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MANAGER ANALYTICAL

EDUCATIVE

ISSN 1821-7184

THE

INFORMATIVE

A publication of the University of Dar es Salaam Business School Alumni Association

ISSUE NO. 4

OCTOBER / DECEMBER 2012

ECONOMY Despite hurdles EWURA Consumer Consultative Council makes progress

DIPLOMACY ELLEN Johnson Sirleaf: Unleashing the Woman Power

FINANCE Serving the poor: Hellen Lutege shows the way

Alumni Updates

Richard Kasesela: How he climbed to the top Y

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Are you a graduate of the University of Dar es Salaam Business School - UDBS (former Faculty of Commerce and Management- FCM)?

PROMOTION

If yes, enjoy a network of more than 5000 graduates by joining in the University of Dar es Salaam Business School Alimni Association Who are we? The UDBS Alumni Association is a consortium of members who have undergone their undergraduate degrees,masters’ degrees, postgraduate studies and PHD at the University of Dar es Salaam Business School formerly known as the Faculty of commerce and management.We are pround to say we have members who are talented with immerse experiences and competent graduates holding various potential senior position in Tanzania and world at large world class professors, Ministers, Chief Executive offices, business man and politicians.

The great migration

Our vision UDBS Alumni Association aims to be acclaimed as a mentoring tool of professional network.

Tanzania’s annual migration is one of nature’s most spectacular experiences

Our Mission UDBS Alumni Association’s Mission is to be the leading business development catalyst that impacts on economy,social and political dynamics-Individually and community at large.

THE SERENGETI IS FAMED FOR ITS ANNUAL migration, when more than 1,500,000 wildebeest follow some 200,000 zebra in a 2,000km pilgrimage in search of fresh grazing and water. It’s ‘The greatest wildlife show on earth’! Wildebeest feed only on new shoots and very short grass, but also eat longer grass once it has been ‘trimmed’ by zebras or buffalos (which is why they follow the zebras). Elands and Thomson’s gazelles also migrate, but alternate between the plains and the woodlands. Grant’s gazelles move only locally and, in many cases, in the opposite direction to the migratory species. Predation is rife during the migration, as lions, leopards, cheetahs, hyenas and a host of smaller predators – watched by the ever-present vultures – feast on the grazers. The best time to see the migration is usually between June and August when the wildebeest congregate and prepare to cross the Grumeti River. During the early wet season (December to April) the animals are found on the short grass plains around Lake Ndutu, the Moru Kopjes, the Gol Mountains and Seronera in the south of the park.

Our Core values - Networking: Connect people and moments. - Mentoring: Nurture and impact experiences shared among members. - 10pm weekdays - Professionalism 8am and Integrity:Maintain respectable distinguished values and ethical behaviour that identify 8am - 8pm weekend/ members. public Catalyst:Provide holiday - Business Development guidance and facilitation to business development in the markets we pursue. - Change Agent: Derived opportunities.Provide analytical +255 764 700500 | 22 2161500 | 22 5515166 understanding of business and economic phenomena through steering community with business training and advocacy - Encourage and reward innovation:By awarding distinguished Alumni and Partners.

Just a call away to get... February is the main month for wildebeest calving. During the late wet season (April to June) vast herds, in columns over 40km long, head towards Kirawira, Mbalageti and Grumeti in the Western corridor. Then, in June, with the rains coming to an end they face the death-defying crossing of the crocodile-infested Grumeti River into the Ikorongo Controlled Area. During the early dry season (July to October) all migratory herds head north. Finally, in the late dry season (October to December) the herds start their trek back south to the Serengeti to give birth to their young (December being the peak month for zebra births). And then the cycle starts again – as it has for over a million years!

For further information contact: The Director General, Tanzania National Parks PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania Tel: +255 27 250 3471, fax: +255 27 250 8216 E-mail: info@tanzaniaparks.com www.tanzaniaparks.com

• Account opening procedures • Complaints reporting • Tariffs information • Exchange rates • Other customer service enquiries

Talk to us on: +255 714 150660 |

Open

NMB Customer Service Center | Even closer to serve you P.O. Box 35046,Dar es Salaam. Mob ; + 255 765 604 172, Tel : 022 2410 006 Fax : 022 2410 119 E-mail: fcmalumni@udbs.udsm.ac.tz, udbsalumni@udbs.udbs.ac.tz Website: www. udbsalumni.udsm.ac.tz

THE

MANAGER

OCTOBER - DECEMBER PILOT EDITION 2012

EDITORIAL CHIEF EDITOR Celestine Mushi

ASSISTANT EDITOR Mary Damian

CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

Richard Kasesela: How he climbed to the top.....................................................4 Gepf voluntary savings retirement scheme (vsrs)..............................................11 Masters of international trade offered at UDBS..............................................20 UDBS short courses..........................................................................................................24 2012 BAAA/UDBS Summer School Experience..............................................28 Meet the new head of finance department at UDBS.....................................31 Madesa demon destroys intellect...............................................................................32 10,000 Women initiative: developing critical competencies to women entrepreneurs through ACEBM..................................................................................34

Welcome to Alumni Magazine.

LAYOUT & DESIGN HMK Graphics Ltd Tel:0653 82 02 19

ADVERTISEMENTS Francis Chocks Chokala Paul Masatu

ADMINISTRATION CHAIRPERSON Nehemia Kyando Mchechu VICE CHAIRPERSON Ephraim B.Mafuru DIRECTORS Said Nassoro Jonathan Njau Christine Mavula Dr.Diana Mwiru Itandula Gambalagi David Shambwe Natu Ringo Tobias Swai Rebeca Muna Goodluck Mmari EDTORIAL COMMITTEE Mohamed Kamilangwa Emilian Rwejuna David Shambwe Abdallah Singano

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Despite hurdles EWURA Consumer Consultative Council makes progress

37

SERVING THE POOR: HELLEN LUTEGE SHOWS THE WAY

Dean of University of Dar es Salaam Business School (UDBS) Dr Ulingeta Mbamba

W 17 ELLEN Johnson Sirleaf: Unleashing the Woman Power

COUNTRY CORDINATOR Salim Ally Copyright 2012.This Publication is a property of the University of Dar es Salaam Business School Alumni Association. All rights reserved. No section of this publication may be reproduced,stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means mechanical,electronic,photocopy,recordi ng or otherwise without the written permission of the publisher and copyright owner. Published and distributed by Otme Company Limited, P.O. Box 2239, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Mob: +255 754 308676/ +255 715 308676 E-mail: otmecompany@gmail.com

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This year we have witnessed the passing over of the leadership baton from the previous regime to a new one. A new triennium has started. In this regard, new leaders have been appointed tasked with a noble duty of forging the School further ahead. As we welcome these new leaders we hope that this is not the end of an era but rather a continuation of all the good things from the previous regime and that they have the requisite energy essential for the School to move forward.

13 WHEN DAR LAUNCHED ITS FIRST COMMUTER TRAINS

A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association

elcome to the 2012 UDBS Alumni Magazine. The current magazine carries various inspirational articles from some of the members directed not only to the other members but also to general community. The articles feature some of our graduates’ struggles and aspirations as well as elucidations on how the UDBS has contributed to their successes and achievements. Moreover, the Magazine highlights on the various short courses offered by the School for members and non members alike addressing the contemporary business challenges facing Tanzanians today.

our cover page

We are operating within a dynamic environment and so many things are happening within the School to cope with the education sector changes and requirements. In order to cope

with education requirements in the country as well as the requisite flexibility in offering its programmes, the School will soon start offering the Master of International Trade (MIT) and Master of International Business (MIB) degrees in evening as well as in modular form. I welcome prospective students to join these programmes for betterment of country, region, and the world at large. In addition, there is the 10,000 Women initiative supported by Goldman Sachs which aims at building the capacity of women to efficiently and effectively running their businesses for growth purposes. This has been a very successful programme throughout its three year life. This year we will witness some participants graduating while more will be joining. We welcome and encourage Tanzanian business women to take advantage of this unique programme and join in their multitudes. For the very first time the UDBS in collaboration with the Business Academy Aarhus from Denmark conducted a very successful Summer School. 30 UDBS and 10 Aarhus students attended the summer school. They were able to learn and practice business plan development skills (from idea generation to plan execution) while handling cultural differences and coping with stress. As this was the beginning, these

two Business Schools will continue to offer similar summer schools in the future. Remember the Hon. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. She is the President of the Republic of Liberia who recently visited the University of Dar es Salaam. With her unique position in African politics this UDBS Alumni Magazine extensively covers her visit. She is a living evidence that democracy works in Africa and that irrespective of gender, creed or any other prejudices just about anyone can be president, and a successful one if given a chance. The Hon Allen Johnson came and inspired us Tanzanians. She threw several challenges to the University Community at large and we, the UDBS Alumni, took them on board and are working hard to address them. Several other life aspects have been covered in this magazine. Interestingly some of these are on the old cultures within the University of Dar es Salaam, health matters, technological developments in the financial services sector and their impact on your finance, your pump prices, nutritional issues and others. Knowing that this magazine will be informative, inspirational and entertaining to anyone who reads it, I welcome its publication and urge readers to make good use of it.

