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OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

NOVEMBER 12 - 18, 2015

11

RAPTORS soccer wins championship

SCHOOL SPORTS

FROM P1

(Left, in green) Juniors Emma Copp and Ara Norwood leap up to block an Eagle spike. Despite losing only one other game this season, the Demons would fall to the Paonia Eagles 3-1. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

Lady Demons fall to Eagles at regionals by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com Coming into the regional volleyball tournament with an impressive record of 21-1, the Lady Demons added tallies to both the win and loss columns last Saturday afternoon. The Ridgway Lady Demon volleyball team lost only their second game of the season to the Paonia Eagles (214) last Saturday, 3-1. Unfortunately, this loss came at the critical juncture of the regional tournament championship, resulting in Ridgway taking second place on their own court to the Eagles. Backed by an enthusiastic home crowd, Ridgway handily defeated the Ignacio Bobcats (15-9) in the first round of the tournament in three straight sets to reach the championship game against Paonia. The Bobcats didn’t score over 20 points in any of the three sets they dropped to the Demons. The Lady Bobcats were the only other team to defeat the Demons this season, earning a victory over Ridgway 3-2 on Sept. 17. Although both teams came in fired up for the champi-

onship match, Paonia grabbed the first set quickly. Ridgway was able to earn one set back, but the Eagles’ momentum carried them to victory. Paonia won the first two set decisions by a ten-point margin and barely dropped the third to the Demons 2729. The visiting team stomped out a Demon comeback the next set, winning 25-21. Despite their late-season loss, the Demons will still travel to Denver for the Class 2A state championship, taking place Nov. 13 and 14. They take to the court Resurrection against Christian (24-1) 3:30 p.m. at the Denver Coliseum. The Cougars are 11th ranked team in the state. The Lady Demons’ state championship campaign continues the next morning against the Fowler Grizzlies (18-6) at 9:30 a.m. The Grizzlies are ranked 88th in the state, as opposed to the Demons’ rank of 58. Emma Copp, junior, reaches for the ball before her Paonia opponent, Taylor Carsten, can get to it. Copp played all four sets of the game, with one block. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

tournament before, and to be able to go and win every single game was amazing.” Even though they were originally a rec team, Coach Brown was confident going into the tournament. “We had played some travel teams in a couple friendlies against Delta, Montrose and Durango,” he said. “Going into the tournament, we had won five in a row.” The team plans to stay a traveling team starting next spring and making the attempt to earn more gold in tournament play. “It’ll be all travel teams and games, so more competition for us,” said Brown. “Definitely at least two, possibly three, tournaments (as well).” Brown also thanked Waggoner for all of her hard work during the season, including her support and scheduling. In turn, the Raptors thanked their sponsors Ace Hardware of Telluride and Fishbone Graphics for their work on the team uniforms. “This team started as beginners,” said Waggoner. “With the help of their coach and support from their families, they grew as a team to become champions.”


20

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

DECEMBER 24 - 30, 2015

OURAYNEWS.COM

COLORADO

Big game data collection underway Plaindealer Staff Report plaindealer@ouraynews.com

gas exploration. He is also studying the of researchers, veterinarians and volunefficacy of mitigation efforts designed to teers gather blood samples and record address human activity and habitat degra- body condition, weight, age and sex. A collar is then placed on the animal before dation in the resource rich area. Although the main big game hunting "We have been concerned about the it is released. seasons have ended, Colorado Parks and "Net-gunning is far less stressful to the steady decline of mule deer populations Wildlife's researchers and biologists are animal than immoin several areas of preparing for another busy time of the bilizing drugs," said Northwest Colorado year. Beginning in early December Petch."It is chaland we need as through late March, CPW employees will lenging work, espemuch information as climb aboard aircraft and fly across large cially for the heliwe can get to reverse swaths of wildlife habitat in search of big copter crews, but it the trend," said game animals to classify by sex and age allows us to gather Anderson. "Capture while others will gather biological data vital information and collar operaon the ground. Late-season hunters and efficiently with the tions are among the outdoor recreationists are advised that added benefit of important most they may see low-flying helicopters or significantly reducmethods we use to airplanes and are urged to be patient ing inadvertent gather data about while critical monitoring is conducted. mortality." mule deer migration In addition to a thorough inventory of Big game coordipatterns and moveBrad Petch thousands of animals, CPW staff will nator Andy Holland ments in response to Northwest Region Senior Terrestrial coordinate the helicopter capture and adds that capture human activity." radio-collaring of a variety of big game Biologist operations using The Piceance species, including elk, moose, desert aircraft results in Basin research projbighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain bighorn ect began in 2008 and is scheduled to establishing a wider distribution of colsheep and mule deer. continue until 2018. It is funded primari- lared animals than is possible from With the data collected, agency ly by several energy producers currently ground captures alone. researchers and biologists will be able to "From the air, we can capture in exploring in the area. track the progress of several ongoing "Whether you are a hunter, outfitter, remote and rugged areas by avoiding wildlife management efforts and studies. local business, energy producer or a physical barriers like deep snow and They will also gain a clearer picture member of the general cliffs," said Holland. "This enables us to public, we all have a vest- rapidly capture a wider cross-section of ed interest in finding the overall population, improving the effective solutions that value of the information we gain from will allow the continued each collared animal." Holland says the use of helicopters exploration for much energy while helps biologists and researchers meet needed maintaining and preserv- their capture goals after big game ing the viability of this migrates to lower elevations and before critical mule deer habi- the harshest part of winter sets-in. This tat," added Anderson. allows for the accounting of natural mor"This research project will tality of collared animals that occurs durbe instrumental in helping ing that time. us find solutions to this "Our goal is to safely and quickly capchallenging issue." One of the preferred ture a representative number of these methods researchers use animals," said Holland. "The public to capture ungulates is should know that we work hard to be effi'net-gunning' which cient while keeping the animal's stress to involves the use of a net a minimum." CPW reminds the public that although launched from above by skilled helicopter crews a few of the aerial operations may inconthat safely and effectively venience some hunters today, the longimmobilizes an animal. term benefits, including healthy wildlife Biological data can be populations and productive hunts in the gathered and the animal future, should be considered. "Colorado has an extremely valuable can be fitted with a GPS or radio collar at the cap- natural resource that we are working hard ture site, allowing for its to conserve," said Petch. "We appreciate release in a matter of everyone's contributions and patience as Deer graze on the lightly snow-covered grass in the field beside the Ouray Hot Springs and Fitness Center. A minutes. Alternatively, it we continue to find ways to ensure the can be carefully lifted and health of our wildlife in the face of a herd often passes through this area, providing an up close look for visitors. delivered to a nearby base growing human population and other Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver camp where a contingent challenges." about the overall health of big game, allowing wildlife managers to form population models, management strategies and set future hunting license numbers. "We will spend long hours in cold temperatures and harsh conditions, but it is vital that we keep track of how all these species are faring across the state," said Northwest Region Senior Terrestrial Biologist Brad Petch. "These yearly efforts provide us with important information that helps us effectively conserve Colorado's populations of big game animals." Radio-collared animals provide a variety of biological information. For example, tracking collared bighorn sheep survival, movements and populations following a large wildfire can provide information that may predict the impacts to the animals after future fires. Studying collared mule deer allows biologists to closely monitor varying survival rates of adults and fawns, useful for estimating population sizes and setting hunting license quotas for next year. CPW mammals researcher Chuck Anderson is leading a 10-year study to measure how Piceance Basin mule deer populations have responded to natural

