Beacon Fall 2018 - Women's Health Issue

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BED OF ROSES 8 PA G E

FALL 2018

SAFER SEX FOR MATURE WOMEN

1 in 3?

ARE YOU THE

FIND OUT FROM KAREN SMITH COLEMAN, MD, FACE

STOP A TANTRUM IN ITS TRACKS

HEAD-SPINNING HEADACHES

AROUND TOWN WITH KATRIN ARNOLDS, MD


WELCOME

SEIZE THE DAY… VOLUNTEER!

MORE THAN A MOM

Research reveals the critical role women play as the “Chief Medical Officer” for their families. Roughly 80% of healthcare decisions in households are made by women, and women are more likely than men to take care of family members when they get sick. In my family, I schedule the majority of doctor visits for our two sons, while lovingly encouraging (and sometimes nagging) my husband to stick to his regular checkups as well. Women are no doubt powerful motivators for our family members and loved ones, but while we take care of others, it is of utmost importance to remember to take care of ourselves, too. Cultivating a strong support system of women is important— my mom and sister are great sounding boards, and we often share our health concerns about ourselves and family members.

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Open communication with your healthcare provider is so crucial as well, especially breaking the barriers with uncomfortable topics such as sexual or mental health concerns. The importance of being an advocate for your health and keeping up with regular appointments and screenings is brought to the forefront in our in-depth article on prediabetes (page 9), as we get advice from Dr. Karen Smith Coleman. Read about this and much more in this Fall Women’s Health issue of the Beacon!

TO YOUR HEALTH,

My mother, who was an active volunteer even in her nineties, always inspired me to follow her example by participating in volunteer work. When my husband, Jack, and I decided to retire to our home in Bethany Beach, we felt so fortunate to be able to live in such a beautiful place that we wanted to give back. For many years, I volunteered with the Friends of the South Coastal Library on their Board of Directors and with the Beach and Bay Cottage Tour. Now, I’m involved with Operation SEAs the Day, an organization which brings families of wounded warriors to the Bethany area for a special vacation each year just after Labor Day. For his part, Jack is now finishing his tenth year on the Bethany Beach Town Council, the last four and a half years as Mayor. In addition to volunteering, which keeps our minds active, we place a great deal of importance on exercising almost every day, whether it’s walking, playing tennis, or kayaking (my favorite). Now that summer is over and fall is here, we expect to enjoy these last warm days being outdoors and continuing to give back to the community we love. JOAN GORDON

TRICIA MATSKO

FIRST LADY OF BETHANY BEACH,

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

VOLUNTEER

IN THIS ISSUE

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FRAME OF MIND Learn why it’s important to speak up when you’re feeling depressed. PAGE 4

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JUST SAY YES Read about how to seize opportunities in Shonda Rhimes’s new book. PAGE 4

CLOSE TO THE CHEST Take time to understand the importance of mammograms each year. PAGE 6

SHOWING UP See how to support family members and friends living with cancer. PAGE 7

For exclusive digital content and resources from this issue, visit www.beebehealthcare.org/beebe-women.

NUMBERS GAME Why an annual blood test could help you avoid diabetes. PAGE 9


IN/SIGHT

AROUND TOWN

with

Katrin Arnolds, MD, FACOG

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B E E B E W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H C A R E—P L A N TAT I O N S

ADVOCATE FOR WOMEN

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“I love that I can advocate for women’s health for all ages. My job is rewarding every day, and I feel privileged to be able to provide healthcare for women.”

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“In my free time I enjoy yoga, bicycling, cooking, and being outdoors. At times, it can be challenging to maintain a healthy lifestyle with a busy schedule, but I try to stay hydrated, practice good sleep hygiene, and eat healthy.”

SURGICAL PRECISION

“I am tremendously excited to offer robotic surgery to our patients at the new Center for Robotic Surgery. Minimally invasive surgery is proven to reduce complications such as infections, reduce pain, shorten a patient’s hospital stay, and lead to quicker recovery times.”

