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BEEFMASTER Pay Weight

a publication dedicated to serving commercial cattlemen and produced by Beefmaster Breeders United FALL 2020

Vol. 6, No. 2

Section 1

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Price Protection Can Help Cattle Producers in Volatile Markets By Dan Childs, Noble Research Institute Many risks are ever present for agricultural producers. To attempt a listing of all the risks would likely be somewhat surprising and quite lengthy. The risks that come to mind quickly are weather risk and price risk. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) has created ways to help many producers — both grain and livestock — manage both of these risks. Before The Coronavirus Managing weather risk has been an ongoing concern of producers. However, the interest in managing price risk has been more sporadic. Producers, being generally optimistic, are reluctant to lock in a certain price that eliminates the opportunity of a higher price if by chance the market offers it later in the production cycle. The pandemic has reminded producers of and heightened

the interest in price risk management. If you are a cattle producer, think back to the outlook for cattle prices in late January 2020. On Jan. 1, the U.S. cattle inventory report estimated beef cow numbers to be down from the previous year by 1.2%, the first decline since 2014. The calf crop was estimated to be down 0.9%. In a market where supply and demand determine prices, the fundamentals were in place to support stronger prices. Projections in the fall for purchased stocker calves or retained home-raised calves indicated a profit when sold at heavier weights in the spring. Few producers who owned yearling cattle thought much about price protection at the time. Supply And Demand Disrupted Then the pandemic caused

huge disruptions to both the supply and demand for many food items, including beef. Consumers changed their buying behavior due in part to many working from home and eating more meals at home. The food service (primarily restaurants) demand dried up almost overnight and panic buying ensued at the retail level. Some cattle processors darkened plants due to surging cases of COVID-19, while others had to reduce capacity because workers felt unsafe at work and stayed home. Food service products could not easily be retrofitted for the retail market. With reduced processing capacity and a product shortage, a much stronger beef demand was created at the retail level and boxed beef prices skyrocketed. At the same time, feedyards with ample cattle ready for harvest were unable to move those cattle

to processing facilities since the processing capacity had been reduced. So live cattle prices adjusted by approximately 25%, and the price softness was felt down the production chain to yearling cattle and calves. No one in January would have ever thought the cattle market would experience this kind of decline. Price Protection Has Potential The chain of events that created the lower prices caused cattle producers to think back and wish they would have done some kind of price protection. Nothing can be done for what has already happened, but producers can learn from the experience and consider ways price protection can be used in the future. Fortunately, there are several choices a cattle producer has to help with price protection. continued on page 4

Cowart’s Cows

- Third-generation Florida ranch builds better cows with Beefmaster genetics By Laura Conaway A Beefmaster believer, Walton Cowart needs no convincing. The third-generation cattleman, near Bunnell, Fla., has seen breed trends come and go; even tried a few himself. Now, with five years of Beefmaster bulls under his belt, he’s found the breed to keep. The soft-spoken rancher isn’t one to push his opinion on another, though. In a room of opportunity, by choice his voice won’t carry.

“I think riding out here, looking at them says a lot more than I can say,” Cowart says, placing the burden of proof on the cows that

graze his land. “Take a look and you’ll see what they [Beefmasters] can do in a cowherd.” continued on page 5


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The Beefmaster Pay Weight

Letter From The Editor

several interesting articles covering many industry topics, from improving pasture performance and producing commercial By Collin Osbourn Beefmaster females through Fall is just around the a value-added program, corner and hopefully some to how injectable minerals cooler weather is on the way! can help boost your It is great to see the change feeding program. Requests from the dog days of summer from readers prompted heat to a more colorful and us to include articles on comfortable season. With networking within the beef the fall months comes many industry and what the beef of the Beefmaster bull sales markets may look like in the and the opportunity to last half of 2020. We hope buy some of the very best that you will find these and Beefmaster sires that will be the other articles informative offered. In this issue of The in this fall issue of The Beefmaster Pay Weight you Beefmaster Pay Weight. will find several upcoming The maternal advantages events where you can find that we see from the use these high quality Beefmaster of Beefmaster genetics are genetics that are backed with undeniable. Cattlemen proven performance. are using Beefmasters to This issue will also have continue improving cow

herds across the U.S. in terms of efficiency, longevity, productivity and most importantly profitability. Beefmaster genetics are exceling within the beef industry and demand continues to sore with the added heterosis and efficiency that they bring to the herd. Without a doubt increased production with added efficiency are areas that we can all improve upon to make our cow herds more profitable and sustainable for the future. I encourage everyone to read the update on how the Noble Research Institute (NRI) is incorporating Beefmaster genetics into their research herds. This is a great opportunity for the Beefmaster breed to develop a maternal oriented

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seedstock herd at NRI. We anticipate building a great herd with the Noble Research Institute that will showcase the advantages of using Beefmaster genetics. I’m looking forward to the upcoming sales and seeing the cattle that will help shape the Beefmaster future. God bless each you this fall in your travels and I hope to see many of you at one of the upcoming Beefmaster events! If you have any questions or comments please contact me at cosbourn@beefmasters.org or 210-732-3132. Enjoy!

Collin Osbourn

Executive Vice President Editor, The Beefmaster Pay Weight

Articles In This Issue... Page 1: Price Protection Can Help Cattle Producers in Volatile Markets - by Dan Childs, Noble Research Institute Page 1: Cowart’s Cows - by Laura Conaway, Grant Company Page 11: Improve Pasture Performance with Aeration and Renovation - by David Benjamin, RanchWorx Global Inc. Page 14: It Pays to (Net)Work - by Lindsay L. Allen Page 19: Oklahoma State Builds Beefmaster Research Herd - by Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United Page 21: United We Steak - by Texas Beef Council Page 25: Beefmasters Take on the Last Frontier - by Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United Page 31: Noble Research Institute Moves to Demonstrate Heterosis in Their Cow Herd - by BBU & Noble Research Institute Page 33: The Future of the Beefmaster Breed - by Rylee Barber, Beefmaster Breeders United Page 37: Building for the Future - by Chel Terrell, The Beefmaster Cowman Page 41: Injectable Minerals Take Up The Slack - by Gilda V. Bryant Page 43: CattleFax Offers 2020 Outlook for Beef Producers - by Amanda Radke, BEEF Magazine Page 44: Producing Commercial Females through the E6 Program - by Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United

the BEEFMASTER Pay Weight

Beefmaster Breeders United

The Beefmaster Pay Weight is a publication produced by Beefmaster Breeders United and dedicated to serving commercial cattlemen. The Beefmaster Pay Weight Team Editor: Collin Osbourn Managing Editor: Jeralyn Novak Contributing Writers: Lindsay L. Allen, Rylee Barber, David Benjamin, Gilda V. Bryant, Dan Childs, Laura Conaway, Noble Research Institute, Jeralyn Novak, Collin Osbourn, Amanda Radke, Chel Terrell, Texas Beef Council Advertising Coordinators: Carey Brown, Lance Bauer, Jon Garza, Jeralyn Novak Graphic Designer: Jeralyn Novak Beefmaster Breeders United Staff Members Collin Osbourn: Executive Vice President Rylee Barber: Youth Programs and Membership Coordinator Lance Bauer: Director of Breed Improvement & Western Field Representative Melissa Becker: DNA Coordinator Brandi Feller: Registration and Transfer Coordinator Jon Garza: Director of International Programs Donna Henderson: Office Manager Jeralyn Novak: Communications Coordinator

For advertisement sales: Contact Jeralyn Novak 210-732-3132 or Carey Brown with Livestock Advertising Network at 859-278-0899 Contact BBU: 118 W. Bandera Road, Boerne, TX 78006 - (210) 732-3132 - info@beefmasters.org Beefmaster Breeders United reserves the right to refuse advertising in any publications. © 2020 Beefmaster Breeders United. All rights reserved. The contents of this magazine may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or part, without prior written consent of Beefmaster Breeders United.


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continued from page 1 Some of these products have been around for a long time, while others have been available for only about 20 years. Hedging Hedging on the futures market by selling a futures contract is very popular. This strategy locks in a certain price with no opportunity for any upside potential. Typically, the only reason a producer would experience a different price would be that the actual basis was different than projected. The reason many producers do not like

hedging is margin calls. Large margin calls can shake the emotions of the calmest producer. Purchasing options on futures contracts is attractive because of the potential for a higher price. A “put” option provides a minimum floor price and leaves the upside open. No margin calls are required. The reluctance by some producers to use options is premium cost. If a “strike” price close to the underlying futures contract is chosen, premium cost could be considered pricy, especially in volatile markets. Many strategies exist as to ways

producers can pick and choose combinations of put and call options to achieve a higher floor. Livestock Risk Protection

Around the turn of this century, RMA created a product they named Livestock Risk Protection (LRP). RMA provided a 13% subsidy on the premium, hoping it would entice producers to use it. The product is sold and serviced by private insurance agents. The use of the product has been disappointing. Effective July 1, 2020, the subsidy has been increased to 20-35% depending on the level of

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coverage chosen. One of the more attractive features of LRP is that any size group of cattle less than 3,000 head can be protected. Options Are Available If the recent fluctuations in the cattle markets have made you interested in price protection, please become informed of the products available. We at Noble are available to discuss these products with you.