FORECAST LAST WEEK

Fri.

Sat.

HIGH

OURAY

HI 32º LO 04º

Sunrise: 7:25 a.m. Snow Sunset: 4:56 p.m.

OURAY DATE

Dec. 25

“Net-gunning is far less stressful to the animal than immobilizing drugs.”

PCP

LOW

SNOW

S.O.G.

SKY

Dec. 26

HI 27º LO 15º

Sunrise: 7:25 a.m. Snow Sunset: 4:56 p.m.

Sun. Dec. 27

HI 34º LO 17º

Sunrise: 7:25 a.m. Partly Sunset: 4:57 p.m.

Cloudy

Not available this week.

Mon. Dec. 28

HI 35º LO 11º

Sunrise: 7:25 a.m. Sunny Sunset: 4:57 p.m.

Real-Time City of Ouray's weather, go to wunderground.com and click on Ouray, CO. ! From NWS weather observer Karen Risch, lower 9th Ave., Ouray.

RIDGWAY DATE

Dec. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 !

Tue.

Dec. 29

Wed. Dec. 30

HIGH

LOW

PCP

SNOW

S.O.G.

25 24 27 37 46 39 38

16 -3 -9 2 1 7 23

0.06 0.14 trace 0 0 0 0

1 2.8 trace 0 0 0 0

5 7 7 6 6 5 5

From NWS weather observer Jen Coates, Ridgway.

HI 28º LO 12º

Sunrise: 7:26 a.m. Snow Sunset: 4:58 p.m.

Partly Cloudy

HI 36º LO 13º Partly Cloudy

HI 28º LO 10º Snow

Cloudy

Cloudy AVALANCHE DANGER: CONSIDERABLE

9.1”

10,700ft.

8.8” 3.9”

Near Placerville Brooks Bridge, Nucla

1,130 10,640ft. 1,350 McClure Pass 9,500ft. Lizard Head Pass Ice 10,200ft. Ice

Near Cimarron

Ice

Wolf Creek Summit

Near Ridgway

Ice

Lone Cone

Near Gateview

Ice

Upper San Juan

Near Durango

233

Below Gunnison Tunnel Near Delta

5.2”

10,500ft.

4.4”

11,200ft.

12.8”

9,600ft.

8.4”

10,200ft.

11.5”

9,800ft.

6.2”

HI 34º LO 13º

Partly Cloudy LUNAR PHASES

Dec. 25: Full Dec. 31: Waning Gibbous

Compiled by: Evan Vann

100% 61%

Schofield Pass Upper Taylor

Molas Lake

Cimarron

Dallas Creek Lake Fork

Animas River

Idarado

8.0”

Latest readings available Aug. 4. Snow pack inches equal snow water equivalent.

AREA WEEKEND WEATHER Sat

Partly Cloudy

HI 35º LO 16º

11,200ft.

San Miguel

HI 30º LO 16º

Red Mtn. Pass

53 53

HI 24º LO 12º Snow

SNOW PACK

cfs.

Near Ridgway Below Reservoir

Gunnison

HI 31º LO 13º

Sunrise: 7:27 a.m. Partly Sunset: 4:59 p.m.

Uncompahgre

Snow

HI 33º LO 16º

Sunrise: 7:26 a.m. Partly Sunset: 4:58 p.m.

Thur. Dec. 31

RIDGWAY

HI 30º LO 09º

WATER FLOWS

Grand Junction Lake City Gunnison Durango Telluride Dolores Crested Butte Denver Colorado Springs Moab, UT

HI LO 23 26 22 29 24 27 20 24 24 27

03 09 0 10 14 09 02 10 14 03

Sun

HI LO 24 32 24 31 32 30 25 32 33 27

06 11 04 08 15 11 09 16 23 08

Precip. Sun Sat 0% 0% 60% 20% 10% 50% 50% 20% 40% 20% 40% 20% 50% 20% 20% 30% 50% 20% 10% 60%


OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

APRIL 21 - 27, 2016

15

RIDGWAY SCHOOLS

School district celebrates retiring teacher By Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com

Jenny Burdick, kindergarten teacher, first entered the halls of Ridgway Elementary School 40 years ago. She hasn’t left the school district since, impacting more than 500 students’ lives throughout her career. However, this year’s kindergarten class will be her very last. Making the decision to retire, Burdick will walk through the elementary halls with her students for the last time as a teacher on May 27. In addition to six years instructing kindergarten, Burdick taught fourth grade for two years and second grade for 32 years. “The older they are, the more complicated and intense it is,” she said. “In second grade, it’s amazing what they can do. In kindergarten, it seems like they just grow from being babies to regular kiddos. It’s so much fun to watch them grow up and develop.” Burdick was inspired to become an educator by her third grade teacher, who really pushed for the arts. Along with a conglomeration of other teachers and experiences, she likes to think that parts of her teaching style come from her former teacher. “She was very inspiring. I just loved her,” said Burdick. “I remember writing about Tchaikovsky. I’ll never forget that, because she made it fun. She felt like school should have more to it.” Along with the arts, Burdick values what reading can do for children.

