for Stirling are scheduled for 2020. Ten to 12-month-old steers are sold through the ring at Dingwall and they are price matching other native bred cattle and their Continental counterparts.”

“Within 24 hours of calving, I turn cows and calves out to grass, and they stay there. In fact, all females are out wintered and fed home-grown baled silage and minerals throughout, although cows with young calves at foot have access to accommodation if the weather is inclement. The herd has proved time and again to be so hardy. That was the case during last winter when they had access to a shed full of straw, but both cows and followers definitely seemed to prefer to be outside.” Balnespick’s foundation females were carefully selected for maternal traits within the breed’s top 10% from Alvie, Barwood and Caramba herds. “Good feet and udders are amongst my key selection criteria, as well as taking in EBVs for maternal traits;

Cathryn also relishes the other aspect of cattle breeding - the show ring, and it’s thanks to help from Victor Watson prepping up the show team, along with Cathryn’s grandson, Connor who also assists at weekends, that they returned home from the region’s circuit at the end of the 2019 season with a fistful of tickets, including two reserve championships. “The show ring is not just about winning prizes, it’s also a route to engaging with prospective, new and existing members together with showcasing the breed, and Beef Shorthorn has come a long way in the last few years. “The same can be said of the burgeoning interest in Beef Shorthorn; the breed’s unique set of maternal features match commercial producers’ demand for a modern functional suckler cow. In fact, Beef Shorthorn continues to remain Britain’s fastest growing native breed according to Defra. “I’m very supportive of breed enthusiasts considering start-up herds and new members, particularly next generation. However, I’d offer caution - do not buy on impulse.” She adds: “Going forward, I believe Beef Shorthorn is very well placed to develop it’s positioning within the sector and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to be part of that journey, both as society president and with my own herd.”

Eight top tips for new members and start-up herds - Cathryn Williamson • Buy the best stock you can afford - cattle with accompanying Breedplan data and from a recognised Beef Shorthorn herd • Take advice from the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society and make sure the animals are registered • Consider buying in calf cows or with calves at foot to start the ball rolling; heifers take time to mature and breed from; herd dispersals can be a good source • Buy a stock bull well ahead of the breeding season; give him plenty of time to settle in and semen test pre-start of breeding • Be aware of the health status of the cattle you plan to invest in • Join a registered CHeCS scheme as early as possible • Start performance recording your animals which will help with management decisions and future marketing of your stock • Join the Society and your regional club; it will open the door to members with a mine of information on cattle genetics and management

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Chalkie still the boss! Caramba Rothes Hottie

Dad, So these are the Hottie’s

Caramba Hottie Koo

Once again may we take this opportunity to thank our fellow breeders and supporters for their friendship, support and commitment to the growth and development of our wonderful cattle breed. 2019 was a difficult year for the herd for reasons outside of our control with the loss of animals to TB. However, we intend to do what farmers all over the global do when faced with hard circumstances and that is to face the challenges head on. We will re-establish lost breed lines where we can and confirm our dedication to the success of the Beef Shorthorn bred. Due to these circumstances we are pausing our online sale in 2020. 36

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Caramba Beef Shorthorns have collected a limited amount of outcross semen from the below bulls. Semen is exportable to the UK and anywhere within Europe. Caramba Leyenda Del Norte Sire: Northern Legend N3 Dam: Diamond Hilary Susan €/£ 30.00 Caramba Leyenda Del Norte: Outcross genetics for the UK & Ireland. 1st Progeny

Bushypark Jumbo Sire: Rowanberry Francis Dam: Bushypark Roisin €/£ 50.00

Bushypark Jumbo: Male Champion Balmoral 2018, & Tullamore 2018, Langalbuinoch Highlander

Knockagarry Improver

Sire: Newfield Tarquin

Sire: Deerpark Improver 34th

Dam: Langalbuinoch Zoe

Dam: Knockagarry Winsonia

€/£ 30.00

€/£ 30.00

Minimum 5 straws (mix and match) For enquiries contact Tommy Staunton by email: tommy.staunton@gmail.com Mobile: 00353 86 6047333 FB/messenger @ Tommy Staunton or Caramba Beef Shorthorns www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beef Shorthorn offers the perfect fit on the Somerset Levels, a rich biodiversity of national and international importance 255 acres rented and owned grassland 50 pedigree Beef Shorthorn breeding females 50 Beef Shorthorn cross cows

Ross Whitcombe “Beef Shorthorn are proving they are conducive to the type of farmland that could in future be eligible for green support payments.”

We travelled to Glastonbury, Somerset to meet with Ross Whitcombe who racks up a hectic 50 to 60-hour week working as a livestock auctioneer and chartered surveyor whilst he also farms. Together with his wife, Clare and baby son, Henry, Ross manages 100 cows including the pedigree Brue Valley Beef Shorthorn herd on the Somerset Levels. The majority of land lies at or just above sea level and within the Higher Level Stewardship agreement for species rich grassland and water meadows.

Farming and auctioneering? Yes, I was bought up on a livestock farm here in Somerset, with my dad, Trevor and uncle, Robert farming around 500 cattle, the majority being suckler cows, and whilst I had an ambition to go in to livestock auctioneering from a young age, I also had a passion to farm in my own right, after studying.

When did the Beef Shorthorn journey begin? After graduating from Harper Adams University back in 2009 with a degree in Rural Enterprise and Land Management, the first thing I purchased was a Beef Shorthorn stock bull, with the plan being to put him on the existing suckler cows and retain all heifers as replacements.

Why Beef Shorthorn? Our suckler herd then comprised mainly native cross dairy bred cows which were not suited to the land I planned to rent. Farming the Somerset Levels is extremely challenging; the land all lies at or just above sea level, it’s very wet, of peaty soil type and the grassland whilst species rich, unfortunately is not nutrient rich nor fast growing, and it’s a challenge to keep on top of the rushes. I’d been struggling to find a modern functional suckler cow; she would have to thrive on a very low value forage based diet - overall, a low input system and rear one calf every year.

The Brue Valley Beef Shorthorn herd grazing the Somerset Levels, a designated SSSI and RAMSAR site and within the HLS

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


My grandfather used to keep Dairy Shorthorns which thrived on our land, consequently it was a natural progression to think Beef Shorthorn. After research, I was aware that the Beef Shorthorn was a medium sized cow which is known for being hardy, able to look after herself and provide a lot of milk to grow a quality suckled calf. I was also interested in the breed’s colour markings, further adding to the excitement when they calved. Equally important, Beef Shorthorn had a good temperament; if I was to have a full-time job and farm cattle, they had to be easy to handle and virtually look after themselves. Beef Shorthorn soon proved to tick all the boxes. Finally, the Somerset Levels I planned to farm were within a designated SSSI and RAMSAR Site being highly desirable for HLS agreements which offer a supplementary payment in return for stocking a pedigree native breed. One of the herd’s home bred heifers, naturally reared on traditional grassland

How have you grown the pedigree herd? After purchasing my first bull, I decided that I should also start investing in pedigree females. I bought my first heifer and the Brue Valley prefix was registered. We’ve gradually built up purchasing pedigree cattle from dispersal sales and by retaining virtually all the heifers as replacements. We’ve invested in new sires and started making the 850-mile round trip to Stirling in my quest for a choice of quality bulls starting with Chapelton, followed by Lowther, Stonehills, and in February 2019, the latest from Willingham.

What’s the Brue Valley breeding strategy?

Favourite cow in the herd, the 11-year-old Holtlodge Woodruff

We are breeding a modern functional suckler cow, one that’s sustainable on our hard land. We are selecting for milk and frame. We are aiming for a mature cow ranging from between 500kg to 600kg and weaning a calf 50% her body weight; that’s efficiency. In my opinion, a heavier cow eats too much in winter, she simply costs too much to feed, isn’t able to convert our poor grass and will poach our peaty soil structure. Sires must be polled and within the breed’s top 10% for calving ease EBV – those are my most important criteria. We don’t calve the heifers until they reach 32 to 36 months of age. We allow them to grow naturally in order to sustain their future lifestyle. I like a heifer that will hold her condition well, it’s an indicator of her future potential, I want one that is going to last for at least 10 years and still have a value as a barren cow. Any pedigree heifers or cows that don’t meet our standards are transferred in to the commercial herd I’ve had various enquiries for heifers, but for the time being I am still trying to grow numbers in both herds and we have decided that all heifers should be retained for either herd.

Performance? In the last 12 months, the herd achieved 93% calves reared, 80% of the herd calved within the first two cycles, 5% required calving assistance. Continued over

www.beefshorthorn.org

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What’s going on in the commercial herd? We apply the same breeding policy to our 50 commercial Beef Shorthorn cows as we do the pedigree herd; they are medium sized, efficient cows, all served to the Charolais and in my opinion, produce some tremendous suckler calves; we aim to wean at an average of eight months, 250kg and 350kg off milk and grass. We sell the entire crop through Frome livestock market in November, where they are noted for being ‘honest cattle’, not being pushed, and one which will go away and thrive in their new homes. We have many repeat buyers who tend to take these calves through to finishing.

What’s your management strategy for both herds? It’s low input all the way for me, cows can be very expensive to keep if you are not careful, and this can affect the profit margin. Our cows have to be tough and they are; in fact, the cattle we breed ourselves seem to be hardier than those we’ve bought in. Both herds graze from April through to November, sometimes to December depending how kind the autumn months are; they can thrive outdoors on an autumn flush of grass which keeps them going until weaning in November. The rest of the year is spent in woodchip corale type accommodation with a covered area offering shelter from the rain. The cows are fed second quality hay - we are not allowed to cut until after 1 July and hay is an HLS agreement requirement. Both herds calve outdoors over a tight six to eight-week period in April and in to May.

What are your future plans for the herds? My ambition is to grow the pedigree Brue Valley herd to 180 breeding cows by 2025, and phase out the all crossbreds. Ross and Clare Whitcombe with five-month-old Henry

…and for Beef Shorthorn?

I believe the breed has a huge future role as a modern functional suckler cow as its profile and respect continues to grow in the South West. Beef Shorthorn - pure and crosses are also meeting demand from finishers realising they are quick to finish and within spec whilst processors are looking for that smaller carcase. Overall, Beef Shorthorn are proving they are conducive to the type of farmland that could in future be eligible for green support payments.

Herd KPIs

Pedigree Beef Shorthorn Beef Shorthorn cross

Cows in calf at PD (%)

98

98

Calves born alive per 100 cows/heifers put to the bull (%)

96

96

Calves reared per 100 cows put to the bull (%)

93

93

Cows calving within the first three-week period (%)

67

65

Cows calving within the first nine-week period (%)

95

95

Calving period (weeks)

8

8

Bulling period (cows) (weeks)

10

10

Average age at first calving (months)

34

34

Replacement rate (%)

10

15

Cow efficiency

Pedigree Beef Shorthorn Beef Shorthorn cross

Cow weight at weaning (kg)

560

560

Calf weight at weaning, 200 days (kg)

250

280

DLWG (kg/day)

1.05

1.20

Efficiency (%)

45

50

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Born in the hills, bred to last. V I S I T O R S A LWAY S W E LC O M E

Cairnsmore Lois Reserve Champion Ayr show

Cairnsmore

Cairnsmore Darlene Tessa and her Redhill Lord Thunder sired bull calf

Cairnsmore Libby BeyoncĂŠ Native Champion Wigtown show

Cairnsmore Nighthawke Sired by Coldrochie Jurassic

Bill and Jane Landers Bargaly Farm, Newton Stewart, DG8 7BH Tel: 01671 402179 Jane: 07769 638606 Bobby: 07768 512891

email: Bargaly.shorthorns@gmail.com

www.cairnsmorepedigreestock.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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2019 Northern Club Competition, category overall winners of: In Calf Heifer under 3 years

Heifer born 2018

Bull Calf born 2019

CUTTHORN SHORTHORNS ‘Bred from the ground up’ Stock always available for sale Contact Alastair Gibson ~ Tel: 07823 334910 Cut Thorn Farm, Gibside, Newcastle upon Tyne NE16 6AA 42

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Beef Shorthorn in Wales Meeting demand for another native suckler breed Irwel and Jane Evans, daughter Esyllt and son-in-law, Geraint Price, Llanilar, Aberystwyth 390 acres LFA grassland 25 pedigree Beef Shorthorn breeding females, 10 in calf heifers 35 cow Continental cross sucker herd

Irwel Evans

1,000 ewes 15 Welsh Cob mares

“We’re keeping a sharp focus on our original objectives - to breed quality females for the pedigree sector together with bulls for the commercial farmers, and eventually to fellow breeders.”

The Evans and Price family partnership is one of an expanding number of Welsh based breeders who are reaping the benefits of investing in Beef Shorthorn genetics. Introducing Beef Shorthorn to Llwynhywel has, they say, reduced feed costs, the vet and med bill and opened up a new marketplace. “We proved Beef Shorthorn require less maintenance; last winter one big bale of silage lasted 22 Beef Shorthorn cows for 1.5 days, while in comparison, 16 Continental cross cows got through one big bale in 24 hours,” Irwel explains. “Since we now have no calving difficulties, the vet bills have been minimised, and we are already reaping rewards from both pedigree and commercial sales.” The Evans were initially convinced there was a demand for another native suckler breed in Wales, and they believed that Beef Shorthorn fitted the bill. “Whilst suckler producers continue to search for a modern functional suckler cow, finishers were also expressing interest. They were telling me they were returning to native breeds simply because they are finding Continental cattle are too lean, it’s difficult to finish them to supermarket spec lighter weights and Beef Shorthorn is proving to be early maturing. “Morrisons support for the breed added weight to our interest, along with local butchers’ increasing demand for top quality native breed beef. And then there’s temperament,” says Irwel. The couple used to annually buy in 150, 12-month-old Continental cross stores to rear and sell in the strong store ring. “Temperament was becoming a major issue. We just didn’t need the hassle of bent gates and broken fences anymore. “I’d always liked Beef Shorthorn, the breed’s docility was particularly attractive, along with colour markings, and we could see demand was going from strength to strength. We agreed the time had come to go native.”

Llwynhywel cows and calves www.beefshorthorn.org

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They initially dipped a toe in the water with a couple of cows purchased at the Westhide dispersal in 2015. Later that year, they travelled to the Society’s Skipton sale and invested 5,000gns in the maiden heifer, Sandwick Floss Jitter. “She is very, very long, very stylish and roan, and is proving to be one of herd’s best investments,” says Irwel. Her first calf, Llwynhywel Maestro secured the 2019 Royal Welsh male and overall reserve championships and has since been sold privately. Standing below Maestro in reserve male place was their 11,000gns Willingham Katabatic. Irwel and Jane’s daughter, Esyllt and son-in-law, Geraint Price have joined the family partnership and together they have introduced prize winning genetics from Ashvale, Ballylinney, Ballyvaddy, Bridgehouse, Castlemount, Gordon and Sandley, whilst they are now focused on building the herd with homebred stock.

“Health is important, we are members of a CHeCS scheme, we signed up to Breedplan in 2019, and we highly rate the Society’s linear classification scheme; virtually all our eligible cows are Ex 91 to 93; the scores are the number one criteria we check out when we are considering buying both bulls and females followed by Breedplan figures and then they have to be eye catching.” “We’re keeping a sharp focus on our original objectives - to breed quality females for the pedigree sector together with bulls for the commercial farmers, and eventually to fellow breeders,” says Irwel whose ambition for the family herd is to have 50 correct, powerful and consistent breeding cows.

“Length, width and scale are amongst our most important selection criteria and we are focused on breeding a cow that will produce 12 to 14 calf crops. We also look for depth of breeding.

Beef Shorthorn cross six month old heifer and her dam at Llwynhywel

Beef Shorthorn’s docility is particularly attractive at Llwynhywel

Bred for Quality and Temperament Pedigree Stock often for sale Stock Bull: Podehole Kendrick

CHeCS BVD Accredited, Johnes Level 1, TB 4, Farm Assured Quality Beef Shorthorns grazing alongside the Blackwater estuary on the Essex coast. Visitors welcome by appointment. Contact Vivien St Joseph vivienstjoseph@gmail.com 07747847431 01621868531

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Beef Shorthorn adding value to the commercial herd Beef Shorthorn has replaced a Continental sire to run with the family’s 35 cow Continental cross suckler herd. Three years on, and calving issues are a thing of the past, says Irwel. “Nowadays the head comes out and everything follows. When we used a Continental sire, we had no idea if she would safely calve; 10% of the herd suffered caesareans. We were losing calves and those difficult calvings used to really knock the cows back.”

“The entire crop of calves is sold at 10 to 11 months of age in Brecon market and weight wise at that age, the Beef Shorthorn crosses are a touch heavier. We’re finding there’s an insatiable demand for the heifers as suckler replacements, they’re making above market average price and selling to producers not only in Wales and but as far afield as Yorkshire, whilst steers are knocking on the same price level as Continental crosses.”

Apart from saving on the vet bills and losses to the herd, he says the Beef Shorthorn cross calves are offering added value.

Shawhill dewdrop Molly (p)

Thomson, Roddick & Laurie Cattle Sold at:

Shawhill Dewdrop Molly (P) by Burnside Elite out of a K-Kim Freedom dam. Champion heifer at the 2019 Longtown Sale. 2,600 guineas to Mr W.E. Dickin.

John & Matthew Thomson

Stirling and Skipton with a draft of Shawhill heifers at the Longtown Pedigree Sale, Monday 31st August 2020.

| Newlands, Eaglesfield, Dumfriesshire, DG11 3AA.

Tel: 01461 500769 & 07900 Email: info@shawhillshorthorns.co.uk

181635

www.shawhillshorthorns.co.uk www.beefshorthorn.org

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2019 HIGHLAND SHOW

Glebefarm

Cherry May

FIRST TRIP ACROSS THE WATER Many thanks to everyone in the shorthorn lines at the Highland who extended us such a warm welcome and great hospitality throughout the week at our very first shorthorn show. A special thanks to the judge Jack Ramsay for making it such a successful event for our Glebefarm herd.

herds competiton

Glebefarm

highland show results

Duchess Molly

Duchess Molly - 1st prize baby heifer Class. Cherry May - Reserve Junior Champion, Reserve Female Champion, Reserve Overall Champion and Best Exhibitor Breed animal Highland Show 2019.

Glebefarm has been awarded Best Small Herd for the second consecutive year. Thank you to judge James Porter for this and the many individual prizes awarded to our cattle in this competition. Visitors are always welcome by appointment.

ALFIE & JAMES SHAW

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+44 777 5730 000

www.gflivestock.com

33 Tobermesson Rd, Dungannon BT71 7QE

Glebefarm livestock

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


CHAMPION BROOD COW Glenisla Waterloo Andrea B581, at almost 12 years old having just reared her 10th calf has been awarded Overall Champion Brood Cow NI 2019. Waterloo recently classified excellent 93, her scores were Body EX96, Beef EX96, Legs & feet EX95, Mammery VG85.

2019

BEST COW FAMILY

We are delighted our Cherry family have gained this recognition. Pictured below is Bushypark Cherry 1st EX93 dam of Cherry May, along side another one of her daughters Cherry 4th who recently classifed VG88 at just over 30 months. Her scores were Body VG88, Beef EX90, Legs and Feet VG88 and Mammery VG85 .

champion

glebefarm BEEF SHORTHORNS

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Introducing a three-way suckler cross increases output value Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim - the complementary mix Tamlaght, Enniskillen, County Fermanagh 210 acres grassland 100 cow suckler herd

David Henderson “Going forward I believe we have to be prepared to tweak our farming businesses and not be afraid to adapt to what the market wants.”

50 breeding ewes

Introducing a three-way suckler cross is the way to go for Northern Ireland producer, David Henderson. “Beef Shorthorn, Simmental and Limousin genetics are proving to be a very complementary mix,” he explains. “Together they’re helping us to maintain a low input, low cost, closed herd, whilst that genetic diversity is increasing output value, all of which is essential to stepping up profitability and ensuring the enterprise’s future viability. “We introduced Beef Shorthorn to the Continental cross herd in 2012 to reduce mature cow size, enhance maternal traits, improve temperament and expand our market options,” comments David who farms with his wife Iris, and with part time support from son, Neil. “Beef Shorthorn has helped to maintain a uniform red and white herd and at the same time, enabled us to redress imbalance. Our Continental cows were getting too big at an average 750kg, they were losing milk and demonstrated poor temperament. Nowadays we are breeding 650kg cows which are more suited to our heavy clay soils, they’re proving they can produce just as good a calf, have plenty of milk and are subsequently more efficient. What’s more they are easy fleshing and thrive on a grass silage diet.” In 2019, the three-way cross herd performance stood at 103% calves reared including three sets of twins from 97 cows and 100 calves, 100% calved within six weeks and largely remained unaided. “Introducing Beef Shorthorn to the mix has also enabled us to put our eggs in more than one basket and helped us to spread the risk by extending our market options,” David explains. “For starters, we continue to remain focused on producing a uniform crop of calves, we wean at nine to 10 months when we aim for the male calves to average 400kg, and we trade them privately to finishers across multiple units. We have tracked their finished performance on the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) web site. For example, we recently checked out 157 head by a mix of our own sires. Overall, we found that the Beef Shorthorn crosses finished almost one month quicker than the other cross breeds.” See table 1.

Table 1: Tamlaght bred finished cattle performance Sire Number finished

Daily deadweight gain (kg)

22.8

0.56

Beef Shorthorn

38

Charolais

31 23.5 0.57

Limousin

30 25.3 0.52

Simmental

58 23.6 0.55

David Henderson

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Age at slaughter (months)

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Source: DAERA


“Nowadays we are annually finishing at Tamlaght up to 15 Beef Shorthorn sired cattle for the Glenarm Shorthorn Beef scheme which trades with top end London restaurants and stores,” he explains. “We are taking steers and some heifers to between 320kg and 380kg deadweight at 21 to 23 months in return for a premium - it’s a worthwhile exercise. “We are also finding that the females have added value as replacements - a roan Beef Shorthorn cross heifer is much sought after. Until recently, most farmers wouldn’t have considered native bred cows, whereas nowadays they’re coming back saying whilst Beef Shorthorn crosses are not the biggest cows in the world, they are very happy with the quality calf they’re producing; added to that, cow temperament is improved. “Our own heifer replacements are sufficiently grown at 15 months and 400kg to 430kg to put to the Beef Shorthorn bull,” he explains. “We select these replacements on 200-day weight, conformation, legs and feet and temperament.” The Hendersons run a high health herd which they say is attractive when it comes to selling replacements. “The herd remains firmly closed apart from buying in high health breeding bulls; our preventative health plan includes for all cows to be vaccinated for BVD, Lepto and scour; calves are vaccinated for pneumonia after housing.”

Living in an area with an average 1.25 metres rainfall, means farming cattle with the ability to thrive off ensiled forage is absolutely essential, says David. “The first group of 35 cows and calves in March, is turned out late April and the remainder calve outdoors from mid-May. The entire herd - cows and calves are rehoused after around five months. Depending on the weather, 2019 was exceptionally wet and we had to rehouse some after four months. The Hendersons are members of DAERA’s Business Development Group which brings together small groups of farmers and growers to consider how knowledge, cooperation and innovation can improve the performance of their businesses. David says the networking and opportunity to share is really useful. “We’ve recently learnt a lot more about grassland management, silage production and reseeding which are now among our current priorities,” he says. “Direct drilling has replaced conventional ploughing and reseeding, since it is more suited to the wet unpredictable weather. We are now aiming for our silage to analyse D70, ME 11%, and CP 15%.” David adds: “Going forward I believe we have to be prepared to tweak our farming businesses and not be afraid to adapt to what the market wants. We are currently happy with our system and the diversity that Beef Shorthorn has introduced; I’ve worked with sucklers virtually all my life and I’d say if you want to continue something you enjoy, then there are ways and means to make things work.”

Maintaining a low input, low cost, closed herd with Beef Shorthorn Sim Lim cows www.beefshorthorn.org

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Shorthorn Beef ~ More finishers required to join

Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme

Following its hugely successful launch in 2016, Shorthorn Beef is continuing to deliver unequalled eating quality, so much so that Morrisons’ customers keep coming back for more, whilst new ones are joining them. An initial 130 finished cattle were sourced each week to supply the Shorthorn Beef brand in over 100 selected stores. Since then, we have expanded requirements to over 200 head per week and to supply 300 stores, up and down the country. The supermarket is offering the full range of steaks, salmon-cut and topside joints, each proudly holding the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society logo on its packaging. In the last 12 months, we have introduced those steaks to fixed weight which provides customers with a fixed price point; the decision has been well received and initial sales appear to be positive. Morrisons is continuing to develop new product lines and have launched ‘The Best’ Shorthorn Beef mince in 90 stores selling 1,500 packs a week. We are also continuing to invest in labelling and packaging - watch this space for more news. Overall, we are thrilled by the response to the Shorthorn Beef brand; consequently, as the scheme continues to expand and build momentum, we are actively looking for more finishers to rear cattle sired by a registered pedigree Beef Shorthorn bull. The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society’s president, Cathryn Williamson adds: “We are continuing our agreement for Morrisons to be the sole UK supermarket to retail Shorthorn Beef and we welcome this huge opportunity; it’s a development that reflects the company’s long-standing commitment to the breed and the benefits it offers throughout the supply chain.

Shorthorn Beef Scheme finishing unit criteria + protocol The Morrisons Shorthorn Beef range aims to offer customers a consistent product, using only beef bred cattle sired by a registered Beef Shorthorn bull. To help towards that consistent quality, Morrisons also requires its finishers to adhere to the following requirements: • All eligible cattle must be fed on a high starch, cereal based finishing diet for 60 days immediately prior to slaughter • Approved finishing units must be Red Tractor Beef and Lamb Assured • Farmers are required to sign a declaration form as an approved scheme finisher and submit a copy of the finishing diet

Product quality Tenderness, followed by flavour - influenced by intramuscular fat, are the most important qualities sought after by our customers. Beef Shorthorn has already been successfully confirmed as a quality product using tenderness testing and trained taste panels. Furthermore, the supermarket is continuously testing product to ensure that it is of the highest quality. Those quality traits have been recognised by a growing number of prestigious awards. For the second consecutive year, Shorthorn Beef took gold at the 2019 World Steak Challenge which attracted more than 300 sirloin, fillet and rib eye steaks from 25 countries over four continents. Forty-one expert and 14 consumer judges convened in Dublin, to blind test and taste. They judged each entry raw and then cooked for aroma, colour, flavour and marbling. Morrisons The Best British 21 Day Matured Shorthorn Ribeye Steak and Fillet Steak, from Woodhead’s Turriff plant, Aberdeenshire, each won gold medals. A fillet steak produced in Colne, Lancashire won a silver medal, whilst a ribeye and sirloin steak each won bronze. Each steak came from grain fed cattle supplied for Morrisons ‘The Best’ Shorthorn Beef range,

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


which was launched in 2016. Morrisons head of meat, Joe Mannion said: “This steak comes from the Beef Shorthorn breed which is renowned for its texture and flavour. Morrisons has helped to revive this British breed over recent years working with farmers to produce these award-winning steaks. As the only UK supermarket to work directly with livestock

farmers, we can select the very best cattle. We then age the beef for 21 days to make it even more tender and full of flavour. “The Beef Shorthorn breed is slower growing and because it evolved in the British climate and to keep warm the breed developed ‘marbling’. It is this marbled texture that delivers a greater depth of flavour and tenderness.”

Finishing Beef Shorthorn - a viable venture Finishing Beef Shorthorn sired cattle for Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme is proving to be a viable venture for Castletown Estate, Cumbria which is turning over 300 head a year.

Protein levels are reduced from 16% to 13% in the final two months, whilst starch levels are increased to meet with Morrisons specification for the final 60 days.

“We source mainly Beef Shorthorn cross steers, the majority bought straight from farms at approximately 12 months of age and averaging 400kg, and we take them though to a target 650kg from 18 months. They are killing out at 54%; over half are grading R3/4L and achieving the current 30p/kg premium and the remainder O+ 3/4L,” explains farm and estate manager, James Marshall.

“During those 60 days, we weigh each animal every two to three weeks and tweak the diet and group penning accordingly.”

“Added to the purchased cattle are 30 homebred Beef Shorthorn steers and heifers failing to meet with replacement requirements from our own 80 cow suckler herd.” Stronger stores are introduced straight to the finishing shed, whilst the lighter cattle are grazed during the summer months on Castletown’s 2,500 acres of Solway Estuary saltmarsh along with the estate’s suckler herd. “The saltmarsh is in Higher Tier: Countryside Stewardship and the cattle play an extremely important role in maintaining the biodiversity,” James explains. “Once housed, the cattle are penned in groups of 30 according to weight, sex and time to finish, and introduced to a TMR diet based on homegrown ingredients - grass silage, whole crop barley, maize silage, whole crop beans, crimped barley, high protein molasses or pot ale syrup, together with vitamins and minerals.