Dan Childs Sr. Ag. Economics Consultant Noble Research Institute


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The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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continued from page 1 A June afternoon spent doing so reveals the rancher’s modest nature. In the house he designed by hand, overlooking the land he’s managed well, he prefers his successes show off without him. Under a canopy of oaks, where crickets and cicadas sing their song, you’ll find Cowart’s cows. Roaming 1,700 acres of pastureland, timberland and swampland, to scan the scene is to get a snapshot of native Florida, untouched. It’s just about 25 miles from some of the world’s most famous beaches, yet the cows pay no mind to that, content to graze the blankets of white clover and breathe in the ocean breeze. “We’ll have mild winters, then cold winters, dry springs and wet summers,” Cowart explains, “but one thing that’s always consistent is the heat and the humidity through the mid-summer, into the fall.” And if rain so happens to pour, the grass will surely grow.

It’s nice to have good Beefmaster cows to graze it when it does, Cowart’s brother, David, adds. The men were born into the business their grandfather dreamed into fruition. Their father kickstarted their passion by gifting each child their very own heifer calf to start a herd. Decades past, no matter the pressures of regulations or urbanization, the Cowarts have long set their sights on seeing more dreams come alive on that coveted land.

Perhaps through the watchful eyes of grandsons already on the ground. “I wouldn’t say it’s been a bed of roses,” David says. “Ranching teaches you there’s going to be highs and lows, but you’ve just got to maintain and do the best you can. You’ll make it through.” Because when the dust settles, despite the ebbs and flows that seem to be the only constant of the modern cattle producer, it’s cattle, like the commercial pairs that roam the Cowart Ranch, that

remain the steady pulse of operations near and far. “It’s always important to have a good, dependable cow around,” Walton says. The good, dependable ones are the ones that are going to make you money in the long run, despite the market situation. “If they’ll consistently reproduce and have a good calf every year, that’s the name of the game right there. These Beefmaster cows are doing that for us.” continued on page 7

SIMON CREEK BEEFMASTERS est. 1982 Your S. Central Oklahoma Source for Foundation Beefmasters

Bulls & Females For Sale Private Treaty & at Red River Performance Bull Sale

Contact: Finley Morgan 580-668-2523 Overbrook, OK


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continued from page 5 The Cowart’s journey to the complementary breed wasn’t always so defined, though. In 2015 they were looking to increase mothering capabilities by adding outside genetics to their closed herd of Angus and Brangus cows. “We wanted to improve our females,” Cowart says. “We had good cattle but felt like, if we’re going to stay in this business, then we needed to make our females even better.” While taking stock of some older cows on the ranch, the brothers noted some 18- and 19-year-old cows that were offspring of Beefmaster bulls used in the 80s. With longevity and fertility topping their list, they headed to Savannah, Tenn., and drove south with two Beefmaster bulls in tow. “We put those bulls on an isolated herd, and at weaning time the following year, the calves weighed heavier than all the rest,” David says. Almost 50 lbs. heavier to be exact, Walton recounts. “We sold our first crop of Beefmaster calves in 2016 and they were the heaviest set of calves that we had weaned, ever,” he says. Thick, growthy calves at

The Beefmaster Pay Weight

weaning became custom from that point forward. Feedlots kept coming back for more steer calves, while their heifer mates fit seamlessly into the Florida herd as replacements. “We’ve had what we felt like were good cows all along,” Walton says, “but I firmly believe that if you don’t buy bulls that are better than what cows you’ve got, then you’re not making any improvements at that point.” Beefmasters have made all the difference. “They’re just good momma cows when you get right down to it,” Walton says. His comment doesn’t come off as surprised, rather, he’s still taken aback by what Beefmasters bring to the table all these years later. The goal is to have something to either take to market or put back into the herd. A cow that raises good calves that wean heavy; one that’ll breed back every year. A cow you can depend on is money in your pocket. A cow you can build on, like the Beefmaster, is a guaranteed pay day. “If you’re going to stay in this business, you want the Above middle photo: Walton Cowart very best that does the best Above, top and bottom photos: Beefmaster Cross females and calves for you,” David says. continued on page 9

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continued from page 7

SELLING 60 PLUS PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS!

Honing in on adaptability and the maternal traits synonymous with the breed, the ranchers seem satisfied with the choices they’ve made as their proof grazes the morning dew. Nestled along the tree line of towering Pines, a young calf rests near a patch of overgrown palmettos, cool and just out of reach. Riding through the herd, looking at cows with hearty calves by their side, that’s the life the Cowarts have known since birth, the passion shared by many just like them.

The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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“It puts a smile on my face to see that we are making progress and we have a goal for the future,” David says. He looks out at those Beefmaster females, young and thriving. “As long as we’re going forward and not encountering setbacks, then I feel like we’re achieving something.”

Laura Conaway Associate Director of Content Grant Company

NOVEMBER 7, 2020 • 11 A.M. PARIS LIVESTOCK AUCTION 3320 US HWY 82 E • Paris, TX 75642

Any commercial producer who purchases bulls from our fall sale will be eligible to consign females to our commercial replacement sale in the spring.

Herd Health Protocol: Synanthic, Eprinex Bar Vac-7 Express FP 5-VL5

BID & BUY ONLINE www.cattleinmotion.com 888-554-8437 info@cattleinmotion.com

Volume Discount Available Purchase 4 or more bulls and get 5% off your total purchase. Ask about free delivery! For Additional Information or to Request a Catalog: Robert Scott 469-712-0192 • rscott1549@gmail.com

GOOD CATTLE — BETTER SERVICE — BEST VALUE!

Photos above: Cowart’s Beefmaster Cross females on their Florida ranch. Photos by Laura Conaway


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The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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Improve Pasture Performance with Aeration & Renovation By David Benjamin, RanchWorx Global Inc. Establishing a good base of soil is critical before growing any forage at all. One of the best ways to improve the health of your soil is through investing in quality pasture aeration. Properly aerating soil will penetrate the land to create deep pockets for air, water, nutrients, and fertilizer to be fully absorbed. This will save you time, money, and produce higher yields. When determining which aerator is right for you, some things to consider are how the equipment can handle root breaking and soil fracturing as well as the overall versatility of the product. Tine style aeration can fracture about 4 inches of soil. There are heavier duty forms of aeration that utilize larger blades such as RanchWorx Pasture Aerators. The unique spiral designed RanchTech blades are capable of fracturing soil 18-24 inches. When you are growing grass, it is also

important for your roots to not be bound up in the top part of the soil. If you have a dry year, you are not going to produce as much grass because there is no available moisture. When renovating a hay field or pasture you must cut your roots to ensure they grow correctly. Tine style aerators will create about a 2-inch tear that cuts vertically but RanchWorx will make a cleaner cut that is closer to 6 inches and opens the roots to allow them to spread and become thicker. Tearing and pulling roots is not recommended, clean cuts are preferred. However, too many ranchers assume they need to rip up the pasture or the hay fields and start from scratch if they want to improve performance. That is an expensive and unnecessary proposition. You can rejuvenate pasture and get better performance without ripping it up. If you want better performance from your

pasture, pasture aeration is a good use of money. You get a better ROI than if you rip and re-seed. Some aerators can handle more than just aeration which adds to the overall value of your investment. RanchWorx has a range of machines suited for different situations and are ideal for both aeration and brush clearing. The drums, spiked with blades six inches or eight inches long, handle everything from crushing and clearing pasture-choking brush to breathing new life into bald pastures. The blade is the one common element on all machines. It slices through trees and overgrowth and cuts six inches into the soil. The tandem drum is a heavier machine designed to manage all your brush control needs. Willows and aspens are always trying to encroach on grazing land. Even our single drum can do light brush management, but if you’re doing a large

reclamation or rejuvenation project, the tandem drum is a very cost-effective means of getting rid of overgrowth and trees up to six inches in diameter. You kill off all those woody trees and brush, mulch it up and break it down so it is incorporated into the soil. No need for chemicals. It has two drums, but they are tied together in one solid frame. With the tandem unit, the blades clear brush and aerate soil, all in one pass. Creating healthy soil is an investment in your future. Including aeration in your operation is measurable and justifiable in saving time, money, and producing higher yields because higher yields start with healthy soil.

MCK FLINT ROCK 142 - C1103594 CE

BWT

WWT

YWT

MILK

MWWT

MCE

EPD

4.9

-0.8

51.6

82.8

8.3

34.1

2.2

%Rank

20

20

2

1

65

3

85

SC

REA

IMF

FAT

$T

$M

EPD

1.4

0.96

0.28

-0.011

147.18

31.76

%Rank

2

2

3

95

1

3

You’re Invited to the

Louisiana BBA Cowboy Classic Beefmaster Sale

Dwight Bertrand Louisiana BBA President Elton, Louisiana 337-368-9112 ioccattle@hotmail.com

Kendall McKenzie LBBA Sale Chairman Angie, Louisiana 985-335-7123

Saturday November 7, 2020 11:00am Kinder Livestock Auction 13008 US Hwy 190 Kinder, LA


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The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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It Pays to (Net)Work By Lindsay L. Allen