“I think I enjoy teaching reading the most,” she said. “If you can instill the love of books in children, then they’ve got it made. To me, reading bedtime stories is one of the most important things a parent can do.” Despite having many successful years, Burdick said there were occasionally challenging times in her career. “Sometimes, there are kids that struggle or come from homes that are problematic,” she said. “You just want the best for them and sometimes you struggle with the best way to help them.” The veteran teacher feels that instilling a sense of belonging in the classroom can guide children and teachers through these times. “They belong to their parents, but you claim every kid and I think they feel that,” she said. “I think that helps them learn because the feel safe. I try to make them feel like this is their safe place.” Although she’s never taught anywhere else besides Ridgway, Burdick feels that it’s an excellent community to learn and grow up in. “It sounds too good to be true, but I feel like it’s a very loving place. It’s like family,” she said. “In the school, there’s a sense of family within the staff and I think everybody takes care of each other.” Outside of the classroom, Burdick has taught and been involved with tap dancing for almost 30 years. “(When I got to Ridgway), I started taking classes for eight years and then I taught for 20,” she said. “It was just fun, something in all the old musicals and movies and stuff.”

Comparing her first and last years of Schools superintendent, believes teaching, Burdick said expectations in Burdick has left her mark in the commulearning have changed. nity. “Today, kindergartners are yesterday’s “As educators, it’s always gratifying first graders,” she said. “They’re expect- when we get correspondence from a stued to read, write, add and subtract by the dent that we had years ago,” he said. end of kindergarten. It used to be more “I’m sure it’s happened to her countless of a playtime-type thing.” times.” The school district has planned a The community is invited to Burdick’s retirement celebration event for Burdick big retirement bash at Hartwell Park on on May 7. However, Burdick isn’t sure May 7. The festivities will start at 2 p.m. how to feel about it. and go on until 6 p.m. “I’m kind of freaked out about it, actually. It’s kind of weird to me that everybody is making such a big deal,” she said. “I Due to the recent snow, the volunteer day to place bubble just feel like I am so caps on the City Douglas Fir trees has been rescheduled blessed to find something to Wednesday April 27th from 12 pm – 4 pm. that I loved to do.” After she takes her Volunteer to help save the City of Ouray trees on final walk down her hallWednesday, April 27th from 12:00 - 4:00 pm: way, Burdick has a few plans for the future, Although this does not work on the White-firs the including the usual retireCity has received MCH pheromone bubble caps ment plans of traveling which protect Douglas-fir trees from beetle kill. Join us on Wednesday, April 27th from 12:00 and working on her home. - 4:00 pm to help place caps for the healthy She would also like to trees. We will start at the Ouray Community volunteer her time in Center in the San Juan Room where vollocal retirement homes unteers will learn how to identify the trees, for those who may not followed by a field trip to place the bubble have much family. caps. Plan to be in the woods for several “I would like to go and hours and doing some hiking. read to people or run We welcome both new volunteers errands for those in assistand those who helped in previous years. ed living,” she said. “In Questions? Contact John Strandberg the fall, I’ll try to get a at 970-325-7087 for further information schedule organized to get or in the event of inclement weather. involved with the older folks.” Steve Smith, Ridgway

RESCHEDULED OURAY VOLUNTEER DAY!!

AGENDA *Special Session* Board of County Commissioners Ouray County Land Use / Road and Bridge Facility Conference Room 111 Mall Road, Ridgway, CO April 26, 2016 A. 9:00 Second Chance Humane Society: 1. Review and Discussion of proposed changes by Second Chance Humane Society to the Animal Shelter Management and Service Agreement: B. 10:00 General Business: 1. Request for approval of warrants: 2. Request for approval of the following minutes: a. October 8, 2015 Public Hearing minutes: b. October 28, 2015 Public Hearing minutes: c. January 26, 2016 Public Hearing minutes: d. April 13, 2016 minutes: 3. Request for award on Tandem Axle SemiTractor:

Jenny Burdick, Ridgway kindergarten teacher, leads her class in a tap dance after P.E. last Tuesday. Burdick, after spending 40 years as an educator at Ridgway, will retire this year. The school district is hosting a celebration event for Burdick at Hartwell Park on May 7 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

24th Annual

Ouray County Summer Guide

Advertising Deadline: May 2 • Early deadline: April 25 Contact Peggy Kiniston to reserve your space today! 970-626-6863 • 970-318-8564 • Peggy@OurayNews.com

C. 10:30 Commissioner / Administrative Reports: Note: Action may be taken on any or all of these items. All times are approximate. If any given item is finished earlier than anticipated, the Commissioners may move on to the next item. The only exceptions to this are public hearings, which will not begin prior to their advertised time. Amended Agendas: If it becomes necessary to amend an agenda, such amendment(s) will be posted at the Ouray County Courthouse, 541-4th Street, Ouray, Colorado, no later than 24 hours prior to the commencement of the meeting. Any descriptions of any Land Use applications (Planned Unit Developments, either regular, limited, intra-family, or resort; special use permits; variances; or exemptions) above are not necessarily all-inclusive; for further information on these types of agenda items, please contact the County Land Use Office at 970-626-9775. Commissioner agendas, with the exception of amended agendas, and resolutions being considered are also available on the County's website at www.ouraycountyco.gov. Amended agendas are posted at the Courthouse as stated above.