James says whilst Castletown finishes up to 1,300 head a year of various breeds of cattle on the Farm Assured unit, Beef Shorthorn is the backbone to the enterprise. “Beef Shorthorn do consistently well on our high forage diet and are easier to finish than many Continentals whilst easily matching liveweight gain ready to sell before they reach 24 months. Docility is another plus point, especially in the breeding cows which generally calve easily from 24 months old.” He adds: “Morrisons Shorthorn Beef scheme provides us with a ready market, and its demand for cattle is consistent. Going forward, we are pleased to be working with a British owned processor and supermarket and being involved in the supply chain.”

James Marshall

‘The Best’ Shorthorn Beef range specification and returns

Beef Shorthorn cross matches hybrid breeds - finishing trial results

All Beef Shorthorn sired steers and heifers under 30 months of age are eligible for premiums as per the grid.
Weight range: 270kg to 400kg deadweight; O+ to -U, fat class 3 - 4H.

A group of 14 Beef Shorthorn cross steers achieved 10% gross margin over purchase price following an official 10-week finishing trial on a North Yorkshire unit (AS and EA Dear and Son).

1 2 3 4L 4H 5L E U+ -U 35 35 20 R 30 30 15 O+ 15 15 -15 -O

During the final 10-week period they recorded an average 1.85kg daily liveweight gain and finished at an average 21.5 months, reported Doug Dear.

Passports - name the sire

Become a supplier - join our scheme

A reminder to all suckler producers: the UK passport number of the registered pedigree Beef Shorthorn bull must be included on each animal’s passport in order to ensure eligibility for rightful premiums when you sell your store cattle. When registering births with BCMS, click on the optional ‘sire’ box and enter his UK ear tag number.

To find out more about registering as an approved finisher, see www.beefshorthorn.org or www.morrisons-farming.com for a declaration form.

He commented: “The Beef Shorthorn stands shoulder to shoulder with the hybrid breeds with the added advantage that it is a truly hardy animal and very low maintenance; it does not require a special diet to achieve exceptional growth rates.”

Alternatively, contact the Woodhead Bros livestock office on 01282 729153 or farming@morrisonsplc.co.uk www.beefshorthorn.org

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Should I look for Neospora in my herd? Neospora is a commonly diagnosed cause of abortion in cattle and while it is more commonly a problem in dairy herds, suckler herds should also be aware. Cattle can become infected in two ways: • By eating Neospora oocysts (eggs) from the environment along with food or water • As an unborn calf when Neospora crosses the placenta from an infected cow

Helen Carty v E t

Dogs are a vital part of the Neospora story. They become infected by eating Neospora infected placentae, foetuses, calves or wildlife. The parasite multiplies in their intestine and oocysts are passed in faeces for two to three weeks. After this the dog is immune and no longer a risk. As oocysts are only shed when the dog is infected for the first time this is most likely to occur in pups or young dogs. The oocysts are thought to survive in the environment for many months. After being eaten by a cow the oocysts multiply and then become dormant within tissue cysts. This has no ill effects on the cow which continues to appear healthy. The danger comes during pregnancy when the parasite re-activates and travels to the placenta and unborn calf. What happens next can include: • Abortion – abortion storms can occur when infection is introduced to a herd for the first time • The birth of a healthy, but infected, calf which may go on to abort during its first pregnancy • The birth of a calf showing signs of nervous disease, however, this is uncommon Infected cows remain infected for life. The main way that Neospora infection is maintained in the herd is by infected cows giving birth to infected heifer replacements who in turn abort or produce further infected calves themselves. There is no evidence of direct cow to cow spread. If you don’t have Neospora in your herd, you can keep it out by ensuring your cattle don’t get access to dog faeces. In addition you should maintain a closed herd or consider only buying breeding females from herds with a low risk of Neospora. Herds can work towards a low risk level certification by following the CHeCS programme. Annual blood testing of all breeding females over one year of age is required. In addition to annual testing, there are mandatory control elements of the programme. These are to ensure that infected females are not retained in the herd for breeding. A health plan must be in place to ensure that farm dogs cannot acquire or pass on infection to cattle. Abortions must be investigated. Herds can choose how quickly they wish to progress through the risk levels. It is possible, for example, to retain high genetic merit test-positive cows to breed bulls. If doing this however, the herd cannot progress above level 3 until the test positive animals are removed. Herds are now assigned a risk level, from 1 to 5 as below, with 1 being associated with the lowest risk of being a source of Neospora infected stock. Level 1: Three or more consecutive clear annual herd screens. Level 2: One or two consecutive clear annual herd screens.

© Catherine MacGregor www.macgregorphotography.com

Level 3: The number of test positive animals does not exceed 5% of the herd eligible for testing in the Neospora programme. Level 4: More than 5% of eligible animals identified as test positive animals at the most recent test. Level 5: These herds may be carrying out a testing programme, but are not adhering to the mandatory requirements of the programme. For further information contact the PCHS team at pchs1@btconnect.com or call 01835 822456.

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Mineshop Beef Shorthorns

• Premium Cattle Health Scheme • CHeCS Accredited for BVD, IBR & Lepto • Johne’s Disease Risk Level 1

Chris Nye Hollyoaks, The Hythe, Little Downham, Ely, Cambridgeshire, CB6 2DT Tel: 01353 699413 or Mobile: 07876 543552 Herdsman – Charlie MacLean Mobile: 07984 327274

www.beefshorthorn.org

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The Suckler Cow Efficiency Project Measuring the impact of Beef Shorthorn in commercial herds An increasing number of suckler producers farming Continental cross cows are introducing Beef Shorthorn to their herds. They share the same common goals - to reduce cow size and improve maternal traits together with temperament. To sum up, they are attempting to improve their herd’s efficiency and subsequently make more money.

Geoff Riby Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society d i r ec t o r

Whilst suckler cow size has steadily increased in recent years, we have become aware that the biggest sucklers are not always the best. Smaller suckler cows are in general more efficient at producing calf weight per unit of cow weight, consequently they don’t cost as much to keep compared with the higher cost of maintaining bigger cows. As a rule of thumb, a suckler cow should be weaning a calf 50% of her body weight at 200 days. The bigger a cow, the more unlikely it is for the calf to hit the 50% dam weight target. A small cow is just as likely to produce a big calf at weaning. There is no evidence that cow size influences calf growth rates. Growth rate is driven by milk, not cow size. See table 1.

Table 1: Suckler cow efficiency: top v bottom 10 cows Cow weight (kg)

Adjusted 200-day calf weight (kg)

*Efficiency (%)

Top 10 CS 3.7

579

296 (1.28kg/day)

51.1

Bottom 10 CS 3.9

700

219 (0.91kg/day)

31.2

*Average % of total herd cow efficiencies

Source: CAFRE, Dr Norman Weatherup

Farming smaller cows also enables higher stocking rates, which means the opportunity to wean more calves. Introduce Beef Shorthorn noted for its longevity and the chances these producers will increase the number of calf crops per cow. Consequently, stocking larger cows for their cull value is unlikely to stack up. In 2019, the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society officially launched its own Suckler Cow Efficiency Project designed to identify the breed’s impact amongst commercial herds. The results are just starting to come in.

Recent SRUC studies involving three Farming Connect demonstration farms in Wales have also shown that suckler cows of a lower weight are, in general, more efficient at producing calf weight per unit of cow weight. This was achieved at lower cost due to the high cost of maintaining bigger cows. In a 12-month period, 75% of feed consumed is used for maintenance by the animal and this is directly related to cow size. At one of the trial farms, the 12 heaviest cows with an average weight of 678kg had an efficiency factor of 44.5% compared with 60.5% in the 12 lightest cows averaging 521kg. By replacing the larger cows with smaller ones it would be possible to carry 15% more. Why keep big cows unless it is proven that they are more efficient on your farm? The size of the cow needs to match environmental resources, otherwise fertility and calf performance will be compromised, SRUC concludes.

• We are welcoming more commercial herds to join the Society’s Suckler Cow Efficiency Project. For further details please contact the Society on +44 (0) 1604 698060.


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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


“Continental cross Beef Shorthorn cows are slightly smaller, and they’ve proved they are efficient in terms of rearing a calf with a higher daily liveweight gain.” David Monkhouse, Tow Law, County Durham - 70 cow suckler herd Dam genetics Continental x Beef Shorthorn

Continental

Cow weight at weaning (kg)

640

680

Calf weight at weaning (200 days) (kg)

287

305

DLWG (kg/day) 1.35

1.28

*Efficiency (%) 42.6

39.1

*Average % of individual cow efficiencies

Source: AHDB

“Our Continental cross suckler cows were averaging 800kg mature body weight. The issue wasn’t just size; we found these cows were losing their maternal traits including milk and calving ease. “We’ve now had five crops of Beef Shorthorn cross heifers coming in to the herd; they are going on to mature at 650kg to 700kg which is enabling us to keep 10% more cows on the same area farmed.” Mark Webb, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - 190 suckler cows plus followers Dam genetics

Beef Shorthorn Stabiliser x Continental

Simmental x

Cow weight at weaning (kg)

648

622

696

Calf weight at weaning (200 days) (kg)

280

261

291

DLWG (kg/day)

1.4

1.3

1.45

*Efficiency (%)

43.20

41.96

41.81

*Average % of total herd cow efficiencies

Source: Eyford House Estate www.beefshorthorn.org

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Why Performance Record Performance recording is a tool available to all Society members to help you make more informed selection decisions, and in turn to assist you to market your stock. Performance recorded data is becoming increasingly important to cattle buyers - both pedigree and commercial, at bull sales and over the farm gate. The data is managed by the Society’s performance recording register, Breedplan and specific trait values are reflected in Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs).

Steve Johnson Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society breed development c h a i r m a n

In addition to EBVs for specific traits, three indexes are available - Terminal, Self-replacing and the new Maternal Index - see following article. EBVs help in selection making decisions by • Taking in to account the performance of the bull’s relatives as well as his own performance • Allowing you to compare bulls on the basis of how they will breed, rather than how they have been fed • Accurately estimating progeny performance for specific traits and to predict the outcome of breeding programmes • Identifying genetic differences for ‘hard to see’ traits such as milk and marbling • Reporting differences in the units of commercial value, for example carcase weight and retail meat value Whilst prospect buyers still place importance on the animal’s looks, they are realising that they require the back up of an evidence base provided by the performance data. The following price trends realised at the February 2019 Stirling bull sale reflect the value of performance recording. Self-Replacing Index (SRI) Breed Ranking

Number sold

Average (£)

Top 25% 26

5,104.61

Average 12

3,176.25

Below average or less or non-recorded

2,17.49

3

Source: United Auctions

Performance costs are very reasonable at £150 for the first five breeding cows and thereafter £3 per active cow. Scanning costs can vary according to numbers forward. How to get started • Record all young stock, both bulls and heifers - the good, bad and indifferent • Record cow weights at weaning • Weight record at birth, 200 days and 400 days • Scan at 12 to 15 months • Input the above data in to a Breedplan spreadsheet and issue to our service provider, the British Charolais Cattle Society (BCCS) • Finally, select the most relevant EBVs for specific traits for your breeding programme; don’t just concentrate on the three indexes For further information, please contact the Society on: 01604 698060

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


I have been performance recording my Gilven herd of Beef Shorthorns for around 12 years. During that period, I have found that what I thought were good consistent breeding families have actually been backed up with strong EBVs. Conversely my poorer cows that tended to look after themselves more than their calves are also highlighted. These trends are all made much more obvious by regular weighing and scanning so enabling me, as a breeder, to make more informed decisions on future breeding and culling policies. Having cattle for sale that have notable pedigrees and that are pleasing to the eye, are always much more ‘saleable’ if they are accompanied by good accurate performance recording data and EBVs. I always view EBV figures as a pedigree in numbers. Along with my long-established pedigree family lines, health status and cow classification data, I find performance recording another invaluable tool in the breeding and marketing of my cattle. Steve Johnson

G LENISLA SHORTHORNS

Thank you to all our previous customers. We wish you luck with all your purchases.

~ Visitors always welcome ~ Email: glenislashorthorns@yahoo.co.uk

John Gibb 01575 582736

|

Nick Gibb 07762 541554

|

Catriona Gibb 07790 798062

|

Ian Burgess 01575 582317

Glenisla House by Blairgowrie, Perthshire PH11 8QL www.beefshorthorn.org

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A guide to Beef Shorthorn Selection Indexes The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society now provides three Selection Indexes through its performance recording provider, Breedplan. A Maternal Index has joined the Self-Replacing and the Terminal Index, both of which have been updated.

Carey Coombs Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society d i r ec t o r

It is important to appreciate that the Maternal Index is not a simple evaluation of traits that might be considered maternal traits. These traits are best evaluated as individual EBVs. The Maternal Index is an overall evaluation of genetic merit of an animal managed in a production system where maternal traits are of particular importance, but not to the exclusion of other important measurable traits.

What is a Selection Index? Breedplan calculates Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs) for a range of economically importantly traits. While this provides cattle producers with a comprehensive range of information regarding the genetic merit of an animal, it can result in a dilemma when trying to select animals for use in a particular breeding program. In an ideal situation, it would be desirable to select animals that excel in all traits, but rarely will an animal be superior for all the available EBVs. So which traits should producers put most emphasis on? How much emphasis should be placed on each trait? BreedObject is a tool that can help solve this dilemma. BreedObject combines the Breedplan EBVs for an animal with an economic weighting based on costs of production and returns on outputs, to produce a single Selection Index. A separate Selection Index can be produced for any particular production scenario and market. Selection Indexes enable cattle producers to make ‘balanced’ selection decisions, taking into account the relevant growth, carcase and fertility attributes of each animal to identify the animal that is most profitable for their particular commercial enterprise. Selection Indexes reflect both the short term profit generated by a sire through the sale of his progeny, and the longer term profit generated by his daughters in a self-replacing cow herd.

Using Selection Indexes As a guide to using Selection Indexes, it is recommended that producers complete the following steps: 1) Identify the Selection Index of most relevance to your production system 2) Rank animals on the Selection Index 3) Consider the individual EBVs of importance 4) Consider other traits of importance More detailed information is available as a downloadable document from the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society’s website.

© Catherine MacGregor www.macgregorphotography.com

It is important for producers to remember that cattle can attain similar index values through different EBV values.

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


For example, if a bull is selected using the Maternal Index, and Calving Ease Direct is of particular importance in your management system, e.g. to be used over heifers, be sure to check the individual EBV as a bull may have compensated for having poor Calving Ease Direct by being exceptional in other traits, e.g. Days to Calving.

Please note •

The Maternal Index, in particular, places a high emphasis on fertility. This is measured by the Days to Calving EBV. This is the only EBV that collects calving regularity data. Until more herds record this data then the spread between the highest and lowest maternal value indexes will be small. We would therefore encourage all breeders to collect the necessary data on an ongoing basis. Forms for collecting this data will be available from July 2019 onward. Back data from previous years can also be collected and analysed.

It is important to note that this difference includes profit across the entire production chain from joining to slaughter, and also considers the long term profit generated by a sire’s daughters if a Self-Replacing or Maternal Selection Index.

Index descriptions •

Maternal – The Maternal Index is designed for a commercial Beef Shorthorn/cross herd that is focussed on breeding herd replacements and on weaning as many and as heavy calves as possible at eight months of age. It estimates the genetic differences between animals in net profitability per cow joined for an example Beef Shorthorn Continental cross commercial cow herd targeting the production of pasture grown calves. Steers and heifers are weaned and marketed at an average of 350kg live weight at eight months of age for further finishing or as replacement heifers.

• The Terminal and the Self-Replacing Indexes have been updated. • Self-Replacing – The Self-Replacing Index is designed for a purebred commercial Beef Shorthorn herd that is focusing on Breeders will notice that animals have new index values and breeding both herd replacements and finishing all steers and there will be some changes to the previous rankings. surplus heifers. It estimates the genetic differences between Interpreting Selection Indexes animals in net profitability per cow joined, for example Beef Shorthorn commercial cow herd targeting the production of The Selection Index value for an animal is effectively an EBV of finishing steers (average 150 days on feed). Steers are then the animal’s profitability in that particular commercial production scenario and market. Ranking seedstock animals on their Selection marketed at an average of 650kg liveweight (355kg carcase weight) at 20 months of age. Some daughters are retained for Index value sorts them based on their progeny’s expected breeding. profitability for the targeted production system. Selection Indexes are expressed as ‘net profit per cow mated’. For example, if we compare a bull with an Index of +£60 with a bull that has an Index of +£30, we can estimate that the difference in net profit from the progeny of the bulls would be : = ½ x difference in Index = ½ x (60-30) = £15 per cow mated NB. We need to multiply by ½ because only half the progeny’s genes come from the sire. If the two bulls were joined to 200 cows during their breeding life, this would equate to a difference of 200 x £15 = £3,000.

• Terminal – The Terminal Index is designed for a commercial herd using the Beef Shorthorn as a terminal sire. It estimates the genetic differences between animals in net profitability per cow joined, for an example a Shorthorn Continental cross commercial cow herd targeting the production of finishing heifers and steers (average 150 days on feed). The heifers and steers are then marketed at an average 590kg live weight (320kg carcase weight) at 21 months of age. All progeny are slaughtered.

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Trace element supplementation AHDB Beef and Lamb Plus+

Inadequate trace element levels can result in production losses, however over supplementation can also end up with costly issues, so achieving the correct balance is vital for your herd to maximize performance. The most economically important trace elements are copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), iodine (I) and selenium (Se).

Trace element availability is influenced by soil type, types of forage, preservation of forage and also by season. Deficiencies can cause poor production, they can vary with age and state young, pregnant and lactating animals have the greatest need. • Grass and forage widely varies in trace element content due to soil type, pH, drainage, plant species and fertiliser use.

Geology and soil The key reason for different trace element deficiencies is variable geology and soils, consequently they are more likely to show up where the ration is mainly grazed grass or conserved forage, such as a spring calving herd fed no concentrates or minerals or store cattle.

• Clay soils generally have higher trace element levels than sandy soils.

In general

• Independent testing and advice should be considered before buying and feeding supplements.

• Free draining soil contains less trace elements than poorly drained soil

• Soil testing may reveal gross deficiencies but should only be used as a guide when considering the trace element status of livestock.

• Soil derived from acid rocks, such as granite, is low in trace elements

• Herbage analysis alone can be misleading and needs careful interpretation. • Blood or tissue testing is the most accurate indicator or mineral status. • Confirm the deficiency diagnosis by monitoring the response to supplementation. • Over-supplementation could cause toxicity or other undesirable interactions in the animal. • Over-supplementation could waste money. • Draw up a monitoring programme with your vet as part of an active health plan.

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

• Sandy soils contain less trace elements than clay soils

• Excessive liming will reduce herbage cobalt levels but increase the amount of molybdenum present. The latter can reduce the availability of copper to livestock The trace element content of plants can vary widely even in the same soil. In general, herbs and weeds have much higher trace element levels than grasses, and clover is generally richer in trace elements than grass. Re-seeding can reduce trace element intake by reducing the diversity of plants present. Rapidly growing, lush pasture following fertiliser application could also have low trace element content. Encouraging greater sward diversity and incorporating clover can often reduce the need to supplement the diet.


Supplementation Free-choice minerals are widely used but intake can be variable. The widespread belief that animals are aware of any mineral deficiency and will only take what they need is unproven. Mineral mixes, licks and block intakes, both between animals in the same group and across breeds and farms is significant. Some animals take little or none at all, others take several times more than they require. Self-help minerals contain a lot of common salt to control intake. In-feed minerals - compound feeds and balancers are generally well fortified with trace elements, although the level of feeding dictates the amount of trace elements the stock receives. When the concentrate is a mix of straight feeds, it is often prudent to add a mineral supplement at a rate calculated from the recommended daily intake per head. Drenches are an effective method for ensuring each animal receives the required level of trace elements for optimum performance. Drenches containing iodine and cobalt need to be repeated at regular intervals. Cobalt boluses have been widely used, but stock may suffer from rumen regurgitation or the coating sometimes prevents the cobalt from releasing. Top dressing pasture provides a longer-term solution to raise the level of trace elements in grassland. This can be effective in the case of simple deficiencies but not where availability is restricted by other factors, such as alkaline soils, however it requires a disciplined approach with accurate records of application rates and timing. A deficiency state should always be confirmed by independent testing and advice before supplementing stock with extra trace elements.

if a very large amount of the element is ingested or injected at one time, or if it accumulates in the liver over a long period of time. Symptoms: poor growth and scouring, and in extreme cases a thickening of bones around the joints, infertility and ‘spectacling’ of dark coated cattle due to reduced pigmentation of the hair around the eyes. Diagnosis: analysis of blood samples or preferably liver tissue - a biopsy on live animals, or more commonly slaughtered/ dead animals. Pasture levels: a deficiency is either primary due to low copper intake, or secondary due to interference of other elements, specifically a three-way interaction between copper, molybdenum and sulphur, which reduces the availability and absorption of copper from the rumen. Copper is more readily available from cereals and other concentrate feeds than from grass or conserved forage. Compound feeds and minerals formulated for sheep do not have added copper, but cattle feeds and minerals do and should never be fed to sheep. Prevention: due to the risk of causing toxicity, animals should only be supplemented after laboratory tests confirm that extra copper is needed, and if so added to feed, given orally or by injection. Alternatively, it may be applied to pasture, usually in combination with other trace elements.

Cobalt: an essential component of vitamin B12 which is associated with energy metabolism. Vitamin B12 is produced by rumen micro-organisms which require a regular supply of dietary cobalt. Vitamin B12 is secreted in milk; cobalt is only required as the rumen develops. Symptoms: ill-thrift accompanied by poor appetite, lethargy.

Copper: an essential part of a number of different enzymes which allow the body to function. The amount of copper that ruminants absorb from the diet is very variable; excess is stored in the liver. Ruminants are susceptible to copper toxicity, either

Prevention: oral drenching raises blood vitamin B12 levels for around seven days. For longer term supplementation, supply cobalt in a rumen bolus, either on its own or in combination with other trace elements could be considered. Continued over

www.beefshorthorn.org

61


Iodine: a component of the important hormone thyroxine

Selenium: acts with vitamin E to protect tissues against

which controls the animal’s energy metabolism. It is also essential for foetal growth and development.

oxidation and the breakdown of cell membranes. It is also important for immune function. Requirements are related to the diet’s vitamin E content. Excess selenium is toxic.

Symptoms: enlarged thyroid, commonly known as goiter; late abortions, still-born or weak calves, and retained afterbirths. Pasture levels: vary depending on species, soil type, fertiliser treatment, climate and season. There is no clear relationship between levels in herbage, rock or soil type. Iodine can be deposited by rainfall, especially when clouds form over seawater; coastal regions have the highest level of pasture iodine. The typical level in pasture grasses is 0.2-0.3mg/kg DM. Improved grassland usually has higher iodine levels than unimproved - a high percentage of pastures in upland Wales are recognised as being low in iodine. Prevention: oral drench or in a slow release rumen bolus. Iodine can be applied to pasture in combination with other trace elements. Longterm, excessive use of iodine supplementation can also cause toxicity problems.

Trace Element Supplementation of Beef Cattle and Sheep: a copy of the full publication is available from www.beefandlamb.ahdb.org.uk

Symptoms: poor reproductive performance in females - early embryonic death and retained placenta, and in bulls, impaired fertility. Diagnosis: usually by blood sampling and measuring levels of the enzyme, glutathione peroxidise. Pasture levels: Unlike most trace elements, there is a direct relationship between selenium levels in soil, grassland and the animal. So, if soil or pasture levels are known, the likelihood of animals developing a deficiency can be predicted with some confidence. Different plant species take up different amounts of selenium, for example, clovers contain less than ryegrass. The typical level is 0.06-0.08mg/kg DM. Whilst cattle can grow normally on pastures containing 0.06mg/kg DM, it is widely recommended that the whole diet should contain 0.1mg/kg DM or more. Sulphur can interfere with selenium uptake by plants and over-use can exacerbate a marginal deficiency. Prevention: oral drenching with selenium salts can provide adequate supplementation for one to three months. A slow release formulation injection can provide up to 12 months supply from a single shot. Selenium can also be given in a rumen bolus, or applied to pasture in combination with other trace elements.

Est.2014

Founded on great cow families

Lovely, Princess, Queen of Rothes, Nonpareil, Heathermaid, Tessa, Flossy, Blythesome

Herd average Classification VG87 James Cameron 07971998597 62

Johnes Level 1, IBR Accredited, BVD Free Beef Aberdeen Irish ~ Shorthorn ~ Angus Moiled Vale of Strathmore, Scotland

www.trainviewlivestock.co.uk

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Valerie Orr 07753504654


PLYNLIMON

Stock for sale annually. Pedigree Beef Shorthorn & Beef Shorthorn X Highland. Steers and breeding heifers available.

BEEF SHORTHORNS

Plynlimon cattle are reared on land above 1,000ft. We breed for ease of management, in particular ease of calving and a degree of internal and external fat cover to assist in adverse weather conditions. We expect Kenneth’s offspring, both male and female, will provide this ability.

Highland and Beef Shorthorn x Highland cows making use of natural hill grazing, Shorthorn calves by Kenneth.

Plynlimon Daisy VG 88, mother of Plynlimon Kenneth

mpetition - Best under 2 year bull 2 018

Plynlimon

ll. Welsh co of Upsa a t o k a yD Kenneth b

Enquiries welcome to: Christopher Evans, Llerneuaddau, Ponterwyd, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3AG tel: 01544 327223 | email: cpe@ladyarbourcourt.co.uk Manager: Rheinallt Jones | tel: 01970 890480 Thank you to all our purchasers in 2019, we now have 4 home bred Beef Shorthorn bulls (and numerous Highland x Shorthorn females) out on commercial hill farms in Wales.

www.beefshorthorn.org

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The quest is on to identify homozygous polled cattle or 100% polled individuals within the breed Demand for polled beef cattle is gaining momentum. The industry already requires dehorned animals in transit, as well as for farm and safety and welfare reasons. Also dehorning is another job that can come at a busy time on the farm; a botched job can cause fly trouble. Consequently, I believe that the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society should embrace polled cattle or risk commercial buyers choosing other breeds.

the Hon. Gerald Turton Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society d i r ec t o r

A number of Beef Shorthorn breeders have recently imported genetics from Australia and Canada, many of which are likely to be homozygous polled. These cattle together with UK bred homozygous polled cattle have the opportunity to have that status recognised on their online pedigree certificate. Polling is a genetic mutation. The polling gene is dominant and the horned gene is recessive. It means that animals which are visually horned must have two copies of the horned gene, however visually polled animals maybe heterozygous - they may carry one horned gene and one poll gene, or homozygous carrying two poll genes. Only DNA testing can accurately distinguish which genes each animal carries. Two different mutations have recently been discovered that result in poll the Celtic gene (Pc) and the Friesian gene (Pf) If you DNA test hair from the animal’s tail you will find • Pc/Pc or Pf/Pf = homozygous polled and will be polled • N/Pc or N/Pf = heterozygous polled or scurred; the animal will carry the horned (N) gene but will be polled, however when crossed may produce a horned calf • N/N = homozygous horned and will be horned The following table will explain further.

Key: N = Horned (Not Polled) Pc = Polled Celtic Pf = Polled Friesan

SNP test result

Description

Pc/Pc Homozygous Polled Animal is polled and will only produce polled Pf/Pf (or scurred) calves even if crossed with horned animals Heterozygous Polled Animal will be polled (or scurred), however carries both a polled and horned gene. N/Pc When crossed with other animals carrying two polled genes will produce polled progeny 100% of the time.

Flashback to 1888: Captain Miller of Elmore Ohio wrote that he has read an article in the Breeders Gazette featuring a small herd of naturally polled Shorthorns. He went to Minneapolis and purchased 1881 born yearling twins, Millie Gwynne and Nellie Gwynne, and a bull, King of Kine. The Gwynne twins were out of Oakwood Gwynne 4 Vol 15 ASHB, a registered cow with scurs. King of Kine was then mated to his half sister, Nellie Gwynne to produce a polled animal, the first that could be registered in the American herd book.

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When crossed with other animals carrying one horned gene will produce horned progeny 25% of the time and polled progeny 75% of the time. When crossed with other animals carrying two horned N/Pf genes will produce horned progeny 50% of the time and polled progeny 50% of the time. Homozygous Horned Animal will be horned. When crossed with other animals carrying two polled genes will produce polled progeny 100% of the time. N/N

When crossed with other animals carrying one horned gene will produce horned progeny 50% of the time and polled progeny 50% of the time.