Ranching life is often depicted as one of a solitary lifestyle, surrounded by open spaces, while located miles from civilization, but the reality is that ranchers have always gathered to swap and share advice, as well as discuss business issues. Today, the networking opportunities still exist at the fence post or over a cup of coffee, but a much more formal web of networking also exists to provide ranchers with the tools, potential business advice and education that it takes to produce safe and efficient beef. The formal networking groups, educational seminars, field days and more are almost as numerous as the head of cattle in the country. These tried and true

ways are now mixed with the new (especially during COVID-19), and together are providing producers more avenues to learn, make connections and reassess how they manage their operation. Let’s look at a few ways registered Beefmaster breeders and commercial producers can network today. Sale Barn Local sale barns have always been a hub for networking. It’s a place to meet other cattlemen and meet them on a regular basis. It provides a way to stay on top of market prices, learn about what kind of cattle you need to raise, or your herd needs to provide depending on your segment of the industry. Having a personal relationship with your local sale barn operator can be a

valuable resource. Greg Goudeau, owner of Navasota Livestock Auction in Navasota, Texas, recommends that producers get to know their sale barn owner. “Call your owner, introduce yourself and your program and ask to meet with him,” he continued, “It’s important to know the owner so they can work for you and market your cattle for you.” Goudeau said that the one of the first things he will ask, as the operator at the Navasota Livestock Auction barn, are details surrounding your herd health program. “I need to know what vaccinations you are giving and if your calves are castrated and dehorned. I need to know that you are preparing your calves for the next level-be

it a stocker operation, grow yard, feed yard, etc. This will require a producer to have a solid relationship with their veterinarian, also,” Goudeau advised. Additionally, he pointed out the advantage that a sale barn relationship can offer when it comes to finding good help. “Most producers have a 9-5 job and need good help. Your local sale barn can recommend professional cowboys, who can administer a good herd health program and ensure the right vaccinations and protocols are being followed as prescribed by your veterinarian,” Goudeau stated. “Proper vaccination of your animals is your responsibility and is a major continued on page 15


The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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continued from page 14 part of animal welfare,” he continued, “If I know this is an important part of your operation, I can help you market your calves and help you get what you deserve for the program you are operating.” Goudeau added that the best way he can stay in contact with producers who market their cattle at his sale barn is through the barn’s social media accounts, webpage and the weekly free e-mail listing that provide cattle reports. Social Media While face-to-face opportunities are always preferred, this day and age offers several ways to network online. Searching social media platforms for groups and conversations that relate to your interests creates a way to engage with producers at all levels (local,

regional, state, national). By searching key phrases such as “YOUR COUNTY Beef Producers” or “STATE Agricultural Advocates” producers can find groups where conversations related to their interests are happening. These groups provide a virtual way to ask questions, discuss an issue, carry on a chat online about something or find out about local beef producers events in their area and more. COVID-19 has brought many educational seminars online and even though cattlemen may be at home, these still provide ways for growing your education, gaining resources and making your circle of influence and influencers larger. County Extension Events Extension programs are held throughout the year that are tailored for beef cattle producers; some may be held

individually in a county; some may be multi-county and even multi-district events.   Tommy Phillips, Van Zandt County Extension Agent in East Texas, said, “Each county extension agent has their own way of connecting with their clientele. Some still do traditional mail out newsletters, while others do e-mail blasts. More and more frequently, many are turning to social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) as form of connecting and sharing too.” The various events, educational seminars and field days that extensions offer creates networking between producers and also producers and vendors. A big advantage is the opportunity for producers to ask questions and gain more perspective about something pertinent to their operation from their extension agent

and/or guest speaker. “Attending extension events offers an opportunity for producers to gain insights and use that information on their operation, which can lead to a true economic impact,” Phillips said, “I encourage all producers to take the opportunity to meet your local county extension agent. Make an appointment, sit down with them over a cup of coffee to discuss your operation-the good and the bad- and have that relationship in your herd management toolkit.” Veterinarian Relationships A working relationship with your veterinarian is an important aspect of your program for many reasons, including a networking aspect. Knowing your veterinarian provides valuable benefits for afterhours calls and emergencies. Your veterinarian is also continued on page 17

DOUBLE L 7008 - C941847 L L BRED BY L BAR BEEFMASTERS OWNED BY LARRY LAIRMORE & WHISKEY RIVER L L

EPD %Rank EPD %Rank

CE 2.7 65 SC 0.8 20

BWT -0.4 25 REA 0.60 10

WWT 40.5 10 IMF -0.21 95

YWT 66.4 10 FAT -0.032 40

MILK 8.2 70 $T 113.34 5

MWWT 28.4 15 $M 24.22 10

MCE 1.3 95

Selling

sons & grandsons

of KID ROCK & DOUBLE L 10 Bulls: BOF FLORIDA - Sept 25 Arcadia, Fla. Kid Rock 4218 - C1053295 L L BRED BY FRENZEL BEEFMASTERS OWNED BY LARRY LAIRMORE & LEE CREEK FARM L L

EPD %Rank EPD %Rank

CE 3.5 45 SC 1.4 2

BWT 0.2 40 REA 0.29 40

WWT 39.4 10 IMF -0.17 95

YWT 64.6 10 FAT -0.049 3

MILK 11.8 15 $T 111.09 10

MWWT 31.5 10 $M 28.16 5

MCE 2.2 85

15

10 Bulls: BOF TEXAS - Oct 17 Brenham, Texas LARRY LAIRMORE 903.278.7623 HEBER SPRINGS, ARKANSAS LAIRMORE72@YAHOO.COM


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range of topics. Advocacy Groups familiar with local and Joining agricultural regional situations, forage advocacy/policy groups inadequacies specific to your offers meaningful ways to location and more that could make a difference, volunteer be impacting your herd and get to know others. Texas health or require attention in Southwestern Cattle Raisers the herd health program. Association (TSCRA), is one Having your local of the largest state cattlemen veterinarian understand and organizations and is member know your program also driven. It focuses on hearing helps them see common from members about what problems and issues you is on their mind and what and your neighbors may they’re dealing with on the share that may reflect on the ranch. health of your animal and Stacy Fox, advertising environment. and sales for TSCRA, said, Implementing a good herd “Education is a large part health program includes of TSCRA too. The more having your veterinarian educated we are about over to check the herd cattle, the industry, and and in return, over time, what’s happening, then the a relationship is built that better decisions we can benefits you both. Your local make. There are benefits veterinarian, much like your all around for attending sale barn operator, can be our events. Additionally, a strong resource for your our events are the best ranch needs across a wide continued from page 15

tility

Put longevitoy uarndcofewr herd back into y

networking opportunities. We normally host about 50 events per year, including an annual convention where more than 4,000 people are in attendance. Other events include local ranch gatherings, educational programs, Young Leadership Series, and other opportunities.” Mailings, e-mails and social media accounts for TSCRA keep members notified of upcoming events and engagements. “We are always looking for volunteers to help us with events. That’s a great way to meet others in your area. It’s not too much work, but always a lot of fun. It can be as much as helping plan the event or just helping sign people in onsite,” Fox continued, “There is value in knowing what others are doing and having a community to lean on and

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learn from. Isn’t it great when you can call someone and ask about what they’re doing regarding nutrition or cattle health? Maybe a connection knows of some land when you’re in the market. The cattle industry is fighting a lot of battles on a lot of different fronts – animal rights, legislative and regulatory, a consumer that’s removed from the ranch and more – it’s more important than ever that we stand together as a community.” In addition to volunteering with events, TSCRA offers members the opportunity to apply to work with the policy committees within the association. The association’s promotion committee is also a great place to volunteer and help promote TSCRA to potential members. continued on page 18

Johnson Beefmasters mccammon, Idaho

HEAVY MUSCLED CLEAN SHEATHED RANGE BULLS DEVELOPED FOR NORTH WEST RANGES AND MARKETS Casey herd sire 6-31 working on the range at 12 years old

Bulls and Females Available at the Ranch - Call For Details

doug & LexIe Johnson 208-681-5967 johnsonbeefmasters@gmail.com @johnsonbeefmasters

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Beefmasters. Through Beefmaster Specific Groups their yearly sales, complete with a dinner and auction, A quick search on the Beefmaster Breeders United socialization and fun (BBU) site will help breeders surround the events, giving breeders opportunities to find satellite groups, like meet and engage with others. the Lone Star Beefmaster “We have begun hosting Breeders Association ‘Scan Days’ where breeders (LSBBA), where they can plug in and get to know other can bring calves 320-500 days in age and receive breeders in the area. ultrasound performance Debbie Cheatham is data and weight. This tool a long-time member of is really helping Beefmaster the LSBBA and said the breeders have a tool and main emphasis of the offer the commercial buyers group is to meet members, a quality product. It is hard especially new members, for breeders with smaller provide education and quantity of calves to do this a place for grass roots as some may not have breeders to sell and market continued from page 17

working chutes, scales, and cost of scanning. This offsets the trip fee for them and again, we socialize! Every satellite group operates on a volunteer basis, giving producers an added opportunity to connect and engage. “The events we host draw breeders together from all over the country and we see friends, chat, look at each other’s cattle, market cattle and just have a great time,” Cheatham shared. “To keep up with raising the best seedstock cattle we can, we need to network and improve the breed together.”

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A full list of BBU satellites can be found online at beefmasters.org/purebred/ satellite and a full list of BBU marketing groups can also be found online at beefmasters. org/purebred/marketing. Look At Others Purebred breeders can also find it helpful to network with seedstock producers of other breeds. Visit with those in your local (and beyond) area and attend some of their events/sales. Learn how others do things, market their genetics, or handle a myriad of management responsibilities. The beef industry is now experiencing many multi-breed registered herds and multi-breed marketing events and we all can learn not just new things, but different ways of doing things. The options are unlimited for networking in the beef industry and can lead to new friendships, new business partners, increased sales, more effective and efficient management practices and further education for you and your herd. In this day and age, the exchange of information and the power of relationships is not just a “nice perk” but a necessary advantage to one’s long-term success and improvement of their herd.