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD Have an idea for a future issue of Beacon? Want to share your feedback? We’d love to hear from you! Find us on social media and tell us what you think. Or, email us your thoughts today at beacon@beebehealthcare.org. www.facebook.com/beebehealthcare www.instagram.com/beebehealthcare www.twitter.com/beebehealthcare www.beebewomen.org www.nextgenerationofcare.org

FIT AS A FIDDLE

Katrin Arnolds, MD, FACOG is a Gynecologist and Obstetrician at Beebe Women’s Healthcare— Plantations. She is Fellowship Trained in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. BIKE PROVIDED BY LEWES CYCLE SPORTS.

BEACON EDITORIAL BOARD

PUBLISHER CHRISTINA DEIDESHEIMER

EXECUTIVE EDITOR TRICIA MATSKO

MANAGING EDITOR MICHELLE BANGSON

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR R ACHEL SWICK MAVITY WRITERS MICHELLE BANGSON

KATIE CLEM

DESIGNERS VICTORIA CARLSON

BRITTANY LAWSON

PHOTOGRAPHERS SCOTT NATHAN

Beacon is published by Beebe Healthcare to present health information to the people living, working, and visiting southern Delaware. Health information provided in Beacon should not be substituted for medical advice offered by a physician. Please consult your physician on medical concerns and questions.

PRODUCED BY LIFT FOR BEEBE HEALTHCARE

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TRENDS

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“In order to YES a problem, I have to find whatever it is inside the problem that challenges me or scares me or makes me just freak out—and then I have to say yes to that thing.”

As the creator of three popular shows on ABC, Shonda Rhimes certainly seems to have it all. In her book Year of Yes: How to Dance it Out, Stand in the Sun, and Be Your Own Person, Rhimes shares her own experience of learning to say “yes” to the opportunities that came her way and the incredible impact it had on her own happiness. INSIGHTS FROM YEAR OF YES Rhimes, writer and producer, has loads of advice for recognizing and taking advantage of opportunities.

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SOMETIMES YOU NEED TO BE PUSHED. Do you say no to events or

challenges that make you nervous? Having someone that you trust push you into these tough moments can force you to deal with your fear.

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SOMETIMES YOU ASK TOO MANY QUESTIONS. Do you overanalyze an

opportunity when it arises? Instead of spending so much time asking questions, say “yes” and use that time to find out whether you’ve found your new passion.

3 Do you shy away from compliments? SOMETIMES YOU’RE TOO HUMBLE.

Try to internalize the compliments you receive, say thank you, and move on, knowing that you’ve done something great.

FACES OF DEPRESSION

Start Your “Year of Yes”

According to Mental Health America, one in eight women can expect to develop clinical depression during her lifetime. Despite how prevalent it is, people suffering from depression often are unsure where to turn or feel afraid to talk about it. If you or someone you know has symptoms of depression, your doctor can help, so make an appointment if symptoms last more than two weeks.

how about rchers d a e r To g sea g helpin ession usin s i e l g r o p o e d G tools, ns of ning g e i e s r c y f s i ident e pre- n’s Health onlin d e ome t a ne W i t valid l n o ur nter a g/ visit o source Ce .or r Re hca e t l a e h beebe omen. www. -w b bee e

Common treatment methods for depression include antidepressant medications and psychological counseling. The most important thing to remember about seeking depression treatment is simply to speak up and ask for help. Depression is not a sign of weakness or laziness—it’s a sign that something is out of balance. With proper treatment, you can feel well again. There are several medical conditions that can cause depression symptoms, such as vitamin and mineral deficiencies, female hormonal changes, and thyroid conditions. A physical exam and blood tests can rule out health problems that are similar to or contribute to depression. If your doctor doesn’t find any of these factors as a cause for your depression, you may then be referred to a mental health professional. Your first visit should be to your family doctor for a thorough checkup. To find a new family doctor, visit www.beebehealthcare.org/find-a-doc.


MINDFULNESS

m u r t n a T r e l d d o T e h t g n i m l Ca We’ve all been there. Whether it has been in a grocery store, movie theater, church, or park—we’ve all seen and heard the child tantrum.