When crossed with other animals carrying two horned genes will produce horned progeny 100% of the time.

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Potential joining outcomes Homozygous Polled x Homozygous Polled

P P

P

P/P P/P

P

P/P P/P

100% Homozygous polled progency

BEEF SHORTHORNS at SKIPTON

Homozygous Polled x Hetrozygous Polled

P N

P

P/P N/P

P

P/P N/P

50% Homozygous polled progeny 50% Hetrozygous polled progeny Hetrozygous Polled x Hetrozygous Polled

P N

P

P/P N/P

N

N/P N/N

25% Homozygous polled progeny 50% Hetrozygous polled progeny 25% Homozygous horned progeny Homozygous Polled x Homozygous Horned

P P

N

N/P N/P

N

N/P N/P

100% Hetrozygous polled progency Homozygous Horned x Hetrozygous Polled

P N

N

N/P N/N

N

N/P N/N

50% Hetrozygous polled progeny 50% Homozygous horned progeny Homozygous Horned x Homozygous Horned

N N

N

N/N N/N

N

N/N N/N

Annual Show & Sale Wednesday 11th November 2020 Craven Cattle Marts Ltd Gargrave Road, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 1UD 01756 792375 www.ccmauctions.com

100% Homozygous horned progeny www.beefshorthorn.org

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Wenmar Beef Shorthorns Semen available in the UK and for export throughout mainland Europe

DRS Super Mario 42E Canadian herd book No. [CAN] *23935 Age 18 months on photo. Full details on DRS Super Mario 42E are available on our website.

SIRE

DAM

Crooked Post Stockman 4Z

DRS Picture Perfect 32A

Two purchasing options available: 1. Semen suitable for progeny registrations in the Beef 2. Semen only to be used for commercial breeding is offered Shorthorn Society herd book is offered in minimum units in minimum batches of 50 straws at a cost of £750 plus a £75 of 10 straws at a cost of £400 plus a £75 fixed fee to cover fixed fee to cover shipping (UK mainland only). shipping (UK mainland only), other areas happily quoted on Purchasers will be required to sign a disclosure document request. Limited numbers available for pedigree registrations. agreeing to the terms of use statement. Plus 3 great ordering incentives!

Early Bird Offer - 10% extra FREE!

Pedigree Offer - 50% off your next order!

Place and pay for your order by the 31st March 2020 and receive 10% extra semen FREE!

Every 100th straw of a Drover’s semen sold, entitles the purchaser to a 50% discount off their next semen order. Order today! (offer applies to semen orders for pedigree use only. Maximum credit £500).

Lucky Draw - Purchase Super Mario’s semen for a chance to win two free embryos in our prize draw to be held in December 2020

For a full listing of all of our cattle, embryos and semen available please visit our website:

www.wenmarbeefshorthorns.com Wenmar Beef Shorthorns

Exclusively available in the UK and mainland Europe from Martyn Moore.

Wenmar Beef Shorthorns, Warren Farm, Lulsley, Knightwick, Worcestershire, WR6 5QT.

Mobile: 07767 608012 Email: martyncmoore@manx.net 66

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Semen use and care in breeding programmes: AI, ET and IVF Transitioning from niche breed to mainstream

Rob Simmons v e t e r in a r y “MOET and IVF are accelerating genetic progress. They are maximising the number of offspring from the best dams and permitting the introduction of completely new genetics on both dam and sire side.”

The breeding of cattle has advanced significantly since semen was first successfully frozen for use in artificial insemination (AI) in 1949. AI has become the primary breeding method for most producers in the dairy sector and is being increasingly popular with beef producers as well. It allows the introduction of new genetics into the herd from high quality bloodlines worldwide in a cost-effective and bio-secure manner. To further accelerate genetic progress, techniques to maximise the number of offspring from the best dams have also been developed. These include the introduction of Multiple Ovulation Embryo Transfer, known as MOET or ‘flushing’, and In Vitro embryo production (IVF). As well as being a means of insurance that these bloodlines endure, these techniques allow the overall merit of the herd to advance more quickly and permit the introduction of completely new genetics on both the dam and sire side through the trade of embryos. Furthermore, they can offer a new income stream through the sale of genetics both within the UK and abroad. Flushing cows involves the synchronisation of the donor, followed by a period of superstimulation, using hormones to encourage the development and ovulation of a large number of follicles. The donor animal is then served two to three times, and embryos are flushed from the uterus using a catheter passed through the cervix one week later. The embryos recovered are graded, and either transferred directly into recipient animals which were programmed to be in heat seven days previously, or frozen for future transfer or sale. On average this generates around 5.5 embryos every six weeks or so. IVF involves recovering eggs, known as oocytes, directly from the ovary using a needle under ultrasound scanner guidance. Because the uterus is not involved, oocytes can be collected from younger animals that have not yet reached puberty, as well as animals in the first third of pregnancy, and from some animals which have previously been reproductive failures. The oocytes recovered are maintained in a controlled environment for 24 hours before being fertilised in the laboratory. Because only small volumes of semen are required for fertilisation in the lab, only one straw needs to be thawed, and it is possible to fertilise the oocytes from three to four donors all with just one straw. After fertilisation the resulting embryos are cultured for a further seven days before being either transferred or frozen. On average IVF generates approximately 4.5 embryos every two weeks. Regardless of the methods used when breeding cattle, the dam and sire remain key. Just as cows and heifers need to be healthy, in correct body condition, on a good quality diet and low stress environment to be bred successfully by natural service and AI, these are equally, if not more, important for flushing and IVF. At least as much attention also needs to be paid to the bulls. In natural service situations the importance of breeding soundness examinations cannot be overstated. They include checking that there are no abnormalities in the penis, that the sperm are suitably numerous, without excessive abnormalities, and are strong swimmers. These should be carried out on a regular basis, much as you’d check your bulls for lameness and avoid using them if they were unable to work effectively. AI, IVF and, in most cases, flushing of cattle are all reliant on frozen straws of semen kept in liquid nitrogen at -196°C. The health and disease status of the donor sires are all checked prior to semen collection, and the processing, testing and freezing carried out ensure that the semen is of good quality, and will produce the required results once used correctly. Despite this, there is significant variation seen in results between different batches of semen. In our IVF lab in Newbiggin, Cumbria, we thaw out and assess semen every week prior to using it to fertilise oocytes collected from our IVF donors, and in doing this we regularly see straws of semen with poor motility, or large numbers of dead cells. This damage primarily occurs after freezing, and highlights the importance that needs to be placed on the correct storage, transport and handling.

Semen handling from the tank

It goes without saying really that liquid nitrogen tanks need to be checked regularly, to ensure they are functioning correctly, and remain filled at all times. www.beefshorthorn.org

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Liquid nitrogen flasks consist of two skins, with a vacuum in between. Loss of the vacuum will lead to the rapid boiling and loss of the nitrogen. The inner vessel is suspended from the neck of the outer vessel, and as such it is important that the flask isn’t knocked, dented or tipped. Significant vibration and tipping of these can lead to cracks developing in the inside of the neck, and tank failure, which can be slow and occur over weeks or months or an acute damage which will result in warming of the flask in a matter of days. The appearance of frost at the neck on the outside of the tank is the most common sign that the vacuum has been lost, and warrants urgent action. It is also good practice to keep the flask out of direct sunlight, and off the floor, particularly if the floor gets wet, to prevent corrosion. Transferring semen between goblets or flasks, or when trying to identify a straw within a tank, are other areas requiring consideration. Many breeding companies are moving from larger 0.5ml straws, to narrower 0.25ml straws. These smaller straws have a larger surface to volume ratio and are more susceptible to thermal damage when locating straws or moving them between tanks. The upper half of the neck of the flask should be considered to be the ‘danger zone’ and raising straws this high should be avoided wherever possible. Having a clear inventory of where each bull can be found, and a label in each pot can help to identify the correct straws quickly, without having to lift them out of the goblets. In an ideal world a straw would only ever be lifted from the goblet immediately before use. A straw does not have to thaw completely for the sperm within it to be significantly damaged. The partial thawing of straws which are incorrectly handled is followed by uncontrolled refreezing when they are returned to the liquid nitrogen, which leads to the damage. Any canisters lifted into the ‘danger zone’ must be returned within five seconds at most and must remain back in the nitrogen for at least 10 seconds before lifting again. It is worth noting that the issues caused by incorrect handling are likely to be pronounced in the case of sexed semen, where there are only 10% to 20% of the number of sperm when compared with a conventional straw. Finally, each bull stud tends to have its own freezing protocol and, hence, its own recommendation for thawing semen for transfer. These can differ between breeding companies, so it is best to check the recommended thaw protocol to minimise the risk of damaging sperm by incorrect thawing. This is especially the case with imported semen.

Rob Simmons making an oocyte collection

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Checking for embryos and embyros viewed under a microscope

The consequences of damaged sperm in AI are reduced pregnancy rates, extended calving periods or higher returns to service. In flushing this would lead to higher numbers of unfertilised oocytes being recovered, and a reduction in the quality of embryos produced, which would also potentially be seen in IVF. Rob Simmons BVMS MRCVS Paragon Veterinary Group and Activf-ET


Est. 2004 We Live Naturally at 900ft Above Sea Level

FARMS

FARMS

Stirling Feb’19 Overall Res Champion Meonhill Lion King (Photo By Adrian Legge)

Chapelton Winsome daughters

Owners Mrs M Chaplin Little West End Farm Chidden Hampshire PO7 4TE Tel: 02392 632101 email: marychaplin@btinternet.com

Limited Semen Chapelton Winsome

Manager John Reynolds Mob 07733 351695 email: marygreynolds@hotmail.com

“Visitors Welcome" Stock For Sale

CHeCS Accredited BVD, IBR, Lepto, Johnnes www.beefshorthorn.org

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Health test requirements for Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society sales (January 2020) We are leading the way and health cards at Society sales continue to be an important source of information for buyers. Here is our checklist which can be found online under shows.

Male Animals Test required Vaccination Health card boxes to be completed BVD accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed Non BVD accredited herds - Yes - Antigen and antibody Optional- but recommended The individual test result must be shown must be part of the health and if vaccinated the details must be scheme and be testing for a completed minimum of 12 months IBR accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed IBR non-accredited herds Yes - Antibody Optional - but recommended The individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Lepto accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional

The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed

Lepto non-accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional If tested the animal’s individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Johne’s - must be part of the Every animal must have the risk level of the health scheme and be testing herd shown in the box. Non-homebred for a minimum of 12 months animals have no details in the Johne’s box

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Female Animals Test required Vaccination Health card boxes to be completed BVD accredited herds No - Individual test optional Must be vaccinated to cover The herd accredited box and vaccination period of sale. The Society details box must be completed strongly recommends that in-calf females are vaccinated prior to service Non BVD accredited herds - Yes - Antigen and antibody must be part of the health scheme and be testing for a minimum of 12 months

Must be vaccinated to cover The individual test result must be shown period of sale. The Society and vaccination details must be strongly recommends that completed in-calf females are vaccinated prior to service

IBR accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended

The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed

IBR non-accredited herds Yes - Antibody Optional - but recommended The individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Lepto accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional

The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed

Lepto non-accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional If tested the animal’s individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Johne’s - must be part of the Every animal must have the risk level of the health scheme and be testing herd shown in the box. Non-homebred for a minimum of 12 months animals have no details in the Johne’s box

Calves at Foot (the minimum age at date of sale is one month) Calves at foot

Test required

Vaccination

BVD accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended

Health card boxes to be completed The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed

Non BVD accredited herds - Yes - Antigen Optional- but recommended The individual test result must be shown must be part of the Health and if vaccinated the details must be Scheme and be testing for a completed minimum of 12 months IBR accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed IBR non-accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional - but recommended If tested the animal’s individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Lepto accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional The herd accredited box must be completed and if vaccinated the details must be completed Lepto non-accredited herds No - Individual test optional Optional If tested the animal’s individual test result must be shown and if vaccinated the details must be completed Johne’s - must be part of the Every animal must have the risk level of the health scheme and be testing herd shown in the box. Non-homebred for a minimum of 12 months animals have no details in the Johne’s box www.beefshorthorn.org

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HOME OF THE STANFORD PARK AND LONGFIELD HERDS

Kassam of Longfield

Champion Male and Reserve Breed Champion at Beef Shorthorn National Show 2019, Great Yorkshire Show Breed Champion at Royal Three Counties Show 2019 Breed Champion and Reserve Interbreed Male Champion at Edenbridge Show 2019 Champion Senior Stock Bull - Southern Club Herd Competition 2019 All females classified annually

Available for sale Pedigree Beef Shorthorn cows and calves, In calf and maiden heifers, Unrelated young bulls

Semen available from: Meonhill Geronimo and Jacobite Star of Longfield

Visitors are always welcome Stanford Park Farm, Park Lane, Stanford in the Vale, Oxfordshire, SN7 8PF Simon Bradley Farmer: 07739 035667 | Tina Russell: 07711 810354 Email: stanfordpark@btinternet.com

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

stanfordparkbeefshorthorns


Stirling Beef Shorthorn bulls peak at 15,000gns Monday, 4 February 2019 Beef Shorthorn bulls sold to a top of 15,000gns in Stirling on Monday 4 February at the breed society’s official annual spring fixture.

Ian Park J U D G E

Overall and junior champion, Podehole Landmark, 15,000gns

Bulls

Sale leader was the junior and overall champion, Podehole Landmark TI +26, SRI +19, a 22-month-old roan by Knockenjig Hercules and out of a homebred dam. Bred and exhibited by H Horrell, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire he sold to breed newcomers, Gates Farming Partnership, Oakham, Leicestershire. Another Hercules son from the same breeder, the 23-month-old red Podehole Lincoln TI +30, SRI +25 was awarded the senior championship and made 7,500gns to MG Bailey, Forfar, Angus. The day’s second highest call of 13,000gns went to Leonard of Upsall TI +30, SRI +26, a 23-month-old roan Dingo of Upsall son from Hon. G Turton, Thirsk, North Yorkshire to David and Rosemary Dickie, Sanquhar, Dumfriesshire. Two more entries from Hon. G Turton were in the money. First at 8,000gns was Lawyer of Upsall TI +37, SRI +34, a 23-month-old roan within the breed’s top 1%. Sired by Fearn Elmer, he went to SS Horton and Sons, Cirencester, Gloucestershire. Next came a bid of 5,000gns from Lour Farms, Forfar, Angus for Longfellow of Upsall TI +24, SRI +21, a 21-month-old roan by Firefox of Upsall. A bid of 9,000gns from C Lowther, Penrith, Cumbria, secured Glenisla Lochan Dubh TI +29, SRI +27, a 22-month-old roan by Glenisla Jack Frost from Major JPO Gibb, Blairgowrie, Perthshire. Dunsyre Lancelot TI +21, SRI +18, a 22-month-old roan by Redhill Ferny from Carey Coombs, Carnwath, Lanarkshire made 7,500gns to RL Morris and Partners, Blairgowrie, Perthshire. Another entry from the same breeder, Dunsyre Lanark TI +21, SRI +20, a 22-month-old roan Dunsyre Hamlet son went for 5,000gns to the Scottish Government’s bull stud. Chapelton Lancer TI +21, SRI +20, a 22-month-old roan by the 9,000gns Fergus of Upsall from DJ Biggar, Castle Douglas, Dumfriesshire made 5,500gns to P Dawes, Dinmore, Herefordshire. Mullaglass Lexus TI +22, SRI +14, a 22-month-old roan Dunsyre Esquire son from R Henning, Newry, County Down commanded 5,200gns from A Morton, Denny, Stirlingshire. Laga Farms, Evie, Orkney offered their Lagas Larry TI +27, SRI +26 for 5,000gns to WG and H Murray, Golspie, Sutherland. A 22-month-old red and white, he was by the 5,500gns Chapelton Adonis. www.beefshorthorn.org

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Senior champion, Podehole Lincoln,7,500gns

Females

Chapelton Gem, 6,000gns

Trade was led at 6,000gns by Chapelton Gem TI +28, SRI +24, a 22-month-old in calf roan heifer from DJ Biggar. Sired by the 9,000gns Fergus of Upsall, she sold to Thomas Staunton, Kinvara, County Galway. Next at 4,000gns was the champion female, Glenisla Foxglove Flake L295 TI +29, SRI +23, a roan 22-month-old in calf roan heifer by the 7,500gns Chapelton Glen Clova. Bred and exhibited by JPO Gibb, she was secured by A Shaw, Dungannon, County Tyrone. Glenisla Foxglove Flake L242 TI +26, SRI +27, a 23-month-old in calf white heifer from the same breeder sold for 3,200gns to J Dodge, Cunningburgh, Shetland. Mountbenger Lorna TI +17, SRI +14 was awarded the reserve female title and sold for 3,000gns to Mark Runciman and Partners, Lauder, Berwickshire. Bred by JF Irving and Son, Yarrow, Selkirkshire, she was a 23-month-old in calf roan heifer by Mountbenger Jake. Averages: 41 bulls £4,676; 19 females £2,536. 57 Fearn draft, 5 females £2,121. Auctioneers: United Auctions

Class results ~ Beef Shorthorn Males (Senior Classes) Bulls born on or between 3 December 2016 and 3 March 2017 (Class 1) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Meonside Legionaire (P) Craigeassie Logan (P) Meonside Kilimanjaro (P) Willingham Logan (P) Highlee Larkin (H)

T & D Bradley Farmer Lord Glendyne T & D Bradley Farmer Mr A Haigh Mrs Tracy Severn

Bulls born on or between 4 and 19 March 2017 (Class 2) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Leonard of Upsall (P) Podehole Lancer (P) Cutthorn Loam (P) Mountbenger Lucias (H) Chapelton Liberator (P)

The Hon. G Turton Mr H Horrell A J Gibson Farming J F Irving & Son Mr D J Biggar OBE

Bulls born on or between 20 and 25 March 2017 (Class 3)

Reserve male champion, Meonhill Lion King, 4,000gns

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1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Podehole Lincoln (H) Chapelton Lionheart (P) Millerston Lynchpin (H) Uppermill Roman (P) Knockenjig Lancelot (H)

Mr H Horrell Mr D J Biggar OBE Jack P Ramsay Mr J Porter David and Rosemary Dickie


Beef Shorthorn Males (Intermediate Classes) Bulls born on or between 26 and 31 March 2017 (Class 4) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Lawyer of Upsall (P) Lightning of Skaillhouse (P) Stonehills Logic (P) Mineshop Ingleton L167 (P) (Et) Millerston Lookout (H)

The Hon. G Turton Messrs C Macadie and Sons Mr G L Riby Chris Nye Jack P Ramsay

Bulls born on or between 1 and 10 April 2017 (Class 5) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Dunsyre Lanark (P) Dunsyre Lancelot (P) Dunsyre Leo (H) Cairnsmore Lambert (P) Mineshop Quantum Leap (P) (Et)

Carey Coombs Carey Coombs Carey Coombs Mr and Mrs B Landers Chris Nye

Bulls born on or between 11 and 18 April 2017 (Class 6) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Meonhill Lion King (H) Miltonlockhart Lionheart (P) Eastmill Lad (P) Lagas Larry (P) Shawhill Lancelot (P)

LEP Farms Ltd Mr William Allan Firm of Doldy Farm Laga Farms Ltd Thomson Roddick & Laurie

Beef Shorthorn Males (Junior Classes) Bulls born on or between 19 April and 8 May 2017 (Class 7) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Podehole Landmark (H) Chapelton Lancer (P) Millerston Lawman (H) Sowerbyparks Gypsy Leader (P) Castlemount Loverboy (P)

Mr H Horrell Mr D J Biggar OBE Jack P Ramsay S & G Hunt D McDowell

Bulls born on or between 9 May and 13 June 2017 (Class 8) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Lagas Lovejoy (P) Willingham Loki (P) Gordon Desert Storm (P) (Et) Knockenjig Lonestar (P) Eastmill Lord (H)

Laga Farms Ltd Mr A Haigh G R Brooke Estate David and Rosemary Dickie Firm of Doldy Farm

Bulls born on or after 14 June 2017 (Class 9) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Leonard of Upsall, 13,000gns

Derwentwood Leonard (H) (Et) Miltonlockhart Landlord (P) Lookout of Ballyvaddy (P) Mullaglass Lovejoy (P) Lurig of Ballyvaddy (P)

Glenisla Lochan Dubh, 9,000gns

N and A Hunter Mr William Allan T & K Madden Mr R Henning T & K Madden

Lawyer of Upsall, 8,000gns www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beef Shorthorn Females Heifers born on or between 22 March 2016 and 12 May 2017 (Class 10) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Rosewood Rosewel 9th of Skaillhouse (P) Mountbenger Kimberly (P) Glenisla Foxglove Flake L242 (P) Lancaster Liz 25th of Skaillhouse (P) Chapelton Princess Royal 5755 (P)

Messrs C Macadie and Sons J F Irving & Son Major J P O Gibb Messrs C Macadie and Sons Mr D J Biggar OBE

Heifers born on or between 13 March and 18 April 2017 (Class 11)

Reserve female champion, Mountbenger Lorna, 3,000gns

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Mountbenger Lorna (P) Burnside Minnie (P) Uppermill Flossy Fox (P) Fearn Monique L1512 (H) Uppermill Lovely Lyndsay (P)

J F Irving & Son William and Jill McAllister Mr J Porter J Scott & Partners Mr J Porter

Heifers born on or after 19 April 2017 (Class 12) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Glenisla Foxglove Flake L295 (P) Chapelton Gem 5839 (P) Ashvale Beauty 2 (H) Twin Ashvale Beauty (H) Castlemount Matrix Veronica (P)

Major J P O Gibb Mr D J Biggar OBE Mr R and Mrs F McKeown Mr R and Mrs F McKeown D McDowell

Champions Senior Champion Bull (Classes 1 – 3) Champion Reserve

Podehole Lincoln (H) Leonard Of Upsall (P)

Mr H Horrell The Hon. G Turton

Intermediate Champion Bull (Classes 4 – 6) Champion Reserve

Junior Champion Bull (Classes 7 – 9) Champion Reserve

Meonhill Lion King (H) Lawyer Of Upsall (P)

LEP Farms Ltd The Hon. G Turton

Podehole Landmark (H) Chapelton Lancer (P)

Mr H Horrell Mr D J Biggar OBE

Overall Male Champion Champion Reserve

Podehole Landmark (H) Meonhill Lion King (H)

Female Champion (Classes 10 – 12) Champion Reserve

Mr H Horrell LEP Farms Ltd

Glenisla Foxglove Flake L295 (P) Mountbenger Lorna (P)

Major J P O Gibb J F Irving & Son

Trophies Uppermill Dunsmore Park Challenge Cup Champion Female

Glenisla Foxglove Flake L295 (P)

Major J P O Gibb

Chapelton Lancer (P), Chapelton Lionheart (P), Chapelton Libertor (P)

Mr D J Biggar OBE

Auctioneers Challenge Cup Best Three Bulls

Uppermill Linzee Gordon Trophy Junior Champion Bull

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Podehole Landmark (H)

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Mr H Horrell


Trophies continued Uppermill Millhills Cup Senior Champion Bull

Podehole Lincoln (H)

Mr H Horrell

Meonhill Lion King (H)

LEP Farms Ltd

Leonard of Upsall (P), Lawyer of Upsall (P)

The Hon. G Turton

Podehole Landmark (H)

Mr H Horrell

Meonhill Lion King (H)

LEP Farms Ltd

Podehole Landmark (H)

Mr H Horrell

Leonard Of Upsall (P)

The Hon. G Turton

South Africa Trophy Intermediate Champion Bull The Uppermill Bapton Cup Best Two Bulls Uppermill Calrossie Challenge Cup Supreme Champion Bull Campbell/Durno Perpetual Trophy Reserve Supreme Champion Bull City of Perth Trophy Supreme Champion Bull MacGillivray Aldie Trophy Best Poll Bull The Herdsman’s Trophy Herdsman of Supreme Bull

Roy McDonald

Stirling Shorthorn Sales February 2019 Bull Sales Sales (Guineas)

Lot Animal Name Buyer No.

3000 3600 2000 3000 2000 4500 13000 2600 3800 3500 4000 7500 3000 8000 3250 3250 3000 3000 2600 5000 5200 7500 4000 4000

176 181 182 185 187 189 190 194 195 197 201 203 206 207 209 209A 211 214 215 218 220 221 222 223

Meonside Kilimanjaro (P) Meonside Legionaire (P) Lowther Larry (P) Craigeassie Logan (P) Lowther Leon (P) Chapelton Liberator (P) Leonard of Upsall (P) Grandtullybrae Lochailort (P) Podehole Lancer (P) Uppermill Glenn (P) Chapelton Lionheart (P) Podehole Lincoln (H) Millerston Lynchpin (H) Lawyer of Upsall (P) Lightning of Skaillhouse (P) Lightning of Skaillhouse (P) Stonehills Logic (P) Uppermill Gibraltar (P) Millerston Lookout (H) Dunsyre Lanark (P) Mullaglass Lexus (P) Dunsyre Lancelot (P) Mountbenger Lucas (P) Dunsyre Leo (H)

G T & S Coghill M O & L D Jones A H A Morgan J & R Paisley W C Mably Farming R F Leach D M Dickie C I Graham Haddo House Estate Farms R Brown C Macadie and Sons M G Bailey Ellary Farms Ltd S S Horton & Sons W & J McAllister T & K Madden Ross Whitcombe A Purdon A & B McHarg Scottish Government O F A Morton R L Morris and Partners P Turnbull Exmoor Forest Farms www.beefshorthorn.org

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Bull Sales continued Sales Lot Animal Name Buyer (Guineas) No. 9000 1800 3000 5000 4000 4000 5500 15000 3000 2200 4000 5000 2000 3000 2000 2000 3000 4000 3800 1800

224 225 229 232 234 236 238 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 250 252 254 261 266

Glenisla Lochan Dubh (P) Mineshop Quantum Leap (P) (ET) Eastmill Lad (P) Lagas Larry (P) Meonhill Lion King (H) Miltonlockhart Lionheart (P) Chapelton Lancer (P) Podehole Landmark (H) Sowerbyparks Gypsy Leader (P) Stallashaw Lincoln (H) Cairnsmore Landmark (P) Longfellow of Upsall (P) Castlemount Loverboy (P) Millerston Lawman (H) Miltonlockhart Logan (P) Knockenjig Lonestar (P) Lagas Lovejoy (P) Gordon Desert Storm (P) (ET) Derwentwood Leonard (H) (ET) Ashvale Lord of the Ring (H)

C Lowther P L Dickson and Son M R S Macrae W G & H Murray Alison Watt Ormsary Farmers P Dawes Gates Farming W C Mably Farming G R & D M Thorp J P Ramsay Lour Farms J & J Green K R & J M A Gauld Broadland Properties A H A Morgan Ormsary Farmers Aucheneck Estates T C Brown W Owen

Female Sales Sales Lot Animal Name Buyer (Guineas) No. 2600 2500 2800 2000 1400 3200 1700 2500 2400 3000 1200 2500 2000 1200 6000 4000 1500 1700 1700 1200 2400 2400 1500 1600 2200 57200

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276 Mountbenger Kimberly (P) 277 Rosewood Rosewel 9th of Skaillhouse (P) 278 Lancaster Liz 24th of Skaillhouse (P) 279 Fearn Lassie L1505 (P) 280 Lancaster Liz 25th of Skaillhouse (P) 281 Glenisla Foxglove Flake L242 (P) 283 Chapelton Princess Royal 5755 (P) 284 Chapelton Duchess 5760 (P) 285 Chapelton Princess Royal 5763 (P) 287 Mountbenger Lorna (P) 288 Miltonlockhart Lassie (P) 291 Burnside Minnie (P) Twin 292 Fearn Monique L1512 (H) 297 Miltonlockhart Lizzie (P) 298 Chapelton Gem 5839 (P) 299 Glenisla Foxglove Flake L295 (P) Twin 300 Burnside Miss Moneypenny (P) 301 Ashvale Beauty (H) Twin 302 Ashvale Beauty 2 (H) Twin 312 Grandtullybrae Foxglove Flake L667 (P) 314 Fearn Monique L1576 (P) 315 Fearn Fairy Clipper L1582 (P) 316 Fearn Phyllis L1585 (P) 317 Fearn Phyllis L1587 (P) 318 Fearn Monique L1596 (H) Total Guineas

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

I Tennant J & A Brown C Clarke R Brown W S L Muir J Dodge W S L Muir J Dodge Martin Kelly Mark Runciman & Partners W C Mably Farming Alison Watt Walker of Netherwood W C Mably Farming Thomas Staunton A Shaw Alison Watt David Gray David Gray David Clark R Brown Denis Cadzow & Co Ltd R Brown R Brown Denis Cadzow & Co Ltd


www.beefshorthorn.org

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OAKLEIGH SHORTHORNS Hardy natural reared cattle off the North Yorkshire Moors

Oakleigh Briar Rose Lacie

Oakleigh Kerry

Reserve Supreme Champion Carlisle May 2019

Carlisle May 2018 Sold for 4000gns.