Lindsay L. Allen Freelance Writer

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Oklahoma State Builds Beefmaster Research Herd By Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United Oklahoma State University (OSU) Department of Animal and Food Sciences in Stillwater, Okla., is initiating a new research cow herd and they are using Beefmaster genetics as their crossbreeding tool. The research effort, led by Dr. Ryan Reuter, will focus on precision ranching for improved long-term sustainability of ranches in Oklahoma and the Southern Plains. “Our research will focus on incorporating cuttingedge technology such as automated supplementation equipment, on-animal sensors to monitor behavior and stress, and virtual fencing. This technology will allow real-time decision making and better implementation of best management practices. We need a base herd of approximately 70 cows to conduct this research effectively and sustain our research into the future,” said Reuter, Beef Range Nutrition Associate Professor. OSU is in the process of building a commercial cow

herd to facilitate this exciting research. They currently have cows of predominately Angus breeding and will incorporate Beefmaster genetics into their crossbreeding program. “We hope that alumni and stakeholders who have an interest in both OSU Animal and Food Sciences, as well as Beefmaster genetics, will be excited about contributing to this effort. To that end, we are seeking donations of Beefmaster breeding females,” said Reuter. OSU is currently seeking quality, problem-free, moderate framed Beefmaster influenced females of any age that are either purebred Beefmaster or Beefmaster x Red Angus breeding that can be delivered to Stillwater. Donors would be eligible for a tax deduction for the value of the donated animal. This is a tremendous opportunity for the Beefmaster breed to become a part of a leading agricultural university’s quest to build a premier Beefmaster herd. In addition to their use in the OSU research program, this herd will be

used to teach students about ranch and grazing management, precision technology, and will be the subject of numerous tours and field days in the future. Reuter says, “we think Beefmaster genetics can be an important component to achieving long-term sustainability and we look forward to the impact this research could have.” To serve as background to this project; Beefmaster breeder Joe Kreger, an OSU alumnus and managing partner of Kreger Ranch, began a dialogue with department head Dr. Clint Rusk, a few years ago with the concept of including Beefmaster genetics in beef cow research at OSU. Joe Kreger, along with Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) Executive Vice President Collin Osbourn and BBU President Bob Siddons, toured the OSU ranch near Stillwater with Dr. Reuter and in that meeting a general concept

was developed to include Beefmaster genetics in Dr. Reuter’s range nutrition research. The goal of this partnership is to create cutting edge grazing research involving Beefmaster genetics, as well as many other levels of advanced beef cattle production educational content. Joe Kreger, Wes Hood and Bruce Robbins are leading efforts to assist BBU and OSU in sourcing this cow herd. If you have questions about making cattle donations or getting involved in the OSU Beefmaster research herd please call BBU at 210-732-3132.

Jeralyn Novak Beefmaster Breeders United

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United We Steak

- Grilling Campaign Celebrates Beef in Texas and Nationwide By Texas Beef Council Every year, as spring turns to summer, more American families head outdoors for traditional backyard barbecues. In fact, earlier this year, research from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, found that approximately one-third of consumers planned to grill more in the summer of 2020 than they had in the past. NCBA and its Checkofffunded Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand saw this as an excellent opportunity to position beef as the protein of choice for the 2020 summer grilling season. The result was “United We Steak,” a summer grilling campaign showcasing 50 steaks and all 50 states.

Across all 50 states and millions of different palates, Americans share a universal love of beef. United We Steak celebrates the time-honored tradition of grilling delicious steaks as well as what makes each state unique when it comes to this beloved pastime. According to Rachel Chou, director of consumer marketing for the Texas Beef Council, this campaign has definitely resonated with consumers in a state that may just love beef even more than most. “I believe that Texas consumers are seeking content that is familiar, unifying, uplifting, and inspiring,” Chou says. “The United We Steak campaign focuses on encouraging folks to unite around a shared

love of beef on the grill. It’s not only a message that is resonating with consumers, but it’s also making their mouths water.” The idea comes to life at UnitedWeSteak.com, which features an interactive map of the United States made from 50 hand-cut, state-shaped steaks. State beef council partners collaborated with NCBA staff to build out 50 separate state landing pages. By clicking on each state, visitors to the site can get

state-specific recipes, fun facts and the profile of a beef producing operation in that state. “Our brand, Beef Loving Texans, has a mission to celebrate food and the many different faces of the Texas family,” Chou says. “The United We Steak campaign aligns so nicely with all of the other high-quality Beef Loving Texans content because it focuses on many Texan families’ year-round continued on page 22

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continued from page 21 past time – grilling. Because, let’s be honest, no one gets together like Texans, and nothing brings Texans together like beef.”  The state-shaped steaks have been featured in national advertisements, as well as still images and videos on digital and social media platforms, including YouTube, Connected TV, Pandora Radio, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. State beef councils have access to all creative assets, including still imagery, radio ads and video ads for use in their own promotional efforts. Since it was launched, United We Steak and Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner., have generated a tremendous amount of positive exposure for beef nationwide: - The campaign has been

featured in multiple news stories and interviews on sites including The DailyMeal. com, FoxNews.com and GoodMorningAmerica.com. - NCBA also hosted a satellite media tour live from its Culinary Center in Denver, CO on June 30 – just ahead of the July 4th holiday weekend. During this tour, 24 TV and radio stations from across the country interviewed NCBA’s in-house butcher and culinary expert, Bridget Wasser, about how to grill up a delicious steak while showing off the handcut, state-shaped steaks central to the United We Steak campaign. - A United We Steak image appeared on a 7,300-squarefoot digital billboard in New York City’s Times Square five times during morning and evening rush hours. - Popular blogs, including The Daley Plate and Vindulge shared tips on how

to make the perfect steak meal, and Masters of Beef Advocacy graduates are also being encouraged to share resources and content with their followers and local communities. - “Shoppable” e-commerce ads are being served up on digital platforms, allowing consumers to add beef to their online shopping carts and have it delivered directly to their doors from retailers like Kroger and Walmart. To date, the United We Steak Campaign has been a tremendous success, with more than 153 million impressions through paid advertising and social media efforts alone, more than 34 million video views and more than 547,000 pageviews of UnitedWeSteak.com. There’s no reason to believe those numbers won’t continue to rise as we head toward the final grilling holiday of the year, Labor Day Weekend.

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Of the 153 million impressions that United We Steak campaign has received so far, an impressive five million have come from Texas. The state has also accounted for 1.5 million United We Steak video views and 550,000 audio ad listens. The Texas state page has received 15,167 total page views, making it the most viewed state page on UnitedWeSteak.com. Recipes on the Texas page were viewed 608 times, and the video about the J.D. Hudgins Ranch in Hungerford, Texas received 170 clicks. Beef Loving Texans has also had success sharing the campaign’s Texas-specific content on its social media channels, reaching 1,890 people on Facebook, 5,986 on Instagram, and 850 on Twitter. continued on page 23


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continued from page 22 “Over the years, we’ve noticed that Texasspecific content always outperforms other, more general content,” Chou explains. “The Texas United We Steak content is proving that same notion. When we’re

able to connect the brand to shared passion and values, consumers are more enticed to interact and engage with the content.” Learn more about the campaign, get state-specific recipes and discover how farmers and ranchers across

the U.S. are working hard to bring nutritious and delicious beef to tables everywhere at UnitedWeSteak.com. For more information about beef in Texas, visit BeefLovingTexans.com.

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BEEFMASTER Pay Weight The Beefmaster Pay Weight

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a publication dedicated to serving commercial cattlemen and produced by Beefmaster Breeders United FALL 2020

Vol. 6, No. 2

Section 2

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Beefmasters Take on the Last Frontier By Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United The Six Essentials are what differentiates Beefmasters from all other beef breeds. Hardiness is one of the Six Essentials on which the Beefmaster breed was founded, allowing Beefmasters to excel in a variety of different regions. From rugged, arid climates where forage is scarce, to tropical climates where heat tolerance is paramount, and everywhere in between: Beefmaster cattle thrive! The breed is well known for excelling in humid, tropical environments but, what about extreme cold climates

like Alaska? Most people would say no, but Dan and Tina McCluskey said yes! The McCluskeys grew up in Middletown, Mo., and this is where they were first introduced to the Beefmaster breed. Dan fell in love with the breed and despite moving to Alaska 17 years ago, he always dreamed of owning these beautiful Beefmasters. “I have always had two dreams in life; to be a mountain man and to own cattle. After many years of hunting Alaskan wildlife and eating only wild game meat, it is now my time to raise

cattle,� said Dan. The McCluskeys currently reside in the Montana Creek Community, located two and half hours north of Anchorage, Alaska. They became members of Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) on October 12, 2016

under the herd prefix Alaska Cross Creek Ranch. Upon their membership, this made them the first BBU members in Alaska. Once BBU members, they began contacting the Lasater family in Colorado for more continued on page 26


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scenario when traveling across many states with information about the breed animals. Also, this meant the and how to acclimate them heifers were smaller and fit to cold climates. Then in easily in a 16-foot trailer for 2018, Dan and Tina began the long journey. Yes, these contacting Beefmaster Beefmaster heifers were breeders in Missouri, since preparing for a trip most they are familiar with the people only dream of. They area and still have family were headed to “The Last there. They eventually got Frontier”! in contact with Don and On a balmy September Kelli Schapeler, owners of day, with temperatures in Don-Kels Beefmasters, in the low 90s, the heifers were Rockville, Mo. loaded onto a trailer that “Don and Kelli have been the McCluskeys purchased so great to work with and in Missouri. The cattle and they met all of our special their new owners traveled requests during this process, 2,032 miles over a three-day like our request for horned period, and this was the short heifers. We wanted them to part of the journey, to their have horns, so they could next stop. This stop was to defend their calves from the prepare for an upcoming Alaskan wolves and coyotes,” five-day ferry ride. Once said McCluskey. the fleet arrived in the very The Schapelers had seven Northwest part of the lower heifers just the right age for 48 states, they loaded the the McCluskeys. They needed truck and trailer onto a ferry heifers under six months owned by the Alaska Marine age, this created the easiest Highway System. The ferry continued from page 25

ride would take five days to travel from Bellingham, Wash., to Whittier, Alaska. Prior to the ferry ride, the McCluskeys made sure the animals would have all the necessities for a comfortable trip. They loaded water, feed, hay and necessary materials to discard waste. The Alaska Marine Highway System only allows 15-minute “pet calls” approximately every 8 hours to allow owners to be escorted to the car deck and see to their animals. These “pet calls” applied to the cattle also, so every 8 hours Dan would work quickly to make sure the cattle had feed and water. “They did allow me extra time to tend to the cattle and my dogs, but it was still a mad rush every 8 hours to get all the animals watered, fed and cleaned,” said McCluskey.