April Business & Real Estate edition inside OURAYNEWS.COM

YEAR 138

Water runoff volume predicted for summer P11

Community safety groups meet P3

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF RIDGWAY, OURAY AND OURAY COUNTY, COLORADO

50¢

NO. 49

APRIL 28 - MAY 4, 2016

OURAY COUNTY

TOWN OF RIDGWAY

Mock accident impacts students

Trucking down the line

From left: Mike Andrews, paramedic; Glenn Boyd, emergency manager; and Richard Herman, Sheriff’s deputy, situate Nisha Harding, Ouray high school freshman, in preparation for ambulance transportation. Harding was one of the student actors involved in last Friday’s mock accident. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com A mottled and mangled truck rested on a similarly junked van. Empty and crushed beer cans were scattered around the scene. Shouts of worry and confusion erupted from the truck, exclamations that soon turned to cries for help. Fortunately, last Friday’s scene

was the result of a team-up of several law enforcement and safety agencies for its quadrennial mock accident the day prior to prom night for both local high schools. Juvenile Diversion, Ouray County Emergency Management, Emergency Medical Services, Sheriff’s Office, Coroner, County Judge, Extrication, Ridgway and Ouray fire and police departments, the Colorado State

OURAY COUNTY

Patrol, Voyager Youth Program, the district attorney’s office, St. Mary’s Care Flight and Crippin Funeral Home worked together to create an accident scene that would send a message to Ouray and Ridgway students: Don’t drink and drive. “The overall goal was to drive home the dangers of drinking and driving on the day before prom,” said

by Tori Sheets tori@ouraynews.com A Model T on train tracks is the newest addition to the Ridgway Railroad Museum. The museum opens this weekend and will unveil the automobile that took 10 years to recreate. According to Jim Pettengill, museum vice president, the Model T is an exact replica of the automobile Rio Grande Southern used for track inspection on the railroad lines. A former member of the museum named Lowell Ross spent the first six years of the project researching records from the Rio Grande Southern to recreate the automobile as accurately as possible. He used photographs to scale dimensions and dug through company records to track changes made to the automobile. Then, two years ago, Ross's company transferred him out of Colorado and he sold what he had completed to the museum. At that point the Model T was about 70 percent complete and all the museum had to do was finish up the mechanical work and body construction. Pettengill said the re-creation is identical to the original automobile in every way. "It wasn't cobbled together, it was very thoroughly researched," he said. "We have all of his dimensional drawings and he had accumulated all the rare parts we needed to do the rest of the construction. We were able to do a very high quality re-creation." In the early 1900s the supervisor of the railroad, W.D. Lee, used the Model T for track inspection along the line to Telluride. Pettengill said the small body of the automobile, MODEL T P9

ACCIDENT P16

OURAY COUNTY

Alaimo to appear Thursday Demid plea date postponed by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com

by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com

Joseph Alaimo, a 50-year-old former Ridgway resident, is scheduled to appear at the Ouray County Courthouse Thursday at 10 a.m. for an advisement hearing, according to the district attorney’s office. According to the arrest warrant issued by the Ridgway Marshal’s office, Alaimo faces two counts of sexual assault and one of possession of a controlled substance. The two incidents leading to the accusations are recorded as July 13, 2015 and May 10, 2015. At an advisement hearing, a defendant is notified of the charges against him and his right to an attorney. Bail may also be reconsidered. Alaimo was apprehended April 4 in Point Township, ALAIMO P9

The plea date for Robert Demid, a 78-year-old Ridgway man, has been pushed forward two months. Demid was involved in a March 14 pickup truck-motorcycle collision on US 550, resulting in the death of Ouray police officer Sgt. Scott Mills. He was charged with the Class 1 misdemeanor offense of Careless Driving Causing Death. Demid appeared in county court last Thursday and requested that his case be postponed until July 14 at 10 a.m., when a plea could possibly be made. “This will give us time to talk about the case and get a better idea of where we’re going with this,” said Vincent Felletter, Demid’s representative out of Grand Junction. The charge could result in a minimum sentence of 10 DATE P9

A re-creation of a Model T automobile converted into an inspection car for the Rio Grande Southern Railroad is now on display at the Ridgway Railroad Museum. The re-creation is identical to the original brass-era Model T used during the early 1900s. Courtesy photo

Lindsey & Co.

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OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

19

MAY 12 - 18, 2016

CALENDAR & EVENTS Calendar

On the Slope • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

The following are the editor’s choice of events and happenings throughout the Western Slope. TELLURIDE Pinhead Institute: Mad Labs Spring 2016 Edition. Hands-on, scientific activities that will encourage kids K-4th grade to experiment, learn, design, create, investigate, and more. 300 S Mahoney Drive. May 17 2-5 p.m. ]

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

View of WW II"

THURSDAY, MAY 12

which covers the written

account of Ouray's Robert Boecking's 36 mis-

MAC CLASS - iPhones and iPAs. Sherbino

sions flown over Germany. Visitors and guests

ArtBar at Sherbino theater. Learn how to take

are always welcome. Ouray Community

great photos with your iPhone. $35 6-8 p.m.

Center. 1 p.m.

at

Register

https://apm.activecommunities.com/weehawkenarts/Activity_Search/1903.

outs of the 900 pound gorilla of media man417-8434 to register.

SPIRITFEST - Explore and celebrate the Universal Spirit Within during this weekend of lectures, poetry, meditation, yoga, dance and film.

MAC CLASS - iTunes; discover the ins and agers. Ridgway Library. 6-8 p.m. $20 call 970-

FRIDAY, MAY 13

For full details and schedule, visit

www.ridgwayspiritfest.com. Free event will last until May 15. LIVE MUSIC - Liver Down the River. Sherbino Theater. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $10.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 18 SHERB NERDS - Monthly trivia for teams of up to 6 members. Sherbino Theater. 6:30 p.m. $5 admission, $3 students. MOVIE AT THE WRIGHT - “Embrace the Serpent.” Wright Opera House. 7 p.m. Tickets $7. This film is not rated.

THURSDAY, MAY 19

MONDAY, MAY 16 SENIOR LUNCH - Ouray Community Center, noon.

RIDGWAY BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Second Chance Thrift Store. Food, drinks and music. $6 for non-members. 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, MAY 17

DURANGO Croce: Two Generations of American Music. The son of legendary singer/songwriter Jim Croce, A.J. Croce brings to the stage a new show featuring a complete set of classics by his father. Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College. May 13 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Go to https://www.durangoconcerts.com for tickets and information.

MOVIE AT THE SHERBINO - “St. Vincent.”

WOMAN’S CLUB OF OURAY COUNTY

Starring Bill Murray and Melissa McCarthy. 7

MEETING - Guest speaker will be author, Wini

p.m. Tickets $7. Rated PG-13.