Oakleigh Kildale Lad

Oakleigh Justright

Champion at Driffield Show 2018 Sold privately to Frazer Huggil of the Ballard Herd.

Record Price Female at Carlisle 2017 Heifer in calf to ‘Chapelton Bonanza’ Sire: Blelack Masterpiece Dam: Endeavour Bred.

Members of Biobest HI Health Scheme Accredited free: IBR, BVD, LEPTO, Risk Level 1 Johnes, T.B 4. Enquiries Welcome ~ Peter Turnbull West House Farm, Kildale, Whitby, YO21 2SE Tel: 01642 722506 Mobile: 07977 396829

Also Blackface and Texel Rams Sold Privately Advert design by: johnmuirdesign.com ~ Tel: 07929 646999

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Beef Shorthorns sell to 2,800gns in Carlisle Friday, 1 March 2019 Beef Shorthorn bulls sold to a top of 2,800gns in Carlisle on Friday 1 March at the breed society’s official early spring sale.

Fraser Hugill J U D G E

Male champion and overall supreme, Inglestone Laureate

Reserve male champion and overall reserve, Laird of Upsall

Heading the trade at 2,800gns was Stonehills Lightning TI +28, SRI +30, a two-year-old white bull by the 4,000gns Tofts Prince Grenadier from G Riby, Bridlington, East Yorkshire to MacGregor Farming, Norwich, Norfolk. Next at 2,600gns was the reserve male champion, Laird of Upsall TI +29, SRI +29 from Hon. G Turton, Thirsk, North Yorkshire to Gillesbie Farms, Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire. A two-year-old red bull, he was by the homebred Jehu of Upsall. Leading female at 2,000gns was the 22-month-old in calf red heifer and reserve female champion, Gonder Sarahrose Louisa TI +9, SRI +8 from J and P Miller, Preston, Lancashire. A Meonhill Eastern Star daughter, she sold to Irish breeder, Danny Molloy, Athlone, West Meath. Averages: 4 bulls £2,572.50; 2 females £1,890.00. Auctioneers: Harrison and Hetherington

Judge, Fraser Hugill with champion female, Sandwick Lakeland Flossy

Judge, Fraser Hugill with supreme champion, Inglestone Laureate and reserve champion, Laird of Upsall www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beef Shorthorns sell to 7,000gns in Stirling Monday, 6 May 2019 Beef Shorthorn bulls sold to a top of 7,000gns in Stirling at the breed society’s official sale in Stirling on Monday 6 May. Heading the trade at 7,000gns was Eastmill Lord TI +15, SRI +11, a two-year-old dark roan by Eastmill Joop. Bred and exhibited by Doldy Farms, Blairgowrie, Perthshire, he went to H Adamson and Son, Newport-on-Tay, Fife.

Stuart Macadie J U D G E

Next at 5,000gns was the reserve champion, Coxhill Luke, TI +14, SRI +13, a roan two-year-old from LJ Townsend, Moffat, Dumfriesshire. A Barnaigh Highwayman son, he sold to Fiona Davidson, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire. Elliot Top Gun (H), TI +26, SRI +18 from J Elliot, Kelso, Roxburghshire attracted a 4,000gns bid from the Scottish Government to join its bull stud at Inverness. A roan 23-month-old, he was by the 13,000gns Chapelton Braveheart and earlier on had been awarded the championship. Averages: 10 bulls ÂŁ3,203. Auctioneers: United Auctions

Eastmill Lord, 7,000gns

Champion, Elliot Top Gun, 4,000gns

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Reserve champion, Coxhill Luke, 5,000gns


MILLERSTON BEEF SHORTHORNS  

Our herd motto of “bred to breed” has never been more appropriate than with progeny Millerston Irania Flame EX90. (pictured with 2019 bull calf).

Her Dam: Millerston Irania Ace EX91. 12 years old & still going strong. Her Progeny: Millerston Jasper born 1/4/15. Champion Stirling County Show. Sold for 6,000gns. Millerston Kasper born 5/4/16. Junior Male Champion Stars of the Future, Junior & Reserve Breed Champion Great Yorkshire Show. Sold for 20,000gns. Millerston Irania Linnet born 3/4/17. Junior Female Champion Stars of the Future. Best 2017 Heifer Scottish Club Herd Competition. Retained. Millerston ManOWar born 7/4/18 Junior Male Champion Stars of the Future. For Sale Feb 2020. Millerston Naval Officer 26/6/19. Showing potential. _________________________________________________________

JACK & GRACE RAMSAY Millerston Farm Mauchline East Ayrshire KA5 5HH

Tel: 01290 550997 Mob: 07791302478 Email: millerstonfarm@aol.com www.millerstonfarm.wixsite.com/beefshorthorn

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Carlisle Beef Shorthorn peak at 5,600gns Friday, 24 May 2019 Beef Shorthorn females sold to a top of 5,600gns whilst bulls went to 5,000gns and achieved 87% clearance in Carlisle on Friday 24 May at the breed society’s official spring sale. Sale topper at 5,600gns was the female and overall champion, Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie TI +29, SRI +25, a two-year-old red and little white by the 7,500gns Dunsyre Demetri from James Porter, Dromore, Co Down. She returned to Northern Ireland with Messrs Gott, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh.

Dan Bull J U D G E

Overall and female champion, Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie at 5,600gns

Another Demetri daughter, Uppermill Broadhooks Bernadett TI +21, SRI +20, a 21-month-old roan heifer from James Porter made 2,100gns to Messrs Ewing on behalf of a client, whilst his red and little white Uppermill Lovely Leanne TI +16, SRI +12, a 21-month-old heifer by Uppermill Rank sold for 3,000gns to Messrs Green, Lisburn, County Antrim. Leading the bull trade at 5,000gns was Ardoyne Lindsay TI +23, SRI +22, a rising two-year-old red and little white from H and H Rennie, Insch, Aberdeenshire. Sired by the homebred Ardoyne Fiddich, he went to Messrs Douglas, Hawick, Roxburghshire. Another Fiddich son from the Rennies, this time the 21-month-old roan Ardoyne Longmore TI +19, SRI +16 made 4,200gns to Messrs Oliver, Newcastle Upon Tyne. Earlier in the day Longmore was awarded the male championship. A bid of 4,000gns from Messrs Mallaber, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire secured the reserve male champion, Gordon Maverick TI +18, SRI +15. An 18-month-old red and white Star P Matrix son, he was bred and exhibited by Gordon Brooke Estate, Earlston, Berwickshire.

Ardoyne Lindsay, 5,000gns

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Male champion, Ardoyne Longmore, 4,200gns

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Reserve male champion, Gordon Maverick, 4,000gns


Next bull at 3,800gns was Galla Mister Muscle TI +22, SRI +19, a 15-month-old roan by Elliot Matrix from JW Frame, Biggar, Lanarkshire to Messrs Shorrock, Burnley, Lancashire. B and J Landers and Son, Newton Stewart, Wigtownshire took a 3,500gns bid for their two-year-old roan bull, Cairnsmore Lambert TI +11, SRI +11. Sired by the 15,000gns Chapelton Dauphin, he went to Messrs Mainwaring, Ellesmere, Shropshire.

Glenariff Lorna Broadhooks, 3,700gns

AC Farms, Langham, Rutland invested in four females. At 3,700gns they secured Glenariff Lorna Broadhooks TI +25, SRI +27, a 21-month-old roan heifer by the 9,000gns Glenisla Drambuie 2 from Glenariff Pedigree Livestock, South Wootton, Norfolk. AC Farms went on to pay 2,500gns for the two-year-old roan Millerston Augusta Lucy TI +22, SRI +19, a Meonhill Charlie Chaplin daughter from Jack P Ramsay, Mauchline, Ayrshire. Their third lot at 2,200gns was the two-year-old roan, Oakleigh Tassa Lucy by Blelack Masterpiece from P Turnbull, Whitby, North Yorkshire. Next lot in the ring was P Turnbull’s Oakleigh Briar Rose Lacie, another two-year-old roan by Masterpiece selling for 3,100gns to Messrs Thompson, Whitby. Earlier on Lacie had been awarded the reserve female and reserve overall titles. Oakleigh Linda, a two-year-old roan by the 5,500gns Chapelton Bonanza attracted a 2,600gns bid from Messrs Burgess, New Abbey, Dumfriesshire. A second 2,600gns call was made, this time by M and T Severn, Halifax, West Yorkshire for Sandwick Luscious Hermione TI +23, SRI +24, a 21-month-old roan by Glenisla Jack Frost bred and exhibited by A and C Ivinson, Penrith, Cumbria.

Overall reserve and reserve female, Oakleigh Briar Rose Lacie, 3,100gns

Entries from drafts twice sold to 2,100gns. First to go was Rumsden Nettle Kaleidoscope TI +25, SRI +17, an in-calf roan heifer by Beautry Excalibur from Debs and Sarah Wilkins, Crowborough, East Sussex to Messrs Evans, Llanrwst, Gwynedd. Coxhill Floss TI +13, SRI +10, a two-year-old roan Longlands Waterloo Henry daughter from LJ Townsend, Moffat, Dumfriesshire commanded a 2,100gns bid from Messrs Ewing on behalf of a client. Averages: 14 bulls £3,375.00; 7 served heifers £1,890.00; 38 maiden heifers; £1,596.55; 3 cows in calf and/or suckling £1,522.50. Drafts: Ballard (12 lots) £1,066.62; Rumsden (3 lots) £1,610.00; Coxhill (6 lots) £1,557.50. Auctioneers: Harrison & Hetherington

Male champion line up www.beefshorthorn.org

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LOAK FARM

Investing in the future of the Beef Shorthorn breed

O

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Psalm 104:14 Email: adrian.robertson@avmi.com


Worcester Beef Shorthorn lead at 1,000gns Monday, 30 September 2019 Beef Shorthorns peaked at 1,000gns at the breed society’s annual autumn sale in Worcester on Saturday 28 September. Sale leader at 1,000gns was Lynthorpe Tessa Moonbeam, a 20-month-old white heifer from Lynda Robson, Rugby, Northamptonshire. Sired by Podehole Brigadier, she sold to TE Bailey, Ystrad Meurig, Ceredigion. The same buyer paid 880gns for Greenley Heathermaid Mercy from GH and Megan Towers, Welford, Northamptonshire. A 15-month-old white in calf heifer, she was sired by the ₏4,300 Caramba Keystone. Auctioneers: McCartneys

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Breeders Directory Our Breeders Directory is now online. If you are a member and wish to be included, please download, complete and return the Breeders Directory registration form available on the website: www.beefshorthorn.org/downloads We cannot automatically include you due to data protection laws you will need to opt in. To find a breeder, go to:

www.beefshorthorn.org/members-directory and start searching today!

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Stirling Beef Shorthorn peak at 7,000gns Monday, 21 October 2019 Beef Shorthorn females met a level demand selling to a top of 7,000gns at the breed society’s official autumn sale at Stirling on Monday 21 October. Leading the trade at 7,000gns was the female champion, Millerston Augusta Mint TI +35, SRI +41, an 18-month-old light roan heifer from Jack P Ramsay, Mauchline, Ayrshire. Sired by Meonhill Charlie Chaplin and out of a homebred dam, she sold to A and C Farms, Langham, Rutland.

James Porter

The same buyers invested 4,500gns in the 19-month-old red maiden, Podehole Irene Melody TI +42, SRI +41, a Knockenjig Hercules daughter from H Horrell, Peterborough, Cambridgeshire.

J U D G E

Female champion, Millerston Augusta Mint, 7,000gns

Two more entries by Knockenjig Hercules from the same breeder were in the money. Podehole Tessa Moneypenny TI +27, SRI +24, an 18-month-old roan heifer commanded a second 4,500gns bid, this time from Gates Farming, Cold Overton, Leicestershire, whilst earlier in the day Podehole Lord TI +35, SRI +32, a 22-month-old red and little white bull sold for 3,000gns to OFA and K Duncan, Bankfoot, Perthshire. The fourth and final entry from H Horrell made 4,000gns to GL Riby, Bridlington, East Yorkshire. Podehole Rock Master TI +45, SRI +47 was a 19-month-old red bull by Royalla Rockstar. Two entries by Creaga Logic from Dr Peter Fitzgerald, Crumlin, Co Antrim, shared the day’s second leading 5,000gns bid. First to go was the male champion, Cherryvalley Oak, a 21-monthold roan, to HA Smith and Sons, Keith, Morayshire.

Male champion, Cherryvalley Oak, 5,000gns

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Cherryvalley Denise Olea, an 18-month-old red and white Logic daughter was awarded the reserve female title and commanded the second 5,000gns bid. The buyer was Edward Green, Lisburn, Co Antrim. Dr Fitzgerald’s third entry, Cherryvalley Northern Star TI +35, SRI +40, a two-year-old red and white by the 7,500gns Chapelton Glen Clova made 3,500gns to L Townsend, Moffat, Dumfriesshire.


A bid of 3,600gns secured Langalbuinoch Legacy TI +28, SRI +32 for DC and JJ Marshall, Biggar, Lanarkshire. Bred and exhibited by R and P McAlister, Kingarth, Bute, Legacy was a two-year-old red roan by Newfield Tarquin. A second 3,600gns price tag went to the reserve male champion, Elliot Houdini TI +28, SRI +25, a 20-month-old red Sull Cyclone son from J Elliot, Kelso, Roxburghshire to W Barr, Lauder, Berwickshire. Two heifer lots were bid to 3,200gns. First to go was the rising two-yearold roan, Meonside Tansy Louise, a Meonside Hercules daughter from D and T Bradley Farmer, Parkgate, Dumfriesshire to Laga Farms, Evie, Orkney. Balnabroich Lovely Maya, a 21-month-old roan heifer made 3,200gns to Leanne Green, Lisburn, Co Antrim. A Meonhill Charlie Chaplin daughter, she was bred and exhibited by Balnabroich Farms, Blairgowrie, Perthshire.

Reserve female champion, Cherryvalley Denise Olea, 5,000gns

The day’s drafts were led by entries from Mrs L Townsend’s Coxhill herd, Moffat, Dumfriesshire. Coxhill Menna-M395 TI +18, SRI +17, an 18-month -old red Ballylinney Glenn daughter in calf to the 20,000gns Millerston Kasper, made 5,500gns to Gates Farming. Another same age Glenn daughter, the roan Coxhill Princess-M397 and in calf to Barnaigh Highwayman commanded a 5,000gns bid from Thomas Staunton, North Kinvara, Galway. Averages: 12 bulls £3,439; 28 females £2,550. Drafts: Coxhill 10 heifers £3,076; Glenisla 8 heifers £2,284; Skaillhouse 5 heifers £1,050; Dunsyre 6 heifers £1,750. Auctioneers: United Auctions

Reserve male champion, Elliot Houdini, 3,600gns

Judge, James Porter and Society president, Cathryn Williamson present the leading female awards to Cherryvalley Denise Olea and Millerston Augusta Mint www.beefshorthorn.org

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Class results ~ Beef Shorthorn Males Bulls born on or between 9 August 2017 and 3 January 2018 (Class 1) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Gordon Magnum (P) (ET) Podehole Lord (H) Muiresk Lord Mair (P) Rumsden Lancelot (P) Langalbuinoch Legacy (P)

G R Brooke Estate Mr H Horrell Stuart G Mair Sarah Wilkins R and P McAlister

Bulls born on or between 4 January and 3 March 2018 (Class 2) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Cherryvalley Oak (P) Elliot Houdini (P) (ET) Monarch of Upsall (H) Ettrick Maximus (P) (ET) Masterman of Upsall (P)

Dr Peter Fitzgerald Mr J Elliot Hon. G Turton Clare Gray Hon. G Turton

Podehole Rock Master, 4,000gns

Bulls born on or after 4 March 2018 (Class 3) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Castlemount Millionaire (P) (ET) Castlemount Masterpiece (P) Cherryvalley Orion (P) Podehole Rock Master (P) Shawhill Moondust (H)

D McDowell D McDowell Dr Peter Fitzgerald Mr H Horrell Thomson, Roddick and Laurie

Class results ~ Beef Shorthorn Females Heifers born on or between 15 March 2017 and 1 January 2018 (Class 4) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Millerston Augusta Lark (H) Cherryvalley Northern Star (P) Cherryvalley Lovely Nightingale (P) Meonside Tansy Louise (P) Balnabroich Lara (H)

Mr Jack P Ramsay Dr Peter Fitzgerald Dr Peter Fitzgerald D and T Bradley Farmer Balnabroich Farms

Heifers born on or between 2 January and 24 March 2018 (Class 5) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Meonside Foxglove Tansy 275 (P) Podehole Irene Melody (H) HW Marigold (P) Augusta X1310 of Upsall (P) Lancaster Liz 27th of Skaillhouse (P)

D and T Bradley Farmer Mr H Horrell Ian Tennant Hon. G Turton Messrs C Macadie and Sons

Heifers born on or between 25 March and 15 April 2018 (Class 6) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Millerston Augusta Mint (H) Podehole Tessa Moneypenny (H) Cairnsmore Marcy Tessa (H) Cairnsmore Marley (H) Hyndford Madonna (P)

Jack P Ramsay Mr H Horrell Mr and Mrs B Landers Mr and Mrs B Landers Ian Tennant

Heifers born on or after 16 April 2018 (Class 7) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

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Cherryvalley Denise Olea (P) Shawhill Foxglove Maisie (P) Shawhill Chelsea Marie (P) Brackenhill Gipsy Ray M299 (H) Cairnsmore May Tulip (P)

Dr Peter Fitzgerald Thomson, Roddick and Laurie Thomson, Roddick and Laurie Mr R Crawford Mr and Mrs B Landers

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Podehole Irene Melody, 4,500gns


Overall male champion Champion Reserve

Cherryvalley Oak (P) Elliot Houdini (P) (ET)

Dr Peter Fitzgerald Mr J Elliot

Female champion Champion Reserve

Millerston Augusta Mint (H) Cherryvalley Denise Olea (P)

Mr Jack P Ramsay Dr Peter Fitzgerald

Final judging line up in the bull section

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Skipton Beef Shorthorn peak at 6,000gns Wednesday, 6 November 2019 Beef Shorthorn females met a solid demand selling to a top of 6,000gns at the breed society’s official sale in Skipton on Wednesday 6 November. Sale leader at 6,000gns was Meonside Hyacynth Misty, a 20-month-old roan heifer by Elliot Salute from D and T Bradley Farmer, Parkgate, Dumfriesshire. The buyer was T Staunton, Kinvara, Co Galway.

Bobby Landers J U D G E

Another Elliot Salute daughter, the 22-month-old roan Meonside Lily May from the same breeder was secured for 3,200gns by TC and AJ Owen, Richmond, North Yorkshire. Earlier on she has been awarded the reserve female and overall reserve titles. Next at 4,500gns was the female and overall champion, Beautry Tessa Melody, a 19-month-old red and little white heifer by the 8,000gns Poyntington Himself. Bred and exhibited by Stuart and Gail Currie, Settle, North Yorkshire, she sold to Gates Farming Partnership, Oakham, Leicestershire.

Female and overall champion, Beautry Tessa Melody, 4,500gns

The 20-month-old roan, Beautry Dewdrop Morgana, another Poyntingham Himself daughter from the same breeders made 4,200gns to R Taylor and Sons, Fintry, Stirlingshire. A third Himself daughter, the 20-month-old white Beautry Morticia was secured for 2,800gns by C Lowther, Penrith, Cumbria.

Averages: 1 cow and calf, £1,575; 10 in calf heifers £1,604; 38 maiden heifers £2,287. 1 bull £2,415. Auctioneers: CCM

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W and J Mair, Cumnock, Ayrshire took home two in calf heifer from the Hon. G Turton, Thirsk, North Yorkshire. They invested 3,700gns in Ury Maid X1321 of Upsall TI +32, SRI +37, a 19-month-old roan Dingo of Upsall daughter whilst at 2,400gns they secured Jilt X1297 of Upsall, a dark roan 21-month-old by Grenadier of Upsall. Two entries each commanded a 3,000gns bid from Lister Brown, Clitheroe, Lancashire. First to go was Shawhill Mayflow TI +27, SRI +27, an 18-month-old maiden by Burnside Elite from Thomson, Roddick and Laurie, Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire. Mr Brown’s second purchase was Stonehills Foxy Princess 5, a 14-month-old roan Tofts Prince Grenadier daughter from GL Riby, Bridlington, East Yorkshire.

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Reserve female and overall reserve champion, Meonside Lily May, 3,200gns

Class results Best bull any age 1st 2nd

Marrgrange Landmark (P) Marrgrange Marquis (P)

P S and S E Hardcastle P S and S E Hardcastle

Best heifer born between 1 February and 28 February 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Meonside Lily May (P) Catterall Princess 14 (P) Jilt X1297 Of Upsall (P) Beautry Shuna Minerva (P)

D and T Bradley Farmer E and T Richardson The Hon. G Turton S C Currie

Best heifer born on or between 1 February and 25 April 2018 1st 2nd 3rd Meonside Hyacynth Misty, 6,000gns

Beautry Tessa Melody (P) Ury Maid X1321 Of Upsall (P) Meonside Hyacynth Misty (P)

S C Currie The Hon. G Turton D and T Bradley Farmer

Best heifer born on or between 28 April and 10 September 2018 1st 2nd 3rd

Shawhill Mayflower (P) Shawhill Marina (P) Westmoor Rose Marigold (H)

Thomson, Roddick and Laurie Thomson, Roddick and Laurie R Paisley

Male champion Reserve

Marrgrange Landmark (P) Marrgrange Marquis (P)

P S and S E Hardcastle P S and S E Hardcastle

Female champion Reserve

Beautry Tessa Melody (P) Meonside Lily May (P)

S C Currie D and T Bradley Farmer

Champions

WM Morrisons Supermarket Trophy for male champion Marrgrange Landmark (P)

P S and S E Hardcastle

I’Ansons Perpetual Trophy for female champion Beautry Tessa Melody (P)

S C Currie www.beefshorthorn.org

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Balmoral (Royal Ulster) Show Wednesday, 15 May to Saturday, 18 May 2019

Mark Holmes J U D G E

Champion, Ricketstown Lovely 191 from Duncan McDowell

Class results Bull born on or after 1 January 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th Junior champion and reserve overall champion, Creaga Phoenix from Noel and Lisa Dowd

Creaga Phoenix Maximus of Ballyvaddy Lowtown Braveheart Castlefin Tornado Castlefin Hotshot

Noel and Lisa Dowd T and K Madden H D Dorman and Family Kenny Baxter Kenny Baxter

Cow or heifer born in 2016 in-calf or with calf at foot 1st 2nd

Creaga Macey Caramba Hottie Koo

Jane’s Kitchen Caramba Shorthorns

Cow born on or before 31 December 2015 in-calf or with calf at foot 1st 2nd

Ricketstown Lovely 191 Caramba Rothes Hottie

Duncan McDowell Caramba Shorthorns

Heifer born in 2017 1st 2nd 3rd Heifer born on or after 1 January 2018, Caramba Rothes Majestic from Caramba Shorthorns

Pair of animals, Caramba Hottie Koo and Caramba Rothes Hottie from Caramba Shorthorns

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Ashvale Beatrice Lancaster Liz 24th of Skaillhouse Caramba Katrina Leanna

Richard and Fiona McKeown Christopher Clarke Ben King

Heifer born on or after 1 January 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Caramba Rothes Majestic Della Bushypark Sparkler 3rd Creaga Prada Magherone Rosie Mae Bushypark Dandoline 3rd

Caramba Shorthorns Timothy Reid P and A Hamill Noel and Lisa Dowd Christopher Clarke P and A Hamill

Pair of animals, bona fide the property of one exhibitor and entered in the classes for which they are eligible 1st 2nd

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Caramba Shorthorns Noel and Lisa Dowd


Overall champion Champion: Ricketstown Lovely 191 Reserve: Creaga Phoenix

Duncan McDowell Noel and Lisa Dowd

Junior champion Champion: Creaga Phoenix Reserve: Ashvale Beatrice

Noel and Lisa Dowd Richard and Fiona McKeown Reserve junior champion, Ashvale Beatrice Best Interbreed Group of Three

Interbreed winners Best Native Breed Pair Lancaster Liz 24th of Skaillhouse Creaga Prada

Christopher Clarke Noel and Lisa Dowd

Best Interbreed Group of Three Creaga Phoenix Lancaster Liz 13th of Skaillhouse Ashvale Beatrice

Noel and Lisa Dowd Christopher Clarke Richard and Fiona McKeown

Best Interbreed Group of Five Ricketstown Lovely 191 Caramba Rothes Hottie Ashvale Beatrice Creaga Phoenix Lancaster Liz 24th of Skaillhouse

Duncan McDowell Caramba Shorthorns Richard and Fiona McKeown Noel and Lisa Dowd Christopher Clarke

President’s trophy and special prize for the Overall Beef Breed Champion of Champions Ricketstown Lovely 191

Duncan McDowell

Best Interbreed Group of Five www.beefshorthorn.org

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Royal Highland Show Thursday, 20 to Sunday, 23 June 2019

Jack P Ramsay J U D G E “My overall champion and reserve heifers were as close to my ideal females as I have seen anywhere, with the champion featuring favourably in the various interbreed competitions.� Overall champion, Trowbridge Tessa Linsay from Tom McMillan

Sponsored by Alistair Young Engineering Ltd, Dunphail, Forres

Class results Female born on or after 1 April 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Glebefarm Duchess Molly M606 Highlee Blackbrook Millie Podehole Tessa Moneypenny Roundhill Millie Crichton Patsy 1013 Headlind Duchess Monica

Alfie Shaw Tracy Severn Harry Horrell Emma Trueman T & I Walling T A Jackson (Headlind Partners)

Female born after 1 January and on or before 21 February 2018 (split class)

Reserve champion, Glebefarm Cherry May

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Glebefarm Cherry May Juaul Maryann Magdalaina Meonside Lily May Beautry Shuna Myrtle Coldrochie Catriona Rosebud M7 Highlee Duchess Matilda

Mr Alfie Shaw Balnabroich Farms D and T Bradley Farmer Mr Stuart Currie D and T Bradley Farmer Mrs Tracy Severn

Female born after 22 February and on or before 1 March 2018 (split class)

Glebefarm Duchess Molly M606

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1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Coldrochie Broadhooks M8 Meonside Hyacynth Misty Podehole Irene Melody Knockenjig Duchess M1989 Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy Rookwith Lily M322

W J and J Green D and T Bradley Farmer Harry Horrell David and Rosemary Dickie T A Jackson (Headlind Partners) Page Farm Partnership


Female born in 2017 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th Reserve pair, Trowbridge Tessa Lindsay, left, and Highlee Lenny

Trowbridge Tessa Linsay Podehole Tessa Lotus Podehole Tessa Lara Cairnsmore Libby Beyonce Cairnsmore Lois Gilven Irene Lapwing

Tom McMillan Harry Horrell Harry Horrell B Landers and Son B Landers and Son Clark Farms

Female in-milk or in-calf born on or before 31 December 2016 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Podehole Gypsy Game Alvie Lovely Jemima Headlinds Rosetta Kitty Podehole Madeline Glamour Miltonlockhart Juicy Couture Roundhill Saffron Ruby

Harry Horrell Stuart G Mair and Sons T A Jackson (Headlind Partners) Harry Horrell James Currie and Sons Emma Trueman

Bull born on or after 1 April 2018

Judge, Jack P Ramsay in the ring

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Rookwith Marvellous Glenisla Macleod Beautry Malfoy Portnadoran Maestro Eastmill Machine Knockenjig Mascot

Page Farm Partnership Major J P O & Miss C M Gibb Stuart Currie Audrey MacDonald Firm of Doldy Farms David and Rosemary Dickie

Bull born after 1 January and on or before 31 March 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Glenisla Masterton Glenisla Maestro Highlee Milo Sowerby Parks Magnus Farlam Maximus Knockenjig Morpheus

Major J P O & Miss C M Gibb Major J P O & Miss C M Gibb Tracy Severn S and G Hunt Mrs Cathryn Williamson David and Rosemary Dickie

Bull born in 2017 1st 2nd 3rd

Highlee Lenny Miltonlockhart Landlord Muiresk Lord Mair

Tracy Severn William Allan Stuart G Mair and Sons

Bull born on or before 31st December 2016 (2 Entries) 1st 2nd

Dunsyre Horatio Balgay Journeyman

T A Jackson (Headlind Partners) William Allan

In the ring www.beefshorthorn.org

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Best Junior Female Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Tom McMillan

Reserve Junior Female Glebefarm Cherry May

Alfie Shaw

Best Female - The Uppermill Perpetual Challenge Cup Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Tom McMillan

Reserve Female Glebefarm Cherry May

Alfie Shaw

Tom McMillan receiving the Duthie Perpetual Challenge Cup for the supreme champion. He was also awarded the Uppermill Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best female

Best Bull born on or after 1 January 2018 The Emilio R Casares Junior Memorial Champion Challenge Cup (Classes 204/205) Rookwith Marvellous

Page Farm Partnership

Best Junior Bull Eastmill Machine

Firm of Doldy Farms

Best Bull – The Carlos Duggan Memorial Trophy Highlee Lenny

Tracy Severn

Reserve Bull Rookwith Marvellous

Page Farm Partnership receiving the Emilio R Casares Junior Memorial Champion Challenge Cup for best junior bull

Page Farm Partnership

Breeder of Best Bull – Bronze Medal Highlee Lenny

Tracy Severn

Best Bull bred by Exhibitor – The Mains Farm Perpetual Trophy Highlee Lenny

Tracy Severn

Junior Champion Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Tom McMillan

Reserve Junior Champion Glebefarm Cherry May

Alfie Shaw

Tracy Severn receiving the Mains Farm Perpetual Trophy for the best bull bred by exhibitor. She also received the Carlos Duggan Memorial Trophy awarded every three years to the best bull

Overall Champion The Duthie Perpetual Challenge Cup for Best Animal, Breedplan UK Prize Champion Medal Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Tom McMillan

Reserve Overall Champion Glebefarm Cherry May

Alfie Shaw

Best Animal bred by Exhibitor Glebefarm Cherry May

Alfie Shaw

Best Pair, consisting of one Male and one Female of any age, bred by Exhibitor – The Eduardo-Bullrich Perpetual Silver Challenge Cup Beautry Malfoy / Beautry Tessa Mildred

Stuart Currie receiving the Eduardo-Bullrich Perpetual Silver Challenge Cup for the best pair comprising one male and one female

Stuart Currie

Best Group, consisting of one Bull and two Females The B M Durno Perpetual Silver Challenge Cup Beautry Malfoy / Beautry Tessa Mildred / Beautry Shuna Myrtle Stuart Currie Best Pair, the progeny of one animal, bred by Exhibitor The Redhill World Conference Trophy Glenisla Maestro / Glenisla Macleod

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Major J P O & Miss C M Gibb

Brenda Wear presenting the Redhill World Conference trophy for the best progeny pair to the Glenisla Herd


Royal Highland Show 2019 – Judge’s report The 2019 Royal Highland Show will be remembered for the outstanding show of Beef Shorthorn Cattle, especially the heifer classes which I have never seen better. Strength in depth of structurally correct, clean fleshed, growthy functional cattle that fit into present day beef production were found in abundance. The future of the breed looks bright as a lot of these heifers will be the dams of stud bulls in the future.