STACEY FOX, MD, FAAP, BEACON PEDIATRICS

IF IT HAPPENS to you, don’t be embarrassed. It’s difficult to know what to do when a sulky attitude suddenly turns into a full-on, redfaced, screaming tantrum. How do you quell the rising tide before the theatrics start? How do you calm the child without making an even bigger scene? Pediatrician Stacey Fox, MD, FAAP, of Beacon Pediatrics has these suggestions.

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TAKE A MINDFUL PAUSE. Instead

of jumping all over the screaming child, take a momentary breath to gather yourself. “Once a tantrum is in progress, it is like a tornado. You cannot stop it. It just has to blow over. Be calm and patient, make sure the child is in a safe place (such as in the middle of the supermarket aisle), and try not to feed into it,” says Dr. Fox.

SPEAK SOFTLY, BUT FIRMLY. Children

BABY’S CHOICE Try to notice when your children are starting to get upset and redirect their energy if possible. Often, children feel they are not in control of many parts of their life, and toddlers especially crave control. Try to give your kids choices between two acceptable options, such as: ++ No, you cannot have the candy, but you can have either applesauce or a banana. It’s up to you. ++ No, we can’t go to the park right now. Do you want to go play catch or play with your hula hoop? You can pick! Do this whenever possible, so your children feel like they have some control. “This small shift may make all the difference,” says Dr. Fox.

Read more stories from the front lines of parenting on the Be Real blog at www.beebewomen.org.

want to communicate their needs, but they may not yet have the language skills to do it. This is, as you may imagine, incredibly frustrating, and thus can lead to tantrums. Looking your children in the eyes and speaking with a soft but firm tone shows children that you hear them. REMEMBER THAT THE HOUSE WILL BE QUIET SOONER THAN YOU THINK.

Remember, children grow up fast, and it is likely you will miss being able to take them to the store. If you can feel yourself losing control, take a few deep breaths and remember tantrums happen. If your child will let you, kneel next to them and give them a hug.

And, if you are bystander to one of these spectacular toddler tantrums, instead of looking down on the parent and child, put on your supportive hat. Perhaps give them a knowing smile. This is tough and loud, but it is normal, and this too shall pass.

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NOURISH

For some patients, there is never a noticeable lump or any symptoms leading up to the diagnosis of breast cancer. That’s why Luisa Galdi, DO, Board-Certified Obstetrician and Gynecologist, advocates for women to have yearly screening mammograms at age 40.

there’s not always a lump

ELLEN BAHTIARIAN, MD, SOUTHERN DELAWARE IMAGING ASSOCIATES

IN THE PAST, it was recommended that all women practice monthly “self-breast exams.” However, most breast cancer screening guidelines recommend against this practice. Average-risk women are now encouraged to practice “breast self-awareness” instead.

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LUISA GALDI, DO, FACOG, BEEBE WOMEN’S HEALTHCARE— PLANTATIONS

“I often suggest to my patients that their first screening mammogram should be a 40th birthday present and should be something they complete before celebrating and blowing out the candles!” —DR. GALDI

So why do we emphasize this change? Well, Dr. Galdi often explains it to her patient’s like this: “It is important to know what is normal for you, so that anything abnormal is very obvious and just jumps out at you.” BE BREAST SELF-AWARE The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age, so starting to know your breasts as early as possible is the key to optimal breast self-awareness. Changes in how your breasts feel may be simply due to natural hormonal changes. Specifically, women who menstruate may notice subtle differences in their breasts during their cycle, including sensitive areas, additional pain, or even swelling.

SIGNS OF TROUBLE So how do you know when to be concerned? Talk to your care provider immediately if you notice a lump, hard knot, or thickening inside the breast or underarm area; swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast; change in the size or shape of the breast; dimpling or puckering of the skin; itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple; pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast; nipple discharge that starts suddenly; or new pain in one spot that doesn’t go away. Don’t wait until you have a concern to make your appointment! It is important to see your gynecologist or primary care physician yearly to identify and discuss risk factors for breast cancer and to talk about changes in her overall health.