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Above: Alaska Ferry Below: Truck and trailer with cattle loaded on the ferry

And you are probably wondering about the feces? Yep, they took care of that by laying down wood pellets on the trailer floor to absorb urine, while discarding of the cattle waste in a nearby dumpster. If it seems like a lot of work, it was by no means easy or cheap. The roundtrip ferry ride cost close to $15,000, specifically due to continued on page 27


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continued from page 26 the space occupied by the truck and trailer on the car deck. However, Dan said “the girls handled the trip really well.” At times the seawater would produce 18-foot waves and the ship would rock for 24 hours straight, but the cattle handled it well and laid down most of the time during the rough sea waters. Once docked in Whittier, the team had a short threehour drive north to their new home in Montana Creek. Even in September, the ranch was already experiencing frost at night, but according to Dan the heifers acclimated quickly to the cold. Their new home greeted them with winter temperatures averaging 15 degrees Fahrenheit, and a constant four feet of snow. At one point the temperature stayed below zero for over a month. “They did shiver at the beginning due to the drastic temperature change from Missouri to Alaska,” McCluskey said. “But I am so proud of these girls, they did a really good job handling the cold even when we dropped to -35 degrees.”

Top photo: McCluskey Beefmaster cattle in November 2019 Above Photos 2-4: Beefmasters in the Alaskan snow

Throughout winter the heifers had access to a barn for protection from the snow and wind. They also always had access to hay and water. However, they had their challenges throughout the winter too. One heifer earned the name “Lucky” due to a day of exploring that ended with falling through the ice. “Luckily, she was able to swim to safety and find her way out of the ice water,” said Dan. She earned the name “Lucky” and earned a “thick hide” after that adventure. “The night we dropped to -35 degrees was a bit extreme and the heifers did have ice on the tips of their ears, but they didn’t get frost bit,” said McCluskey. “Just enough cold to freeze the hair and hide on the tip. It worked like a freeze brand does, once the hair grew back their ears were tipped with white hair instead of red.” Once late spring rolled around and the snow began to melt, Dan and Tina knew that their Beefmasters were tough girls and really are adaptable to any climate. During the summertime the Beefmaster females now get

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to enjoy mild temperatures averaging in the 60s and nice green grass. A cow’s paradise. However, even in Alaska they must deal with mosquitoes and due to the extra snow melt and spring rain, the mosquitoes this year have been the worst Dan has ever seen. “The mosquitoes are horrible, but the heifers took it good,” said McCluskey. Beefmasters are genetically built for sub-tropical climates where mosquitoes swarm year-round, so the mosquitoes in Alaska are a minor issue to them. Soon the McCluskeys will begin a cow/calf operation on their ranch, once they bring their Beefmaster bull to Alaska from Missouri. Ultimately their goal is to sell meat to their local neighbors. “Five percent of the food Alaskans consume is grown in Alaska and everything else is shipped up on a barge,” according to McCluskey. By raising their own beef and selling to local consumers, they will be more sustainable in their food resources. continued on page 29

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continued from page 27 Which is a great match because the Beefmaster female is a steady source of sustainable profitability. “The heifers did really well considering all of the challenges they faced with the cold. Several people probably thought I was crazy, but I knew that Beefmaster cattle were bred to survive and are tough enough to thrive in Alaska.”

The McCluskeys are proud to be the first Beefmaster breeders in Alaska. And more importantly they are excited for the future and to raise the first Beefmaster calves born in Alaska. Stay tuned for more tales of Beefmasters in Alaska!

Jeralyn Novak Communications Coordinator Beefmaster Breeders United

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Noble Research Institute Moves to Demonstrate Heterosis in Their Cow Herd By Beefmaster Breeders United & Noble Research Institute Heterosis is an oftenoverlooked production and financial advantage that many commercial cattle producers are not utilizing. Maternal heterosis can be measured in several ways: stayability of the cow, cow lifetime productivity, increase in calving and weaning rates, increase in calf weighing weight, and a subsequent increase of weaning weight per exposed cow. Developing and maintaining a deliberate maternal heterosis program is easy to talk about but difficult in practice to accomplish. Furthermore, small- to mid-sized producers find it difficult to manage the logistics of managing several distinct breeds on their operation to develop a cross-breeding program. The Noble Research Institute determined they would utilize Beefmaster and Hereford genetics to take advantage of cross-breeding

and maternal heterosis in their predominately commercial Angus-based cow herd, which is comprised of approximately 550 mother cows. The decision to utilize Beefmaster genetics in the research herd was made in part based off of the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) feed efficiency data that ranked the Beefmaster breed second for average daily gain (ADG) and dry matter intake (DMI) in both steers and heifers. Hereford was selected as the Bos taurus cross component as the industry already recognizes the value of a baldy cow. “By incorporating both Beefmaster and Herefords, we intend to demonstrate the value of heterosis by utilizing Bos taurus and Bos indicus influenced genetics,” said Robert Wells, Ph.D., Noble Research Institute livestock consultant.

Starting in spring 2020, Noble Research Institute will start utilizing Beefmaster AI bulls to create half-blood heifers that will potentially go back into a terminal-focused cow herd. “Noble consultants regularly teach maternal heterosis to producers based on science and experience,” Wells said. “By incorporating additional complementary maternal breeds into our research cow herds, we are now able to practice what we preach in the realm of maternal heterosis and the benefits thereof.” Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) will work with Dr. Wells to select the Beefmaster genetics that will meet the parameters that have been set forth, based on EPDs and phenotype.

“Assisting Noble with this project is a great honor for the Beefmaster breed and we are pleased that such a wellrespected research institute recognizes the Beefmaster breed for their strong maternal traits,” said BBU Executive Vice President Collin Osbourn.”

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The Future of the Beefmaster Breed By Rylee Barber, Beefmaster Breeders United “The youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow,” said Nelson Mandela. The Junior Beefmaster Breeders Association’s (JBBA) mission is to create and promote enthusiasm for the Beefmaster breed while providing opportunities through leadership, education and scholarship, thus ensuring a brighter future for youth and the cattle industry. The JBBA is growing each day with nearly 700 members currently and is one of the fastest growing youth cattle organizations. JBBA provides juniors opportunities to become leaders in the industry. as well as develop and enhance their leadership skills. At the National Show and Convention each year, juniors participate

in the annual leadership conference and strengthen their individual and team leadership skills. Members take part in different activities designed to help them get to know each other while also giving them the tools they need to grow their capabilities. JBBA members have gone on to be leaders in BBU, Texas FFA and other agricultural organizations. The leadership skills members have gained over the years from attending the annual leadership conference are prevalent in the JBBA Board of Directors. These outstanding individuals lead the organization and develop and implement programs and events that serve junior Beefmaster members. The individuals serving terms on the board

interact with JBBA members year-round and help plan and execute the National Show and Convention each year. Alongside the board, are the JBBA junior ambassadors. These individuals aged 11 14 are the future leaders of the JBBA and have jumped in headfirst to serve in a leadership capacity. The ambassadors along with the directors lead the JBBA and consistently showcase their talents and skills in various JBBA programs. The National Show and Convention is the JBBA’s largest event annually and displays the hard work the juniors put in all year

long. While at the National Show and Convention juniors compete in several educational contests that help increase their knowledge of the beef industry. From Beefmaster Skillathon to public speaking to cattle judging there are a variety of contests and events that juniors can compete in to show off their knowledge and skills. Each contest provided gives juniors a chance to learn more about the Beefmaster breed and the agricultural industry as a whole. Once they have learned the information there are several opportunities to continued on page 35


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genetics with other breeds, and this gives them the promote the breed and the opportunity to showcase industry through the public those genetics. The E6/ speaking and video contest. Advancer show is just one of JBBA chooses to place many shows that are offered emphasis on our educational for juniors. The National contests to help prepare our Heifer Show, Bred and youth to be the leaders of Owned Bull and Heifer Show, tomorrow. and the Ultrasound Carcass While much of the week Show are some of the other at the National Show and shows offered to juniors. The Convention is filled with Ultrasound Carcass show educational and leadership teaches juniors how their contests, the rest of the week animals would perform on a happens in the show ring. carcass basis. The scan data Juniors compete for the gives juniors one more tool top spot in showmanship to use when making breeding and show their cattle in the decisions for their animals. various shows offered. One While the shows are just one of the newest editions is the of many things to participate E6/Advancer Show. The E6/ in, the week is capped off Advancer show gives juniors with the annual awards the opportunity to showcase banquet, where we recognize the maternal qualities of their the juniors that have excelled Beefmaster cross females. in JBBA. Many JBBA members see JBBA is an organization the value of the hybrid vigor that is devoted to the when crossing Beefmaster development of their continued from page 33

members’ determination to achieve an advanced education. Each year JBBA and BBU groups award over $25,000 dollars in scholarships to deserving JBBA members for their higher education goals. The purpose of the scholarship program is to encourage individual effort, enthusiasm, excellence, leadership, academic success and achievement among youth. Through this program JBBA strives to develop successful individuals as good leaders for both the Beefmaster breed and the beef industry. To date the scholarship program has awarded approximately 500,000 dollars in scholarships to JBBA members. The Junior Beefmaster Breeders Association continues to lay the foundation for the beef industry’s future leaders since

its start in 1984. JBBA offers a complete and well-rounded slate of programs that covers all aspects of the beef cattle industry. JBBA members can gain valuable knowledge about every phase of the business and become better prepared to contribute to the beef cattle industry. If you and/or a young Beefmaster enthusiast are interested in joining JBBA, go to www.beefmasters.org to find out more information and to sign up today. JBBA is moving with the Beefmaster breed to the forefront of the beef cattle industry, and this is the chance to be a part of it.