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Alumuni Updates

How he climbed to the top M

Richard Kasesela:

In May this year President Jakaya Kikwete appointed Richard Kasesela (The Nyakyusa) to chair the Mining Advisory Board. It is such a challenging task that Mr. Kasesela feels he has to see it through following what he sees as an uproar as many Tanzanians do not see much from the mining sector. He writes his profile.

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y life goes back to memories I witnessed as well as those which I have been told. I was told when still a toddler that on 16th February (1970), my lovely mother Monica Agnes gave birth to a young chubby boy in Dar-es-Salaam. The family then had only one daughter, so you can imagine the excitement of my coming. I was also told that a debate on what name that boy should be given ensued. As usual with African culture, my dad had moved so fast to name that child Tuntufye, the name of my grandfather. However, my mother was slightly against that name since in Nyakyusa culture she is not allowed to call names of fathers-in-law.

Firmly but politely my mother convinced my dad to change that name from Tuntufye to something else. My father settled for Atufigwege, to which my mom chuckled with relief, but remarked; “our son will have difficult times at school as colleagues would have to put a struggle to pronounce that name.” My father asked mom if she could propose a second name. She took the cue and came out with Richard. The debate ended there and since then I have been known as Richard Atufigwege Kasesela.

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Two years later my parents moved from Dar es Salaam to Iringa. In Iringa, the family was staying at Wilolesi area. I went to my first nursery school run by Roman Catholics nuns. It was when I turned three that our family received a new comer, a baby boy named Jonathan Baraka. Jonathan was a strong and dark, making the family grow lively, with three kids. This was a joyous moment to all of us. The new baby in the family was the turnaround of my life, as at four, I started learning being independent as parents became busy with the new comer. At five, I realized that I needed to stand alone. Luckily it was this time when my lovely grandmother Tulubwene Lyombo came from Rungwe to visit us in Iringa. When the time of her stay in Iringa came to an end , I decided to go with her to the Syukula village in Rungwe district. She was very happy that I have made up my mind.

The trip to Syukula village was long in those days as the roads were not as good as today’s. I was happy to leave with my granny but on the way questions popped up in my mind: Why did I make this decision? Where am I going to? This was like travelling in a tunnel of darkness. I was however, consoled by something inside me

Richard Kasesela

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that was sort of saying; “if your dad had survived the village life, you will also survive.” We reached Syukula village when it was approaching dusk. Grandma and I disembarked from the bus and she carried all the luggage on her head, letting me walk freely. On the way from the bus stop we kept meeting people, stopping here and there to greet them. I did not understand the Nyakyusa language but I kept walking and smiling. When we reached home, I found out that there was no electricity. That was very shocking to me. It was so completely dark that I got scared stiff, asking how dad had made it through without electricity. I met my Granddad and the house helper, a certain Mr. Malinyi, and both tried to make me happy. They were jovial all the time. My life as real Nyakyusa began.

The first degree was a necessary tool to help me to get my second job at Kibo Breweries Ltd which immediately posted me to Moshi branch in Kilimanjaro region. It was all fun for me although my parents were worried that I could not make it on my own. It was great learning experience having to make a lot of new friends with different characters. I used to share a house with two ladies. The ladies where full of life and we really enjoyed being together.

After several years with Kibo Breweries Ltd, I moved into several jobs, gaining experience in various settings from private sector to Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO). I had even volunteered to work for free with Kwembe village as well as Poverty Africa (NGO). The chance helped me to boost experience and confidence. At the private sector I learned to The School and work work hard and speed up delivery After a short while in the village, whereas with the NGO I learned I joined Syukula Primary School how to be socially committed and before being moved to Muhimbili to be passionate in helping others Primary School in Dar-es-salaam who are in need. where my father was transferred I now hold a first degree (BA to. Later I went to ordinary level Economics) and have a Master secondary and high schools. After degree in Business Administration high school and National Service I (MBA in Marketing, graduated started working at Regent Tanzania in 2006), all from the University ltd, which was a British owned of Dar-es-Salaam. Also, I have logistic and procurement firm. I undergone several short studies thank my sister for the connection. which include Social Marketing It’s still difficult to get placement courses and Management for in Tanzania without know-who Nonprofit Organization in the and this is the challenge today to University of South Florida – most young ones. In 1993, I joined USA, Management courses run by the University of Dar-es-Salaam Mzumbe University, and Effective to pursue my first degree where I Selling Skills by Steadman graduated in 1996. Associates – Kenya. It is very vital that learning is doing beyond what you are supposed to do. My first job helped me to save some money for which in my second year at the University I managed to buy my first car which I was so proud of despite my dad loathingit.

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Leadership I was always an admirer of John F Kennedy quote, “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country.” This is a mantra that has helped me

My first leadership challenge I got was in high school as I had to contest for a position through an election. I was contesting for the position of Chief Head of Food and Beverage in charge of wellbeing of students. The contest was tough but we all had a wonderful experience during the campaigns and I eventually won.

to keep on. It is true that if we are chosen as leaders we should always try to evaluate ourselves on what we should do for Tanzania. This internal evaluation has helped me to stop apportioning blame to other people for any failure. It has been common for most people to blame their parents, the government or even friends for our misfortunes.

the preliminaries for Member of Parliament but lost to the incumbent who was then a Minister and one of the trusted eminent persons in the country. The first few political rallies I campaigned were scary. However as time went on, I gained enough strength to deliver my promises to the voters and gave them a new hope. I could always see the excitements from their eyes whenever I finished my speech. This can be a critical learning for those who aspire for political positions. You should always build hope to the voters and they should trust you. That they can see better life if they chose you!

My first leadership challenge I got was in high school as I had to contest for a position through an election. I was contesting for the position of Chief Head of Food and Beverage in charge of wellbeing of students. The contest was tough but we all had a wonderful Another area where my leadership experience during the campaigns acumen has been tested is in my and I eventually won. local church. I was elected a During the campaigns I learnt two Church Councilor for four years things; respect all and also learn to before being re-elected for another live according to the society you period of four years. This role is want to lead. If you elevate yourself normally reserved for elders with high you will definitely miss the tremendous leadership skills and connection with the people you good conduct. When elected, I was happy to be a servant of GOD but intend to lead. also got scared as some members of In 2010, I decided to contest for that church were prominent people

in our society with vast church leadership experience. I took up the opportunity to be of service by taking solace on the words of Apostle Paul who said, “I Can Do All things through Christ WHO strengthens me” Life I have worked in various jobs. I am now chairing the Pan Africa Business Coalition which has offices in 30 different countries in Africa. I am doing that with the passion and all the commitment. I am not saying that I have not failed, I have failed in various areas but I always use failing as learning ladder to move to the next level. It is important to acknowledge the failure so that you can be able to work out the solution. I am currently the Chief Executive Officer of Business Coalition on HIV AIDS (ABCT). This is a Non Governmental coalition of Tanzania employers engaged in the fight against HIV and AIDS at the workplace.