ADVANCED IMAGING TECHNOLOGY WITH 3D While not all women benefit equally from a 3D mammogram, there aren’t any downsides to having your regular screening with this advanced technology, says Ellen Bahtiarian, MD, FACOG, Board-Certified Diagnostic Radiologist and Nuclear Medicine physician. In fact, the radiation dose is nearly equal to that of traditional 2D mammography. “Studies have shown that the cancer detection rate is higher for 3D mammography, and the recall rate (need to return for additional images to clarify a finding) following a 3D screening mammogram is lower,” she says. “While every woman can benefit from 3D mammography, the benefits are greatest for women with dense breasts since having dense breasts can increase the risk of breast cancer and can make breast cancer harder to see on a mammogram.”

If you are concerned you might have breast cancer, contact Debbie Campbell, Beebe’s Cancer Screening Nurse Navigator, at (302) 645-3169. Debbie can connect you with a screening or diagnostic mammogram and with resources for your health journey.


NOURISH

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TYPES OF MAMMOGRAMS

SCREENING MAMMOGRAM ++ This is your yearly mammogram for those who do not have a breast problem. ++ Four standard views are obtained, and the images are interpreted by the radiologist after you have left the facility. ++ The American College of Radiology recommends annual screening mammograms beginning at age 40.

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Showing You Care

DIAGNOSTIC MAMMOGRAM ++ This is for women who have found a lump or have another problem such as pain, a history of breast cancer, or who have been recalled to evaluate a finding on a screening mammogram. ++ The results of a diagnostic mammogram are reviewed right away by a radiologist. ++ In some cases, more images or a breast ultrasound are completed at that time.

It can be hard to know what to do when a close friend or relative is diagnosed with cancer. You can say you’re sorry, but what else can you do to show you care?

3D mammography improves Beebe’s radiologists’ ability to see abnormalities in dense breast tissue and reduces the number of return visits. If your physician recommends a mammogram, Beebe offers advanced 3D mammography at its Diagnostic Imaging centers in Millville, Georgetown, and Rehoboth Beach.

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Here are some tips from Grit & Grace blogger Amanda Gross, Cancer Care Coordinator at Beebe’s Tunnell Cancer Center:

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BE A PEN PAL. Send cards, notes, and supportive or funny text messages that honor the difficult and celebrate the good.

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OFFER AN OPEN-ENDED INVITATION.

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Women going through treatment don’t know how they’ll feel day-to-day, so leave the invitation open. HELP WITH DAILY TASKS. Offer to do

laundry, run errands, or help coordinate a visit from the kids. MAKE DATES. Something simple like coming over every week to watch a show

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FOR MORE INFORMATION on 3D mammography, visit www.beebehealthcare.org/3-D-mammo.

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together can be very supportive and gives her something to look forward to.

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HAVE REGULAR CONVERSATIONS.

Don’t forget to talk about things other than cancer. SEND ANONYMOUS GIFTS. This could

be family meals, books, treats, or services such as lawn care, handyman services, or house cleaning. Sometimes it’s hard for women to ask for or accept things they need. Gifts coming from an anonymous source can lighten that anxiety.

Find more information about living with grit and grace in the face of cancer on the Grit & Grace blog at www.beebewomen. org/blog/author/ amanda.

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ASK THE CARE TEAM

BETWEEN THE SHEETS Staying Ahead of STIs in Your Golden Years BEDSIDE MANNERS

It’s clear that many women age 50+ are continuing to have active, vibrant sex lives. Here’s what older women can do to keep sex safe, enjoyable, and pain-free: ++ KNOW YOUR PARTNER

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and ask about his or her sexual history and whether he or she has had any sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Limit the number of sexual partners that you have— the more partners you have, the greater your risk of contracting an STI.

ADELINE NUKUNA, MD, FACOG, BEEBE WOMEN’S HEALTHCARE— PLANTATIONS

++ ALWAYS USE A

CONDOM during sex

unless you are in a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship. Remember, condoms must be used properly and consistently. ++ TRY VAGINAL

LUBRICANTS or talk

to your doctor about local estrogen therapy to relieve friction and discomfort related to vaginal dryness during sexual relations. Sex should be a pleasurable experience.