Tappan, who will discuss her book, "A Pilot's

May 13: May 14: May 16: May 17:

In case you missed it • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

May 12:

• • • • • • • •

• •

May 18: May 19:

Carla Choate, Michelle Persoff, Jill Reynolds, Wedding Anniversary of Robert and Mary Louise Mardock John Nixon, Barbara Muntyan Wayne Baumgardner Daniel Sunderland Owen Leeper, Pete Ponchak, Brendon Dunn, Brenda Fox, Stephanie Gregory Enid Shaw Richards Norm Rooker, Mary Williams, Bobby Lou Head, Kristen Smith, Judy Smith, Ruth Smith, Walt Swetkoff, Wendy Bazin; Wedding Anniversary of Steve and Fran Felde

Send us your name and birthday to plaindealer@ouraynews.com PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE www.Ouraynews.com

DURANGO Durango Farmers Market. Parking lot of the First National Bank of Durango. May 14 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.

EAST MAIN & HILLCREST MONTROSE FRIDAY - THURSDAY MAY 13 - MAY 19 Visit www.facebook.com/montrosedowntown or montrosemovies.com for more information THEATER 1

GRAND JUNCTION Racing in the Rockies Barrel Race. Mesa County Fairgrounds. May 14, 15, 28, 29 and 30 8 a.m.

Super Discount Wednesday All Tickets $5 and All 3D Tickets $7

]

Chris Evans

Captain America: Civil War 7:30 Only Every Night (1:00 & 4:10 Saturday & Sunday)

All Shows in 3D

THEATER 2

7:05 Every Night 9:10 Friday & Saturday (2:00 & 4:25 Saturday & Sunday)

All Tickets $5 and All

4 O'clock hour

Star

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

Drive-In Theatre 600 E. Miami - Montrose www.stardrivein.com

249-6170 Double feature starts at dusk

NOW OPEN FOR 2016 SEASON!! OPEN FRI, SAT & SUN MAY 6, 7 & 8 DOUBLE DISNEY FEATURE

THE JUNGLE BOOK

PG

BILL MURRAY & BEN KINGSLEY ~ PLUS ~

ZOOTOPIA

Mother’s Day

7:00 Every Night 9:15 Friday & Saturday (2:05 & 4:30 Saturday & Sunday)

FOX 1

Voice of Bill Murray

T HE J UNGLE B OOK

27 S. Cascade Montrose

249-8211

Friday - Thursday FOX 2 May 13 - May 19 Super Discount Wednesday All 3D Tickets $7

PG Super Saver Matinee All Tickets $5 and All 3D Tickets $7 in the 4 O'clock hour

PG-13

Visit Dealflicks.com for money saving deals! Please visit montrosemovies.com

THEATRES

Tickets $5 and All

GINNIFER GOODWIN & JASON BATEMAN

See the Stars, Under the Stars At the Star

www.Ouraynews.com

FOX

R

Julia Roberts

3D Tickets $7 in the THEATER 3

Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

uuuuuuuu

George Clooney

Money Monster

Super Saver Matinee

A rainbow forms over the Town of Ridgway after the sun breaks through a patch of drizzling clouds early Tuesday evening.The weather around Ouray County has been similarly rainy and gloomy over the past two weeks.

PG-13

7:05 Every Night 9:10 Friday & Saturday (2:10 & 4:25 Saturday & Sunday)

Sally Field

H ELLO , M Y N AME

IS

PG

D ORIS

7:05 Every Night 9:10 Friday & Saturday (2:10 & 4:25 Saturday & Sunday)

R

PENTHOUSE- DOLBY Chris Evans DIGITAL 5.1

C APTAIN A MERICA : C IVIL W AR 7:00 Every Night 9:55 Friday & Saturday (12:30 & 3:45 Saturday & Sunday)

All Shows in 2D

PG-13

uuuuuuuu


Ouray concert preview P22 OURAYNEWS.COM

YEAR 139

BOCC gets forestry update P10

Ouray SIlver Mine Designs P18

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF RIDGWAY, OURAY AND OURAY COUNTY, COLORADO

NO. 4

50¢ JUNE 16 - JUNE 22, 2016

Paula Marlatt (left) and Jane O’Laughlin put the finishing touches on their sculptures at the Weehawken amateur sculpture contest on June 12 at the Ridgway Community Center. O’Laughlin was presented a second place award for her sculpture later in the day. John Billings was also a sponsor and judge. This year, the contest was named after the late Michael McCullough to honor his legacy as the godfather of the Ridgway Creative District. See more contest photos on page 8. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

OURAY COUNTY

OURAY COUNTY

R o a d up g r a d e s require trust

OURAY COUNTY

I nt er net int err upt ed Vo y a g e r g e t s n e w by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com

During a special meeting on Tuesday the county Road Committee met with citizens to discuss long-term plans for improving all county roads in Ouray. Plans range in cost from $5.4 million to $10.8 million over either a 10 or 15 year timeframe. No matter what is done to improve the roads, the Road Committee and county staff were in agreement that they need more funds. This of course means raising property taxes, sales taxes or both. The purpose of Tuesday's meeting was to begin developing a strategic plan before going to the Board of County Commissioners with recommendations. However, the BOCC is not the only place the Road Committee needs to gain approval. "It's time to figure out where we're going with this thing, and if you expect people to vote for money, you can't always

An act of vandalism cut the connection for many CenturyLink customers in Ouray County this past week. An aerial wire that carries Internet traffic was damaged on June 10 around 5:10 p.m., according to CenturyLink. Connections were restored to some customers as soon as 8 p.m. that same day. However, many customers, including those on Log Hill Mesa, were still disconnected until about mid afternoon June 13. Despite the alleged vandalism, law enforcement agencies in Ouray County did not receive a report. The company apologized in an email to the Plaindealer for any inconvenience the loss of connection caused customers. The specifics of the vandalism have yet to be explained by CenturyLink. Randy Krause, the former CenturyLink media relations agent for southwest Colorado, recently retired and

CITIZENS P20

CENTURYLINK P20

by Tori Sheets tori@ouraynews.com

p l ac e to p la y by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com Voyager youth will soon have another place to learn, grow and boost their creativity. The Voyager basecamp is expanding its already expansive backyard play options with a “state-of-theart” clubhouse. With the help of Voyager kids, clubhouse construction started June 14. Kids aged five to 12 gathered around as Gabe Ciafre, owner of the property Voyager basecamp sits on, demonstrated how to safely hammer in a nail. Ciafre has taken on the contracting duties of the clubhouse project, as well as incorporating Voyager youth learning into the process. After the nail was cleanly in the wood, he handed the hammer to the nearest learner next to him. Placing a pair of safety glasses over his eyes, the Voyager youth YOUTH P19