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ECONOMY

Despite hurdles EWURA Consumer Consultative Council makes progress

EWURA CCC Chairman, Eng. Prof. Jamidu Katima (2nd right), Councillors and Shinyanga RCC members keenly listen to Eng. Clement Kivegalo, KASHWASA Managing Director (4th right), during familiarization visit to KASHWASA operational site in May, 2012. The purpose of the visit was to learn among other things, how the project operates.

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ncrease in water bills, electricity, meter reading disputes, inaccurate bills, estimated bills, poor service quality delivery, service interruptions, poor infrastructure, low service coverage and unreliability of service are some of the main problems facing consumers in accessing water and energy services in the country.

on the use of water and electricity services, (rationing), underdeveloped service infrastructures, losses and leakages, poor customer services, and fuel adulteration, according to the Executive Secretary of the Consumers Consultative Council of Energy and Water Utility Regulatory Authority, Eng. Goodluck Mmari.

Eng. Mmari told our reporter Other problems are restrictions that the Council recognized that

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A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association

every problem that a consumer His Excellency Jakaya M. Kikwete, President of the United Republic faced in accessing energy and of Tanzania is briefed by Council’s Executive Secretary Eng. Goodluck water services was sensitive and Mmari on the Council’s activities when he visited the Council’s seriously needed to be addressed, pavilion during Maji Week Commemorations, held in Iringa in March, adding that since its inception, 2012. EWURA CCC has conducted various activities which are geared towards safeguarding the of regulation were split from disseminate information and interests of Consumers. the powers of promoting and views on matters of interest to consumers of regulated goods Some of the activities are protecting competition. It is representation of consumers in from this that the EWURA Act and services; establish local, various public hearing meetings, of 2001 was born to regulate regional and sector consumer committees and consult with development of various strategies water and energy sectors. geared towards furthering The same law establishes the them; and consult with industry, Government and other consumer the interest of consumers and EWURA Consumer Consultative groups on matters of interest to enhancing their protection, Council under section 30 of the consumers of regulated goods collaboration with the media EWURA Act, 2001 Cap 414 and services. in which consumer issues are with the primary objective of discussed and elaborated and promoting and safeguarding In discharging its functions, networking with other consumer EWURA CCC is guided by a bodies for the purpose of sharing the interests of consumers. The interests mission “to protect the rights best ways to protect consumers. Council represents of consumers by submitting, of consumers of regulated Back in the year 1993 the providing views and information energy and water utilities and government tabled a bill to to, and consulting with the to promote public awareness, repeal the Price Control Act Authority, Minister and better business relation and of 1973, in which the powers sector Ministers; receive and networking with policy makers A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association THE

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EWURA CCC Chairman, Eng. Prof. Jamidu Katima, Councillors and Shinyanga RCC members during familiarization visit to KASHWASA operational site in May, 2012. The purpose of the visit was to learn among other things, how the project operates.

“EWURA

CCC calls for all consumers of EWURA regulated goods and services to surf the Council’s website: http://ewuraccc.go.tz or visit their office at Infotech building Kawe to learn more on consumer related issues including complaints lodging procedures.

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as well as other consumer groups through enhancement of effective dialogue among key actors in the energy and water industries.” Some of the notable achievements attained by EWURA CCC since its establishment include being afore in promoting and representing consumers’ interests in various regulated sectors. Also, the Council has successfully established Regional Consumer Committees in 20 regions of mainland Tanzania. These committees are an extended arm of the Council and they are already operational.

aimed at awareness creation and

educating consumers of water and energy sectors on their rights and obligations. . This included introducing itself to its various stakeholders across the country. The Council has also successfully educated consumers on how to lodge their grievances and complaints when they are aggrieved.

EWURA CCC calls for all consumers of EWURA regulated goods and services to surf the Council’s website: http:// ewuraccc.go.tz or visit their office at Infotech building Kawe to learn more on consumer issues including The Council also has successfully related conducted stakeholder meetings complaints lodging procedures.

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GEPF Director General, Mr. Daud Msangi receiving the Certificate of Merit from ISSA President Mr. Errol Frank Stoove as witnessed by ISSA Treasurer, Mr. Philippe Conus.

GEPF VOLUNTARY SAVINGS RETIREMENT SCHEME (VSRS)

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EPF is one of the Social Security Funds in Tanzania, established by Act of the Parliament (CAP. 51 of 1942 as amended) as a Social Security Institution operating under Provident Fund System. The Fund has two schemes, Mandatory and Voluntary. The Mandatory Scheme covers non-pensionable employees working in the Central Government, Government Agencies, Donor financed projects and private sector. The Voluntary Scheme caters for self employed people from different sector irrespective of the type of their employment.

Despite its fundamental role and functions, social security is still far from being a reality for the vast majority of Tanzanians. More than 95 percent of its active labour force in Tanzania is not covered by the existing social security schemes. Unfortunately for many years, social security system in Tanzania recognized only those who are formally employed and receive monthly salary. As a result a bigger group of self employees was left behind without any structured means of protection against unforeseen occurrence as compared to employed people.

In 2003 the Government of United Republic of Tanzania, through the Ministry of Labour and Employment and Youth Development set up a National Social Security Policy (NSSP) which identified some of the challenges, including extension of social security coverage. In response to NSSP, GEPF was one of the pioneer Funds to take some initiatives and started GEPF Voluntary Savings Retirement Scheme (VSRS) covering both formal and informal sector workers. GEPF VSRS does not have minimum contributions amount and does not have specific contributory

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GEPF Director General, Mr. Daud Msangi being congratulated by the Permanent Secretary Ministry of Labour and Employement, Mr Erick Shitindi.

difference economic sectors and savings collection reached above TZS 1.2 billion. These members are normal employed Tanzanians, taxi drivers, mama lishe, fishermen, shopkeepers, traders and farmers. In order to service these members conveniently and reach majority of Tanzanians the Fund opened 5 new branches in Mwanza, Tanga, As a measure of safeguarding Dodoma, Mtwara and Mafinga.

periods. it allows members to vary contributions depending on the income of a given time. The scheme allows members to deposit their contributions in different convenient ways. The main collection methods are Electronic Money Transfer Systems operated by mobile phone companies such as M-Pesa which is administered by Vodacom in Tanzania, Airtelmoney and TIGOPESA. Other methods are direct deposit in the Fund’s bank accounts; Fund’s staff collect from members’ working premises and collection agents who are contracted by the Fund to collect on commission basis.

member qualifies to withdraw some cash from the savings account if he faces any problem. The GEPF VSRS offers three main benefits which are withdrawal benefit from the occupational account, lump sum or staggered payment once the member reaches 55 years of age, and survivors benefit in case of death of a member.

The members under VSRS are being provided with two accounts (Short term account and retirement account). After contributing continuously for 6 months, the

Many Tanzanians have shown interest and joined the Scheme. Within two years since its inception, the Scheme has registered more than 12,000 members from

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the value of member’s saving, Members contributions are credited with interest after every six months. The credited interest is the real income from investment realized in the given investment period.

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Last year, The International Social Security Association(ISSA) based in Geneva. recognized efforts done by GEPF in extending social security services to reach the majority of Tanzanians. Following this recognition, ISSA presented a certificate of merit to GEPF during Africa Social Security Forum held in Arusha, Tanzania.

WHEN DAR LAUNCHED ITS

FIRST COMMUTER TRAINS

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n 29th November 2012 Tanzania marked what The Manager views as one of the biggest achievements in history. Why? Because the country launched its first commuter trains which are operating in commercial capital Dar es Salaam. The Government of Tanzania, through the Ministry of Transport, used its own funds and local engineers to rehabilitate coaches, engines and railways and made it possible for two commuter trains to start operations.

a 25 Km (15.5 miles) stretch between Mwakanga – TAZARA railway stations, and the second track runs for 20 Km (12.4 miles) between Ubungo-Maziwa and City railway stations are meant to ease commuter traffic. There are six trips on the Tazara line – three between 05.00 and 11.00, and three between 15.00 and 20.00, with one-way tickets costing Sh500. Eight trips are scheduled for the TRL line between Ubungo-Maziwa and City railways stations, four between 05.00 and 11.00, and four between 15.00 and 20.00,

400. There are no operations on Sunday. The plan is to have two trains running the TRL and two in TAZARA tracks, each with six coaches, with the capacity of carrying 1000 passengers. The trains are supposed to conduct in each track eight runs in the morning and eight runs in the evening. The response of people

The people of Dar es Salaam have received the commuter trains with jubilation and The trains, which one covers with one-way tickets costing Sh excitement. A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association THE

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The response of people

The people of Dar es Salaam have received the commuter trains with jubilation and excitement.