Rylee Barber Youth Programs Coordinator Beefmaster Breeders United

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Building for the Future

- Beefmaster breeder of the year meets growing demand for quality genetics By Chel Terrell, The Beefmaster Cowman Growing demand for Beefmaster genetics in the commercial industry has skyrocketed in recent years as seedstock producers strive to develop genetics that not only meet customer demand, they exceed their expectations. Gaining this kind of traction in the commercial realm doesn’t happen overnight – it takes years of diligent work, making tough decisions with patience and fortitude to mold and develop a program into a premier operation that ultimately achieves this purpose. Derek Frenzel, Temple, Texas, and Larry Meacham, Cat Spring, Texas, two of the leading breeders driving efforts to expand the commercial market for Beefmaster genetics, combined forces in 2009 and established F&M Cattle Co. (FMC). Their forwardthinking partnership has led to growth in Beefmaster sales across the country thanks to their continued focus on utilizing performance data and strict culling practices to improve their breeding program while eagerly helping other breeders achieve success and further the impact of Beefmasters as well. Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) recognized these efforts by selecting FMC as the 2019 BBU Breeder of the Year during their annual convention last fall. Building a Solid Foundation Reaching this pinnacle in the breed took diligent effort. When Frenzel and Meacham combined personal herds and purchased several outside herds in 2009 – moving cattle to a ranch in Salado, Texas – they began using a 60-day calving season and culled cows for low fertility and

performance. “We quickly realized that not all Beefmaster cattle were equal to what we had been raising. We operate on a low input environment and these cows couldn’t withstand what they were subjected to,” Frenzel said. “So those first few years we culled pretty ruthlessly for fertility, color and udders and were left with a nucleus of productive cows to advance our purebred program.” This “base” set of cows serves as the foundation for FMC’s replacement females. “We sold some of our oldest cows last year (ranging from 10 to 18 years old) to one of our customers and now our cowherd is a little bit younger,” Frenzel said. “We maintain strict 45- to 60-day calving and breeding seasons and develop all our heifers. We turn a lot of cows over, so we have to have a lot of replacements for that.” They continued improving genetics with bull power, a cornerstone of the FMC operation since its inception. “We started by selecting top end bulls from performance tests to build our herd and analyzed the udders and production records of their dams before bringing them into the herd,” Frenzel said. Laying this important groundwork early on created a solid foundation for FMC’s future success. Customer-Focused Mindset and the Power of Performance From the outset, Frenzel and Meacham set a goal to produce quality Beefmaster bulls for the commercial cowman. With customers spanning across the United States and internationally, they’ve honed their program to meet the growing demand

for cattle that can perform in widely varied regions. “We sell bulls to buyers from Florida to Oregon and other parts of the country. You’ve got to identify which genetics really work in those particular regions and build bulls to suit your customer base,” Meacham said. “That’s really part of the success that we’ve had – listening to our customer.” “We’re trying to produce an easier fleshing, moderate, heavier boned bull that doesn’t have to be massive, but does have to be above average,” Frenzel said. “He’s got to be able to go out there and make a living.” Cows aren’t cut any slack either. “We run cattle in four regions across Texas, and one thing we’ve learned from ranching in these various areas is the type of cow that it takes to survive and thrive,” Frenzel said. “We try to raise a more moderate cow that fits the wide variety of environments where our customers are

located. I think we ‘ranch’ cows a little bit harder than most breeders and that’s what our commercial customers are doing, so we’ve got to be just as hard on them. If we find cows that are a little bit more moderate size and easy fleshing, plus feed efficient, that’s what we’re going for.” They pride themselves on strictly following the Foundation philosophy but concentrating on more phenotype. “Our customers can get the best of both worlds knowing they can buy from a program that stresses fertility, udder and color,” Frenzel said. “Making everything solid colored to fit the commercial industry is a big focus for us, but we also have the phenotype to go along with it.” A driving force for many of the decisions to advance the FMC herd and meet growing customer demand is data collection. “Our goal is to move our herd and the breed forward by measuring continued on page 38


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continued from page 37 everything possible and utilizing all the newest tools available,” Meacham said. Cattle are run in large multi-sire pastures; therefore, DNA is collected on every calf born so it can be parent verified and receive a genomic EPD. They also record weaning and yearling weights and ultrasound data as part of BBU’s Whole Herd Reporting program. In 2016, Frenzel and Meacham, along with two other breeders, formed the Beef Development Group and invested in a GrowSafe® system to collect and monitor feed efficiency data. FMC tests every keeper bull and

all heifers with the system, utilizing that data to select replacement females. Their commercial customers are also benefiting from the additional information, enabling them to make better decisions when buying bulls or replacements. “We made the decision to purchase a GrowSafe

system because we really felt like Residual Feed Intake (RFI) was something that is not only important today, but that will be extremely

relevant in years to come,” Meacham said. “We all talk about how Beefmasters are easy keepers and how they perform very well. But most people weren’t really measuring that. Now we’re measuring it and bringing that to the table. There’s a lot more interest in feed efficiency today, and we are kind of pioneering that in our breed and hopefully going to see the association develop an EDP for it. We’ll see what happens in years to come, but there’s a lot of benefit for cattle producers in cutting 10 percent of your feed costs, for example. That’s a major chunk of money.” Staying ahead of the competition is also crucial for the Beefmaster breed. “I think measuring feed intake is very important to our breed. You’ve got to separate yourself in an industry that’s very competitive. I think efficiency is a big part of why Beefmasters work as well as they do. Through GrowSafe, we’re able to test for it and prove that,” Meacham said. In addition to collecting data to improve herd genetics, Frenzel and Meacham utilize artificial insemination and embryo transfer technology. “We’ll put in about 40 to 50 embryos this year and AI all continued on page 39


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continued from page 38 of our first-year replacement heifers,” Frenzel said. “We’re using all tools available to push that marker forward in our breeding program and try to get better and better,” Meacham said.

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“You can’t lose sight of any of opportunity to improve.” FMC markets cattle through several avenues, including private treaty, the three annual Beef On Forage sales and the fall Maternal Compass sale. Along with

A GrowSafe system, pictured left, collects and measures feed efficiency for participants in the Beef On Forage bull and heifer development tests. Shown far left, DNA is collected on every calf in the FMC herd to parent verify and receive a genomic EPD. An up-and-coming young herd bull grazes in a pasture, seen below. FMC Beefmaster heifers, pictured right.

purebred herds, many of the bulls they have raised can be found in the top 25 largest cow-calf operations in the country. They also purchase bulls from breeders within their Beef On Forage group and ones that participate in the Beef On Forage bull test – herds with similar breeding philosophies.

“We’re raising bulls that go through this program, so we need to stack that back on top of each other,” Frenzel said. They’ll keep their top 50 heifers each year as replacements, then develop the other females on oats and sell them to seedstock breeders or commercial producers. continued on page 40


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continued from page 39

current weights, scrotal measurements, EPDs and Frenzel manages the Beef scan and gain data as well as On Forage bull test, which Fleshing Ability Scores. The has been in operation for group has tested over 1,000 over 30 years and is the bulls and females to date. largest performance test in “Our priority is to develop the breed, marketing over bulls for the true working 300 bulls and 75 females rancher that perform in the annually at sales in Texas, real-world environment,” Oklahoma and Florida. The Frenzel said. “Not all bulls are forage-based performance test enables breeders to select created equal, and it’s our job to identify superior genetics.” bulls that fit their specific One of the premier bulls environment by testing them owned and marketed by against each other in large FMC and coming out of the contemporary groups. Feed Beef On Forage test is the efficiency data is collected 1001 bull. “He’s produced using the GrowSafe system and participants are provided McAlester and Summit, two

of our really highly promoted bulls that we and other breeders have been successful with,” Frenzel said. “He’s still the number one ribeye bull in the breed and we utilize his genetics quite a bit to flush,” Meacham said. Focused on the Future For the duo, participation in association activities as well as at state and national level events is an important aspect of promoting both the FMC herd and the entire Beefmaster breed. Meacham, a BBU lifetime member, and Frenzel, who has been a member of the association for over 20 years, have both served on the BBU Board of Directors, as members of multiple committees, several satellites, including Central Texas BBA, Central States BBA and Arkansas BBA and the Texoma Beefmaster Marketing Group. You’ll find them actively promoting the breed at Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) events, too. They are also financial contributors to the Beefmaster Educational Endowment Foundation (B.E.E.F.) and run the Flying B test heifers through their GrowSafe system for BBU and will be giving several donors to Texas A&M University to flush for the new Beefmaster herd. “Serving on the Board, on committees and promoting and supporting the breed through various avenues is a way to stay involved, especially when you have the opportunity to relay important information to other breeders and commercial cattlemen,” Meacham said. “If you’re going to separate yourself from other breeders you need to set an example, whether someone follows your lead

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or at least utilizes some of the information you provide. If you’re going to push yourself to the top, it’s really important.” Helping other breeders, especially new breeders, realize their own success with Beefmaster genetics is essential to the pair, as they know a rising tide lifts all boats. After years in the business, they can offer some valuable insight to help these programs move forward. “First, go buy an iron set of cows and put the best bull you can afford on them. Keep those heifers out of him and breed up from that point,” Frenzel advises. “It’s too hard to go to sales every weekend and put together cows from multiple locations that’ll fit your environment.” Patience is also paramount. “This is a marathon, not a sprint,” Meacham stresses. “No matter how much money you throw at it, you’re not going to make it happen quickly. It takes time to reach goals in your breeding program, to really mold your program to where you feel like you’ve got a good set of cows that you can carry forward on the registered end.” And when you reach a set of goals, it’s time to move the needle and set new ones so the fruits of your efforts pay off again, they emphasize. “It’s a never-ending cycle and you can’t ever let off the throttle because you’ll fall behind,” Frenzel said. “We have to stay focused on the future and take steps to maximize what we’re doing to stay on top.”