ACCORDING to a 2016 report from the CDC, the increase in the rate of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among older Americans is larger than that of the rest of the population. We talked to Adeline Nukuna, MD, FACOG, Gynecologist and Obstetrician at Beebe Women’s Healthcare— Plantations to learn more about what important sexual health issues are facing mature women. WHY ARE STIs ON THE RISE IN OLDER ADULTS? Some older adults may not think that they are at risk for STIs, and as a result, they might not use condoms during sexual encounters. Also, many people do not feel comfortable talking to their

physician about sexual health in general or about certain symptoms they may be experiencing. In addition, providers may not ask their patients about their sexual activity or sexual health. WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU GET AN STI AND WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES IF LEFT UNTREATED? You need to seek medical evaluation and treatment if you are having symptoms of an STI or if you believe that you have been exposed to STIs. STIs have some untoward consequences including pelvic inflammatory disease and chronic pelvic pain. There are other complications that are associated with specific STIs—

Beebe Healthcare is here for you in every phase of your women’s health journey. If you have any questions about Women’s Health, call (844) 316-3330.

neurologic problems, meningitis, complications of HIV, and heart problems, to name a few. HOW OFTEN SHOULD POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN SEE THEIR GYNECOLOGIST? Going for your annual exam is important because your provider will address your overall wellbeing and administer necessary screenings. Before the appointment, write down any concerns you want to discuss with your provider, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, or pain with sexual relations. Also, bring a list of any new medications that you are taking, and be ready to update your provider of any changes in your health status.


One in 4 Americans Can Hold a Conversation in a Second Language. One in 6 Millennials Has $100K in Savings. One in 700,000 Are Struck by Lightning. One in 2000 Fall Off a Ladder. One in 6 People in America Face Hunger. One in 13 Children Have Food Allergies. One in 7 Americans Lose Sleep Over Politics. One in 9 American Workers Works in Sales. One in 20 Americans is a Millionaire. One in 12 Men Are Color Blind. One in 5 Adults in the U.S. Experiences Mental Illness. One in 6 Seniors Have Smartphones. One in 4 Americans Develop Insomnia Each Year. ONE IN 3 AMERICANS HAS PREDIABETES. COULD IT BE YOU? Life is about weighing your odds and being prepared. Here’s why getting screened for prediabetes should be at the top of your list. READ ON ->

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One in 4 Americans Can Hold a Conversation in a Second Language. One in 6 Millennials Has $100K in Savings. One in 700,000 Are Struck by Lightning. One in 2000 Fall Off a Ladder. One in 6 People in America Face Hunger. One in 13 Children Have Food Allergies. One in 7 Americans Lose Sleep Over Politics. One in 9 American Workers Works in Sales. One in 20 Americans is a Millionaire. One in 12 Men Are Color Blind. One in 5 Adults in the U.S. Experiences Mental Illness. One in 6 Seniors Have Smartphones. One in 4 Americans Develop Insomnia Each Year. One in 3 Americans Have Prediabetes.

Dancing with the Odds

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With a family history of diabetes, Deb Brown has always been conscious of staying active and eating a healthy diet. Hear what happened when she found out she was one of 84 million Americans with prediabetes.

KAREN E. SMITH COLEMAN, MD, FACE, WITH BEEBE ENDOCRINOLOGY — MILLSBORO

When she and husband, Milton, moved to Delaware in 2015, Deb slowed down a bit. She noticed she was spending more time on the couch and eating sweet treats more often than she ever did when she was working full-time for the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Pennsylvania. “I noticed I was feeling more sluggish, and I felt like I was thirsty all of the time,” Deb says. “My daughter passed away from complications from diabetes, and my husband, Milton, has diabetes, so I thought that could be what was going on.” Deb’s annual bloodwork showed an elevated A1C—the

percentage of your red blood cells that are coated with sugar. Deb’s levels fell in the prediabetes range.

have a sweet tooth, too,” she says. “I tell people it’s all about being intentional.”

“As soon as I got those results, I said to myself, I need to make some changes,” Deb says. She joined a water aerobics class and exercise group and now exercises four to five times each week. “I’m 73, and I walk regularly. There are many activity groups in my community at Heritage Shores to choose from, so I make an effort to be active every day,” Deb says.