Jack P Ramsay J U D G E

In each of the heifer classes it was all about quality, with some truly outstanding animals vying for the top awards. It was from the heifer section that my overall champion and reserve came. These two heifers from Tom McMillan and Alfie Shaw were as close to my ideal females as I have seen anywhere, with the champion featuring favourably in the various interbreed competitions at the show. The bull classes proved more difficult to sort out due to slightly different types (not a bad thing as the Beef Shorthorn is now being used in a wide variety of production systems) at different stages of maturity and body condition. It will be really interesting to see a lot of these young bulls at the sales in the spring where I’m sure a lot of them will be needed. Page Farms produced the pick of the yearling bulls with a stirk that ticked a lot of boxes. The male champion from Tracy Severn came from the two-year-old section and was a bull I considered to be right up the commercial man’s street. With over 100 cattle forward, it was good to see so many new exhibitors and breeders featuring in the main awards; this can only bode well for the future. My thanks go to the Royal Highland Show for inviting me to judge, to the section stewards for the pleasant and efficient manner they carried out their duties, and to the exhibitors and stock men and women for putting on such a magnificent spectacle.

UPSALL

POLLED SHORTHORNS

all King David of Ups

heifer calf Augusta X877 with 3 of the bulls we are using Firefox, Grenadier, and Mandalong have been tested DNA homozygous for the polling gene.

Member of CHeCS Controlled Health Scheme for Johne’s BVD, IBR & Lepto. 4 year TB testing & Johne’s risk 1.

We would like to thank all our buyers and bidders; visitors are always welcome. Stockman George McCulloch

Sales Gerald Turton & Robin Turton

+44 (0)7555 296 054

+44 (0)1845 537 932

web: www.upsallshorthorn.co.uk | email: turtongerald@hotmail.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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The UK Beef Shorthorn Championships at the Great Yorkshire Show Tuesday, 9 to Thursday, 11 July 2019

Mr J P L Playfair-Hannay J U D G E “To discover after the presentations that the champions’ grandfathers were both Tofts bulls was a great way to finish the day!”

Overall champion, Trowbridge Tessa Linsay from T M McMillan

Class results Bull born on or before 31 December 2016 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Kassam of Longfield (P) Dunsyre Horatio (P) (TW) King David of Upsall (P) Warmington Chalkie 285 (H)

Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Mr T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners The Hon. G Turton Mr R F Leach

Bull born in 2017 1st 2nd 3rd

Lowther Lennox (P) Podehole Lionheart (H) Highlee Lenny (P)

Mr C Lowther A & C Farms Mrs Tracy Severn

Bull born on or after 1 January 2018 (split class) 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Highlee Milo (P) Stanfordpark Mighty Wyvis (H) Norworth Malakai (P) Lowther Mike (P)

Mrs Tracy Severn Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Miss Victoria Hainsworth Mr C Lowther

Bull born on or after 1 January 2018 (split class)

Graham Hunt receives the 2018 Mohmar points competition award from president, Cathryn Williamson

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1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Beautry Malfoy (P) Millerston Man O War (H) Stanfordpark Mayfair (P) Shawhill Maestro (P) Sowerbyparks Mac The Knife (P) Lowther Madoc (P) Norworth Merlin (H)

Mr S C Currie Mr Jack P Ramsay Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Thomson, Roddick & Laurie S & G Hunt Mr C Lowther Miss V A Hainsworth


Female, in-calf or in-milk, born before 31 December 2014 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Podehole Gypsy Game (P) EX93 Gilven Butterfly Georgia (H) EX90 Stonehills Lovely Wallie (P) GP82 Roundhill Saffron Ruby (H)

Mr H C Horrell R S and G Johnson Mr G L Riby Miss Emma Trueman

Female, in-calf or in-milk, born on or between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2016 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Dinmore Zoe Katrina (P) Meonhill Secret Silky (P) Dinmore Zoe Kardashian (P) Headlind Rosette Kitty (P) Wenmar Gipsy Rose J104 (P) G79 Sleightholme Rockrose (H)

Mr Paul R Dawes LEP Farms Ltd Mr Paul R Dawes Mr T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners S & G Hunt Mr Patrick J James

Female born in 2017, on or between 1 January and 31 December 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th

Trowbridge Tessa Linsay Warmington Molly 369 (P) Meonhill Candy Queen (H) Podehole Tessa Lotus (P) Jodame Lulu (H) Stonehills Princess Marguerite 2 (P) Headlind Rosette Lizzy (P) Shawhill Foxglove Layla (P) Kimrina Lottie (H) Caramba Secret Love (P) Jodame Princess Royal Libby Jilt X1217 of Upsall (P)

Mr T M McMillan Mr R F Leach LEP Farms Ltd Mr H C Horrell Michael and Joanne Souter Mr G L Riby Mr T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners Thomson, Roddick & Laurie Miss C J Ward S & G Hunt Michael and Joanne Souter The Hon. G Turton

Female born in 2018, on or after 1 January and before 1 April 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

Beautry Shuna Myrtle (P) Gilven Sapphire Midge (P) Sapphire X1292 of Upsall (P) Sleightholme Robusta (P) Coldrochie Catriona Rosebud M7 (P) Langhams Minnie Mansi (P) (ET) Sowerbyparks Welsh Lily (P) Langhams Minnie Mai (P) (ET) Kimrina Matilda (H) Sleightholme Ruga (P)

Reserve champion, Kassam of Longfield from Mr and Mrs M Stoneham

Mr S C Currie R S and G Johnson The Hon. G Turton Mr Patrick J James D and T Bradley Farmer A & C Farms S and G Hunt A & C Farms Miss C J Ward Mr Patrick J James

Heading to pole place, Trowbridge Tessa Linsay www.beefshorthorn.org

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Female born in 2018, on or after 1 January and before 1 April 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th

Podehole Irene Melody (H) Beautry Tessa Mildred (P) Highlee Duchess Matilda (P) Meonside Hyacynth Misty (P) Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy (P) Willingham Wineberry M348 (P) Roundhill Maddison (P)

Mr H C Horrell Mr S C Currie Mrs Tracy Severn D and T Bradley Farmer Mr T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners Mr A Haigh Miss Emma Trueman

Female born in 2018, on or after 1 April 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th

Beautry Tessa Melody (P) Clipper X1316 of Upsall (P) Podehole Tessa Moneypenny (H) Highlee Blackbrook Millie (H) Shawhill Madison Rose (H) (ET) Stanfordpark Wineberry Whisper (P) Millerston Augusta Mint (H)

Mr S C Currie The Hon. G Turton Mr H C Horrell Mrs Tracy Severn Thomson, Roddick & Laurie Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Mr Jack P Ramsay

Charles Lowther receiving the Hon. G Turton Challenge Cup for the best bull born in 2017

Female born in 2018, on or after 1 April 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th

Roundhill Millie (P) Willingham Honeysuckle M354 (P) Jodame Madonna (P) Kimrina Malteser (P) Gilven Butterfly Maiden (P) Warmington Primula 416 (H) Willingham Eva Broadhooks M356 (P) (TW) Mineshop Primrose M218 (P) Dinmore Macaroni (P)

Miss Emma Trueman Mr A Haigh Michael and Joanne Souter Miss C J Ward R S and G Johnson Mr R F Leach Mr A Haigh Chris Nye Mr Paul R Dawes

Roy McDonald on behalf of Mr H C Horrell receiving the Frank Milnes Trophy for the best junior heifer

Blythewood native beef pairs competition: Dinmore Zoe Katrina with calf by Mr Paul R Dawes and Kassam of Longfield by Mr and Mrs M Stoneham

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Group of three animals, the property of the same exhibitor

Tom McMillan receiving the Nathaniel Catchpole Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best Shorthorn female

1st Podehole Tessa Lotus (P) Podehole Tessa Moneypenny (H) Podehole Irene Melody (H) 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th

Mr H C Horrell Mr S C Currie The Hon. G Turton Mr T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners Mrs Tracy Severn Steve Johnson Mr Patrick J James

Pair of animals, one male and one female, bred by the exhibitor 1st Beautry Malfoy (P) Beautry Shuna Myrtle (P) 2nd 3rd 4th

Mr S C Currie The Hon. G Turton Mr Jack P Ramsay Mrs Tracy Severn

Stuart Currie receiving the Uppermill Calrossie Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best bull bred by exhibitor

Mr and Mrs McMillan receiving the Brothers Colling Memorial Challenge Cup for the best Beef Shorthorn

Champion prizes Beef Shorthorn Junior Champion Mary Cormack on behalf of Mr P R Dawes receiving the Hugh Cornwallis Maud Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best animal bred by the exhibitor

Champion Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P) Reserve Podehole Irene Melody (H)

Mr T M McMillan Mr H C Horrell

Beef Shorthorn Male Champion Champion Reserve

Kassam of Longfield (P) Beautry Malfoy (P)

Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Mr S C Currie

Beef Shorthorn Female Champion Champion Reserve

Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P) Dinmore Zoe Katrina (P)

Mr T M McMillan Mr Paul R Dawes

Beef Shorthorn Breed Champion Champion Reserve

Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P) Kassam of Longfield (P)

Mr T M McMillan Mr and Mrs M Stoneham

Simon Farmer receiving the John Doughty and Balmoral Crackle Perpetual Challenge cup on behalf of Mr and Mrs M Stoneham for the best bull www.beefshorthorn.org

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Special prizes Winner of Class V2: The Hon. G Turton Challenge Cup for the Best Bull born in 2017 Winner

Lowther Lennox (P)

Mr C Lowther

Winner of classes 7 & 8: The NEBSC Members Trophy for the Best Yearling Heifer shown by a North of England Beef Shorthorn Club Member Winner

Beautry Shuna Myrtle (P)

Mr S C Currie Paul R Dawes receiving The Sally Horrell Perpetual Trophy for the best exhibitor bred cow and calf

The Best Animal from the Junior Heifer Classes 7 and 8: The Frank Milnes Trophy for the Best Junior Heifer Winner

Podehole Irene Melody (H)

Mr H C Horrell

Trophies Nathaniel Catchpole Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Best Shorthorn Female Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P)

Mr T M McMillan

The Uppermill Calrossie Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Best Bull bred by exhibitor Beautry Malfoy (P)

Mr S C Currie

Maud Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Best Animal bred by exhibitor Dinmore Zoe Katrina (P)

Mr Paul R Dawes

Rebecca Braithwaite and Tom Bradley Farmer on behalf of Mr S C Currie receiving the Durno Bullrich Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best pair - one male, one female

The John Doughty and Balmyle Crackle Perpetual Challenge cup for the Best Bull Kassam of Longfield (P)

Mr and Mrs M Stoneham

The Brothers Colling Memorial Challenge Cup for the Best Beef Shorthorn Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P)

Mr T M McMillan

The AJ Marshall Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Beef Shorthorn Breed Champion (Yorks Trophy) Trowbridge Tessa Linsay (P)

Mr T M McMillan

The Sally Horrell Perpetual Trophy for the Best Exhibitor Bred Cow and Calf at the Great Yorkshire Show Dinmore Zoe Katrina (P)

Mr Paul R Dawes

Sally Horrell on behalf of Mr H C Horrell receiving the Durno McNair Snadden Perpetual Challenge Cup for the best group of three Beef Shorthorns

The Durno Bullrich Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Best Pair - one male, one female Beautry Malfoy (P) Beautry Shuna Myrtle (P)

Mr S C Currie

The Durno McNair Snadden Perpetual Challenge Cup for the Best group of three Beef Shorthorns Podehole Tessa Lotus (P) Podehole Tessa Moneypenny (H) Podehole Irene Melody (H)

Mr H C Horrell

Northern Club: The NEBSC Members Trophy for the Best Animal shown by a North of England Beef Shorthorn Club Member for the Best Yearling Heifer Beautry Shuna Myrtle (P)

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Mr S C Currie

Stuart Currie receiving the NEBSC Members Trophy for the best yearling heifer shown by a North of England Beef Shorthorn Club member


Great Yorkshire Show 2019 – Judge’s report I was privileged and greatly honoured to judge the 2019 Beef Shorthorn National show and I would like to thank the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society and Yorkshire Agricultural Society for inviting me. I would also like to thank the exhibitors for putting on such a spectacular display of cattle. Since I first joined the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society in 1981, the breed has been transformed from heading to the rare breeds, with over fat and under-weight animals and genetics. The modern Beef Shorthorn makes a significant contribution to the beef industry as a breeder of suckler cows and a producer of top shelf beef product. As the breed has evolved with increased growth and carcase size, the shape and structure of the animals changed also.

Mr J P L Playfair-Hannay J U D G E

Judging this show I was very mindful of the breed’s role within the industry and was looking for structurally correct cattle with good locomotion and breed character. The first class of senior bulls demonstrated some of the changes and issues that the breed has gone through. Kassam of Longfield, a solid easy fleshing bull with size and character demonstrates what is good about the breed in the commercial industry. The second class again had a variation in types, and I chose Lowther Lennox. It would be very interesting to see this class of bulls in a year’s time. The next two classes were a split of 2018 born bulls. There were some fantastic young bulls out in the ring, and again may look very different when they have matured. Highlee Milo and Beautry Malfoy were the winners. I particularly liked the Beautry bull and believe that he is the type of bull required to enhance the future of the breed. Moving into the female classes, numbers have increased and the consistency has got better. The senior cow class was won by Podehole Gypsy Game, a tremendous cow with great structure and breed character making a great job of her calf. Arguably this cow is too big and high maintenance but the quality that she oozes made her an easy winner. The junior cow class was won by a very similar type of cow as the previous class, but without the size making Dinmore Zoe Katrina a more desirable cow in my eyes. The two-year-old heifer class was a fantastic class to judge. It had everything a judge could ask for. The winner was Trowbridge Tessa Linsay and is to my mind what Beef Shorthorns are all about. She has character, smooth flesh in great abundance, spring of rib, structure and locomotion, the complete package. Also in this class were a couple of nursing heifers. Feeding their calves, as they were, was certainly detrimental to their potential show places. Maybe there should be a separate class for two-year-old heifers in milk. I was however asked to judge females born in 2017. The yearling classes with four splits demonstrated the depth and strength in quality that the breed has and must give the breeders great optimism for the future. Continued over

Housewives’ Choice, first in the native class and first in fancy dress www.beefshorthorn.org

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Beautry Shuna Myrtle, Podehole Irene Melody, Beautry Tessa Melody and Roundhill Millie were all excellent females with great futures ahead of them. I look forward to seeing them as brood cows. I thoroughly enjoyed my day. It was a great pleasure to present the trophies and to be able to hold the Colling Bothers cup again. Fantastic. To discover after the presentations that the champions’ grandfathers were both Tofts bulls was a great way to finish the day! Many thanks for the memories. James Playfair-Hannay

Interbreed winners Judge: Mr J Elliot Snr Blythewood Native Beef Pairs Competition 2nd Place

Kassam of Longfield Dinmore Zoe Katrina

Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Mr P R Dawes

Interbreed Beef Group

4th Place

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Kassam of Longfield LDinmore Zoe Katrina Podehole Tessa Lotus Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

Mr and Mrs M Stoneham Mr P R Dawes Mr H C Horrell Mr T M McMillan


CHAPELTON Beef Shorthorn & Aberdeen Angus

Founded on Tradition, Focused on the Future... Donald & Emma Biggar Tel: 01556 660205 Mob: 07860 325 888 Email: djbiggar@aol.com

James Biggar Mob: 07879 696 450 James Rea Mob: 07826 395 806

www.chapeltonfarm.co.uk

Castle Douglas - Kirkcudbrightshire

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Royal Welsh Show Monday, 22 to Thursday, 25 July 2019

Class results Bull born on or before 31 December 2017 1st 2nd

Willingham Katabatic (H) Camlas Legend (P)

Evans and Price Family Eric Thomas Gethin

Bull born on or after 1 January 2018

James Porter J U D G E “With one of the largest turnouts of Beef Shorthorns yet on show at the Royal Welsh, it was a credit to the exhibitors to help promote the breed in Wales.”

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Llwynhywel Maestro (H) Llwynhywel Mathew (P) Headlind Masterpiece (H) Charlesbury C K Macjettic (P) Langhams Maximus (P) Glebedale Maserati (H)

Evans and Price Family Evans and Price Family Mr T Allan Jackson Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton Andre Vrona T and K Bodily

RWAS Special Rosette – Best Male Exhibit born on or after 1 January 2018 Champion

Llwynhywel Maestro (H)

Evans and Price Family

RWAS Championship Rosette - Best Male Exhibit Champion Llwynhywel Maestro (H) Reserve Willingham Katabatic (H)

Evans and Price Family Evans and Price Family

Female in milk or in calf born on or before 31 December 2016 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Sandley Harriet (P) Bridgehouse Brandy Floss EX91 (P) Wenmar Gypsy Rose J104 (P) Glebedale Krispy Kreme (H) Headlind Rosette Kitty (P) Charlesbury Jettas Peach (P)

Evans and Price Family Evans and Price Family Graham Hunt T and K Bodily Mr T Allan Jackson Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

Female born on or between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2017 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Wenmar Perfect Pride L137 (P) Sandley Lola (H) Headlind Rosette Lizzy (P) Langhams Passion Lotta (P) Jodame Princess Royal Libby (H) Gordon Millicent 187 (P)

Champion, Wenmar Perfect Pride from Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

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Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton Evans and Price Family Mr T Allan Jackson Andre Vrona Michael and Joanne Souter Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

Reserve champion, Llywynhywell Maestro from Messrs Evans and Price


Female born on or after 1 January 2018 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy (P) Jodame Madonna (P) Langhams Minnie Mai (P) Langhams Minnie Mansi (P) Charlesbury Duchess Rosie (P) Charlesbury Mel’s Rose (P)

Mr T Allan Jackson Michael and Joanne Souter Andre Vrona Andre Vrona Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

RWAS Championship Rosette Champion Reserve

Wenmar Perfect Pride L137 (P) Llwynhywel Maestro (H)

Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton Evans and Price Family

RWAS Group Rosettes - Best Group of Three Animals, the property of the same exhibitor already entered and shown in the above classes 1st 2nd 3rd

Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy (P) Headlind Rosette Lizzy (P) Headlind Rosette Kitty (P) Charlesbury Duchess Rosie (P) Charlesbury Mel’s Rose (P) Wenmar Perfect Pride L137 (P) Sandley Lola (H) Bridgehouse Brandy Floss EX91 (P) Sandley Harriet (P)

Mr T Allan Jackson

Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

Evans and Price Family

*The BSS Supreme Champion Rose Bowl Trophy and RWAS Championship Rosette for the Champion Beef Shorthorn exhibit and the Inverness Auction Mart Trophy for the Reserve Champion Champion Reserve

Wenmar Perfect Pride L137 (P) Sandley Lola (H)

Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton Messrs Park, Baird and Hamilton

Wenmar Perfect Pride, right, and Judge, James Porter with champion, Wenmar Perfect Pride and reserve champion, Llwynhywell Maestro www.beefshorthorn.org

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Royal Welsh Show 2019 – Judge’s report It was a great privilege to judge the Royal Welsh Show. I thoroughly enjoyed my trip to Wales and was made to feel very welcome. With one of the largest turnouts of Beef Shorthorns yet on show at the Royal Welsh, it was a credit to the exhibitors to help promote the breed in Wales. The first class saw senior bull Willingham Katabatic in first place, a well-developed bull with plenty of power. Second place was Camlas Legend. The yearling bull class was the largest male class on the day with a lot of bulls to watch in the future, Llwynhywel Maestro was first. He caught my eye from the moment he came into the ring, a lot of breed character with a great carcass. Second was Llwynhywel Mathew. Llwynhywel Maestro went on to be male champion with Willingham Katabatic in reserve.

James Porter J U D G E

The senior cow class was won by Sandley Harriet, a strong cow two months off calving, with Bridgehouse Brandy Floss in second, another useful cow with a stylish bull calf at foot. In the two-year old heifer class Wenmar Perfect Pride was first, a special heifer with a lot of future potential. Second place was Sandley Lola. Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy was first in the yearling heifers. A good, sweet heifer with great confirmation, second was Jodame Madonna. Wenmar Perfect Pride was female champion, with Headlind Foxglove Tanzy Missy in reserve. My overall breed champion on the day was Wenmar Perfect Pride, a very well-developed heifer with great breed character. Llwynhywel Maestro was reserve breed champion. Two great young cattle to represent the Beef Shorthorn breed. A big thank you to stewards Martin Reynolds, Terrig Morgan, and Ruth and Vaughan Pritchard-Jones.

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Est. 1982

Ricketstown Heathermaid Marlee. Overall National Livestock Show Tullamore champion 2019.

Ricketstown Lovely 191. Overall shorthorn and overall interbreed champion Balmoral Show 2019 and National Shorthorn Northern Ireland champion 2019. Owned by Castlemount Shorthorns.

Est. 1982

BVD Free | Johne’s testing 9 years | Male and female stock always for sale KELLY FAMILY | email: kelly.martin13@yahoo.com tel: Martin +35387 9821117 | Pj +35387 6247082 or home +35359 9161213 ďŹ nd us on facebook

ricketstownshorthorns www.beefshorthorn.org

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S ANDWIC K BEEF SHORTHORNS Est. 2002

BREEDING HARDY MODERN CATTLE FIT FOR THE FUTURE

• Traditional maternal qualities • Milky and docile cattle • Breeding show quality stock on high Pennine farm • Naturally reared cattle from long established female bloodline BVD Accredited since 2012 | Johne’s level 1 since 2008 BVD & IBR vaccinated | TB4 | Linear classifying

WISHING OUR CATTLE PURCHASERS SUCCESS FOR THE FUTURE VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME. STOCK USUALLY FOR SALE Andrew & Caroline Ivinson, Sandwick Farm, Ousby, Penrith, Cumbria CA10 1QB. 114

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society - 2019 Show Results Woodhall Spa Country Show - 19 May (Judge: Mr R Paisley) Champion Reserve

Podehole Madeline Podehole Tessa Moneypenny

Harry Horrell Harry Horrell

Central and West Fife Show - 1 June (Judge: Bruce Campbell) Champion

Wells Serena

John Wood

Royal Three Counties Show - 1 June (Judge: Steve Johnson) Champion Reserve

Kassam of Longfield Dinmore Zoe Katrina

Stanford Park Farm Paul Dawes

Royal Cheshire County Show - 18 & 19 June Champion Reserve

Dinmore Zoe Katrina Dinmore Zoe Kardashian

Paul Dawes Paul Dawes

Lincolnshire Show - 19 June (Judge: Mr M Holmes) Champion Reserve

Highlee Larkin (H) (TW) Mineshop Maximilian (P) (ET)

Mr G M T Foljambe Chris Nye

Royal Norfolk Show - 26 June (Judge: Bobby Landers) Champion Reserve

Glenariff Morna Broadhooks Sowerby Parks Magnus

N J and A M Barrett Graham Hunt

Black Isle Show - 1 August (Judge: Stuart Macadie) Champion Reserve

Lowther Sally Farlam Maximus

Eilidh Mackenzie Cathryn Williamson

Burwarton Show - 1 August (Judge: Mr C Horton) Champion Reserve

Schofield Micky Greenley Mandy Floss

T Smith G Towers and R Heard

Turriff Show - 1 August (Judge: David Dickie) Champion Reserve

Coldrochie Broadhooks M8 Muiresk Lord Mair

W J and J Green Stuart G Mair and Sons

Nidderdale Show - 1 September (Judge: Tommy Staunton) Champion Reserve

Royal Three Counties Show champion, Kassam of Longfield

Coldrochie Leif Jodame Madonna

Mrs T Severn Mrs J Souter

Nidderdale Show champion, Coldrochie Leif www.beefshorthorn.org

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Agri-Expo Calf Show Friday, 1 November 2019 ~ Borderway Mart, Carlisle

Class results Male calf born before 28 February 2019

Vic Watson J U D G E

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Headlind New Lad (P) Sowerbyparks Norseman (H) Sowerbyparks Neptune (H) Jodame Nathan (P) Mayfield Nimrod (P) (Et)

T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners S and G Hunt S and G Hunt Michael and Joanne Souter Gerard Te Lintelo

Male calf born before 1 March and 4 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Headlind Nobunaga (P) Cutthorn Nato (P) Jodame Nicholas (P) Mayfield Nostradamus (P) (Et)

T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners A J Gibson Farming Michael and Joanne Souter Gerard Te Lintelo

Male calf born before on or after 5 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Coxhill Norseman (P) Coxhill Nightstar (H) Mallerstang Navigator (P) Jodame Nobleman (H) Dyneley Ned (P)

Mrs L J Townsend Mrs L J Townsend Mr and Mrs A M and Mr E Clarke Michael and Joanne Souter J and J Shorrock

Overall champion, Coxhill Norseman from Mrs L J Townsend

Judge, Vic Watson with the overall winners, reserve champion, Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg and champion, Coxhill Norseman

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Female calf born before 21 February 2019 1st 2nd 3rd

Lowther Strawb Surprise V2 (P) Sowerbyparks Welsh Lily 2nd (H) Sowerbyparks Jonquil 1st (P)

C Lowther S and G Hunt S and G Hunt

Female calf born before 22 February and 30 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd

Coxhill Josie N464 (H) Sandwick Gypsy Nigella (P) Headlind Holly Nutmeg (P)

Mrs L J Townsend A and C Ivinson T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners

Female calf born between 31 March and 9 April 2019

Overall reserve champion and female champion, Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg

1st 2nd 3rd

Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg (P) Beautry Shuna Narnia (P) Sandwick Nowthen Floss (P)

S C Currie S C Currie A and C Ivinson

Female calf born on or after 10 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Beautry Dewdrop Nightshade (P) Headlind Wineberry Neiva (P) Harrietsfield Niamh (P) Mayfield Scotty’s Maid 0019 (P) (Et)

S C Currie T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners K G Anderson Gerard Te Lintelo

Overall champions Male champion Reserve

Coxhill Norseman (P) Headlind Nobunaga (P)

Mrs L J Townsend T Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners

Female champion Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg (P) S C Currie Reserve Beautry Shuna Narnia (P) S C Currie Reserve champion male, Headlind Nobunaga

Reserve female champion, Beautry Shuna Narnia

Overall champion Coxhill Norseman (P) Mrs L J Townsend Reserve Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg (P) S C Currie

Champion young handler, David Lawson

Reserve young handler, Megan Souter

Young handlers Under 16s 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

David Lawson Dilan Mackenzie Freddie Sharp Megan Park William Crew Iona Park

Young handlers 17 – 21s

Champion group of three from S C Currie

1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Megan Souter Ethan Clarke Erika Ivinson Phoebe Wharton

Champion Reserve

David Lawson Megan Souter

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Stars of the Future 2019 Saturday, 9 November 2019 ‘Stars of the Future’ calf show staged at Stirling Mart attracted a good turn out of Beef Shorthorn entries

Dean Anderson J U D G E

Senior champions, Eskechraggan Masterstroke and Castlemount Matrix Matilda

Class results Bull born on or between 30 July and 17 November 2018 1st 2nd 3rd

Eskechraggan Masterstroke by Tamhorn Glen Muiresk Messiah by Loch Awe Lysander Westbroad Marshall by Shawhill JAT

Tom McMillan S Mair and Sons Duncan Welsh

Heifer born on or between 13 April and 20 October 2018 1st 2nd 3rd Senior male champion, Eskechraggan Masterstroke

Castlemount Matrix Matilda by Elliot Matrix Westbroad Bramble 3rd by Shawhill JAT Westbroad Rusty 12th by Shawhill JAT

Duncan McDowell D Welsh Duncan Welsh

Bull born on or between 10 January and 16 March 2019 1st

Headlind Nobunaga by Tofts Atlas

Allan Jackson, Headlind Partners

Bull born on or between 25 March and 11 May 2019 1st 2nd 3rd

Muiresk Northern Dancer by Alvie Galaxy Westbroad Nadal by Shawhill JAT Millerston North Pole by Meonhill Charlie Chaplin

S Mair and Sons Duncan Welsh J and G Ramsay

Heifer born on or between 3 January and 28 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

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Millerston Irania Novelty by Bushypark Tiger Headlind Hooly Nutmeg by Tofts Atlas Rattray Naddie by Fearn Joker Castlemount Matrix Floss by Elliot Matrix Castlemount Matrix Lovely by Elliot Matrix Rattray Nicola by Fearn Joker

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

J and G Ramsay A Jackson Calum Clark, Rattray Estate Duncan McDowell Duncan McDowell Calum Clark, Rattray Estate


Senior female champion, Castlemount Matrix Matilda

Reserve male champion, Muiresk Messiah

Junior male champion, Muiresk Northern Dancer

Heifer born on or between 14 April and 9 May 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Millerston Irania Nutella by Bushypark Tiger Wells Tessa by Wells Kopperpot Headlind Wineberry Neiva by Tofts West Point Westbroad Rosette 9th by Shawhill JAT Crafters Greta Naomi by Alvin Elton

J and G Ramsay John Wood Allan Jackson Duncan Welsh Messrs Clark

Champions Senior male champion Reserve

Eskechraggan Masterstroke by Tamhorn Glen Muiresk Messiah by Loch Awe Lysander

Tom McMillan S Mair and Sons

Senior female champion Reserve

Castlemount Matrix Matilda by Elliot Matrix Westbroad Bramble 3rd by Shawhill JAT

Duncan McDowell D Welsh

Senior champion Reserve

Eskechraggan Masterstroke by Tamhorn Glen Castlemount Matrix Matilda by Elliot Matrix

Tom McMillan Duncan McDowell

Junior male champion Reserve

Muiresk Northern Dancer by Alvie Galaxy Westbroad Nadal by Shawhill JAT

S Mair and Sons Duncan Welsh

Junior female champion Reserve

Millerston Irania Nutella by Bushypark Tiger Millerston Irania Novelty by Bushypark Tiger

J and G Ramsay J and G Ramsay

Junior champion Reserve

Millerston Irania Nutella Millerston Irania Novelty

J and G Ramsay J and G Ramsay

‘Stars of the Future’ senior native championship went to the Beef Shorthorn senior champion, Eskechraggan Masterstroke from Tom McMillan

Junior female champion, Millerston Irania Nutella

Reserve junior male champion, Westbroad Nadal

Reserve junior female champion, Millerston Irania Novelty www.beefshorthorn.org

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Northern Club ‘Rising Stars’ Calf Show Sunday, 10 November 2019 ~ Thirsk Mart

Class results Bull born between 1 January and 31 January 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

James Frame J U D G E

Langhams Nevada Buffalo Highlee Nero Langhams Nebraska Podehole Rock Neopolitan

A C Farms T Severn A C Farms H Horrell

Bull born between 31 January and 28 February 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Sleightholme Larix Stonehills No Limits Jodame Nathan Sowerbyparks Neptune

P James G L Riby and Son M and J Souter S and G Hunt

Bull born between 1 March and 30 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Warmington Nemo Jodame Nicholas Headlind Nobunaga Neil of Upsall

Robert Leach M and J Souter A Jackson Hon. G Turton

Bull born after 31 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Mallerstang Navigator Rookwith Niko Stonehills Native River Marrgrange Noble

M and S Clark Page Farming Partnership G L Riby and Son P S and S E Hardcastle

Heifer born between 20 December 2018 and 31 January 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Sleightholme Saffron Delphead Phantasy Nina Podehole Isobel Naomi Barwood Gypsy Nell

P James A Thornber and Daughters H Horrell A Thornber and Daughters

Heifer born between 1 February and 12 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Overall champion, Rookwith Hilda N392

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Headlind Holly Nutmeg Sowerbyparks Gypsy Rose N526 Sandwick Gyspy Nigella Jodame Cara Nelly

A Jackson S and G Hunt A and C Ivinson M and J Souter

Male champion, Langhams Nevada Buffalo


Heifer born between 13 March and 3 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Rookwith Hilda N392 Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg Augusta X1394 of Upsall Kelleythorpe Carnation Rouge N568

Page Farming Partnership S and G Currie Hon. G Turton J Hopper

Heifer born on or after 4 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Beautry Shuna Narnia Raindale Joyful Nancy Beautry Dewdrop Nightshade Raindale Eveline 5th

S and G Currie Clough Family S and G Currie Clough Family

Mixed or same sex pairs 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Beautry Langhams Sleightholme Mayfield

S and G Currie A C Farms P James G Te Lintelo

Mixed or same sex pairs 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Headlind Raindale Highlee Sandwick

A Jackson Clough Family T Severn A and C Ivinson

Young handler - under 16yrs on show day 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Dylan McKenzie Beth Lack Emi Thornber George Lack

Young handler - 16yrs to 21yrs on show day 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Lewis Lack Max Clough John McCulloch Erika Ivinson

Class results

Champion young handlers, left Dylan McKenzie and Lewis Lack

Champions Overall champion Reserve

Rookwith Hilda N392 Langhams Nevada Buffalo

Page Farming Partnership A C Farms

Male champion Reserve

Langhams Nevada Buffalo Mallerstang Navigator

A C Farms M and S Clark

Female champion Reserve female

Rookwith Hilda N392 Beautry Blythesome Nutmeg

Page Farming Partnership S and G Currie

Overall winning pairs Beautry

S and G Currie

Overall young handler

Lewis Lack www.beefshorthorn.org

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East of England Winter Stock Festival Calf Show Friday, 29 to Saturday, 30 November 2019

Class results Bull calf born on or between 1 September and 31 September 2018 1st 2nd

Caroline Ivinson J U D G E

Mineshop Masterpiece Mineshop Masterclass

C Nye C Nye

Bull calf born on or between 1 and 31 January 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

Langhams Nevada Buffalo Podehole Rock Neopolitan Langhams Nobleman Highlee Nero Langhams Nebraska Highlee Napoleon

A & C Farms Harry Horrell A & C Farms Mrs T Severn A & C Farms Mrs T Severn

Bull calf born on or between 1 and 31 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th

Podehole Norbert Warmington Nemo Warmington Nastasi Glenariff Nathaniel

Harry Horrell Robert Leach Robert Leach Glenariff Pedigree Livestock

Heifer calf born on or between 1 September and 31 December 2018 1st 2nd

Mineshop Pattie M240 Mineshop Margies Memory M262

C Nye C Nye

Heifer calf born on or between 1 January and 28 February 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Podehole Isobel Naomi Langhams Passion Nellie Highlee Nellie Greenley Nelly Floss Langhams Secret Nova

Harry Horrell A & C Farms Mrs T Severn Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers A & C Farms

Heifer calf born on or between 1 March and 31 March 2019 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Greenley Heathermaid Nancy Greenley Nectar Floss Glenariff Navana Gina Glenariff Natalia Broadhooks Warmington Bordeaux

Overall and female champion, Greenley Heathermaid Nancy

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Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers Glenariff Pedigree Livestock Glenariff Pedigree Livestock Robert Leach

Reserve overall and male champion, Langhams Nevada Buffalo


Calf born on or after 1 April 2019 1st 2nd 3rd

Pair of calves

Warmington Cathy 468 Warmington Primular 506 Warmington Molly 494

Robert Leach Robert Leach Robert Leach

Champions Overall champion Greenley Heathermaid Nancy Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers Reserve Langhams Nevada Buffalo A & C Farms Male champion Reserve

Langhams Nevada Buffalo Podehole Rock Neopolitan

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th

A & C Farms Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers C Nye Harry Horrell Glenariff Pedigree Livestock Mrs T Severn

A & C Farms Harry Horrell

Female champion Greenley Heathermaid Nancy Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers Reserve Podehole Isobel Naomi Harry Horrell

Interbreed winners Best Interbreed Group of Three Greenley Heathermaid Nancy Greenley Nelly Floss Mineshop Masterclass

Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers Mr G H and Ms Megan Towers C Nye

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ROWANBERRY JASMINE by Rowanberry Finest

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ROWANBERRY JILLIAN with her 2019 Heifer Calf ROWANBERRY NARNIA


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Beef Shorthorn Regional Club Contacts As a Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society member, you are very welcome to join one of our regional clubs. Each one offers an array of activities focused on learning and sharing information, together with various social activities. Here are the contact details for the various clubs, please feel free to get in touch with the officers.

Scottish Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Matthew Thomson Vice-Chair: Victor Watson Secretary: Rosemary Dickie Treasurer: Kenny Mair

t: 07900 181635 t: 07736 887246 t: 07887 737040 t: 07384 890092 e: sbsc2012@hotmail.com

Northern Ireland Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Vice-Chair: Secretary: Treasurer:

Richard Henning Tom McGuigan Barry Fitzsimons David Alexander

t: 07730 762905 t: 07801 063164 t: 07801 123966 t: 07738 414713

e: richard.henning@lakeland.ie e: tommcguigan34@gmail.com e: bawnforth@yahoo.co.uk e: davidalexander24@hotmail.co.uk

‘N.I. Beef Shorthorn Club’

Northern Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Ian Clough Secretary: Caroline Ivinson Treasurer: Andrew Ivinson

t: 07710 192398 t: 07469 687738 t: 07570 390226 e: northernbeefshorthornclub@gmail.com

‘North of England Beef Shorthorn Club’ Central Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Katy Coles Treasurer: Trevor Brown

e: kecoles@ymail.com t: 07974 366805 e: hootensfarm@gmail.com

Southern Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Simon Bradley Farmer Secretary: Steve and Joni Davies Treasurer: Mary Chaplin Herd Visits & Calf Show: Tina Russell

t: 07739 035667 e: simonroan@gmail.com t: 07733 105990 e: steve@bloomfieldhatchfarm.co.uk t: 07763 780829 e: marychaplin@btinternet.com e: t17nar@gmail.com

‘Southern Beef Shorthorn Breeders Club’ Wales & Borders Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Hywel Evans Secretary: Emma Evans Treasurer: Martin Reynolds

t: 01239 811597 e: h-e.evans@outlook.com t: 01239 811597 e: h-e.evans@outlook.com t: 07966 371558 e: martin.shorthorn@gmail.com

‘Wales & Borders Beef Shorthorn Club’ South Wales & Mid Western Beef Shorthorn Club Chairman: Alma James Secretary: Huw Evans Treasurer: Martin Reynolds

t: 01437 731610 t: 07976 328177 t: 07966 371558 e: martin.shorthorn@gmail.com

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Northern Ireland Club Beef Shorthorn Club visit Cherryvalley Estate

Cows with calves by Creaga Logic

Local Beef Shorthorn breeders enjoyed fantastic show of top-quality cattle at an open day at Cherryvalley Estates, Crumlin. The Cherryvalley herd was established by local businessman, Dr Peter Fitzgerald and is managed by Stephen Williamson. The herd won the overall championship in the 2018 herd competition, along with many of the individual category awards, and presented local breeders with a fine display of purchased foundation stock together with some quality homebred yearling and calves. Over 80 visitors were transported around the estate and, despite the odd heavy shower, managed to see all the stock including cows with calves mostly by Creaga Logic, male champion at Balmoral in 2018, heifers and five promising young bulls. Refreshments were served before and after the tour and a very detailed booklet was provided with all cattle pedigrees topping off a terrific day.

Cherryvalley foundation females with stock bull Croobview Klass

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Overall champion Shorthorn and 1st prize cow with calf, Ricketstown Lovely from Duncan McDowell and Fiona McKeown

Beef Shorthorns turn out in style at Fermanagh Local Beef Shorthorn breeders put on a fantastic show of top quality cattle at Fermanagh County Show. The NI Beef Shorthorn Club held their national championships at this year’s event and local breeders came out in support with a terrific show of cattle, the largest of any breed on display. Breed entries were placed by Bobby Landers from Newtown Stewart, Galloway. Bobby runs the well-known Cairnsmore herd along with his father and mother, Bill and Jane. The Landers have judged before in Northern Ireland, as well as being familiar exhibitors at the Stirling Bull sales in February and the Carlisle sales. The first class to come before his gaze was the senior bull. Leading the way was Linhill Kevin, stock bull in the Mullaglass herd of Richard Henning from Newry. A son of Craigfaddock Xerxes, this naturally fleshed bull was bred by JP McFadden, Martinstown. Junior bulls were led by Castlemount Masterpiece, a roan son of Elliot the Gambler from Duncan McDowell, Newtownards. Next in front of the judge were the senior cows. This class was led by Ricketstown Lovely 191, a Nevada Nitetime daughter bred by the Kelly family,

Reserve overall champion and 1st prize senior heifer, Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie from William and George Gott with handlers, Kieran Flately and Jenson Lindsay, and sponsor, Brian Keys

Continued over

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Rathvilly, Co Carlow and exhibited by Duncan McDowell, Newtownards. Shown with a smart heifer calf at foot by Elliot Matrix, this cow is no stranger to the show ring having been breed and interbreed champion at Balmoral in 2019. Richard Henderson from Trillick claimed first in the junior cow class. Another one bred by the Kelly family, Ricketstown Millicent Kim is a 2016 born daughter of Creaga Flash. 2017 born heifers were led by Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie, bred by James Porter, Dromore, County Down and exhibited by Fermanagh breeders, George and William Gott. This long red heifer is a daughter of Dunsyre Demetri. The junior heifer class also went to Fermanagh with first time exhibitor, Kyle Hopper claiming the red ticket with Aghalun Grainne, a very correct roan daughter of Croft Dynamite. The calf class was led by an October 2018 born heifer from Richard Henning. This light roan calf, Mullaglass Flossies 3rd is the first progeny from new stock bull, Linhill Kevin.

Best junior bull, Castlemount Master Piece from Duncan McDowell shown by Richard McKeown

The pairs class was won by Castlewellan breeder, Kenny Baxter with two smart 2018 bulls. Both were imported from Canada as embryos and carry Shadybrook bloodlines. Overall breed champion went to Duncan McDowell with Ricketstown Lovely. Reserve overall champion went to George and William Gott with Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie.

NI National Show results Senior bull born before 1 January 2018 1st

Linhill Kevin

Richard Henning

Junior bull born between 1 January 2018 and 31 August 2018 1st 2nd 3rd

Castlemount Masterpiece Castlefin Hotshot Castlefin Tornado

D McDowell K Baxter K Baxter

Cow with calf at foot born before January 2016 1st 2nd 3rd

Ricketstown Lovely Mullaglass Margo Gillaroo You’re Nice

D McDowell R Henning D and E McNulty

Best junior cow and calf, Ricketstown Millicent Kim and Croft Nellie, exhibited by Richard Henderson shown by Jack and Charlie

Junior cow born in 2016 1st

Ricketstown Millicent Kim

R Henderson

Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie Ashvale Beatrice Lowtown Heather

G and W Gott R and F McKeown R Henderson

Heifer born in 2017 1st 2nd 3rd

Heifer born between 1 January 18 and 31 August 2018 1st 2nd 3rd

Aghalun Grainne Magherone Rosie Mae Magherone Lovely Mabel

K Hopper C Clarke C Clarke

Best calf, Mullaglass Flossie 3rd from Richard Henning

Calf born on or after 1 September 2018 1st 2nd 3rd

Mullaglass Flossies 3rd Castlemount Matrix Lovely Gillaroo Dove 2nd

R Henning D McDowell D and E McNulty

1st

Castlefin Hotshot and Castlefin Tornado

K Baxter

Champion

Ricketstown Lovely

D McDowell

Pairs

Reserve champion Uppermill Blythesome Bonnie

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G and W Gott

Junior heifer, Aghalun Grainne exhibited by Kyle Hopper and David Whittaker


O v

g n

Continuo f o us ars Br e Y ee 60 d r i e Est. 1959

SKAILLHOUSE SHORTHORNS ALWAYS AIMING TO PRODUCE FUNCTIONAL, EASILY FLESHED, WELL BALANCED CATTLE

Tulip 36th of Skaillhouse

Tulip 45th of Skaillhouse

Flora 57th of Skaillhouse

Looking forward to the 2020 crop of calves by our new stock bull, Chapelton Lionheart

Breedplan Recorded Beef Shorthorn Society Linear Classified since 2016

Visitors always welcome! Stuart & Lynn Macadie

Marstyn, Skaill, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7YD. High Health Status Accredited clear of BVD, IBR. Monitored free for LEPTO. Johne’s Level 1. TB4.

Tel: 01847 861225 M: 07711 371385 E: stuart.macadie@ukgateway.net

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Scottish Club The popularity of the Beef Shorthorn is as evident as ever in Scotland by the continuing growth of new members joining our Scottish Club.

Delegates on a trip to Co Clare and Co Galway

After the first committee meeting of 2019, we were delighted to announce that C & D Auction Marts Ltd (J Thomson and Sons) were going to sponsor the champion at the five shows with the most exhibitors, based on the previous year’s entries. The competition is now called ‘The Longtown Prize’. The first event of 2019 was our ‘Supper and Blether’ during the February bull sales at Stirling Golf Club, where many friends gathered and even enjoyed a wee punt at guessing the average price of the bulls to be sold the next day. Calum Clark, Rattray Estate was the lucky winner of the £50 for his guess of 4,453gns. Over £170 was also raised for RSABI. On 30 May, we took a stand at Scotland’s Beef Event at North Bethelnie, Oldmeldrum, Aberdeen, featuring a Beef Shorthorn cross Simmental heifer with an outstanding heifer calf at foot, kindly loaned by Smallburn Farms. Our ‘guess the weight of the calf’ competition attracted a lot of attention and kept our stand busy all day. The calf weighed 441 kgs and we had two lucky winners who won a bottle of whisky each.

Matthew Thomson, Pilmuir Farm, Hawick, where we enjoyed a cuppa together with a fantastic selection of Beth and Anne’s cakes. Matthew told us how he is building up his commercial herd by using cows of various breeds that are being put to the Beef Shorthorn bull, with the young cows showing that the Beef Shorthorn is the ideal base for the suckler cow. We also saw the improvement that he is making to the productivity of the land. On arrival back at the steading, we viewed cattle which Matthew had brought over from Shawhill: four young bulls, two cows with calves at foot and two heifers. Moving over to the Yarrow valley, we were welcomed by George and Kirsty Irving at Mountbenger Farm. A tasty lunch was enjoyed by all before we took off on trailers on a farm tour. The first stop was the pedigree Beef Shorthorns, which turned out to be a very uniform group of cows with equally good calves at foot. The next field, commercial cows, proved the value of the Beef Shorthorn bull as they were tremendous Beef Shorthorn x Galloway cows. Over the road we then viewed two very high index young bulls followed by

Again, at the Royal Highland Show in June, the Beef Shorthorns had the largest entry of cattle and put on a great spectacle with the supreme championship going to Tom McMillan, Eskiecraggan, Isle of Bute with a two-year-old heifer, Trowbridge Tessa Linsay. The Scottish Club again provided teas, coffees, biscuits and cakes, enjoyed by members and friends for the duration of the show. Our annual barbeque was again held on the Saturday night and this year the club paid tribute to Liz Lang for her dedicated service to the RHS and the Beef Shorthorn breed, with it being her 60th year in attendance. As usual, it was a very popular and sociable evening. The last Sunday in July the Club had its annual day trip. Over 60 members and friends had a wonderful day looking at great cattle (and sheep) in amazing weather. Our first hosts were John and

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George Irving introduces his Mountbenger herd


some very good bulling heifers. Back at the farm we saw a selection of Blackface, South Country and North Country Cheviot tups which will all be sold later in the season. Our third Scottish herds competition was judged by Ian Park this year visiting 27 herds from the Borders to Thurso, up the east coast and down the west.

Fanore Shorthorns on the Burren

On Friday 20 September, 27 Scottish members found their way by boat, car and plane to Ennis, County Clare to enjoy three very full days of herd visits and much chat. Those of us who flew were met at Shannon airport by one of Shane Brigdale’s minibuses and there the tour began. After we all met up at the hotel, we visited all seven farms and enjoyed the journey back to the airport again using Brigdale’s buses. There’s nothing like all travelling together for good camaraderie as well as enjoying the amazing scenery of the west coast of Ireland. We had a great start to our weekend visiting the Rowanberry and Buncraggy herds, courtesy of Shane and Frances Brigdale and John Kelly, in beautiful sunshine and great company. We walked through Shane’s Beef Shorthorns seeing good, big, stretchy cows; cattle which we could all relate to and would be more than happy to have at home.

Shorthorns at Rowanberry

Moving on to John Kelly, we started this visit with a very interesting chat and guessing game about weights of cattle and producing cattle for a very specific market, something of which we probably need to be more aware. We commended him on his bull, Buncraggy Fire Fox graduating from the Gene Ireland Maternal Bull Breeder Programme, and then enjoyed a walk round his cattle. Day two to County Clare started with Johnny Keane’s well-known Bushy Park herd. Walking from field to field we saw big cows with big frames and some tremendous families, breeding consistently, including four generations of one family together. The second visit of the day was to Anthony and Marie McNamara’s Tintrum herd where we enjoyed viewing the Beef Shorthorns in the various fields and seeing Tintrum Amelia, the All Ireland Champion 2019, as well as other winners. The young calves certainly stood a second look. Marie and her helpers laid on a bite of lunch which was much appreciated.

Four generations of the Bushy Park Beauty family

The third and last visit that day took us to Mike and Yvonne Conway’s Clonina herd, where we saw cattle that were being bred for muscle for a specific market. Our members appreciated this and were particularly drawn to a red bull calf. Due to unforeseen circumstances, Yvonne was our courier at very short notice throughout our whole trip and we really appreciated her helpful and friendly manner.

Looking over the west coast of Ireland www.beefshorthorn.org

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Our final day took us on a most picturesque journey along the County Clare coast through the Burren to Pat Casey, part-time farmer of the Fanore herd, where we saw really good working cattle doing a great job under what look like difficult conditions. Amazingly they are out-wintered up the hill and only come in just before they are due to calf. Rowanberry genetics have done a great job in this herd and their present stock bull, again from Shane Brigdale, is leaving some cracking calves. Last, but not least, of the seven herds we visited was Noel and Lisa Dowd, Creaga Beef Shorthorns in County Galway. A great welcome awaited us with the Scottish flag flying at the entrance to their

farm! We all enjoyed walking round their Beef Shorthorns, many of which had won accolades at many big shows. Our members were particularly pleased to see the famous Heidi cow and her mother who is still looking well. The calves we saw in the last field made us think that their showing success will certainly continue. On return to the barn a lovely tea awaited us, many members also enjoying a wee dram! From here we made our way to Galway Bay to be treated by Tommy Staunton to a most delicious meal with wine. A great end to an unforgettable trip among our Beef Shorthorn family.

Competition results Best small herd 1st 2nd 3rd

T A Jackson (Headlind) George Irving (Mountbenger) Stuart G Mair and Sons (Muiresk) Team Balnabroich, winners of the medium herd

Best medium herd 1st 2nd 3rd

Sir M and Lady S Nairn (Balnabroich) Cathryn Williamson (Balnespick) C Macadie and Sons (Skailhouse)

Best large herd 1st 2nd 3rd

Messrs James Biggar (Chapelton) Major J and C Gibb (Glenisla) Carey Coombs (Dunsyre)

Champion herd Messrs James Biggar (Chapelton)

James Rea, stockman for D J Biggar and Sons, winner of the large herds and overall winner

Judge, Ian Park with Alan Jackson, winner of the small herds

Herds and points competition Thanks to our members and friends from south of the Border - and across the water - who came along to the Scottish Beef Shorthorn Club’s ‘Social and prizegiving’ and made it such a success. After an excellent hot buffet, the presentations began with Matthew Thomson presenting ‘The Longtown Prize’ certificates to this year’s winners. The five shows with the most exhibitors from 2018 were as follows: Dumfries Show

Tom Bradley Farmer with Meonside Lily May

Grantown-on-Spey Show

Glenrinnes Farms Ltd with Smallburn Katie

Orkney County Show

J M Lennie & Co with Nearhouse Lyall

Stirling Show

Tom McMillan with Trowbridge Tessa Linsay

Turriff Show

W J & J Green with Coldrochie Broadhooks M8

Above Left: Laura Beattie, one of the five winners of the Longtown Prize, being presented by Matthew Thomson of CD Marts Above Right: Tom Bradley with the champion of Dumfries Show, also a Longtown Prize winner

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Judge, Ian Park said: “What a privilege to be asked to judge the Scottish Herd Competition this year and I would like to say a big thank you to everyone who entered, which was 27 herds and 162 animals in the individual classes. What an achievement for the Club, as it is only the third year this competition has been held. Thank you to everyone for your hospitality, it was second to none. “From the Borders to Thurso on every farm we visited, there were outstanding cattle with very differing landscapes, but the enthusiasm and love of this great breed was evident to see everywhere we went. Individual classes were extremely strong with very little between the top three in each section. I’m sure we will be seeing a few of these animals at next year’s shows. “Congratulations to all prize winners in the herd and individual competitions, your cattle were outstanding and to every herd we visited, your cattle were a credit to you – the breed is in good hands for the future.”


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Kelleythorpe Carnation Rouge E474 EX90 Suckling promising bull calf by Balgay Hidden Land

Promising calves by

Kelleythorpe Tessa L543

Balgay Hidden Land

Balgay Hidden Land

1st calf by Balgay Hidden Land Northern England Herd Competition ‘Best Heifer Calf 2017’

(3 Years)

Visitors Welcome!

Northern Club - best medium size herd 2017

• TB 4 yrs • Johne’s Risk Level 1 • Elite Herd • BVD PIBR Accredited • LEPTO Accredited James Hopper, Hall Garth Farm, Harpham, Driffield, East Yorkshire, YO25 4QZ

t: 01262 490019 | 07974 697733 | e: jameshopper50@gmail.com 136

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Northern Club Stanford Park herd visit Our first event of the year was a visit to the Stanford Park herd owned by Mr and Mrs Stoneham. This was a joint visit with the Welsh, Southern and Central Clubs. We were shown around the cattle by farm manager, Simon Farmer and his team. The herd is one of the largest in the country but over the past few years has had to battle with the effects of TB, thankfully now it is all clear. We got to see the huge amount of work which has been carried out to improve the farm after years of neglect, as well as Kassam of Longfield, who then went onto much success at the summer shows. After our look around the cows, we were treated to a real good feed with burgers and pulled beef.