Chel Terrell Managing Editor The Beefmaster Cowman


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Injectable Minerals Take Up The Slack By Gilda V. Bryant

Free choice minerals are the bedrock of a wellbalanced nutrition program for beef cattle. But there are times when bagged minerals aren’t enough. For example, transported calves become stressed and don’t eat well for about 30 days plus they tend to ignore minerals. Animals on lush forages may bypass the mineral feeder. Bulls, cows and first-calf heifers also need an extra nutrient boost before breeding. If producers develop smart tactics, they can ensure their animals receive the best supplements at the right time. Lourens Havenga, veterinarian and CEO of Multimin, USA says that mineral intake is always the first hurdle. Bagged mineral generally allows for two to four ounces per head per

day. If intake isn’t consistent, some animals will be oversupplemented while others will be under-supplemented. It’s not uncommon for herd members receiving the same feed, supplements and management practices to have a trace mineral variation of 40 to 50 percent between animals. When producers initially introduce minerals to the herd, cattle often eat more than two to four ounces, then level off with lower intakes. Cattle grazing on lush grass pastures often refuse to visit mineral feeders for weeks at a time. Producers may feed molasses-based supplements that contain sulfur, an antagonist that decrease absorption of copper, zinc and manganese. When pregnant cows are exposed to

sulfur for long periods, their calves are born with a copper deficiency. Without adequate levels of copper, animals are unthrifty, unhealthy and prone to sickness with poor reproduction rates. Transport stress occurs when calves are shipped across the state or across the country. The strain of being on a truck comingled with animals they don’t know is a

real problem. Calves lose their appetites, eat little and ignore minerals. Younger calves may not know how to feed at the bunk. Natural competition during feeding times may prevent a shy calf from eating enough. “It’s usually in the first 14-21 days that we have Pasteurella that causes BRD (Bovine Respiratory continued on page 42


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continued from page 41 Disease),” explains Havenga. “It may be because those animals didn’t have enough mineral to support their immune systems.” Injectable minerals can make a huge difference in animal health and performance. Injected trace minerals hit the blood stream in eight to ten hours, and the animal uses these nutrients immediately. Excess minerals are stored in the liver for later utilization. The physiological benefit of injectables may last between

90 and 120 days. “You can put a small quantity into the animals immediately after birth for less than a dollar and it is taken care of,” Havenga explains. “These calves grow so fast, you need to give them another injection at branding time.” Many producers with BLM grazing contracts in the rugged backcountry of Oregon and Idaho have discovered their animals ignore minerals and head for the hills. Havenga reports that some owners now inject

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their livestock when they offload them so they have enough mineral to last the 60 to 90 days they are grazing. When cattle come off BLM land, producers inject them again before taking them to a pasture where they have access to minerals. MultiMin® 90 is a great injectable mineral option, that supports an existing well-designed oral feed It’s program. Veterinary prescription required. important to note that mineral Free choice minerals are the injections should mainstay of a well-balanced never replace an oral supplementation program. supplementation program. Animals that have a good They are only for those mineral program, low stress times when livestock are and antagonist-free water experiencing physiological and diet don’t need injectable stress which deplete trace minerals. However, when minerals that are vital for cattle ignore minerals or ruminant health, such as face stress, adding injectable weaning or being trucked minerals to an established to a new location. Trace mineral program may reduce minerals are also critical for illness, promotes animal optimal vaccine response health and productivity. And and disease prevention in that means more money in cattle or before breeding the bank. and calving. In addition, stockpiled or purchased hay bales often lack vital minerals and other nutrients that cattle require. Injectables have also been the subject of several Gilda V. Bryant studies in stocker and feedlot Freelance Writer cattle. The results indicated writing for MultiMin® USA improved finishing phase performance plus improved carcass quality compared with animals that did not receive a shot. Producers may be tempted to give larger injections to sick or unthrifty cows or calves. Havenga strongly recommends that stockmen strictly follow label directions. “More isn’t better,” he recommends. “It could be dangerous if you overdo trace minerals. Stick to the label dose.”

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CattleFax Offers 2020 Outlook for Beef Producers By Amanda Radke, BEEF Magazine Kevin Good with CattleFax presented at the Alltech ONE Virtual Experience in May 2020. His session focused on the short-term impacts and long-term repercussions of the COVID-19 crisis that will be experienced by beef producers. His speech, titled, “Sunny with a high chance of cattle: The ag market outlook,” offered insights on supply and demand, imports and exports and an analysis of meat production moving through 2020.

over the next 30-45 days, kill levels will move toward an adequate level, and as that occurs, the beef complex will get back to what was the norm over the last four to five years,” he said.

back and think this is a situation we have never seen in our lifetimes, and hopefully we’ll never see it again. There have been tremendous supply What will the new normal and demand dislook like in the beef ruptions. The net industry? of those is there Good said, “As we move will be lower pricforward into bigger supplies es received for all and the beef complex rolls classes of cattle. forward, we are still antici“That said, we pating the cash market to at also need to recleast maintain a dollar on the ognize there are bottom side. That being said, positives. Demand First, Good laid out the sup- it should be supportive price- will come back. ply disruptions we have seen wise, but unfortunately, our Our export market in the industry. breakevens are above that, so is very strong. Let’s Tighter production levels we will still see financial loss- remember that we have impacted the beef that es in the feeder side.” still have a protein is available on the shelves as We’ll also see more redeficit in China, harvest levels have been lim- tained ownership in the in particular. Also, ited in recent months. months ahead on feeder domestically as “The bottom line is, we calves because if they sold restaurants, we exhave to recognize that it will now, they would experience pect more robust take some time to get back to losses, he added. demand activity those pre-COVID-19 levels, “Looking to the fall run, there.” and those levels may look dif- we unfortunately expect ferent than it did in the past. the cow-calf segment to not In other words, we might not have a very good year from a get back to full capacity, and profitability standpoint,” said we might see more Saturday Good. “Because of that, we kills than what we were pre- will expect some liquidation viously doing.” on the cow side in the next Amanda Radke 6-9 months. And as we think BEEF Magazine What does production look about prices that the calf like for the rest of 2020? market will have this fall, you Good anticipates produc- really can’t be overly optimistion for beef dropping -0.5% tic that they will be great for (-136 million pounds), pork the cow-calf producer.” increasing 2.0% (550 million pounds), poultry increasing How will beef sales change? 1.8% (895 million pounds) “With much of the counfor a total of 1.31 billion try on lockdown, folks are pounds of total meat prospending more time at home, duced, increasing production so more and more of our 1.3%. food that has been consumed Good explained that the has been at retail compared drop in beef production to food service, which has means 5 pounds per capita had a dramatic effect about less per person. And with the where dollars are spent and lower supply, we will see an demand overall,” said Good. beefmasters.org uptick in prices. He added, “As we “Our assumptions are think about the effects of that as we move forward COVID-19, we need to step

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Producing Commercial Females through the E6 Program By Jeralyn Novak, Beefmaster Breeders United Value-added programs are on the rise in the beef industry as input costs increase and margins remain tight. Enterprising beef producers are exploring new ways to improve their return on investment and open doors to new marketing avenues. Beefmaster Breeders United offers a value-added program through the Beefmaster E6 Commercial Female. The BBU Essential Commercial Female Program is a prime example of expanding the market for Beefmaster cattle. The program, referred to as the E6 program, focuses attention on the strong maternal traits of Beefmaster cattle and helps commercial cattlemen develop stronger markets and greater value for their Beefmaster and Beefmaster cross heifers. The word “essential” is included in the name because of the six essentials upon which the breed was founded - weight, conformation, milk production, fertility, disposition and hardiness. While attractive, hearty bulls are often known to steal the spotlight, the modest hero of this legendary breed is without a doubt the

essential Beefmaster female. She’s universal – in tropical climates of the South, high altitude or sparse sections of the West. Throughout the Fescue Belt and stretching into the High Plains, the Beefmaster female remains constant. What is an E6 Certified Female? An E6 female is simply a commercial Beefmaster female, that is at least half Beefmaster. This female was labeled as an E6 based off the essential six traits that were used to develop the Beefmaster breed. This E6 program has been around now for about 20 plus years. The National E6 Sale in Columbus, Texas, and others like it throughout the Plains and Florida, ensure there’s verified and topquality females available for purchase. The National E6 Sale as been held for 15 years plus. Commercial breeders from all over the country are constantly looking to restock their pastures with Beefmaster cross females. “They are needing that genetics and they realize that in hot and humid and tropical regions they need