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A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association

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Mwakanga – TAZARA railway stations

DIPLOMACY By: Nancy Lazaro

Unleashing the Woman Power :

ELLEN Johnson Sirleaf

The trains, which one covers a 25 Km (15.5 miles) journey between Mwakanga – TAZARA railway stations, and the second track runs for 20 Km (12.4 miles) between Ubungo-Maziwa and City railway stations are meant to ease commuter traffic.

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A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association

The President of Liberia Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf delivering her speech at Nkrumah Hall during a visit to the University of Dar es Salaam’s Julius Nyerere Campus (Main Campus).

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houts of joy, hearty screams of happiness, hours full of inspiration and minutes of global exposure while concentrating on our motherland Tanzania, our beautiful nation, the phenomenal woman, one

of our own, pure African queens, the 24th President of Liberia and the first elected female Head of State in Africa, Hon. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, graced Tanzania through the Nkrumah Hall at the University of Dar es Salaam on 18th July, 2012,

as she was holding a public lecture on “The role of women in African development.” In her public lecture at the UDSM where members of the academia, distinguished ambassadors, invited guests and students from secondary schools and colleges attended, Sirleaf addressed the eight millennium development goals of the United Nations, the progress so far and most importantly, the role of African women in development. She had said women formed the highest population in Africa and a significant positive change that a woman makes can lead to massive transformation in African countries. Women need to be empowered and they need to know their position in the society. Women have been affected by a lot of things that go on

Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf greets members of the community of the University of Dar es Salaam as she was walking to Nkrumah Hall. She is flanked by the Minister of Community Development, Gender and Children, Hon. Sophia Simba (right) and the Vice Chancellor of the University of Dar es Salaam, Professor Rwekaza MuA Publication of UDBS Alumni Association THE MANAGER kandala (left).

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Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf signing in the Visitors’ Book at the Council Chamber. Looking on are the Vice Chancellor of the University of Dar es Salaam, Professor Rwekaza Mukandala (second left) and the former Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations, Hon Dr. Asha Rose Migiro. in the communities but that should not be reason enough for a woman to stand behind and be afraid to fight for what is right. Our own first lady, Mama Salma Kikwete, has been in the frontline in empowering women in Tanzania through WAMA (Wanawake na Maendeleo) Foundation which deals with women, girls and other vulnerable children by promoting them to gain access to education, adolescent and sexual reproductive health, maternal and infant services, and capacity building for economic empowerment. All these works contribute directly to the achievement of millennium development goals of the United Nations. Hon Sirleaf was born in Monrovia as Ellen Eugenia Johnson on October 29, 1938. She went to the College of West Africa in Monrovia for her high school education then joined Madison Business College, the University of Colorado and finally, in 1971, she did her Master’s Degree in Public Administration at Havard

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University’s Kennedy School of Government. Sirleaf has obtained eight honorary doctorates from a number of distinguished academic institutions. She is serving her second term after winning the 2011 presidential election. The same year, 2011, she became one of the three Nobel Peace Prize Laureates jointly with Leymah Gbowee of Liberia and Tawakel Karman of Yemen. The women were recognised “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work”. In 2006, President Sirleaf was named by Forbes Magazine as the 51st most powerful woman in the world. It didn’t end there. In 2010, The Economist called her “arguably the best president the country has ever had” while Newsweek listed her as one of the ten best leaders in the world and Time magazine mentioned her among the top ten female leaders. President Sirleaf is a phenomenal and

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outstanding woman, a woman that all African women should look up to and aspire to walk in her feet and bring important changes in our societies. Sirleaf is a strong woman who never gave up, despite all the challenges that she faced. This nobel laureate is committed to hard work, integrity and good governance. Women are amongst her first priority thus she remains in the frontline advocating for the rights of women and the importance of education for a better nation. The eight millennium development goals agreed by 191 UN member states to be achieved by 2015 are: To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; To achieve universal primary education; To promote gender equality and empower women; To reduce child mortality; To improve maternal health; To combat HIV/ AIDS, malaria, and other diseases; To ensure environmental sustainability; and To develop a global partnership for development. Superwoman Sirleaf said that women were part and parcel of all MDGs

in one way or another, thus women involvement in the achievement of Millenium Development Goals of the United Nations was essential. She said this could be done through women taking part in the highest level of decision making as well as

empowering them fully. Women should know that they are the roots of development in any country; they should take the bull by its horns and be part of development. President Sirleaf commended the progress made by many African countries in attaining the MDGs before 2015 deadline. She added that a lot of efforts was still needed in addressing different challenges facing African countries and increase the push in achieving the MDGs. Former UN Deputy Secretary – General Dr. Asha Rose Migiro was present during the public lecture by President Sirleaf and when given a chance to speak her mind, she said in order to achieve the MDGs, African countries

The President of Liberia, Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in a group picture with members of the University of Dar es Salaam Gender Centre. Seated to her right are the Centre’s Director Dr. Rose Meaipopo and the Minister of Community Development, Gender and Children, Hon. Sophia Simba. should link their policies with MDGs. The vice chancellor of the University of Dar es Salaam, Rwekaza Mukandala, hailed Sirleaf as a devoted human rights advocate, dwelling specifically on the rights of children, women and persons at risk of discrimination. The University of Dar es Salaam presented her with the University Of Dar es Salaam Golden Jubilee Award.

Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf joyously shows the University Of Dar es Salaam Golden Jubilee Award which was presented to her by the Vice Chancellor, Professor Rwekaza Mukandala (left).

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Academics

MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE OFFERED AT UDBS

MIT students of University of Dar es Salaam Business School on the study tour in Switzerland, June 2012.

Thrust of the Programme The MIT is broadly-conceived to offer a critical mass of technical knowledge (theoretical and practical/professional) on all aspects of contemporary trade policy management. In this connection, it extensively covers the technical analytical skills, and negotiations skills. The MIT is also an innovative programme, with a carefully selected and balanced blend of courses. Objectives of the Programme

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postgraduate degree is evidently a prerequisite today in any professional environment in order to survive the cutthroat competition of the employment market as an undergraduate degree is not sufficient. Despite success stories of entrepreneurs and Company owners such as Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg who did not even finish their undergraduate degrees, research shows that a greater percentage of successful business owners and managers tend to have Postgraduate degrees, and not just any postgraduate degree but a postgraduate degree from a respectable institution.

At the UDBS, which is without doubt the most respectable business school in the region, with

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a mission of becoming a world class business school, there are several postgraduate programmes one can take, from the famous Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of International Business (MIB) and the Master of International Trade (MIT). Master of International Trade (MIT) Master of International Trade (MIT) is a postgraduate education Programme that reflects the “convergence of minds�, as evidenced by the background initiatives instituted through a broadly interpreted consultative process. Local stakeholders from both the public and non-public sectors and foreign stakeholders have made invaluable inputs to the design of the Programme. The broad (regional and international)

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consultations make the MIT to have an international appeal, underscoring its relevance for other African and developing countries.

The MIT is designed in such a way that it is run by UDBS in collaboration with other focal units of the University of Dar es Salaam, such as the Department of Economics, Department of Statistics, and the School of Law, as well as other local and foreign partners. The medium to long-term perspectives are that UDSM will develop necessary institutional, individual and procedural capacity to run the Programme. However, UDSM will continue to use the services of experts from intergovernmental organizations with a trade agenda, which are available to Tanzania.