Lipwood and Cutthorn herd visits In August, we hoped to take advantage of the late summer sun, so about 50 members headed to the Hexham area in Northumbria. The first of our two visits was to Maurice and Tonya Tailford’s Lipwood herd. Here we got to see the stock bull, Burnside Jack the Lad who is putting his stamp on the 60 cow herd. After an excellent lunch we moved on to Alastair and Donna Gibson’s Cutthorn herd founded in 2008, which has grown to around 50 cows. Stock bulls used across the herd include Ballylinney Hawk and Coldrochie Kracker, and the most recent purchase Tofts Grenadier. It was easy to see how the herd is moving forward with successive generations. A hearty tea of homegrown mince pies and lots of cake rounded off a right good day out.

Delphead herd visit At the end of August, we were invited to near Bradford to the Delphead herd owned by Stephen and Judith Hodgson. They have only been going a few years with cattle purchased mainly from Carlisle and Skipton, together with the Carlisle centre record holder at 8,500gns, Gilven Journey, but the progress is obvious with some very smart calves on the ground. Locally produced Beef Shorthorn burgers, rolls and a great rake of cakes then had to be eaten before we could leave.

Jodame herd visit A blustery October afternoon awaited the Club’s pre-AGM herd tour of the Jodame Herd owned by Joanne and Michael Souter and family. The herd comprises of 20 breeding cows, the stock bull, Lowther Xfactor certainly has made his mark on the young stock and this has followed through with success at the shows each year. On behalf of the club members, we would like to thank all those who hosted visits and took the time to show us their cattle, as well as feeding and watering us so well.

Some highlights from our visit to Stanford Park

Once again, Club members have enjoyed great success at both local and national shows and sales this year. The Club proves to be an excellent way for breeders and those interested in the breed to get together, have a look around each other’s cattle and share ideas. It is also a great way for those new to the breed to gain information and network with other breeders.

AGM and herd competition Next up was our annual pilgrimage to the Moorcock Inn, Eggleston for the AGM. Not only is this excellent hostelry owned by Club members, Joanne and Michael Souter, but also they feed us Beef Shorthorn reared on their next door farm and picked out by our herd competition judge. Our annual dinner with a fun quiz followed, then John and Jill Redpath, our herd competition judges, announced the results and presented the trophies. The hardcore of members then partied hard until about 4am; a good night was had by all.

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Northern Club herd competition results Registered cow with calf at foot Overall winner

Stonehills Lovely Wallie and Stonehills No Limits

Geoff Riby and Son

Longmoor Formidabull Bob

John and Caroline Elliott

Registered stock bull Overall winner

Registered in-calf cow over three years old (must previously have calved, but not in 2019 and must not have calf at foot Overall winner

Wholaw Cressida

Robert Hawking

Registered in-calf heifer under 3 years of age Overall winner

Cutthorn Melody Loki

Alastair and Donna Gibson

Cutthorn Amber’s Martina

Alastair and Donna Gibson

Rookwith Marvellous

Page Farming Partnership

Lipwood Maryanne Namara

Maurice and Tanya Tailford

Overall winner

Cutthorn Nato

Alastair and Donna Gibson

Judges’ choice

Group of heifers

Geoff Riby and Son (Stonehills)

Judges’ choice

Group of calves

John and Caroline Elliott (Farlam)

Registered heifer born in 2018 Overall winner Registered bull born in 2018 Overall winner Registered 2019 born heifer calf Overall winner Birth notified 2019 born bull calf

Overall 2019 Champion herd

John and Caroline Elliott (Farlam)

Reserve 2019 Champion herd

Maurice and Tanya Tailford (Lipwood)

Herd competition awards

Overall herd competition winners, John and Caroline Elliott of Farlam herd with judge, John Redpath

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‘back to where they came from’ The Derwentwood herd continues to grow with AI, ET, the recently acquired Ballylinney Hawk and our second live female purchase from the Newfield dispersal.

arch (P)

Derwentwood Mon

Neptune (H) (ET) and Tessa 6 (P)

entry for Stirling in at 18 months old – our February 2020.

(ET)

the last two calves from the very succ essful Tessa/Meonhill Firefox flush.

Newfield Limelight Foxglove (P)

Ballylinney Hawk (P)

at 2½ years of age.

at 5 years of age.

TB-4 year area, Johne’s Risk Level 1, BVD Accredited. Show and sale stock vaccinated for BVD, LEPTO & IBR.

Another good result in the North of England Beef Shorthorn Club’s Annual Herd Competition 2019 (Small Herd).

~ N & A Hunter ~ Woodlands Hall Farm, Knitsley, Consett, Co Durham, DH8 9EY. tel: 01207 580040 | 07836 739306 | email: neil.hunter007@gmail.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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Central Club Central Club herd visit to Stanford Park In late May, together with members of the Southern, Northern and Welsh Clubs, the Central Club travelled to Stanford Park for our spring herd visit. Whilst waiting to ensure all had arrived, members were able to have a look around the amazing newly built sheds and handling set up. The eagle-eyed members among us also caught sight of the show team who were in for show preparation – enough to make us all think twice about those we’d picked out from our own herd! We had a very informative introduction to the herd from Simon Farmer and Mark Stoneham, who together with his wife Hayley owns the herd, after which we split into groups to tour the herd. Our first stop was the young bulls, safe to say that we could all pick one we’d like to take home. Cows were split in bull calf and heifer calf groups for our viewing, and it was lovely to see such a uniform bunch. The yearling heifers patiently waited for us to have a good look around them; a great opportunity to study breeding alongside the animals. Our final stop was to the stock bulls who had to wait a few more days before they were set to work. It was great to be able to view bulls and progeny all in the same day. Along with hearing the merits of each bull, our group was told the reasoning behind the use of each bull.

Looking round the cattle at Stanford Park

It was fantastic to see so many members from all the clubs turn out for our spring visit – a great opportunity to catch up with goings on from around the country. A huge thank you to Mark and Hayley Stoneham, and Simon and Tina, for all the effort and work you put into a great day.

Autumn herd visit to Yorkshire In mid-October, together with a few Welsh Club members, the Central Club autumn tour travelled up to Yorkshire.

On route back to the yard I think it’s safe to say that all members took the opportunity to see Kassam of Longfield, who has had rather a successful showing season this year.

Our first stop was to see the Highlee herd of Tracy and Mark Severn. As well as seeing this year’s fabulous show team, we saw the cows rearing calves and bulling heifers. Tremendous cows rearing equally tremendous calves; ones to look out for on next year’s show circuit!

Once all the stock had been viewed, we returned to the yard where we were greeted with an amazing spread courtesy of Hayley and Mark.

Our second visit took us to the Stoneyroyd herd of Tim and Mandy Riley. It was great to see a good herd of cows who were proving how the Beef Shorthorn breed can thrive on steep slopes.

Our Stanford Park hosts, from left Tina Russell, Hayley and Mark Stoneham and Simon Farmer

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Tracy and Mark Severn

Woodhead Bros abattoir at Colne

Day two saw us head to the Sowerbyparks herd of Graham Hunt. The largest herd on our tour gave us the opportunity to see the calves from the several bulls being used across the working cows. Again, we also got a sneak peak at the show team.

final stop of the day where we saw wonderful cows and calves and, after a short ride, we viewed the group of fantastic heifers. We were also treated to a viewing of the equine therapy centre at the farm complete with hydrotherapy pool.

The tour then stopped at the Rookwith herd of Ed Page, where we saw a fantastic herd of pedigree cows along with crossbred cows and calves, showing us all how a Beef Shorthorn bull can produce commercial suckler cows and calves. We also got to test our stock judging skills with a group of yearling heifers. We found out who were the competitive ones amongst us.

Our final day took us on a tour around Woodhead Bros abattoir, owned by Morrisons at Colne. It was great to be able to see where many of our cattle end up and how they are treated with the respect that they deserve. It is always interesting to hear the views of those who see our finished products.

Day three took us for a walk up the moors to see the superb herd of working cows of Rob and Penny Paisley’s Westmoor herd. The herd certainly have all the characteristics you’d expect of Beef Shorthorn cows and work well among the fantastic scenery of the moor. We also had the opportunity to see Penny’s incredible artwork. The Beautry herd, owned by Stuart Currie and family was the

A huge thank you to all we visited during our weekend, not only for allowing us to see your wonderful cattle but also for the hospitality you showed us. All the cattle we saw are a great credit to their breeders, owners and the breed. Thank you to Tina who spent a lot of time organising our tour, ensuring that we had great herds to visit. Many of us went home after our weekend away and took a fresh look at our herds, whilst talk of next year’s tour has already started.

Checking out the Rookwith herd www.beefshorthorn.org

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Herd competition results Extra large herds 1st 2nd 3rd

Hannington Stanford Park Lucombe

Charles Horton Mark & Hayley Stoneham James Fanshaw

Podehole Kislingbury Longlands

Harry Horrell RG Elliot & Son Julie Evans

Large herds 1st 2nd 3rd Medium herds 1st 2nd 3rd

Westmoor herd

Grafton Breakheart Silson

Trevor Brown Ian Rickatson Tim & Katy Coles

1st 2nd 3rd

Lynthorpe Winterbeck Greenley

Lynda Robson Andrew Wright Graham Towers

Champion

Podehole

Harry Horrell

Reserve

Hannington

Charles Horton

Small herds

Beautry herd

Stock Usually For Sale

New beginnings at Cooper Beef Shorthorn 2020 will see the introduction of two new Herd sires to the herd by Australian sires Kamilaroi Meat Packer & Sprys Patents Ace.

Semen Enquires : cooperbeefshorthorn@yahoo.co.uk

Visitors Welcome by appointment

Tom Mc Guigan 34 Mullanary Road, Middletown, Co Armagh Northern Ireland BT60 4HW Tel: 02837568515/00447801063164

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7

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Lowther ShorthornS nord Vue Farm, Armathwaite, Carlisle, Cumbria CA4 9tn

A big thAnk you to ALL our CuStoMerS thiS yeAr 2020 heralds the first crop of calves from Glenisla Lochan Dubh. We are very much looking forward to seeing how this bull compliments our cattle. We purchased him for his correctness, feeding ease and growth. We have also just had a crop of embryos born out of the rb eagle 255 line (different dam), which won us the supreme champion at Stirling in 2015. these calves are showing great early promise.

in 2020 also look out for calves from Lowther konan, (currently the highest ti beef Shorthorn animal in the whole of the UK with tons of growth, fleshing and bone, perfect feet and top-line). Many have been bred out of daughters of LS eagle 276, the sire of 2015 Stirling Supreme Champion bull. We have also gone back to blelack rupert again as well as Willingham Denebola and a few other interesting lines.

Please feel free to contact us to come and view the cattle by appointment only.

Look out For our eXCiting neW genetiCS in 2020 www.lowthershorthorns.co.uk

B R E E D A B I L ITY • P R E D I C A B I L ITY Charles Lowther: 01931 712 350 / 07769 695 380 Martin Strong: 07565 293 570 144

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Southern Club Our Club operates around two major events, which have dominated our year once again. Our spring/summer visit, this year to Stanford Park Farm, and our annual herd competition. The herd visit was arranged to view one of our own members, someone who could display a wide variety of new genetics in what is a newly-formed herd. For our Club herd competition we invited a noted Hereford breeder, who has oceans of experience with native breeds, to be our judge. Steve Edwards and his wife Sandra took to the road in September to travel to our members stretching from Kent across Sussex, Hampshire and Berkshire and on to Somerset, taking in Oxfordshire and Wiltshire on the way, with the odd visit into Dorset. Steve comments: “It was a great honour to be invited to judge the Southern Beef Shorthorn Club herd competition. As I am not a Beef Shorthorn breeder, I approached this with no preconceived idea of what cattle I would be judging. “The impression I got on my travels was that this breed has improved so much in recent years. The quality of the cattle was exceptional, from the small herds right through to the large herds. The females impressed me greatly, from the cow herds and in-calf heifers through to the yearling heifers. I saw some wonderful examples of the breed, with great structure and milking ability. “I want to thank all the entrants for their hospitality, in particular those who provided an overnight stay. It was all greatly appreciated, especially the cups of tea to keep us going.”

Kassam of Longfield

2019 herd competition results Small herds 1st 2nd 3rd

Longfield Poyntington Densworth

Intermediate herds 1st 2nd 3rd

Meonhill Hursley Cooperdown

Stanford Park’s next gen

Large herds 1st 2nd

Stanford Park Farm Hannington

Overall champion herd 1st

Meonhill

Special prize, judge’s choice Glenisla Eva Broadhooks s13, Redhill Jar Jar Binks of Longfield

Meonhill Geronimo daughters

The herd’s crop of maiden heifers www.beefshorthorn.org

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Stanford Park’s yearling heifers

Another Gilven Fairfax sired heifer

Lunchtime proved to be a very social occasion; thanks go to hosts, Mark and Hayley Stoneham for their kind hospitality

Our herd visit was done in conjunction with the Welsh Club and the Central Club, plus a few others who heard about the ‘open house’ approach of Stanford Park Farm. All together we ended up with 120 plus visitors to the farm to see the 150-cow herd. The weather stayed with us for much of the day. Many thanks must go to Mark Stoneham and his wife, Hayley for cooking lunch, homegrown Beef Shorthorn burgers. We saw a 60-cow January calving herd plus 100 cows calving April/May. These are split into seven bulling groups plus an AI group to provide a wide range of genetics which includes bulls from outside the UK. Bulls are sold into local markets and straight to a growing number of local farmers selling back to Morrisons Shorthorn Beef Scheme. All steers are sold through Thame Market native sales. Large numbers of heifers are marketed privately, which has included two herds set up in the last year in Ireland. The farm is also the sole supplier to a local butcher with cattle which don’t make the grade for breeding. These partners have seen a great jump in sales since moving to Shorthorn beef and we can see a great partnership with Dewsmeadow Farm Shop. We hope all our visitors enjoyed their day. A Gilven Fairfax daughter

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STONEYROYD BEEF SHORTHORNS Established 2009

Herd Sires Used (2018/2019): Chapelton Havana

Meonhill Charlie Chaplin

(Semen & Embryos Available)

Stoneyroyd Jacobite Matrix

Millerston Jester

(Semen & Embryos Available)

All males and females tested for Myostatin, polling and parental verification

Chapelton Havana

Stoneyroyd Jacobite Matrix

Semen & Embryos Available

Semen & Embryos Available

ELITE HERD HEALTH STATUS

Contact:

MR T RILEY

STONEY ROYD FARM MIDGLEY HEBDEN BRIDGE WEST YORKSHIRE HX7 5QY

PERFORMANCE RECORDED SILVER STANDARD

Tel: 07812

075568

Email: stoneyroyd@icloud.com

www.beefshorthorn.org

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THE

LANGHAMS HERD

A & C FARMS, HOME OF QUALITY BEEF SHORTHORNS

Jehu of Upsall daughters

We would like to thank everyone that purchased stock from us in 2019. Stock usually for sale.

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME BY APPOINTMENT

LANGHAM LODGE RUTLAND www.acfarms.co.uk Contact: Andre Email: Tel:

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Vrona or Jo Rodger acfarms@hotmail.co.uk 07860 240930 or 07801 709415

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020

FACEBOOK.COM/ SOUTHDEVONS


Wales and Borders Club Spring visit The Club’s Spring visit involved a weekend away and saw a large group travel to the Hannington herd of Club vice-president, Charles Horton. A 100-cow herd gave us plenty of interesting discussion, which was followed by a lamb roasted on the BBQ and some amazing puddings. Many thanks go to Charles and Jemima for hosting us, and to Peter Brain for helping show us around with his day to day knowledge of the cattle. After an overnight stay, the Club headed to Stanford Park. Many thanks to the Stoneham’s for their hospitality, and to Simon and Tina for showing us around.

Hannington stop over for the Wales and Borders Club

Charles and Jemima Horton offered tremendous hospitality

Summer visit A beautiful, sunny Pembrokeshire welcomed members of the Wales and Border Club to the Frenni herd for our late summer visit. We saw great cattle and received wonderful hospitality from Eiryth and Brian Thomas.

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Inaugural Club Sale at Welshpool Livestock Market Our inaugural Club sale at Welshpool Livestock Market took place on Saturday 12 October. It was kindly sponsored by Target Feeds, Holkin Beef Shorthorns and Robson & May handmade leather accessories. We would like to thank both vendors and purchasers for their support for this first time Beef Shorthorn event. We hope sales at this venue will go from strength to strength.

Wales and Borders Club herd competition Judge’s report Judge: Trevor Brown What a pleasure to judge this year’s competition and witness both increasing numbers of our much-loved cattle, and many new breeders throughout the region. The quality of stock was universally good, irrespective of whether they were grazing the lush meadows of the south or the bracken clad mountains of the north. Some particularly impressive bulls have been introduced and these are having a tremendous impact upon the young stock coming forward, all boding well for the future. Beef Shorthorns now have a strong foothold in Wales, and I am confident they will prosper in these challenging times.

Judge, Brenda Wear with Nickie Hollows, Ogilvie Smith, Kate Robson and Ian Hollows

Herd competition results Judge’s calf 1st 2nd 3rd

Derw Nellophinia (Derw) Sannan Nutcracker (Sannan) Calf 553 (Cefynmelyn)

Hywel and Emma Evans Tudor Williams Mary and Jonathan Williams

Brenda Wear with Thomas Corbett, Nickie and Ian Hollows and Kate Robson

Large herd 1st 2nd 3rd

Frenni Llwynhywel Cetris

Brian and Eiryth Thomas Evans and Price Keith Jones

Small herd 1st 2nd 3rd

Derw Nant Fedwen Sannan

Hywel and Emma Evans Eric Evans and Sioned Mair Tudor Williams

Members who attended the Wales and Borders Club annual dinner at the Metropole Hotel in Llandindrod Wells. Judges, Trevor and Julie Brown presented the results and prizes of this year’s herd competition. Alma James with Trevor Brown

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SYMPHONY HERD This year we feature our two stock bulls, we will have surplus heifers by these in 2020 SYMPHONY JASPER DOB 4/4/2015 Sire Glenisla Explorer Dam Lynthorpe Brawith Bud 10th

SYMPHONY KING MAKER (KEN) DOB 11/4/2016 Sire Fearn Wyvis Dam Llanarth Flavia

Members of

BVD free since 2014 JOHNES level 1 since 2014 IBR monitoring and vaccinating LEPTO vaccinating Classified herd since 2016 JO PEARCE and ROB KENT – PEARCE BROAD OAK FARM, HOLLINGTON, ASHBOURNE , DERBYSHIRE. DE6 3GB Tel: 07807440894/07989770160

www.beefshorthorn.org

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CASTLEMOUNT

Ashvale Beatrice

was 1st and Junior Female Champion at the RUAS 2019. She was also the Shorthorn and Interbreed Champion at Saintfield Show.

Glenisla Hercules has produced us some exciting prospects for 2020

Bulls and Females available all year round 152

Castlemount House | 17 Ballycastle Road | Newtownards | Co Down | BT22 2AT 801 Antrim Road | Templepatrick| Co Antrim | BT39 0AN Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


& ASHVALE

Ricketstown Lovely

was the Beef Shorthorn Champion and Interbreed Champion at the RUAS 2019. She was also Breed and Interbreed Champion at the Randox Antrim Show 2019.

Castlemount McMillan

has been retained as a Junior Stock Bull. He is bringing new blood lines into our herds, sired by Linton Priory Victory x Coldrochie Janet.

Semen & embryos available from select cow families Duncan McDowell T: 07851 040032

Richard McKeown T: 07783 894152

www.beefshorthorn.org

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Rules and conditions of Coates’ Herd Book (Beef) Amended 23 September 2019

1. All registrations to be sent to The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society, Society Pavilion, Avenue M, Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire, CV8 2RG. 2. The Society will only accept registrations from the breeder who must be a bona fide member of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society, or in the case of imported animals, from the owner. 3. Registrations may be made online via the website and is the preferred method, or on paper forms which can be obtained from the Society and photocopies can be made. Fees must be submitted along with application forms. Computer based information systems may be substituted for registration forms by prior approval of the Society. 4. Cost of registration: Please refer to the current costs published and dated by the Society. Refunds will not be made in the event of a registration being cancelled. 5. The member will be able to register his/her cattle under the member’s herd name provided the herd name is registered. The Directors may decline to register any herd name considered similar to another breeder or which they consider to be inappropriate. 6. To be eligible for registration, all animals must be of Shorthorn colour: red, white or roan. 7. Animals may be refused registration if of a colour showing markings or conformation foreign to the Shorthorn breed and including genetic defects. 8. Heifer calves must be registered or birth notified by the age of four months. Male calves must be registered, or birth notified by the age of six months. All cases of dead-born calves or calves which for any reason are not to be entered into the Herd Book must be notified to the Society on the appropriate form. Such notifications must be made within four months of the date of birth. There is no fee for birth notification and all calves, including dead or cross bred calves must be notified to maintain cow calving records.

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9. See below: a) Each animal submitted for registration must be the progeny of a sire and dam each of which is registered with the Society in the pedigree section of Coates Herd Book (Beef), or in the case of an imported animal which is registered either in another EU herd book or in the herd book of a third country approved association and accompanied by a zootechnical certificate showing both parents and all grandparents registered in the main section of the herd book of origin. b) Late registration of calves for which full details have been notified to the Society will be accepted for registration on payment of the appropriate fee. Any animal not previously birth notified may be refused late registration. 10. On late registration, of birth notified calves, fees increase as follows (all prices include VAT): a) Heifer calves over four months and up to 12 months old £67.20 b) Bull calves over six months and up to 12 months old £60 c) Female animals over 12 months of age £120 d) Male animals over 12 months of age £240 11. Animal identification: Each animal for registration must be identified as follows and exactly corresponding to the unique UK Cattle Passport e.g. UK 000000-000000 or unique individual identification number from the zootechnical certificate. A Coates Herd Book (Beef) number will be issued on the pedigree certificate. 12. Animal name: Females - Herd name/cow family name/cow name or number. Males - Herd name/bull name or number. 13. Calves’ names shall also include a suffix as a designated letter: P polled, H horned, AI got by artificial insemination, ET embryo transfer, IIU imported in utero. 14. Polled and Horned animals to be recorded together in the Herd Book. The abbreviations (P) or (H) to be registered as part of the name. (P) where the progeny is polled or showing loose


scurs unattached to the skull. (H) where the progeny is horned or dehorned.

progeny must be submitted to the Society for SNP testing at the breeder’s expense.

15. When an animal is a twin it shall so be stated following the name of the animal on the registration and the sex (M) or (F) given of which it is a twin.

In all cases all imports must be accompanied by a zootechnical certificate from either another EU herd book or from a herd book listed on the EU Third Country Approved list, on which all parents and grandparents are listed in the main register of the herd book of origin, together with the relevant registration fee before any progeny can be registered. In the case of imported embryos from a mixed flush, a zootechnical certificate is required for all possible sires. Where such certificates do not show four generations, the importer is required to supply a four-generation pedigree from the herd book origin (up to and including great-great grandparents). The imported genetics is entered into the ‘register for imported animals’. The country of origin will be denoted on the registration certificate by abbreviation. Offspring of these imported genetics, subject to the breed standards of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society at the time of application, are eligible for registration in Coates Herd Book (Beef).

16. The Society reserves the right to recover from the member the full cost of responding to correspondence and enquiries for identification resulting from tag loss, the responsibility for proof of identity at all times to rest with the owner. 17. In any dispute over parentage the Society reserves the right to have the animal DNA/blood typed at the owner’s expense. 18. Male calf registrations: From July 1st 2011 all male calf registrations must be accompanied by a tail switch hair sample for DNA testing. From 1st January 2018 all male calf registrations for calves born on or after 1st January 2018 are to be sire verified at their breeder’s expense. As this process is completed for each calf a Parentage Verified field will appear on the animal enquiry screen of the website showing either ‘SV’ for sire verified, ‘DV’ for dam verified, or ‘PV’ for parentage verified. Where this field is empty the animal has not yet been verified. In the case of females that are neither embryos nor imports and with no parentage queries this field will not be completed and will be left intentionally blank as verification is not required. Where sire verification is not possible for whatever reason, the Society has a discretion to register a male calf. 19. Embryo or imported in utero calf registrations: Registration of calves got by ‘embryo transfer’ and ‘imported in utero’ shall be accepted by the Society provided all other bylaws of the Society are complied with. All embryo born animals born on or after 1st January 2018 are to be parentage verified and myostatin tested at their breeder’s expense. As this process is completed for each calf, a Parentage Verified field will appear on the animal enquiry screen of the website showing either ‘SV’ for sire verified, ‘DV’ for dam verified, or ‘PV’ for parentage verified. Where this field is empty the animal has not yet been verified. In addition, all imported embryo born animals born on or after 1st January 2018 are to be TH tested free. A copy of the import flush certificate or Embryo Registration (ET1) form and in addition a copy of the Embryo Amendment (ET2) form must be lodged with the Society office at the time of flushing and implantation respectively. Where parentage verification is not possible for whatever reason the Society has a discretion to register a calf. 20. Registration of calves got by AI must be accompanied by confirmation of the service date. 21. Where a bull has been hired in or borrowed a letter or email of service is required from the registered owner of the bull who must be a member of the Society.

All imported animals are to be sire verified, TH tested and myostatin tested before registration at their breeder’s expense. As this process is completed for each animal a Parentage Verified field will appear on the animal enquiry screen of the website showing either ‘SV’ for sire verified, ‘DV’ for dam verified, or ‘PV’ for parentage verified. Where this field is empty the animal has not yet been verified. Where verification is not possible for whatever reason the Society has a discretion to register an animal. 24. It is beholden on the importer to satisfy the breed standards required by the board of directors of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society at the time of application and registration. The Board of Directors of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society shall accept no liability for costs incurred with an unsuccessful application. 25. Private Sale – if an animal is transferred into another pedigree herd outside a Society sale, the seller must sign and date the back of the pedigree certificate and return it to the Society for endorsement and re-issue with the appropriate fee due from the purchaser. 26. When selling pedigree Beef Shorthorns which include the involvement of the Society in the transfer of the pedigree certificate to the new owner, the Society recommends to its members, with no cost, liability or involvement of the Society, to provide to the buyer the quality assurance of Breeding Warranties currently required by the National Beef Association. 27. The herd book is closed and the Society no longer accepts animals for grading up. 28. All grade females registered in Coates Herd Book (Beef) are not eligible for showing in pedigree Beef Shorthorn classes and if entered for Society sales they will be sold at the end of the sale.

22. All bulls born after 1st January 2000 used for semen collection, must be SNP profiled and myostatin tested and that report lodged with the Society prior to registration of its progeny got by Artificial Insemination/ET.

29. The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society shall reserve to itself by its Board of Directors the sole and absolute right to interpret these and other guidelines, rules, regulations or conditions and to settle or determine all matters in regard to or otherwise arising out of the business of the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society.

23. When live animals are imported the importer must register with the Society a SNP profile of the live animal which meets Weatherbys Acceptance Standards or submit a tail hair sample for DNA testing at the importer’s expense; where semen is imported the importer must register with the Society a SNP profile for the semen which meets Weatherbys Acceptance Standards or submit a semen sample for SNP testing at the importer’s expense; where embryos are imported a tail hair sample from the resulting

The Society and its officers shall not have any liability for the accuracy of the information contained within either the website database or the pedigree certificate.

30. Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained on the website database and the pedigree certificate the information is not warranted by the Society as it is based on data supplied by members and/or third parties.