Peggy Lindsey

Gifts for Locals, too! Open Daily

Broker/Owner 6

OurayRealEstateCorp.com

970-325-4663

Shirts & Gifts

644 MAIN ST., OURAY (970) 325-4408 MountainFeverShirts.com


OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

JULY 7 - 13, 2016

21

WEBER wins again FROM P1 of the street, which is further down, four out of the five times he’s competed. However, he and Wilson have made do. “If you have two equal teams, I’d say the top team would win. It makes a difference,” said Weber. “We always try to prepare for the bottom.” Compared to previous events, Weber agreed with Martinez that most of the fights were short and sweet, including his own battle. Weber and Wilson defeated Amber and Lucas Gale in under 50 seconds. The winners quickly trudged uphill to finish the fight. “When their hose started to kink on them, they were fighting the hose and fighting us,” said Weber. “When that happens, I think you’re safe to move in a little bit.” Although it wasn’t the biggest crowd Martinez has seen at a water fight, he was impressed with their enthusiasm. “I was pretty impressed for it being a Monday. There were a lot of people in town,” he said. “I love when they start-

ed chanting ‘USA!’ and doing the wave and stuff.” Derek Hanshaw and Ty Edder defeated Clay Zimmerman and Tim Ficco in the junior men’s division. The third battle of the afternoon, it was also the second longest, with the tide turning for both teams at some point in the match. Weber said he plans to compete as long as he can and would love to see new blood in the fights next year. “I hope somebody is determined and wants to beat us,” he said. “I hope next year, somebody comes out and gives us a hell of a fight.”

LiErin Wilson (left) and Richard Weber III bombard their opponents at the traditional water fight battles on July 4. The duo ended up winning the bout in under 50 seconds. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

Level: Beginner

HOW TO SUDOKU:

ANSWERS TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box.

ANSWERS TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

P LAY J UMBLE ! I N T ODAY ’ S C LASSIFIEDS


OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

19

JULY 21 - 27, 2016

CALENDAR & EVENTS Calendar

On the Slope • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

-The following are the editor’s choice of events and happenings throughout the Western Slope. PAONIA U.S. Forest Service SBREADMR hike, July 23. Hike with the US Forest Service and WSCC to see firsthand how aspen decline is affecting local groves in the North Fork. USFS staff will explain how they are attempting to deal with the decline through the SBEADMR (Spruce Beetle Epidemic and Aspen Decline Management Response). Meet at 8am at the US Forest Service Office in Paonia at 403 Rio Grande Ave. TELLURIDE Sunset Concert Series. Sunset Plaza, Mountain Village, for live music on Wednesday evenings. July 22 - Aug. 17. 6-8 p.m. Free admission. DURANGO Fiesta Days. Includes a parade, rodeos and more from July 23-31. Downtown Durango and at the Fair Grounds. 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily. http://www.durango.org /events/event/fiestadays ]

• • • • • • • •

THURSDAY, JULY 21 TEEN CAFÉ - Ridgway Public Library, 300 Charles St. Ages 10-16. Free. Snacks. Read. Write. Chat. Hang out. 3:45-5 p.m. RIDGWAY SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Polyrhythmics. Ridgway Town Park, 6 p.m. Free. Opening act Woodshed Red plays at the Sherbino Theater 9:45 p.m. FJ SUMMIT - National gathering of Toyota 4x4 enthusiasts. See fjsummit.org for details. MUSIC AFTER DARK CONCERT - Sherbino. Woodshed Red. Doors at 9:00pm. Music around 9:45pm. $7 at the door. 21 and over only.

FRIDAY, JULY 22 RIDGWAY FARMERS MARKET - Hartwell Park. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. www.ridgwayfarmersmarket.com. TRUE GRIT WALKING TOUR - 1969 John Wayne movie filmed locally. Arrive 10:45 a.m. at the Ridgway Visitors Center, 150 Racecourse Rd. Tour ends at noon. $10 (11 and under free). Reservations strongly recommended. Or schedule your own tour for 6 or more people. 970-626-5181. LIVE MUSIC - Hot Damn at KOA Campground, 3.5 miles north of Ouray, mm 98. 5:30-8:30 p.m. BARBQUE DINNER - KOA Campground. Please pre order and pay Neighbor to Neighbor 970-3254586. 5 p.m. MOVIE AT THE WRIGHT - “Zootopia” PG. 2:30 p.m. Ouray Public Library at the Wright Opera House, 472 Main St., Ouray. Free. TEEN NIGHT - 4-H Event Center, 7-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, JULY 23 LIVE MUSIC - Hot Damn at KOA Campground, 3.5 miles north of Ouray, mm 98. 5:30-8:30 p.m. LIVE MUSIC - O’Brien’s Pub, Ouray. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. NATURE DETECTIVES - Children ages 4-10 join naturalists for a morning of activities and learn about bird migration. Ridgway State Park Visitor Center, 9:30-11 a.m. 970-626-5822. GUIDED CEDAR HILL CEMETERY WALKING TOUR - $10. 9 a.m.-noon. Led by Glenda Moore, Ouray County Historical Society archivist. Preregister at 970-325-4576. HISTORIC TOUR OF PLEASANT VALLEY - with Farm-to-Table Meal, fundraiser for Ouray County Ranch History Museum. Call 970-318-1190 or go to www.ocrhm.org. OWL PROWL - night hike. 8:15 p.m. Ridgway State Park Visitor Center. 970-626-5822. FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT - “Elf,” Sherbino Theater, 604 Clinton St., Ridgway. Doors 7 p.m. Movie 7:30 p.m. Rated PG. $5 adults/$3 children.

SILVERTON Kendall Mountain Run & K2 Double, July 23. Start at 12th and Greene, finish at Memorial Park. Cost: $40-$50 depending on when participant enters. Contact Aravaipa Running or Jamil Coury at 602-361-7440. Prize Purse: $2,500.

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Star

LIVE MUSIC - Free. Western Hotel bar and restaurant. Classic rock by Salsicha de Amore. 5-9 p.m. 210 7th Ave. Ouray.