SPOTTING THE SIGNS OF PREDIABETES When Deb and Milton were looking for a specialist to help manage Milton’s diabetes and Deb’s prediabetes, they found Karen Smith Coleman, MD, FACE, with Beebe Endocrinology – Millsboro, who they have known for many years.

She also focused on improving her eating habits. “I was always good about eating a healthy diet, but I

“It shows what a small world it is because Milton used to teach Dr. Smith Coleman when she was in junior high in Baltimore,” Deb


WELLNESS

says with a chuckle. “Then when we were in Reading, Pennsylvania, Dr. Smith Coleman was one of the doctors who also helped care for our daughter. Now, here we are in Delaware, and we are her patients.” Many people do not even notice any symptoms of prediabetes. This is why it is so important to have annual exams and bloodwork done with your primary care provider. If levels are elevated, then you can make changes and work with an endocrinology specialist, says Dr. Smith Coleman. WHAT TO EXPECT DURING TESTING There are three tests that can help detect prediabetes: an eight-hour fasting glucose test, a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test, or a non-fasting test, an A1C. One needs one abnormal test over two different periods for the diagnosis of prediabetes. The key indicators for prediabetes are a fasting glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl, or A1C of 5.7 to 6.4%.

Having a fasting glucose and your A1C levels tested are the first steps in helping patients, like Deb, discover they have prediabetes and get started on improving their health. If caught early, patients are able to make lifestyle changes to prevent getting Type 2 diabetes. MAKE A CHANGE TO AVOID COMPLICATIONS Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that can be prevented by managing and reversing prediabetes with lifestyle changes. Those with prediabetes and diabetes have a higher risk for infections, nerve damage that can cause tingling and pain in the hands and feet, and risk of limb loss due to circulatory problems.

“Patients need to understand that prediabetes and diabetes are serious concerns. They should take action to improve their health because both prediabetes and diabetes can often be prevented or reversed,” Dr. Smith Coleman says. If you are concerned that you may be among the 1 in 3 Americans with prediabetes, talk to your physician about being tested. Beebe Endocrinology sees patients in Lewes and Millsboro. For more information on the practice or to make an appointment, call (302) 648-7999.

MAKING THOSE LIFESTYLE CHANGES Dr. Smith Coleman says many patients are worried about making huge changes to their lives. However, simple steps can lead to huge wins when it comes to our health. She recommends: ++ START SMALL. Current guidelines recommend losing 7% of your weight in six months by focusing on what you eat and how much. Avoid processed foods, soda, and sweets. ++ ADD MORE STEPS. Increase your physical activity slowly. Instead of parking close to the store, park farther away so you have to walk. Skip the elevator and take the stairs if you are able. Before starting an exercise regimen, make sure to discuss your plans with your primary care provider. The ADA recommends doing 30 minutes of aerobics, five times per week for diabetes prevention. ++ MEDICATION. For those with a family history of diabetes or those who are deemed higher risk for developing diabetes, your physician may prescribe medication. Medications can help your body stay balanced and keep glucose levels in check. “Making exercise a priority can be fun. Because of this journey, my husband and I have tried Tai Chi and we learned to cha cha and swing dance,” Deb says. “Exercising makes me feel good. I know my age, but no one is ever too old to move or try a new activity.”

ave a not h o d der, u If yo p ro v i e r a ar y c nd a prim e’s Fi b e e w w. use B e a t w g/ t i s b r we a re . o Doc althc e h e . beeb a-doc find-

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WELLNESS

HOW DOES THE

Thyroid Affect Hormones? The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that sits in your neck. It is responsible for secreting hormones that regulate growth and can control your metabolism, or how fast you burn calories. More and more research is being done on the thyroid and the conditions that can cause it to malfunction. The most common issues with the thyroid gland is the overproduction or underproduction of essential hormones. This can throw your body out of balance and cause you to experience a wide range of symptoms, including: ++ Muscle weakness ++ Fatigue ++ Thinning hair ++ Weight gain or weight loss ++ Heavier than normal ++ Dry skin menstruation ++ Increased sensitivity to cold Because the symptoms are so varied, thyroid conditions often take some time to be diagnosed. CONDITIONS OF THE THYROID INCLUDE: + HYPOTHYROIDISM: This condition is caused when your thyroid does not produce enough of certain hormones. It is more common in women over 60 and can cause problems such as weight gain, joint pain, infertility, and heart disease.