The MIT gives students a balanced blend of macro and micro courses that are necessary to enable them

to appreciate the linkages between macro policy issues related to trade management, micro strategy issues and business management, in view of increased international business interactions. In this regard, the MIT is a professional postgraduate degree programme designed to create worldclass trade policy and business managers, who can serve the real needs of governments, businesses and other institutions that pursue a trade and international business agenda. Its general, individual and institutional capacity building objectives are highlighted below:

General Objectives The general objective of the MIT is to acquaint the individuals with the frontiers of education, research and practice in international trade policy and practice; thereby enabling them to make substantive and more effective contribution to the international trade agenda, and to plan and implement more effective trade policy and international business strategies for their institutions. Invariably, the MIT sets trade policy in a broader framework, thereby blending the business, economic, institutional, and social perspectives. Every individual component of the MIT is designed to serve this universal goal.

Dr Lindi of UDBS was head of the study tour of MIT students during their study tour in Switzerland, June 2012.

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D

uring its five decades of operations, the National Housing Corporation (NHC) has gone through ten different Chief Executive Officers (CEOs). Mr Shmitt, a Germany, was the first CEO to manage the corporation for eight years, from 1962 to 1970 when he handed the mantle to the first indigenous Director General (DG), Engineer James Kikenya, who reigned between 1971 and 1976. The third CEO, Mr Melkizedeck Msangi stayed at the helm for five years, between 1977 and 1982 while Mr Karata Mwemba, probably the DG who managed the corporation for the shortest period, headed NHC between 1983 and 1984. Mr Andrew Shitindi’s six-year stay at the country’s real estate management giant lasted between 1984 and 1990 when Mr Omar Mwinchande came for a three-year stint, from 1990 to 1993. The current DG of Energy and Water Utilities Regulatory Authority, Mr Haruna Masebu, too had four years at the top of NHC between 1994 and 1998.

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The Late Mr Hamisi Sang’anya served at the corporation’s top post for a four-year term, from 1998 to 2002, before NHC’s indigenous DG with the longest term at the top, Mr Martin Madekwe, came in between 2002 and 2009. The incumbent DG, Mr Nehemia Mchechu, joined the corporation in 2010. The Daily News managed to catch up with some of the former NHC

top bosses to share their past moments at the public utility: JAMES 1976)

KIKENYA

(1971-

During colonial rule and soon after Tanzania gained her independence in 1961, majority people lacked decent shelter. So, the independent Tanganyika embarked on housing projects to build decent houses for its people. The establishment of NHC in August 1962 aimed at building low cost houses for sale or renting to low income earners. True, the corporation managed to build houses in almost all regions of Tanzania Mainland, first by demolishing the traditional mud and grass-thatched houses and later erecting better new houses in Dar es Salaam, Tabora and other regions. Come 1975, a total of 14,462 house were built. MARTIN MADEKWE (2002-2009) I headed NHC when it was in serious financial difficulties. The corporation’s rental earnings from its houses were at its lowest due to the peanut rent that tenants paid for the firm’s thousands of housing units, countrywide.

Luckily, the parliament repelled the oppressive Rent Restriction Act of 1984, allowing NHC to not only increase rent but also enforce payment. The corporation’s income started growing, enabling the firm to rehabilitate its houses, most of which were in dilapidated state. We were now able to build 213 new housing estates in Dar es Salaam, Dodoma and Iringa regions. The high demand for low cost houses in the country builds a strong case for the government to empower the corporation towards meeting its ambitious goals. NEHEMIA KYANDO MCHECHU (2010 – TODATE) NHC is a strong public firm to reckon with, it boasts of strong operational base and high efficiency. NHC is getting huge government and parliamentary support as a gesture of the good work it is doing to avail ‘wananchi’ with decent and affordable houses through various schemes—tenant purchase, outright purchase, rental housing and rural and peri-urban housing loans. NHC employs various cadres of workers and has established units to facilitate its operations.

It wasn’t easy to either increase rent or even enforce payment of that little amount because the law favoured tenants, even rent defaulters.

NHC is eager to see as many people as possible living in apartments, sharing essential services like security of their areas and property.

NHC had to first get a court approval to either increase rental fee or evacuate defaulting tenants—it was indeed an uphill task to run the cash strapped corporation.

As we commemorate our golden jubilee, we aim at ensuring that NHC becomes the national mirror and hold high its esteem because it has the will and capacity to execute all that it plans.

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School Dean and has an advisory body of experienced accountants who assist in ensuring quality delivery of service. The day to day operations of the office is under the MDCB Manager who is assisted by the Deputy Manager” Dr. Henry Chalu, The unit has a team of at least 60 core staff committed to deliver wellorganized, proficient and effective services to the clients. The staff includes at least 28 PhDs, 32 Master Degree holders and a minimum of 10 Certified Public Accountants(CPAs) who are fully qualified, experienced and competent in the areas of their specialization.

“We understand that, a lot of other universities and colleges may offer the same courses to the public. University of Dar es Salaam offer value added courses. We accommodate different categories of clients, we have experts from different institutions in and out of the country to refine our students so that they can be competitive in the market” Dr. Chalu said.

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Knowledge is self-investment that ensures very high returns if used appropriately. We live in the world where time does not stand still and people get to use their gifts and talents to make the world a better place. The world has been prone to changes especially in technology and development, thus altering the way things are run in organizations. Efficient and effective leaders embrace change and use it to their advantage, to excel in different sectors and the ones who are allergic to change, will always lag behind and eventually cease to exist. The Manager magazine had an opportunity to talk to the Dean of University of Dar es Salaam Business School, Dr. Ulingeta Obadia Mbamba, and Management

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Development and Consultancy Bureau (MDCB) Manager, Dr. Henry Chalu. “Change is the only thing that is not constant. Technology has been advancing with every sunrise, innovation and creativity have been at theirhighest. For instance, back in time, traditional advertising was at its peak and many companies used television and radios to reach out to their markets. Globalization has brought the world together thus in the time being, online marketing is at its uttermost. Companies prefer the use of internet in reaching out to their wide range of customers, local and international market. The business world has been growing and competition between individuals as

well as companies is at its best, one has to be up to date, The Business School understood the demand in the market and decided to start offering the short term courses not to substitute the long term courses but to complement them and equip people with knowledge, effective for being competent in their areas of concern.” Dr. Mbamba said. Management Development and Consultancy Bureau (MDCB) is a long standing unit within the University of Dar es Salaam Business School offering consultancy services and short term training programmes fully focusing in the areas of business and management.

“MDCB is under the Business

Also, the MDCB works hand in hand with the University Consultancy Bureau (UCB) and the University of Dar es Salaam Entrepreneurship Centre (UDEC) and other institutions/ individuals to deliver quality services to its clients. At very affordable rates, employees and entrepreneurs are given an opportunity to add more knowledge and skills in areas of their concern by the most reputable and prominent university in Tanzania. Trainings range from project management, marketing, higher education, tourism, accounting, finance, management, human resources and strategy, the common intake being project management. “These short courses are designed to help managers in different levels of organizations to solve problems and face challenges in their daily

workplace activities.” Dr. Mbamba said. “We understand that, a lot of other universities and colleges may offer the same courses to the public. University of Dar es Salaam offer value added courses. We accommodate different categories of clients, we have experts from different institutions in and out of the country to refine our students so that they can be competitive in the market” Dr. Chalu said. “We also offer tailor made courses, special for organizations which need their employees to gain knowledge on a certain specific sector and ensure competency in the market,” Dr. Mbamba added. In order to achieve remarkable results and make sure our clients are satisfied, MDCB delivers its services differently, uniquely and with a lot more added value. MDCB provides consultancy and short courses to the small and medium scale enterprises and to ensure efficient and effective service is delivered, MDCB play the role of being innovators and project managers. “Our trainings are not limited to English only. We use Swahili language in trainings where Swahili will be best understood and many training materials are in Swahili, for instance, most local government trainings are delivered in Swahili. New courses have been added to the curriculum according to demand and in the coming future, we are anticipating to work closely with Public Private Partenrship (PPP).” Dr. Chalu added. Dr Mbamba finished by saying that the UDBS is committed to make sure the short courses with a span of a day to four weeks offered by MDCB receive full support from the business school. “We are even putting our own funds to support the whole program. For next year, we are putting almost half a billion shillings” He said. Knowledge is success, let’s embrace it.