SUNDAY, JULY 24 SADDLE-UP! RIDE WITH CHRIST - 6-8:30 p.m., Ridgway Fairgrounds. Runs through July 28. Registration July 24, 6-8 p.m. Ages 4-12. Sponsored

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

MONDAY, JULY 25 SENIOR LUNCH Noon.

Ouray Community Center,

LEGO CLUB - ages 6 and up, Ridgway Public Library, 300 Charles St. 4-5 p.m. Library supplies Legos and snack. BASED ON THE BOOK CLUB AND A NOVEL IDEA BOOK CLUB Ouray Public Library. Novel Idea ages 12 and up at 4 p.m.. Based on the Book ages 7-11 at 5 p.m. TOWNIE TUESDAYS PICTURE SHOW - “Jumanji,” Ridgway Town Park at dark. EVENING OF HISTORY “The Geologic Story of Ouray,” by Peter McCarville. Presented by Ouray County Historical Society. 7:30 p.m., Wright Opera House. Admission $5, free for OCHS museum members. AN EVENING WITH ROOSEVELT DIME AND FREE THE HONEY Sherbino. Doors at 7:00pm. Music at 7:30pm. $12 in advance/ $15 at the door.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27 BINGO - Ouray Elks Lodge. Open to the public. 7 p.m.

Jul 24: Jul 25: Jul 26: Jul 27:

Rick Gregory Virginia Spencer, Jackie Clark, Carol Huey Alene River, Pamela Scott, Jace Munzing, Wedding Anniversary of Herb and Charm Kaiser, Pam Scott, Evan Hale Butcher, Caleb Stento Amy Fitzgerald, Judy Williams Cristy Orvis, Holly Poehnert, Charles Jones, Patrick Burke, Lydia McCollum Richard Zortman Tim Currin, John Thomass, Speedy Scott, Chuck Peterson

Send us your name and birthday to plaindealer@ouraynews.com

SUMMER READING PROGRAM Grades 1-5. Ouray Public Library, 320 6th Ave. 2 p.m. LIVE MUSIC - Hot Damn at KOA Campground, 3.5 miles north of Ouray, mm 98. 5:30-8:30 p.m. ART BAR - Paint your Pet and Pinot. 6:00pm-8:00pm. $35 dollars. Pre-register at www.weehawkenarts.org. MOVIE AT THE WRIGHT - “Weiner” R. 7 p.m. Wright Opera House, 472 Main St., Ouray. $7 adults. FREE IPHONE/IPAD OVERVIEW with Mac Doctor John Clark. 5-7 p.m. Ridgway Public Library, 300 Charles St. Registration required. To sign up, call 970-417-8434 or email macdoktor@gmail.com.

THURSDAY, JULY 28

EAST MAIN & HILLCREST MONTROSE FRIDAY - THURSDAY JULY 22 - JULY 28 Visit www.facebook.com/montrosedowntown or montrosemovies.com for more information THEATER 1

Voice of Ray Romano.

Super Discount

TEEN CAFÉ - Ridgway Public Library, 300 Charles St. Ages 10-16. Free. Snacks. Read. Write. Chat. Hang out. 3:45-5 p.m. RIDGWAY SUMMER CONCERT SERIES - Jenny and the Mexicats. Ridgway Town Park, 6 p.m. Free. Opening act I Draw Slow plays at the Sherbino Theater 9:45 p.m.

Wednesday All Tickets $5 and All 3D Tickets $7

Super Saver Matinee All Tickets $5 and All

Ice Age: Collision Course

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

• • •

THEATER 2

THEATRES 27 S. Cascade Montrose

249-8211

OPEN EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK!

Voice of Louis C.K.

The Secret Life of Pets Maria Bello

Lights Out

7:15 Every Night 9:15 Friday & Saturday (2:15 & 4:30 Saturday & Sunday)

FRI., JULY 22 - THUR., JULY 28

Super Discount

ICE AGE COLLISION COURSE

Wednesday All

VOICE TALENTS OF JOHN LEGUIZAMO,

Tickets $5 and All

RAY ROMANO, & JENNIFER LOPEZ PG ~ PLUS ~ HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND

3D Tickets $7

FOX 1

Alexander Skarsgard

T HE L EGEND

A small group jams at the Weehawken New West Guitar Master Class at the Wright Opera House May 29. The New West Guitar Group was brought in from Los Angeles by Ouray County Performing Arts Guild. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver

Matinee All Tickets $5 and All 3D Tickets $7 in the 4 O'clock hour

OF

T ARZAN

7:10 Every Night 9:25 Friday & Saturday (2:10 & 4:30 Saturday & Sunday)

PG-13

Melissa McCarthy

G HOSTBUSTERS

PG-13

2D 7:05 Every Night • 3D 9:25 Fri & Sat 2D (2:00 Saturday & Sunday) 3D (4:25 Saturday & Sunday) PENTHOUSE-

Super Saver

PG-13

Visit Dealflicks.com for money saving deals! Please visit montrosemovies.com

Friday - Thursday FOX 2 July 22 - July 28

OUR 67TH FULL TIME SUMMER SEASON!!

PG

2D 7:10 Every Night • 3D 9:10 Friday & Saturday 2D (2:05 Saturday & Sunday) 3D (4:35 Saturday & Sunday)

3D Tickets $7 in the THEATER 3

FOX

PG

2D 7:00 Every Night • 3D 9:00 Friday & Saturday 2D (2:00 Saturday & Sunday) 3D (4:25 Saturday & Sunday)

4 O'clock hour

249-6170 Double feature starts at dusk

See the Stars,Under the Stars, At the Star

Jul 21: Jul 22: Jul 23:

In case you missed it • • • • • • • •

TUESDAY, JULY 26

600 E. Miami - Montrose www.stardrivein.com

VOICE TALENTS OF KEVIN HART PG& ERIC STONESTREET

• • • • • • • • • • • •

56TH ANNUAL ARTISTS’ ALPINE HOLIDAY FINE ARTS SHOW - 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Ouray Community Center. 970-626-5513. www.ourayarts.org.

MELODRAMA PERFORMANCE - “The Great Ice Cream Scheme” Ouray County Players. Wright Opera House. 7-9 p.m.