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31. The Society accepts no liability for any misunderstanding or misinterpretation. Members are advised to contact the Society on any points for clarification. REGISTRATION RULES APPERTAINING TO THE GENETIC DEFECT TIBIAL HEMIMELIA EFFECTIVE FROM 3RD OCTOBER 2017 32. All animals imported into Coates’s Herd Book (Beef) must be tested TH free. 33. Progeny from imported semen will only be accepted for registration in Coates’s Herd Book (Beef) if the donor bull has been tested TH free or if the progeny is tested TH free at the breeder’s expense. 34. All samples sent for TH testing will require a result release form to be included giving permission for the results to be sent to the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society. All TH results will be published on the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society website. 35. Progeny of TH carriers, or progeny of animals deemed by the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society to be ‘at risk’ must be TH tested in order to be accepted for registration in Coates’s Herd Book (Beef). From 1st March 2008, no TH carrier animals will be accepted for registration into Coates’s Herd Book (Beef). 36. Any TH carrier animal previously registered with the Society and transferred to a new owner will have the pedigree certificate stamped with the words ‘TH Carrier’. 37. TH carrier animals or animals deemed by the Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society to be ‘at risk’ cannot be sold at Society sales. At risk animals are defined as animals whose pedigree contains an unbroken line to a known TH carrier.

with the Society or submitted for registration. NOTES FOR SALE/AUCTION CATALOGUES Whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this Journal article and the pedigree certificate, the information is not warranted by the Society as it is based on data supplied by members and/or third parties. Purchasers should check the animal enquiry screen of the Society website for sire or parentage verification. Where this field is blank the animal has not been verified. In the case of females that are neither embryos nor imports and with no parentage queries this field will not be completed and will be left intentionally blank as verification is not required. The Society and its officers shall not have any liability for the accuracy of the information contained within either the website database or the pedigree certificate. The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society has previously sanctioned the use of Maine Anjou cattle (a French breed of Shorthorn derivatives) in a controlled breed improvement programme. That successful programme is now complete and has been closed (Oct 1999). All calves born on or after 1 January 2001 shall be registered in the Coates Herd Book (Beef) with no mention of percentage (pertaining to Maine Anjou influence) provided that both parents are previously registered in Coates Herd book (Beef). Purchasers who are interested in the influence of Maine Anjou in any prospective purchase are invited to inspect the four-generation pedigree certificate or contact the Secretary for further details. Cattle born before 1 January 2001 will continue to display the percentage of pure Shorthorn blood on their certificate.

38. The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society reserves the right to insist on a TH test, at the breeder’s expense for any animal registered

BREAKHEART BEEF SHORTHORNS

A pedigree herd managed with a commercial outlook YOUNG STOCK AVAILABLE FROM 15 MONTHS OF AGE

Breakheart 2018 in-calf heifers

All females linear assessed annually. Heifers calving at 24 months. EBV’s closely monitored. Herd health paramount.

ACCREDITED • BVD Free since Jan 16 and routinely vaccinating all breeding stock pre-service • IBR Free since Jan 15 and routinely vaccinating • Johne’s risk Level 1 since Jan 16 • Lepto Free since Jan 15 • TB4

Dam and Daughter outfit, Princess Royal family

All enquiries welcome to Ian Rickatson, Breakheart Hill Farm, Fordfield Road, Millbrook, Beds MK45 2HZ.

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Email: rickatsonian@gmail.com


Hansford Shorthorns breeding for the future

John & Judy Fry welcome visitors by appointment only to view their prize winning herd they have developed over the last 5 years Delighted with great results in the Southern Herd competition 2018 Higher Health Johne’s Level 1, BVD Accredited , IBR Vaccinated, TB4

Hansford Moonshine Southern Society Intermediate

Coldrochie Leroy Son of Fearn Godfather

herd winner

Recently acquired

Millerston Monopoly

Well Farm, West Sussex, RH14 9JG Telephone: 07885495674 www.beefshorthorn.org

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Scottish farm based in the hills of Perthshire Catering for commercial and pedigree producers Visitors welcome by appointment

Senior stock bull, Knockenjig Foremost

Coldrochie Janet K6 with her (second) heifer calf at foot – sired by Knockenjig Foremost

Junior stock bull, Eastmill Laird. Purchased from breeder at the Royal Highland Show

Coldrochie Augusta Blossom J48 with her (second) calf at foot - sired by Eastmill Laird

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Junior stock bull, Meonhill Legacy. Purchased privately from Breeder

Coldrochie Clipper Gina J26 with her (third) bull calf at foot - sired by Meonhill Legacy

Junior stock bull, Coldrochie Legend. Purchased as a cow and calf unit

Gilven Magic Ladybird with her (first) bull calf at foot sired by Coldrochie Legend

Keeping femininity in females... Breeding behind the bulls. Proven genetics.

We hope to have stock for sale in 2020!

Thistledown Cowford Farms Ltd., The Farm House, Cowford Farm, Stanley, Perth, Scotland PH1 4PU.

Farm Manager Mr Charlie Reed & stock person Miss Charley Reed Home: 01738 787766 Mobile: 07975 906592 Email: charlie_reed2018@outlook.com www.beefshorthorn.org

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Guide to registrations This should be read in conjunction with Coates Rules and Regulations

Birth notifications

UK produced calves born by UK semen

• All births to be notified within four months.

• Bull calves must be sire verified and myostatin tested.

• There is no charge.

• All calves, regardless of gender, must be verified where the breeder has any concern over parentage. It is the breeder’s responsibility to notify the Society.

• Birth notification is required for all births, including dead calves, to maintain cow records.

UK produced calves born by natural service • Bull calves must be sire verified and myostatin tested. • All calves, regardless of gender, must be verified where the breeder has any concern over parentage. It is the breeder’s responsibility to notify the Society. Check with the Society that there is a SNP profile on record for all possible sires and for all possible dams (where sire/dam verification is required). Please call the office for confirmation or look on ABRI where it will be shown as a G number. If there is no genotype on record with the Society, you will not be able to register any bull calves until the sire(s) (and dams where required) have been genotyped.

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Check that there is a SNP genotype on record for the bull (and for the possible dams where dam verification is required). Please call the office for confirmation or look on ABRI where it will be shown as a G number. If there is no genotype on record with the Society, you will not be able to register any bull calves until the sire(s) have been genotyped. Submit the birth notification. Submit the registration and where verification is required, please post a clean tail hair sample from the calf, containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

UK produced embryos from UK cows and sires

Submit the birth notification.

• All embryo calves must be sire and dam verified and must be myostatin tested.

Submit the registration and where verification is required, please post a clean tail hair sample from the calf, containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

• An embryo flush form (ET1) and subsequently all embryo amendment forms (ET2) to be lodged with the Society at the time of flushing and implanting respectively.

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


• Both parents and ALL grandparents of the donor cow and all possible sires, must be from the main register.

a live list and should be checked regularly for new additions/ removals) must be lodged with the Society.

• A four-generation pedigree certificate where the zootech certificate does not cover four generations.

A Weatherbys SNP profile (or hair sample) for the donor cow and a Weatherbys SNP profile (or unused straw or hair sample) for all possible sires to be lodged with the Society at the time of flushing if not already available. If it is not possible to parentage verify an embryo the progeny will be ineligible for registration in Coates herd book. Check that there is a SNP genotype on record for the donor cow and all possible sires. Please call the office for confirmation or look on ABRI where it will be shown as a G number. Where there is no genotype on record submit SNP profiles or hair/semen samples for the donor cow and all possible sires by the time of flushing.

• Both parents and ALL grandparents must be from the main register. • A SNP profile for the semen to be lodged with the Society at the time of import, if not already available, which meets Weatherbys’ acceptance standard. Before purchase: Check that the bull is registered in an EU herd book or in a herd book from an association with third country recognition. The Society is not able to accept semen from a herd book that is not in the EU or which does not have third country approval.

Submit the ET1 flush form at the time of flushing.

Check both parents and all grandparents are in the main section of the herd book or origin.

Submit the ET2 form at the time of implant. Notify the Society if the implanted embryo(s) fail.

Check that there is a SNP genotype on record with the Society for the bull.

Submit the birth notification.

Obtain, from the herd book of origin, the semen zootechnical certificate AND a four-generation pedigree (to great-great grandparents) where the zootechnical certificate does show four generations.

Submit the registration and post a clean tail hair sample from the calf, containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

Imported live animals After purchase:

• All imported animals must be sire verified, TH and myostatin tested.

Submit the birth notification.

Check that the animal is registered in a EU herd book or in a herd book from an association with third country recognition. The Society is not able to accept animals which are not from a herd book within the EU or from a herd book which does not have third country approval.

Submit the zootechnical certificate for the semen at the point of submitting the calf registration, along with a clean tail hair sample from the calf, containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

Check all parents and all grandparents are in the main section of the herd book of origin.

After re-sale, notify the office giving details of the new purchaser.

Obtain, from the herd book of origin, the zootechnical certificate AND a four-generation pedigree (to great-great grandparents) where the zootechnical certificate does show four generations. Check that there is a SNP genotype on record with the Society for the sire which meets Weatherbys acceptance standard. Post a clean tail hair sample from the imported animal containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

Imported semen • A zootech certificate from the herd book of origin which must be either within the EU or have third country approval (this is

AFTER RE-SALE:

Imported embryos must have • An import or embryo flush form (ET1) and/or embryo amendment form (ET2) to be lodged with the Society at the time of import/implantation. • A zootech certificate from the herd book of origin which must be either within the EU or have third country approval (this is a live list and should be checked regularly for new additions/ removals) to be lodged with the Society at the time of import. •

A four-generation pedigree certificate where the zootech certificate does not cover four generations for all parents, including a four-generation pedigree for every possible sire where a mixed flush has been taken.

• Both parents and ALL grandparents of the donor cow and all possible sires, must be from the main register. Continued over

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• A SNP profile for the donor cow and all possible sires, which meet Weatherbys acceptance standard, to be lodged with the Society at the time of import if not already available.

at private sale to transfer ownership Please note that pedigrees will only be transferred to members of the Society.

BEFORE PURCHASE: Check that the donor cow and all possible sires are registered in an EU herd book or in a herd book from an association with third country recognition. Check all parents and all grandparents are in the main section of the herd book of origin. Check that there is a SNP genotype on record with the Society for the donor cow and all possible sires. Obtain, from the herd book of origin, the embryo zootechnical certificate AND a four-generation pedigree for the donor cow and all possible sires (to great-great grandparents) where the zootechnical certificate does show four generations.

Seller to complete the reverse of the certificate to confirm the date of transfer and the name and address of the purchaser before giving the pedigree to the purchaser. The transfer payment is due from the purchaser and not from the seller. Purchaser to return the original certificate to the Stoneleigh Park office along with payment of £30 (inc. VAT) for each transfer. Animals must be transferred BEFORE any progeny can be registered.

online animal information • Where to check for a G number: www.beefshorthorn.org > Database > Animal Enquiry

AFTER PURCHASE: Submit the ET1 flush form at the time of flushing (OR the intra-trade certificate showing the movement of the embryo from the previous owner to the new owner) along with the zootechnical and four generation pedigree certificate(s) for the embryo. Submit the ET2 form at the time of implant.

G Number and genetic information

Notify the Society if the implanted embryo(s) fail. Submit the birth notification. Submit the registration and post a clean tail hair sample from the calf, containing at least 40 good hair follicles.

AFTER RE-SALE: After re-sale, notify the office giving details of the new purchaser.

dNa requirements for imports (semen, live animals, embryos) • External SNP profiles must meet Weatherbys Scientific’s acceptance standard. This standard can be downloaded from the Downloadable Documents area of the website or requested from the office. There is an additional charge for an external profile transfer of £5.40 (including VAT). It is the responsibility of the breeder, and not the Society, to provide this information which must be sent to: The Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Society Pavilion, Avenue M, Stoneleigh Park, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, CV8 2RG Tel: 02477 103406 Email: registrations@beefshorthorn.org

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Glossary of terms • SNP – Single nucleotide polymorphisms, commonly referred to as ‘Snips’. SNP genotypes are carried out by the Society and are the preferred DNA profile for all sires and dams. • MS – microsatellite. MS genotypes were undertaken before SNP genotypes superseded this technology. Where only a MS genotype is available it can still be used to parentage verify calves, however this means that there will be an additional cost as the calf will have to be MS profiled and SNP profiled.


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KISLINGBURY BEEF SHORTHORNS

Pedigree cows that form part of a 380 cow commercial suckler herd. All progeny sold as finished cattle. Central England Herd Competition. Champion Herd 2017 & 2018

Stock Bulls Glacier of Upsall (above) Kislingbury Hussar Lachlan of Upsall Kislingbury Major R.G Elliott & Son Farmers and Butchers Noborough Lodge Farm, Norton, Brockhall, Northampton NN7 4LA Tel: 07508 624376

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Merchandise

Membership and registration fees

You can purchase a selection of branded merchandise either by contacting jobailey@beefshorthorn.org or in our online store!

Please note that our fees are now detailed online, along with a downloadable application form. Go to:

P&P is £5 per order and all prices include VAT. Look out for new items being introduced in 2020!

www.beefshorthorn.org/membership-fees

Beef Shorthorn Badge £3

Beef Shorthorn Cufflinks £10

Beef Shorthorn Polyester Tie £12

Beef Shorthorn Silk Tie £18

ROUNDHILL BEEF SHORTHORNS

Naturally reared at over 1,500 ft above sea level since 2011

We usually have stock for sale and visitors are always welcome Member of SAC Premium Cattle Health Scheme.

Roundhill Saffron Rose

Tamhorn Fireworks - progeny can be seen

Contact: Emma on 07800 803029 or email: roundhillbeefshorthorns@outlook.com Roundhill Beef Shorthorns, Roundhill Farm, Adders Green Lane, Quarnford, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 0TB. www.beefshorthorn.org

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2019 World Shorthorn Conference Meating the future Eight breeders from the UK travelled down under to Australia to join the World Shorthorn Conference tour, starting in Adelaide on 25 September.

From left, Jemima Horton, Charles Horrell, Gill Nye, Sally Horrell, Chris Nye, Trevor and Julie Brown and Charles Horton

From Adelaide Station, we travelled to the York Peninsula to the Thompson Families Bayview Shorthorns. This mixed farming operation produces bulls for sale up country and the prize winners from the Royal Adelaide Show were on display. From here they sell 40 to 50 bulls per year, which head north to South Australia and New South Wales. Cattle were worked into the arable rotation and grazed on Medic Pasture, an interesting clover with a sweet burr seed capsule. The next day we paid a visit to the Ashby family at Bundaleer Shorthorns run by Matt Ashby, president of Shorthorn Beef Australia. As expected, plenty of first-class cattle to be seen here, also Merinos from their stud which were the most profitable part of the farming operation! With fleeces fetching ÂŁ100 each twice a year and fat lambs commanding nearly ÂŁ200, even the dead sheep are shorn. In the evening, there was dinner in Adelaide where we

A mob of 190 bulling heifers at the Carlton herd

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tasted the Thousand Guineas Shorthorn Beef for the first time. This is similar to our Morrisons Shorthorn Beef Scheme with all cattle going to one feed lot and slaughterhouse where the majority is exported to Japan and China. The qualifying criteria: cattle are 75% Shorthorn and they reach a set standard on intra-muscular fat thus ensuring premium eating quality. Our next visit was to the Carlton Stud, a fabulous lakeside setting for a seed stock stud in the scenic Adelaide hills, where we were treated to a splendid dinner in the Carlton Club hosted by Lyn and John Nitschke. The next morning, we travelled on to see their commercial operation on irrigated land 70km away, where we saw a lovely level group of 190 pure bred bulling heifers. Not able to sell these for breeding due to the drought in NSW, they were all destined for the feed lot. We were starting to realise the effect the drought was having on the Australian cattle industry.


Young bulls in dry conditions at Bunulla Shorthorns

Down the road to Bellmore, home of Andy and Sally Withers. A chance to see this influential stud and more recent winners from the Royal Adelaide Show. There were plenty of bulls to admire here, some sold privately and others go to exclusive Shorthorn auctions at Naracoorte and Dubbo. After an interesting overnight stay in Mount Gambier where hotel stars are a bit scarce, we travelled out to the coastal flats at Telang. Here, Rob and James Starling farm 10,000 acres with 8,000 Merino ewes and 600 Shorthorn breeding cows. They were shearing when we arrived (a five-day job) but they manage the whole unit with only a little part time help. Driving across this flat and productive ground we were impressed with the groves of River Red Gums, they were so magnificent and scenic they are used as a wedding venue. We saw some impressive groups of Shorthorns grazing in the 150-acre paddocks and, on leaving the property, we went past their lamb sale pens where they sell approximately 8,000 lambs a year in one sale. As they are penned in 250 lamb lots, this only takes 20 minutes,

Good locomotion is very important to Australian breeders (Eloora herd)

albeit a very tense 20 minutes! As was becoming usual, all the steers from this property went to the Thousand Guineas Shorthorn Beef Scheme. Day 6 saw us at Dion, Ray and Jill Brook’s Eloora Shorthorns where we saw, amongst other things, the progeny of Ellora Baker, a bull that may soon have an impact in the UK. After wonderful hospitality amongst the scenic Red Gum trees we moved on to Melbourne. Royal Melbourne Show would not be what most of us would recognise as an agricultural show, it is fundamentally a fun fair with a cattle show attached! However, in the cattle shed we watched a fascinating day’s showing with 20 heifers in the yearling heifer class – the prizes were dominated by the Royalla and Nagol Park herds. Several members of our group were invited to ‘sash’ the winners. Continued over

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At this point, some of us split from the tour to check out the surfing (or surfers) in Noosa, leaving Chris Nye to represent us at the conference in Waga Waga. On the way to the conference location there was there JBS Prime Feed lot – 35,000 head capacity. This is where the Shorthorn Premium Beef known as the Thousand Guineas Shorthorn Beef is finished before processing by JBS for the mainly Asian export market. The Thousand Guineas refers to the price paid for Comet, the founding bull of the Shorthorn breed. Additionally, a very pleasant evening was spent at Gerald and Lynden Spry’s with a BBQ, following the viewing of their first-rate cattle. There was a judging competition to choose the best three out of a bunch of 40 bulls, this taxed some of the brains!

Andy Withers’ Belmore herd heifers

The conference was held at Waga Waga. Next stop Dubbo and the Shorthorn Youth Expo, with a very impressive turnout of enthusiastic youngsters – 120 in total, some very young accompanied by ‘buddies’ to pass on the skills of the showring – concluded with a hospitable dinner raising $20,000 for the Youth Group in the breed. Onward to the Job family at Royalla where the famous flies really got into gear! There was a chance here to view some influential sires and also some visiting herds such as Morellan, Warraberry and Ronelle Park. It was here that the impact of the drought hit home, effectively no rain for two and a half years and entering the summer dry season. There was minimal feed in the paddocks and the kangaroos were fighting for that. All herds in this part had reduced numbers and were buying expensive feed for their stock. Some farms had now started to completely de-stock and suspend operations, the Merino sheep in the area seemed to be unaffected and carried on growing wool.

Judging at the Royal Melbourne Show

On through the flies and dust to Terra Shorthorns and then onto the Catt’s futurity stud. Here they sell 60 to 80 bulls a year with on farm and private sales. Next year’s candidates look really well and showed the benefits of feeding despite the conditions. Day 17 and it’s the Bungulla Herd of Peter and Lou Capel. There were even bunches of 20 or so bulls penned by sire for us to see here. A highlight was a camp cutting demonstration by Matt Capel picking out one cow from a bunch of 60 with a horse and keeping it separate this is a highly competitive sport between young people in the area.

Stock bull at the Bayview herd

The end of the tour was insightful, we headed to Nagol Park to see Roger and Naomi Evans and, amongst other things, the supreme champion heifer from Melbourne Show. This was followed by an afternoon at Calrossy Anglican School, where the children are encouraged to learn about farming, breeding, performance recording and show preparation. There were stud bulls raised for sale and steers for a carcass competition where they are shown live and then graded on the hook. The children were very informative and quite unfazed by the fate of their steers. There was considerable speculation on the reaction of trying to do this in the UK! The school was blissfully unaware of the connection between their name and the Shorthorn breed, even though there was a spelling difference between the two Calrossies/Calrossy’s. In conclusion, we were all hugely impressed by the strength of the breed in Australia, particularly the numbers on the farms and the sizes of the units. It was especially interesting to see the market for bulls for crossing onto subtropical herds in the north of the country. Very noticeable was the enthusiasm and numbers of young people involved with Shorthorns and the feeling of the ‘Shorthorn family’ in Australia. We would like to thank all the herds we visited for the phenomenal hospitality, especially in the dire climatic conditions some were enduring. Charles Horton

An 18-year-old cow at Calrossy Anglican School, in calf for 16th time

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Wenmar Beef Shorthorns Semen collected privately in restricted volume from Beef Shorthorn bulls for pedigree and commercial breeding

Crooked Post Drover 29D

Crooked Post Tobias 13D

Shadybrook Qantas

DRS Super Mario 42E

Podehole Beefeater

Wenmar Hakon

Glenisla Hercules

Pedigree Semen

Semen suitable for progeny registrations in the Beef Shorthorn Society herd book is offered in minimum units of 10 straws, priced as shown below.

Crooked Post Drover 29D Shadybrook Qantas Crooked Post Tobias 13D DRS Super Mario 42E

£400 for 10 straws £400 for 10 straws £400 for 10 straws £400 for 10 straws

Commercial Semen

Only to be used for commercial breeding is offered in minimum batches of 50 straws, purchasers will be required to sign a disclosure document agreeing to the terms of use statement.

Shadybrook Qantas Crooked Post Drover 29D

£600 for 50 straws £600 for 50 straws

£400 for 10 straws £250 for 10 straws £200 for 10 straws

Glenisla Hercules Podehole Beefeater Wenmar Hakon

£600 for 50 straws £600 for 50 straws

Crooked Post Tobias 13D Podehole Beefeater

Plus 2 great ordering incentives! Early Bird Offer - 10% extra FREE!

Pedigree Offer - 50% off your next order!

Place and pay for your order by the 31st March 2020 and receive 10% extra semen FREE!

Every 100th straw of a bulls semen sold, entitles the purchaser to a 50% discount off their next semen order. Order today! (offer applies to semen orders for pedigree use only. Maximum credit £500).

Please note: All of the above prices are plus a £75 fixed fee to cover documentation and shipping (UK mainland only).

For a full listing of all of our cattle, embryos and semen available please visit our website:

www.wenmarbeefshorthorns.com Wenmar Beef Shorthorns

Exclusively available in the UK and mainland Europe from Martyn Moore.

Wenmar Beef Shorthorns, Warren Farm, Lulsley, Knightwick, Worcestershire, WR6 5QT.

Mobile: 07767 608012 Email: martyncmoore@manx.net www.beefshorthorn.org

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H IGHLEE BEEF SHORTHORNS

Highlee Millerston Jester Photo: Adrian Legge

Highlee Kinder Rose

Semen available from Millerston Jester

Visitors always welcome

Highlee Lenny Contact us: Tracy: 07880 790595 Mark: 07768 211717 Home: 01422 822932 Email: tracysevern@aol.co.uk

SAC Members TB4 Area BVD, LEPTO, IBR Accredited Johne’s R1

Highlee Beef Shorthorns, Brick Green Farm, Scammonden Road, Barkisland, Halifax HX4 0DE.

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In memory of Christopher John Sydney Marler 22 February 1932 to 6 July 2019 Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society director 2004 to 2010

Shorthorn cattle, both dairy and beef were part of Christopher Marler’s life since an early age. He was brought up with his father’s Dairy Shorthorns - including the 1939 Royal champion, which had a marked influence on his career as a lifelong breeder of the traditional British beef breeds. His home farm was requisitioned by Bletchley Park during the war; in 1952 he moved to Weston Underwood, Buckinghamshire and reported settling in to a rundown 600-acre arable unit which he turned over to grassland. The Dairy Shorthorn herd was dispersed in 1957, after which he established a Blue Grey herd run with Aberdeen Angus bulls for quality meat production. In the early sixties, Christopher purchased Berkshire based Basildon Beef Shorthorns - a top herd of show cattle. He had already attended the Perth Bull Sales to get to know the breed at close quarters. He recalled: “What an experience with close to 300 plus Beef Shorthorn cattle in one place. I got to know the top breeders over the years and those I particularly enjoyed visiting were Captain Macgillivray of Calrossie, Captain Dick DeQuincy of the Erimus herd and Robert Adam of Newhouse Angus and his famous Glamis Shorthorns. “Each of these three men were giants in the breeding of Beef Shorthorn cattle and I regarded myself as very privileged to have known them. The export trade at that time was tremendous and Perth week was an international gathering from every cattle producing country in the world. Exciting times for sure.” Christopher established his Wavendon Beef Shorthorn herd from the Calrossie dispersal in 1995 followed by two groups of heifers from Uppermill. He purchased his first stock bull at Perth in the early 1960s - Woodhead Exchequer was a champion and winner of the South Africa Trophy, and went on to ‘give the herd a

much-needed lift’. His ambition was to win the Brothers Colling Memorial Challenge Cup, then awarded to the Royal Show breed champion, a feat he achieved 50 years later with his stock bull, Chapelton Neptune, proving that dreams do come true. He judged countless UK shows and sales, breed classes and interbreeds including the Burke Trophy in 1993 at the Royal Show and Beef Shorthorn won! Further afield he judged the Royal Melbourne, Royal Canberra, Royal Adelaide, Christchurch NZ, Ohia and Louisville USA. He was very keen on breed type - character, quality, cow families and definitely no black noses! Christopher also became a top breeder and enthusiastic judge of Dun and Belted Galloways, however his colourful life extended to well beyond the bovine world. He bred race horses in early life his stories extended to his 200 winners in 10 different countries. A lifelong passion for waterfowl led him to establish the Flamingo Gardens and Zoological Park at Weston Underwood in the early 1960s; an initiative that grew to stocking one of the largest collections in Britain - all six species of flamingo, all eight of pelican, along with owls and parrots, and a few bison as well as cattle. The initiative was deemed a non-profit-making exercise, one to finance his love of the natural world. The zoo included over 30 acres of lakes and ponds, where he led bands of children, entertaining them with a flow of information. In his last few months he still ferried grain to feed 30 newly purchased flamingos. Christopher knew many greats in the both the cattle and waterfowl world. He had a unique personality, a ‘proper ‘ gentleman of the old style - he made people at ease in his company, he was known worldwide. I met him at Perth and Stirling Bull Sales over many years and thoroughly enjoyed his company. James Nelson www.beefshorthorn.org

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Creaga Shorthorns Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of intention, effort, and execution; it represents the wise choice, it represents Creaga Shorthorns.

Creaga Phoenix

Balmoral Male Champion, Reserve Supreme Champion and All Ireland Bull of the Future 2019

Home of the 2019….  All

Ireland Senior Heifer

 All

Ireland Junior Bull Calf

 All

Ireland Junior Bull

 Reserve All

Ireland Intermediate Bull Calf

 All

Ireland Junior Heifer Calf

 Reserve All

Ireland Intermediate Heifer Calf

The Creaga Herd maintains a very high health status with over 35 Years Free of TB Visitors always welcome. Noel & Lisa Dowd Loughglass, Creggs, Co Galway, Ireland F42 C653 Website: www.creagashorthorns.com | Tel: 00353 87 2977387/00353 86 3584339 | Email: lisa.dowd00@gmail.com 172

Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal 2020


Advertisers Index Beautry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Knockenjig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

Biobest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Langhams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Breakheart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

Lipwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Cairnsmore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Loak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Caramba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Lowther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

Castlemount and Ashvale . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152

Meonhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Chapelton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

Millerston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

Cherryvalley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Mineshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Cooper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Oakleigh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

Cowford Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

Plynlimon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Craven Cattle Marts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Podehole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IFC / 33

Creaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172

Ricketstown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

Croxton Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Roundhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

Cutthorn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Rowanberry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

Derwentwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

Sandwick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

Dunsyre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Shawhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Farlam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163

Skaillhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Fearn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

SRUC Veterinary Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Glebefarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Stanfordpark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Glenariff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Stonehills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Glenbrae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Stoneyroyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Glenisla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Greenley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

Tollesbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Hansford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157

Trainview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Harrison & Hetherington Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . 123

United Auctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Highlee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

Uppermill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Holkin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

Upsall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

Kelleythorpe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136

Wenmar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 / 66 / 169 / 176

Kislingbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

Willingham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4


Wenmar Beef Shorthorns

Beef Shorthorn bulls, cows and heifers raised naturally for pedigree and commercial breeding

Visitors always welcome to view our cattle and breeding policy at any time, without any obligations other than to enjoy their visit

Blending strong British and worldwide Beef Shorthorn genetics • We attempt to blend the best Beef Shorthorn genetics we can find from around the world, enabling us to offer our customers both sound fertile bulls, and hardy milky cows and heifers

• We recognise the importance of the strength of the female line, any female on our farm is able to be purchased if we are above our minimum number in her cow family

• Our cattle are reared to grow on naturally, when they leave us they are targeted to be ready to successfully breed

• Young bulls usually for sale all year round

For a full listing of all of our cattle, embryos and semen available please visit our website:

www.wenmarbeefshorthorns.com Wenmar Beef Shorthorns

For a friendly chat and further details contact Martyn Moore.

Wenmar Beef Shorthorns, Warren Farm, Lulsley, Knightwick, Worcestershire, WR6 5QT.

Mobile: 07767 608012 Email: martyncmoore@manx.net

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Beef Shorthorn Cattle Society Journal - Volume 16 2020  

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