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ORSEA Photo Gallary

ORSEA Photo Gallary

The Director of Foreign Affairs Mr. Christopher Mvulla (left). Dr. Wilson Mboya (centre) and ORSEA Uganda Chapter representative, Mr. Musa Moya (right). The Guest of Honour, Director of Foreign Affairs Mr. Christopher Mvulla (right) arriving at Kunduchi Beach Hotel and Resort to officiate the Conference. Left is the Dean of UDBS, Dr. Ulingeta Mbamba.

From left to left to right, Lisa Tom, Nancy Lazaro, Tobias Swai, Teddy Busagala, Dr. Esther Ishengoma, Dr. MD Baisi and Prof. Erasmus Kaijage.

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Group picture of ORSEA 2012 participants.

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2012 BAAA/UDBS Summer School Experience

Facilitators. From right to left,Nelly Maliva, Dr . Goodluck Urassa, Dr. Severine Kessy, Dr. Mariam Nchimbi (second left) and two facilitors Business Academy Aarhus-Denmark.

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The summer school was a tailored cross-cultural program designed to suit the Danish and Tanzanian students.

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etworking and refreshing stood as crosscutting activities which started from Day One of the first summer school conducted at the UDBS premises under the implementation of the UDEC. Students from both Business Academy Aarhus, Denmark (BAAA) and University of Dar es Salaam Business School (UDBS), Tanzania, facilitators and tourism sector stakeholders got an opportunity to build network and find the possibilities to collaborate in academic and business spheres. There were also many opportunities for refreshments, such as during Tanzanian night where people danced, jived, chatted and enjoyed. The innovation camp also offered

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both learning and entertaining sphere by activities such as swimming, sports, traditional dancing and Danes cultural show. The summer school was a tailored cross-cultural program designed to suit the Danish and Tanzanian students. The program was funded by the shared sponsorship of BAAA, UDBS, UDEC and some DANIDA funds apportioned to support graduates who are inclined to establish their own ventures. On the side of Tanzania the program targeted the third year B.Com students, who by the time of the course would have already completed their degree. The course announcements were advertised through UDBS

notice boards and in classes, and interested students were required to apply for it. A total of 31 students who met criteria were selected, among them was one Ugandan. On the other side, BAAA came out with ten students, three male and seven female. The group combined multiple experiences from various business specializations such as marketing, accounting, finance, human resource and tourism. The two-week program, which took place from 23rd July to 3rd August 2012, was mainly facilitated by experienced experts from BAAA and UDBS, comprising of instructors, three BAAA lecturers and three UDBS lectures. The logistics functions were facilitated by UDBS academic and non-academic staff. At its broadest vision the program aimed at sharing Eurocentric and Afrocentric experiences in order to come out with innovative and unique business ideas, and build meaningful business networks that

cover two continents.

networking atmosphere.

Specifically, the objectives of the course was to develop business ideas that would be implementable in Tanzania and extended or with the partnership of the Danes. Another objective was to develop business ideas that would be used as the roadmap for the implementation of the business also for soliciting resources such as funds.

It also provided the opportunity to transform theories learned in classes to make them fit in the really world. In that way the program used unique learning methods that enabled them to create enterprising and innovative mind-set as well as increasing the ability to encounter the turbulent business environment. Teaching methodology was enticing Within this context the program and surprises basing because it did was meant to develop innovative not show what was coming next enterprises with the focus on beforehand; it always left students tourism sector. The business ideas with curiosity. The program therefore should be within the therefore could be described by cultural exchange, understanding tourism magnitudes. business environment, development Program content and Facilitation of business ideas and plans and Approaches Networking and Refreshing. The program was designed to build the teamwork among individuals from cultural diversity and to bridge the gap between Euro-culture and Afro-culture. So it was intended to create an environment that would provide learning, entertaining and

Culture Exchange Class Presentations Students were given chances to present their own culture through slide shows and video clips. They

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Dancing the famous kwaito tunes! From left, Elia Yobu,Hellen Tusiime, Dr. Marcellina Chijoriga and participants of the summer School

showed lifestyles for both rural and urban people through their daily activities, food and eating habits. For example students demonstrated food cooking. Apart from student presentation, this was supported by lecture presentations from both Tanzania and Denmark. This activity was done in Day One of the program, thereby making students aware of the prevailing cultural differences between Tanzania and Denmark. Tanzanian Night It was done at Makumbusho Cultural centre. This offered an opportunity to taste Tanzanian culture by the native cuisine served in typical traditional Tanzanian foods. Tanzanian students and facilitators demonstrated Tanzanian traditional dancing and the famous African dancing ‘Kwaito’. The Danes also tasted dancing African Dances. Apart from this the professional traditional dancers performed and involved students also. Understanding Environment

Business

Class Discussions This was done through class discussions in which both environments were discussed in terms of possibilities of doing business. This included the

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possibilities and opportunities for investment and all supporting facilities available such as finance and labour resources. This was intended to look at the possibility of business collaboration between two countries. Mini Conference This was emboldened by the mini workshop which was done in the third day. The mini conference involved the main stakeholders of tourism sector in Tanzania and included representatives from Government at different levels such as Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism and Tourism Training Institution and Tanzania Tourist Board. It also involved representation from tourism business sector such as the Association of Hotel chain, tour operators and curio, financial institutions and other businessmen within the tourism industry. The aim was to expose students to real business environment in terms of policy issues, promotion of tourism industry, business experiences and challenges. Development of Business Ideas and Plans

nationalities to ensure cultural and academic background diversity, were composed. Through brainstorming and debate among group members they came with a number of ideas which have been screened and fine-tuned over time as discussion continued with the aim of coming out with a more focused, innovative, implementable and competitive business idea. The whole process was done through group discussion and plenary in which members presented their ideas and got comments from it. Innovation Camp Innovation camp provided a conducive environment for the students as they moved away from University environment to Gezaulole Camp, allocated along the beautiful beach and sports ground, to enable them refresh while thinking about how best that could improve their ideas. The facilitators and students had stayed for three days, working overnight on their ideas in groups, and meeting after every three to four hours for plenary sessions.

Competition Each group developed a business Group Work Five groups, each including students plan for their best idea and they with different specializations and competed to get the winner group.

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Meet the new head of finance department at UDBS Dr. Esther Ishengoma

Dr Ishengoma holding her new born, Estefania Alexandra Mukisa Nnambejja

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sther Ishengoma is a senior lecturer in the Department of Finance. She has PhD from the University of Leipzig (Germany) and MBA from TSM Business School at the University of Twente (the Netherlands). Her research interests include 1) financial linkages, governance, MFIs sustainability and poverty reduction; 2) global linkages and investment behavior; and financial solutions for renewable energy.

the Department of Finance at UDBS; Department of Finance at the University of Ghana Business School; Department of Finance at the Leuphana University of Lüneburg; and GIGA. Apart from these, Dr. Ishengoma has worked in several collaborative research projects and consultancies and has won about four small research grants. Dr. Ishengoma has published several articles in referred journals and books.

Dr. Ishengoma has held a number of positions: Associate Dean Research and Publication of UDBS; Sida-SAREC Deputy Coordinator of UDBS; and Word Bank – UDSM Program Coordinator. Since the 2005, she has been working with the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) as a Senior Research Fellow.

As the Head of Department of Finance, Dr. Ishengoma aspires to strengthen cooperation between the Department and industries through different approaches, viz., collaborative/contracted research and outreach programs. She welcomes different ideas on how this can be achieved. Please send your ideas through financegroup@udbs.udsm.ac.tz.