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+ HYPERTHYROIDISM: TThis condition is caused when your thyroid

produces too much of the hormone thyroxine. It causes accelerated metabolism, which leads to sudden weight loss, rapid or irregular heartbeat, sweating, and irritability. This is more common in women than in men, and it often runs in families. + HASHIMOTO’S DISEASE: This condition (often the cause of hypo-

thyroidism) causes your immune system to attack your thyroid. Inflammation from the disease often leads to an underactive thyroid gland. It is more common in middle-aged women and is often treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy. + GRAVES’ DISEASE: This disorder is most common among women

before the age of 40. It causes overproduction of hormones, similar to hyperthyroidism, which can lead to anxiety, irritability, a tremor of your hands or fingers, enlargement of the thyroid (goiter), fatigue, and bulging eyes. It can also cause a skin condition called dermopathy. If you think you could have any of these thyroid disorders, talk to your primary care provider about having a blood test. Are you wondering if you have a thyroid issue and wondering what to do next? Read more at www.beebehealthcare.org/ womens-health.

When thyroid issues become too much, Beebe General Surgery can help. Mark Facciolo, MD, is a Board-Certified General Surgeon with a special interest in Endocrine Surgery. In partnership with your primary care and Beebe Endocrinology specialist, Dr. Facciolo can help create your personalized treatment plan. To find out more about Endocrinology Services at Beebe: www.beebehealthcare.org/endocrinology.


Pets OUR UNEXPECTED

IN THE KNOW

THERAPISTS

“We have heard rave reviews from many patients and even our team members about what a difference the pet therapy volunteers make in their days,” says Lee Halloran, Manager, Volunteer Services at Beebe.

with PAWS for People, a nonprofit pet therapy program that connects patients and visitors with trained dogs and their handlers.

A pet can be much more than the furry friend who leaves slobber on your slippers and “gifts” on your doorstep. Many studies have shown that contact with a gentle, loving animal decreases loneliness and anxiety, increases levels of serotonin and dopamine, and creates motivation in patients for a faster recovery. Beebe Healthcare partners

Beebe’s team of pet therapy volunteers visit the Margaret H. Rollins Lewes Campus, the Rehoboth Beach Health Campus, and Tunnell Cancer Center, to interact with patients, visitors, and team members.

“Pet therapy, especially in medical settings, has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress,” says Jeannie Briley-Wallo, Director of Patient Experience at Beebe. “This program is one of the most popular and it continues to grow.”

Interested in volunteering? Contact Beebe Volunteer Services: volunteer@beebehealthcare.org or (302) 645-3531.

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MIGRAINE MADNESS Feel like regular headaches are driving you up a tree? It’s possible you’re experiencing migraines, which can go far beyond a headache when it comes to disrupting your daily life. While everyone experiences migraines differently, there are FOUR COMMON SYMPTOMS OF MIGRAINES to watch out for, according to the Mayo Clinic. PRODROME One to two days before migraine

AURA Occurring before or during migraine

ATTACK Migraine typically lasting from 4 to 72 hours

POST-DROME The 24-hours post-migraine

PREVENT + TREAT MIGRAINES

++ Getting enough sleep ++ Frequent mood changes ++ Food cravings and increased thirst ++ Frequent yawning

++ Weakness or numbness ++ Vision loss or seeing bright spots or flashes ++ Difficulty speaking

++ Throbbing or pulsing pain and lightheadedness ++ Sensitivity to light and sounds ++ Nausea and vomiting

++ Confusion or dizziness ++ Weakness ++ Moodiness

++ Avoiding stress ++ Relaxing your muscles with yoga ++ Taking over-the-counter pain relievers, like Ibuprofen or Excedrin

If you think you may be experiencing any or all of the above symptoms, contact your doctor to learn about more treatment and prevention options.