cattle that can go out there and eat really low quality forage, that has high water content, fight mosquitoes, fight pests and go out make money for them in a hostile climate situation,” said Trey Scherer, a Beefmaster breeder from Brenham, Texas and a consignor to the National E6 Sale. The essential Beefmaster cross, there’s no better cow. In today’s beef cattle industry, branded programs are the main topic of discussion. The Beefmaster E6 Program is a branded program for those highly sought-after replacement females. This program also gives the buyer assurance that these cattle are at least 50% Beefmaster and that they have been inspected for quality. The program serves as a marketing tool for the cattle producer. “When you get around trying to find these kinds of cattle, they’re hard to find. They are popular,” said Anthony Mihalski, a longtime auctioneer and sale manager for the Beefmaster industry. The advantage of these commercial Beefmaster female sales is that each sale has specific consignors that

are committed to producing these types of cattle and holding them for these valueadded sales. “These sales give us one place where buyers can come to and get a pretty large offering,” said Mihalski. When buyers purchase commercial Beefmaster females from these sales they know the ranch that the cattle are coming from. “You know that these cattle are at least half registered Beefmaster genetics. They give that producer that secure feeling that I am going to get that longevity. We know that these cattle are home raised cattle and coming out of vaccination programs,” said Scherer. If you are a commercial cattleman, you simply can’t afford NOT to be crossbreeding with Beefmaster genetics. The benefits of a crossbred cow to any commercial herd are undeniable and highly documented. Scherer is a true believer in Beefmaster genetics and the advantages of crossbreeding to produce a commercial Beefmaster female. “There’s no more versatile cow out there in the industry than a Beefmaster cow.” Crossbreeding leads to hybrid vigor or heterosis. Crossbred calves, on the average, are better performers than their straight bred parents. They are more vigorous at birth and faster growing calves perform better for almost every trait and make more money. “The beautiful part about a Beefmaster based cow and just Beefmaster genetics is that you can put them on continued on page 45


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born and weaned, more pounds of calf and more anything. You can fit them calves produced over the to whatever program serves cow’s lifetime. With good your ranch the best. You can management, maternal add Beefmaster genetics to heterosis will make a rancher it to get the longevity, the more money than anything structure, to get the efficiency else he can do. and it’s going to work within Meacham adds, “she’s the first year,” said Larry [Beefmaster cow] known Meacham, a Beefmaster for her maternal traits. She’s breeder and commercial known for her longevity, cattleman. along with her efficiency in Crossbred cows the pasture when converting improve calving rates, calf grass into pounds. There’s survivability, more calves no better female than a continued from page 44

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Beefmaster based cow.” That’s the Certified E6 Beefmaster Female. With longevity and sustainability at her core, she’s the cow that can do it all. Her versatility Jeralyn Novak compliments any program Communications Coordinator and brings cattle producers more dollars at the end of the Beefmaster Breeders United day.

K E V I N C AT E BOYD, TEXAS


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2020 - 2021 Beefmaster Sale Calendar

September 19, 2020 - J & T Farms Production Sale, Lexington, TN September 25, 2020 - Beef on Forage - Florida Bull Sale, Arcadia, FL September 25-26, 2020 - Flint Hills Classic Female Sale & 3rd Annual Bull Sale, Paxico, KS September 26, 2020 - Live Oak BBA “Perfect Pair” Futurity and Sale, Three Rivers, TX October 03, 2020 - Lyssy’s Heart of the Herd Production Sale, Luling, TX October 03, 2020 - Isa Beefmasters 59th Performance Test and Sale, San Angelo, TX October 03, 2020 - Ozark & Heart of America Fall Roundup Sale, Springfield, MO October 10, 2020 - South Texas BBA Buccaneer Classic, Robstown, TX October 17, 2020 - Beef on Forage Bull Sale, Brenham, TX October 17, 2020 - Carr & Others Fall Sale, Floresville, TX October 24, 2020 - Southern Plains Performance Beefmaster Bull Sale, Valliant, OK November 06, 2020 - Maternal Compass Commercial Beefmaster Female Sale, McAlester, OK November 07, 2020 - Louisiana BBA Cowboy Classic, Kinder, LA November 07, 2020 - Red River Beefmaster Bull Sale, Paris, TX November 14, 2020 - Purple Premium Sale, Crockett, TX November 21, 2020 - Collier Farms Performance Bull Sale, Brenham, TX December 05, 2020 - Lone Star BBA Fall Sale, Sulphur Springs, TX January 09, 2021 - Live Oak Bull Sale, Three Rivers, TX February 20, 2021 - Beefmaster Border Classic III, Edcouch, TX March 20, 2021 - Beef on Forage - Texoma Bull & Female Sale, McAlester, OK March 20, 2021 - Live Oak Spring Sale, Three Rivers, TX March 27, 2021 - Emmons Ranch Annual Bull Sale, Groesbeck, TX April 23, 2021 - Spring Flint Hills Classic Sale, Paxico, KS May 01, 2021 - The Cowboy Heritage Beefmaster Sale, Oklahoma City, OK May 08, 2021 - Central States BBA Sale, Locust Grove, OK May 15, 2021 - Swinging B and Friends Sale, Salado, TX June 05, 2021 - Emmons Ranch Production Sale, Fairfield, TX June 12, 2021 - Wallen Prairie Ranch Production Sale, Lockwood, MO June 26, 2021 - Clark Jones & Cottage Farm Southern Tradition xxi, Savannah, TN September 04, 2021 - Beefmaster Breeders Harvest Sale, Location TBA September 11, 2021 - Arkansas BBA Fall Classic Graded Sale, Damascus, AR September 24, 2021 - Beef on Forage - Florida Bull Sale, Arcadia, FL September 24-25, 2021 - Flint Hills Classic Female Sale & 4th Annual Bull Sale, Paxico, KS October 02, 2021 - Isa Beefmasters 60th Performance Test and Sale, San Angelo, TX October 16, 2021 - Beef on Forage Bull Sale, Brenham, TX October 16, 2021 - Carr & Others Fall Sale, Floresville, TX November 05, 2021 - Beefmaster E6 Commercial Female Sale, McAlester, OK *sale catalogs posted online a few weeks before sale date at www.beefmasters.org/purebred/calendar*


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Advertisers’ Index Breeder Advertisers Alabama Arrow T Beefmasters................................................................................45 D&D Beefmasters.....................................................................................27 Arkansas Lairmore Beefmasters..............................................................................15 Heritage Cattle Company.........................................................................45 Hood Beefmasters.....................................................................................19 California Walking M Cattle Co...............................................................................29 Florida Beef on Forage Beefmaster Bull Sale..........................................................3 Idaho Johnson Beefmasters................................................................................17 Kansas Hurla Cattle Co.........................................................................................21 NextGen Cattle Co....................................................................Back Cover Kentucky Channarock Farm.....................................................................................31 Ella Mae Farms..........................................................................................27 Louisiana I-O-C Beefmasters & McKenzie Beefmasters........................................11 Louisiana BBA Cowboy Classic Sale.....................................................23 Missouri Berachiah Beefmasters.............................................................................27 Cedar Springs Beefmasters......................................................................41 Headings Beefmasters..............................................................................27 Mountain View Ranch..............................................................................45 Wannabe Beefmaster Farm......................................................................38 Wallen Prairie Ranch..................................................................................4 Mississippi 4G Farm.....................................................................................................29 Cain Cattle Co...........................................................................................24 North Carolina Adam Taylor Farms...................................................................................7

Oklahoma Dance Creek Beefmasters........................................................................27 Hargis Ranch.............................................................................................40 Hood Beefmasters.....................................................................................19 Kreger Ranch.............................................................................................18 Maternal Compass Commercial Female Sale........................................20 Oklahoma Beefmasters............................................................................26 Simon Creek Beefmasters..........................................................................5 Southern Plains Performance Bull Sale...................................................25 Tennessee Jones Beefmasters.....................................................................................46 TA Beefmasters.........................................................................................45 Texas 3B Beefmasters............................................................................................4 Arrowhead Ranch Siddons Beefmasters.................................................45 Beef on Forage Beefmaster Bull Sale..........................................................3 Blau Beefmasters.......................................................................................43 Buckner Polled Beefmasters....................................................................45 Buena Suerte Ranch..................................................................................27 Cate Ranch Beefmasters...........................................................................45 Collier Farms....................................................................................12 & 13 Colvin Beefmasters...................................................................................33 Dancing G’s Beefmasters.........................................................................42 Emmons Ranch.........................................................................................23 Flying B Ranches......................................................................................14 Frenzel & Meacham, LLC.........................................................................36 G4 Ranch...................................................................................................45 Golden Meadows Ranch...........................................................................16 Isa Cattle Co. Beefmasters.......................................................................22 Red River Beefmaster Bull Sale...................................................................9 San Pedro Ranch........................................................................................30 Swinging B Ranch.......................................................................................6 Wittenburg Beefmasters..........................................................................45

Industry Advertisers AgAmerica Lending.................................................................................32 Arrowquip....................................................................................................8 Bush Hog....................................................................................................39 Datamars................................................................................................34 Elgin Breeding Service.............................................................................28 NextGen Trading......................................................................................45 Ragland Mills.............................................................................................35 RanchWorx Pasture Aerators..................................................................10


Profile for Beefmaster Breeders United

The Beefmaster Pay Weight - Fall 2020  

A publication dedicated to serving commercial cattlemen and produced by Beefmaster Breeders United.

The Beefmaster Pay Weight - Fall 2020  

A publication dedicated to serving commercial cattlemen and produced by Beefmaster Breeders United.