In 2010 Dr. Ishengoma won a Senior Research Fellow Grant from Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation (AvH). AvH is supporting her to write a book on Financial Linkages and Performance of Microfinance Cooperatives in Tanzania. She has recently presented a project proposal on Global Financial Linkages, MFIs, Sustainability and Poverty Reduction to Volkswagen Foundation. This project will involve scholars from

Dr. Ishengoma is thankful to the cooperation she is getting from the staff members of the Department of Finance, UDBS and the University at large. She is also grateful to the smile and joy from her daughter, Estefania Alexandra-Mukisa Kironde, which makes her relax and forget about the workload. Thank you Mukisa!

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TO ADVERTISE IN THE MANAGER PLEASE CONTACT US ON....

Mob: + 255 765 604 172, Tel : 022 2410 006 P.O. Box 35046,Dar es Salaam. Fax : 022 2410 119 E-mail: fcmalumni@udbs.udsm.ac.tz, udbsalumni@udbs.udbs.ac.tz Website: www. udbsalumni.udsm.ac.tz

By Nelly Maliva

Madesa demon destroys intellect

M

adesa is a popular concept among undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Dar es Salaam Business School. I do not know the exact origin of this concept but as far as I understand, it implies a kind of illegal shortcut in academic spheres (plagiarism). It is used to explain one who cheats by peeping at other students’ work like assignments, tests or UE. This meaning has been extended to indicate some course materials normally used by lecturers to teach. After teaching some lecturers provide these materials to students while other prefer instead to ask the students to make their notes from the lectures and books. Interestingly, though, students are capable of getting the madesas even if lecturers do not provide them in class. I remember during my days when we used to photocopy whatever materials that had been labelled as a desa. Sometimes we could get wrong desa which we dubbed as ‘poison’ or ‘kasa’. These kasas or poisons were not consumed for fear of killing you if you could not get an antidote on time. The antidote could be obtained by sharing with others

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if it happenned to be recognised beforehand. Whether the madesa is poison or not it has a bad impact on students. When they get the so called madesa, students concentrate on the normally shallow madesa, forgetting about reading books to explore more materials. Strikingly, some madesa are in the form of past papers which students find answers and take them ready for reproduction in tests and exams. Surprisingly, these students feel they are lucky if the same question repeats and make their misonges (‘A’s). As a consequence, students’ minds are confined to madesas; they can no longer think big. They simply ask the logic of reading books while they can pass only by reading madesa. I once chanced to hear an MBA student conversing with a prospective student. “I would like to join UDBS for MBA program but I dread to encounter it. I understand that the courses are very demanding!” The other guy responded, “Do not worry my friend, just come, I will give you madesa and you will pass without even making an effort to bite books!!!” What a culture!!!!!!!!

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University of Dar es Salaam Business School Alumni Association

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P.O. Box 35046,Dar es Salaam. Mob ; + 255 765 604 172, Tel : 022 2410 006 Fax : 022 2410 119 E-mail: fcmalumni@udbs.udsm.ac.tz, udbsalumni@udbs.udbs.ac.tz Website: www. udbsalumni.udsm.ac.tz A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association THE

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP

10,000 Women initiative: Developing critical

competencies to women entrepreneurs through ACEBM

The then Deputy Minister for Trade and Trade (now Deputy Minister of Tourism and Natural Resources) Hon. Lazaro Nyalandu (centre, seating) in a group picture with the first batch of ACEBM students. Also seating are the Director of UDEC, Dr. Mariam Nchimbi (right), Professor Amandina Lihamba, the Director of Public Services Dr. Marcellina Chijoriga, and Deputy Director of UDEC Dr. Goodluck Urassa (right).

organized by the UDBS through University of Dar es Salaam Entrepreneurship Center (UDEC) for their business visibility, links and source of financial resources.

Prof. Lettice Rutashyobya (second left) joins ACEBM first-batch graduates for a Kwaito dance. Looking (right) is the Director of UDEC Dr. Mariam Nchimbi.

More than 100 entrepreneurs, mostly women, have benefited from Advanced Certificate in Entrepreneurship and Business Management (ACEBM) Programme, a user-friendly, time conscious, highly practical and action oriented (learning-by– doing) course.

participants to apply the skills learnt in their businesses. They are usually supported step by step to develop bankable business plans for growing their enterprises, and are then connected with various sources of financial and nonfinancial services for their financial and other needs.

Introduced in 2009 as part of The participants get an opportunity the 10,000 women initiative, to participate in business forums the ACEBM programme guides and business plan competition

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Goldman Sachs Foundation to participate in it.

The main objective of ACEBM is to develop critical competencies (knowledge, skills, attitudes and Each course in ACEBM involves habits) for entrepreneurs and in practical lectures, project particular, women entrepreneurs assignment, follow-up by to grow an entrepreneurial facilitators, coaching, counseling business. At the end of the and mentoring in order to make programme scholars become more sure that the course makes a entrepreneurial in identifying and difference in the participant’s exploiting growth opportunities business, as well as visits to for their businesses and are able participants’ projects where each to provide effective leadership and participant benefits from the on- strategic direction for a growing business. site support. The University of Dar es salaam Business School (UDBS) in partnership with Columbia Business School (CBS) of USA, which jointly runs the one-year programme, invites women entrepreneurs interested in growing their businesses to apply for a scholarship offered by the

The course’s total duration is one year, run on a modular basis with a total of five modules and a business planning project, whereas applicants must be women entrepreneurs/ownermanagers running a business with growth potential in revenues and employment as a result of ACEBM

programme and who cannot afford the program without significant support. ACEBM requires applicants to be holders of at least a diploma, degree or other equivalent qualifications from any reputable or recognized institution, with good command of both spoken and written English language. Also, they must be committed to completing the programme and follow up activities. The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women initiative is a five-year campaign to foster greater shared economic growth by providing 10,000 underserved women around the world with a business and management education. The initiative is coordinated in local markets by a network of more than 70 academic and NGO partners. It is funded by Goldman Sachs and the Goldman Sachs Foundation.

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SERVING THE POOR:HELLEN LUTEGE SHOWS THE WAY By: Nancy Lazaro of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s economic capital. BELITA has at least 33 branches within Dar es Salaam and its neighbouring Coast region. Its mission is to provide affordable microcredit of economical value to individuals and group clients in Eastern Tanzania at competitive interest rates. While many microfinance organizations target the working class, BELITA aims at locals in the rural areas, living in extreme poverty, who cannot support themselves or their families. BELITA works in rural areas where there are no microfinance services.

Hellen Lutege

“Every human being is born to from a poor family I fought my serve a greater purpose. Coming way up and saw myself climbing the ladder of success. Eventually, I found personal success alone was not enough; I felt a gap in my life and I wanted to be a catalyst of others’ success. As poverty is at its extreme in our country, I have a long-term purpose of helping the poor to live a satisfying life, meet their needs and reach out to their dreams,” so says Hellen Lutege, owner and managing director of BELITA (Better Lives for Tanzanians), a microfinance company located at Tabata Kinyerezi suburbs

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Meeting Lutege for the first time in her office, I saw a strong and civilized woman. I saw an African queen with a smiling face and amazing brains behind her ready to take over the world; A simple elegant woman, focused and sharp, who values God, transparency and uniqueness. At the age of 55 Hellen Lutege is busy living her dreams while putting God first in everything she does. “I give all credit to God for the stage that I am in right now. God has never let me down,” she says, putting up a broad smile. She is happily married to a supportive husband, a management consultant, and they

Hellen Lutege in her office.

poverty among vulnerable and disadvantaged groups of women The first millennium and youth. Over the years development goal is to eradicate BELITA has positively changed extreme poverty and hunger and in Tanzania more than half the population lives under the poverty line. By 2015, which is target for the Millennium Development Goals, Tanzania cannot eradicate poverty completely. But it is inspiring to see locals, the type of Mrs. Lutege, who have the urge to help those living in extreme poverty, putting more efforts to uplift the standard of living of the have not. Mrs. Lutege is a perfect example of women who walk hand in hand with the government in the process of eradicating poverty in Tanzania. One of the objectives of BELITA is to design development programs aimed at alleviating are blessed with two children.

thousands of lives, enhancing their standard of living. She says humbly: “I walked in the shoes of poverty as I was

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Indeed truth prevails. If you take one step at a time, you will ultimately walk a thousand miles. So finally it was in 2005 when Hellen started taking infant steps to realize her dreams by opening a microfinance firm. Feeling the need of adding more knowledge, particularly on the microfinance sector, in 2008 she joined the University of Dar es Salaam for a post graduate degree in Microfinance.