TAKE 5

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5 4

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150 130 60 320 90 MINUTES PER WEEK of brisk walking can reduce your chances of developing diabetes.

PET THERAPY locations where Beebe has placed volunteer teams.

mg

SECONDS A DAY of meditation noticeably improves stress.

PUMPKIN OIL DAILY over six months noticeably improves sexual function.

%

MIGRAINE sufferers have a family history of migraines.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

SAVE THE DATE

NOVEMBER 3

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

NOVEMBER 17

BETEL HEALTH FAIR

Mark your calendars for the annual Betel Health Fair SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 9 A.M. TO 3 P.M. AT IGLESIA METODISTA UNIDA BETEL (312 S. Railroad Ave., Georgetown). Free health screenings to be offered at the health fair will include glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, Body Mass Index (BMI), and bone density.

DECEMBER 1

LEWES CHRISTMAS PARADE

Join our Beebe team members as we return to the streets and march in the Lewes Christmas Parade on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 5 P.M., STARTS ON SAVANNAH RD. AT SUSSEX DR. AND ENDS ON SECOND ST. Let’s get in the holiday spirit! The parade will be followed by a tree-lighting and caroling in Zwaanendael Park.

FEBRUARY 9

FEBRUARY HEALTH FAIR

Set time aside this February for the Health Fair at ATLANTIC SANDS HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER IN REHOBOTH BEACH.

For mor e great ev ents, vis it faceboo k.com/p g / BeebeH ealthcar e/ events/ .

31ST ANNUAL BEEBE BALL

You’re invited to the soirée of the season, the 30th Annual Beebe Ball on SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, AT 6 P.M. REHOBOTH BEACH COUNTRY CLUB (221 West Side Dr, Rehoboth Beach). Benefiting the new specialty surgical hospital, which will be located on Rt. 24/Rehoboth Health Campus, this traditionally sold-out evening will feature decadent dining, dancing, and an exciting live auction. For more information, visit www.beebemedicalfoundation.org/ beebeball.


D inah Re a th

PARTING SHOT

I didn’t have any risk factors for a heart attack, but there I was, in the pool, having a heart attack. The cardiac team at Beebe was fantastic, and I loved cardiac rehab. Everyone who has a heart attack needs to do cardiac rehab—I’ve learned so much!

Visit www.beebe healthcare.org/dinah to read more about Dinah’s story. .

15


The Beebe Buzz

C A U G H T YO U B E I N G A C T I V E Workdays can be long. And, if you sit at a desk for much of the day, you might not be getting the activity you need each day. We went out to catch some of our Beebe team members working hard to get their steps in during the workday!

These walkers extraordinaire can be seen most days strolling down Savannah Road. Diane Scholz, Kim Kaczmarczyk, & Lynette Mitchell of Patient Financial

Services make sure to get at least three walks in each day!

team Beebe Marketing een & Gr y ar M rs membe donned Alexandra Keegan and their sunglasses nd took a stroll arou ring du s we Le wn downto their lunch break.

Latericka & Keshawna:

This power duo comes in early and stays after work to get all their steps in at Beebe Women’s Healthcare – Plantations. Latericka Jones & Keshawna Hazzard have noticed a difference in their health because of all the walking, too!

We caught up with this grea t group from B eebe’s Popula ti on Health Depar tment as they returned from a walk around their office in Lew es. Shown ar

e: Haley Winward, Ngo zi Azuogu, Ba rbie Robets, Kim Blanch, & Tracey Bixler.

avigator lth Nurse N ea H ’s en Wom ’s Health & Women er yd Sn e ri Car Buckaloo ctor Bridget e ir D e v ti Execu between moments stole a few d the o walk ar un meetings to Campus. es Rollins Lew . H et ar g Mar

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The Beebe Medical Foundation is grateful for the community’s support and generous giving. Now that is something to flip over!

from this issue, visit www. beebehealthcare.org/

424 Savannah Road Lewes, DE 19958 (302) 645-3300 www.beebehealthcare.org

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MAKE YOUR EVERYDAY DECISIONS HEALTHY ONES. BEEBE—BE THERE.