Drive-In Theatre

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS

MUSIC AFTER DARK CONCERT - Sherbino. I Draw Slow. Doors at 9:00pm. Music around 9:45pm. $7 at the door. 21 and over only.

by Ridgway Community Church.

Chris Pine

S TAR T REK B EYOND

DOLBY DIGITAL 5.1

2D 7:00 Every Night 3D 9:30 Friday & Saturday 2D (2:05 Saturday & Sunday) 3D (4:30 Saturday & Sunday)

PG-13

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8

SEPTEMBER 8 - 14, 2016

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

OURAYNEWS.COM

Ouray County Rodeo and Fair Local Events during CPRA Rodeo Bedroll race - Richard Weber Rescue race - Richard Weber and Colbie Cook Steer packing- Weber Ranch Relay race - Weber Ranch Goatjoring - Richard Weber's team

CPRA results Bareback - tie for first Larry Carter and Dax Koskie Steer wrestling - Hadley Jackson Tie-down roping - Cody Gerard Breakaway roping - Kacey Kobza Saddle bronc - Nathan Oetter Mixed team roping - tie Debbie Fabrizio and Paulette Woods Team roping header - Wade Kreutzer Team roping heeler - Kyon Kreutzer Barrel racing - Taryn Boxleitner Bull riding - Cody Tesch

Ranch Rodeo Events 1st Place - Alpine Ranch 2nd Place - Esty Ranch 3rd Place - Carpenter/LeValley Ranches

Go to www.ouraynews.com for a full list of fair results

Above: Gentry Godbey, mutton bustin' competitor, rides out during the competition on Sept. 5. Godbey won the event, refusing to let go of her sheep, even when the animal rolled, bucked and ran into another group of sheep. Left: A goatjoring team gets ready to load up a goat during the competition at the Ouray County Rodeo on Monday. Lower left: Wyatt Stadelman, livestock sale participant, stands by his grand champion goat at the livestock sale on Sept. 3. Susan Long, 4-H Event Center manager, bought the goat for $900. Below: CPRA roping competitors snag their small steer at the Labor Day professional rodeo events on Sept. 5 at the Ouray County Fairgrounds. Bottom: A CPRA barrel race competitor barely nicks the barrel during her run at the CPRA rodeo events Sept. 5. Upending the barrel results in a penalty of five seconds. Plaindealer photos by Dalton Carver and Tori Sheets


OURAYNEWS.COM

OURAY COUNTY PLAINDEALER

OCT. 27 - NOV. 2, 2016

3

TOWN OF RIDGWAY

Garard signs on as chamber director a retreat to discuss in detail what Garard’s change. A chamber-town compromise followed role will be in Ridgway. She said more information will be released when the the successful vote that will see RACC chamber presents its lodging tax report at receiving 70 percent of the lodging tax. The Ridgway Area of Chamber November’s town council meeting. The remaining 30 percent will be kept by Commerce announced Tuesday morning the town for visitor improvements. “When we put in our LOT report, it that Carol Garard has agreed to fill the will have our future projects and the Previously, the funds were split half and vacant role of executive director. Garard direction of the board that (Garard) half. has been the Ouray RACC will be meeting with the town will be helping us with,” said Chamber Resort council in November to go over the Snelling. Association’s visitor The RACC executive director chamber’s lodging tax report and discuss center supervisor for position became vacant with the fund disbursement. five years. departure of previous director Gale According to Ingram in May. Prior to Garard’s RACC, Garard has acceptance of the extensive experience role, the chamber in administering lodgboard fulfilled the ing tax funds, chammajority of the execber day-to-day operautive director duties. tions, chamber marDuring the keting, tourism marannouncement of keting, membership Ingram’s resignation, relations, as well as RACC released a events and volunteer statement that said it coordination. had unanimously Garard confirmed 10:00 a.m. voted to restructure she was taking the the chamber’s busiposition Wednesday On the corner of Lena & Charles St. ness management morning and said it Pastor Leslie Wood model and marketwas a good fit all the 970-626-5803 ing focus moving forway around. ward. “I think it’s a new In November challenge and I’m This Sunday, October 30 2015, the Ridgway very excited about chamber found sucPastor Leslie Wood, Preaching trying something cess in promoting a she said. new,” “What God Sees” ballot issue increas“Ridgway has some ing the town’s lodgbuilding up to do and ing tax from $2 a I think I’m the person Affiliated with Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Carol Garard, Ouray Chamber Resort Association visitor's center supernight to 3.5 percent who can do that.” United Methodist Church, Presbyterian Church (USA), United Church of Christ Garard also lives visor, recently accepted the position of Ridgway Area Chamber of Com- of the total cost of in Montrose and is merce executive director. Garard will be filling the role left vacant by lodging. About 70 www.UCSJridgway.org percent of voters closer to home with Gale Ingram's resignation last May. Plaindealer photo by Dalton Carver were in favor of the the new position. The new RACC executive director is already familiar with the many Wednesday morning. "We're super excited for her. It's a great opportunity and she's of Ridgway chamber members. There will be a short transition period going to be absolutely amazing," said going into December where Garard will Papenbrock. "I'm looking forward to callhelp out at Ridgway and Ouray, getting ing her a colleague and to what she up to speed with her new position, as well accomplishes in her new role." Judi Snelling, RACC board president, as assisting OCRA executive director Kat said the chamber board has yet to go on Papenbrock hire a new visitor’s center

by Dalton Carver dalton@ouraynews.com

supervisor. “There’s a lot to be done and I have very good support with (Papenbrock) and Heidi (Pankow) here in Ouray, and that’s a plus,” said Garard. Papenbrock echoed this support with her comments on Garard's transition

Sunday Service & Sunday School

COLORADO

Mail ba llot ret urn ta lly releas ed by Beecher Threatt beecher@ouraynews.com The Colorado Secretary of State reports that 416,951 election 2016 ballots have been returned as of Oct. 26. In Ouray County, 584 have been returned. The statewide total includes 166,605 ballots turned in by Democrats and

141,354 by Republicans. The next highest total is 103,354 unaffiliated ballots. Other parties make up the balance. Democrats have returned 221 ballots in Ouray County and Republicans have returned 199. Unaffiliated voters have returned 147. The Secretary of State provides daily tallies of returned ballots until Election Day, Nov. 8.


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