Belita Finance Headquarters at Kinyerezi Looking back, she says: “Getting a degree was the catalyst that boosted me to think of owning a business one day in the near future. I wanted to put into use the knowledge I got in class. I had and still have a burning passion for microfinance and I knew that WHERE SHE CAME FROM is exactly what I wanted to do It was in 1980s when Hellen with my life. I allowed myself Lutege completed her bachelor to get employed for a couple of in commerce and management years to earn experience and save with a major in Marketing. money for my own business.” growing up. I know how it feels to have nothing but I also know how it feels to fight for your dreams without giving up, no matter the circumstances because eventually you will be a victor and the past will be history.”

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THE MANAGER

A Publication of UDBS Alumni Association

“Every human being is born to serve a greater purpose.

Coming

from a poor family I fought my way up and

will knock at your door. I am in both Dar es Salaam and Coast very proud of UDBS for it has regions with its headquarters at given me knowledge that led to Tabata Kinyerezi. my success.” “My vision for the company is to be the leading microfinance in HER ACHIEVEMENT Tanzania working right, left and “My greatest achievement is centre to make sure people in rural seeing my dream come true and areas and those living in difficult that is to help the poor have conditions are able to access our better lives,” Mrs. Lutege smiles, service and be able to support adding almost immediately: themselves,” the outstanding “I feel purely satisfied when I Hellen Lutege says. see people I have helped out of Fondly referred to as Mama extreme poverty making progress Lutege by many beneficiaries of every single day. We had been to her company services has been in places where we found there was the frontline towards achieving her lack of toilets and people could dreams and inspiring generations, not afford their daily basic needs, the young and the old. In 2010 she but after empowering them, we won the excellent award in women saw progress in families and empowerment and wide customer communities at large.” outlet and excellent award in women empowerment and rural BELITA had started with only orientation, to name just a few. two employees growing to 25 These awards were the courtesy of permanent ones currently, the OIKO credit. majority from Tanzania and the rest from Kenya and Uganda. Live your dreams, know your purpose and vision in life and focus “I involve my employees in on them, work hard to achieve the entire decision process them. The road may be rough mechanism, valuing transparency but the prize is worth the efforts. and team work,” she says. Hellen Lutege is an example to be followed. BELITA had initially started with one branch at Mkuranga in Coast You can visit her website ar www. region but has now 33 branches belitamicrofinance.org

She acknowledges that knowledge is power and once effectively used it transforms nations. “Studying another degree in microfinance helped me to know the mistakes I was making in my own business. I graduated in 2010 entirely different from the microfinance business owner I was before I started the course. I had been equipped with more knowledge, and subsequently, more capacity than before to run my business,” fully confident Hellen says during the interview.

saw myself climbing

A Swahili adage goes thus “Elimu ni bahari haina mwisho” literally meaning education is like a vast ocean without end. In 2009, Hellen Lutege joined the 10000 Women Program at UDBS for an Advanced Diploma in Entrepreneurship.

helping the poor to live

The phenomenal and role model Mrs. Lutege believes her success would have amounted to nothing had she received wrong teachings from her teachers, noting sincerely: “The lecturers at the University of Dar es Salaam are very committed in giving out the right information and impact the students with precise knowledge. If only you will put to use the knowledge gained, then success

Dr. Issack Shimba Allan, the new Head, Department of Marketing

the ladder of success. Eventually, I found, personal success alone was not enough; I felt a gap in my life and I wanted to be a catalyst of others’ success. As poverty is at its extreme in our country, I have a long-term purpose of a satisfying life, meet their needs and reach out to their dreams,”

Dr. Issack Shimba Allan is the current Head of the Department of Marketing at the University of Dar es Salaam Business School. Before his appointment to this position he was the Deputy Coordinator for Postgraduate Studies. He has more than 14 years Dr. Issack Shimba Allan of teaching at both undergraduate

and postgraduate levels, researching and public service experience in a wide range of business management related issues, specializing in the areas of marketing management, entrepreneurship and small businesses development, change management and customer care.

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MANAGER 39

Are you a graduate of the University of Dar es Salaam Business School - UDBS (former Faculty of Commerce and Management- FCM)?

If yes, enjoy a network of more than 5000 graduates by joining in the University of Dar es Salaam Business School Alimni Association Who are we? The UDBS Alumni Association is a consortium of members who have undergone their undergraduate degrees,masters’ degrees, postgraduate studies and PHD at the University of Dar es Salaam Business School formerly known as the Faculty of commerce and management.We are pround to say we have members who are talented with immerse experiences and competent graduates holding various potential senior position in Tanzania and world at large world class professors, Ministers, Chief Executive offices, business man and politicians. Our vision UDBS Alumni Association aims to be acclaimed as a mentoring tool of professional network. Our Mission UDBS Alumni Association’s Mission is to be the leading business development catalyst that impacts on economy,social and political dynamics-Individually and community at large. Our Core values - Networking: Connect people and moments. - Mentoring: Nurture and impact experiences shared among members. - Professionalism and Integrity:Maintain respectable distinguished values and ethical behaviour that identify members. - Business Development Catalyst:Provide guidance and facilitation to business development in the markets we pursue. - Change Agent: Derived opportunities.Provide analytical understanding of business and economic phenomena through steering community with business training and advocacy - Encourage and reward innovation:By awarding distinguished Alumni and Partners.

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P.O. Box 35046,Dar es Salaam. Mob ; + 255 765 604 172, Tel : 022 2410 006 Fax : 022 2410 119 E-mail: fcmalumni@udbs.udsm.ac.tz, THE MANAGER A Publication ofudbsalumni@udbs.udbs.ac.tz UDBS Alumni Association Website: www. udbsalumni.udsm.ac.tz

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MANAGER 41

Tanzania’s new Park

T

he number of national parks managed by Tanzania National Parks has increased to fifteen with the recent addition of Mkomazi National Park. Comprising 3,234 sq km in northern Tanzania, Mkomazi is a spectacular wilderness of dry bush, ancient baobab trees, isolated rocky hills, open savannah, acacias and grassy valleys. To the northwest is Mount Kilimanjaro; to the south the Pare and Usumbara Mountains; and to the north Kenya's Tsavo National Park. Mkomazi actually shares a border with Tsavo, allowing herds of over 1,000 elephant, including females and their calves, to range freely

between the two parks. Buffalo, eland, gerenuk, giraffe, grant's gazelle, hartebeest, impala, lesser kudu, oryx, steinbok, waterbuck and zebra share the park with the elephant while predators include numerous lion, leopard, cheetah and jackal. In all, 78 species of mammals have been recorded while a reptile population includes crocodile and python. The birds of Mkomazi are even more numerous with some 450 recorded species. Bee-eaters, hornbills, guinea fowl, starlings and weaver-birds are seen in large numbers but less well-known species include tawny eagles, secretary birds and violet wood-hoopoes, while the

plant and insect life is probably the most diversified in Tanzania. Mkomazi is also home to both the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary and the Breeding Program for the African Wild Dog. Both projects forming part of the Tanzanian Government's policy on endangered species. The 28-square-mile Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary, which will eventually hold up to 20 rhino pending their transfer to other safe and secure areas of the country, offers limitless viewing and educational opportunities. For tourists, Mkomazi offers abundant game viewing, scenic beauty and a quality wilderness experience ideal for game drives, walking safaris and hiking. It is an

ornithologist's and photographer's paradise.

For further information contact: The Director General Tanzania National Parks PO Box 3134, Arusha, Tanzania Tel: +255 27 250 3471 Fax: +255 27 250 8216 E-mail: tanapa@habari.co.tz info@tanzaniaparks.com www.tanzaniaparks.com


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