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Jeffrey M. Bedard In each p ro j e c t w e b e g i n w i t h i n f or m a t i o n and disorder, confusion of purpose, program ambigu i t y, a n i n f i n i t y o f m a t e ri a l s a n d f o rm s . All of these elements, like obfuscating smoke, swirl in a n e rv o u s a t m o s p h e r e . A r c h i t e c t u re i s a result of acting on this indeterminacy. -Steven Holl, Phenomena and Idea


Jeffrey Bedard

Table of Contents

Thickening the Edge

Fall 2010 - Spring 2011 Final Project 1 & 2

Shear Urbanism

Spring 2010 Design Development partner: Jesse Embley

Redefining a Wall

Fall 2008 Design Studio 4

Site Haptics

Spring 2009 Design Studio 5

Layered Movement

Fall 2007 Architectural Design 2 partners: Brandon Dolly, Brad Dunn, Heath Horne, Mike Rich

Sensory Structure

Spring 2009 Design Studio 5 partner: Jesse Embley

Transforming the Grid

Spring 2008 Architectural Design 3 partner: Esther Kang

Urban Shifting

Fall 2009 Design Studio 6

Jeffrey M. Bedard 1161 Silver Lake St. Athol, MA 01331 978-895-2704 bedarj@gmail.com http://www.rpi.edu/~bedarj Rensselaer Polytechnic Intstitute


Thickening the Edge: Student Living & Public Use: Montreal, Quebec At boundary thresholds, multiple systems collide and ecologies transform allowing the adjacent logics to connect or to separate, creating an optimal space to explore and experience. By thickening the edge between differing adjacent conditions, an integrated system can be exploited as a conjoined ecologic where the spatial and phenomenological experience is understood as belonging to both conditions simultaneously; thus enhancing an expanded experience of the program, building, and site through a merging and combination of their ecologics. As such, the condition that acts as a conjoined logic is expanded three-dimensionally to provide an enhanced experience of the exterior and interior conditions of an edge. Positioned between the natural and urban site conditions at the base of Mont Royal in Montreal, Quebec, this project employs architectural means to join student living and urban public spaces within a sloped wooded site in order to expand and integrate one’s experience of internal program and external site relationships.

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Jeffrey Bedard

Fall 2010 - Spring 2011

exercise gathering

living

community

socialize enterttainment

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relax community

gathering a

eat gathering

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interact community m

live sleep

pub ublic

learn play

living gathering

community living

cultural dining g

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Shear Urbanism: Seoul Performing Arts Center*: Seoul, South Korea Cinematic progression, phenomenal transparencies and physical, visual and programmatic interactions are set up to create an urban condition in which the arts transcend the physical boundaries and manifests itself in the urban fabric. Constructing such an environment forces the issue of the streets – or paths – that are typically perceived as the voids within an urban space. By developing the space through a vertical infrastructure of habitable planes, the “streets” shift the urban condition from a solid-void relationship to a layered form of void-void relationships. To emphasize this experiential connectivity, the building relates itself back to the exterior urban context through the means of sheared openings and large cantilevers to emphasize the shifting urban condition within the design. The projection of the cantilevers deteriorates the boundaries of the physical building by engaging the dynamics of the surrounding landscape and city. This occurs through a progression within the building that pushes and pulls users around the programmatic spaces in a form of directed experiences and sights that shift through the internal and external realms of the architecture. In this way, the performance of the building is revealed through the shifting of circulation paths and the spatial/programmatic relationships therein. *Original design competition entry by Dieguez Fridman Architects.

Yonsei University

Namsan Park & Tower

Aluminum Cladding

Gangnam-gu

Steel Tubing

Welted Seam Aluminum Panel

Yeoui-dong

Insulation Steel Tubing HSS3X2.5X5

Vapor Barrier

of Korea

TU14X8X8 Steel Framing

National Cemetery

Wall Washing Lighting

Sindaebang-dong

Aluminum Panel

Gasan-dong

Insulated glazing unit

Slate Tiling

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Jeffrey Bedard

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Spring 2010


Redefining a Wall: Public & Institutional Space: Rockefeller Center West; New York, NY The three main functions of a wall are to support, hold back, or separate. These three functions also serve society through the public realm. By implementing a wall through the site at Rockefeller Center West, the public space could become joined as one site rather than four separate blocks and the space created can form a multitude of spaces and demographics. For this design, various arrangements of size and numbers of walls were tested with the final result being four eight inch thick walls. In keeping to the true meaning of a wall, the walls were used to support the institutional spaces, but more importantly used to hold back and separate aspects of the site and spaces through the means of varying opacity of the walls by using a hung panel system within the steel framed wall. This allowed for light, noise, and sights to be held back at varying points in the project. Through this and the physical aspects of the walls, separation of spaces and people were afforded. Overall, the site can now function for the public as a different space through each wall and around every corner. The number of characteristics of the wall create a number of spaces and feelings throughout the site, allowing for different experiences and places for the users to discover. In this way, the site becomes useful to both the new and the regular users and allows for multiple interactions and experiences for all kinds of people.

Pattern Stone

Dark Slate

Grass

Concrete


Jeffrey Bedard

Fall 2008

primary structure: post and beam secondary structure: steel cantilever tertiary structure: plastic panels


Site Haptics: Addition to World Health Organization: Geneva, Switzerland Perception of everyday life is often focused through the sense of sight. However, the world we inhabit is one of physicality and multiple dimensions. Sight only allows so much of an object to be perceived, but touch opens up one’s perception to the entire truth and manifestation of what is or what could be. Haptic perception– simplified– is the sensation of an object’s geometry and the sensation of the force cues that arise due to interaction between a user and an object. Through multiple studies, it has been shown that what people claim to perceive when touching an object is defined by the force cues rather than the object geometry. By defining a site location as object geometry, the space within can be formed by the force cues that are part of the buildings and trees of the site. Through this process, form, façade, and circulation can all be defined in a unifying gesture that is directly connected to the site of the architecture.

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Site

Site with Object Geometries

Object Geometries & Force Cues


Jeffrey Bedard

Final Form

Spring 2009

Site Design

Exterior Window Placement

Internal Floor Design


Layered Movement: Integrated Lifestyle Housing: Boston, MA The design of this apartment complex evolved from the ideas of transitional characteristics where the boundaries and thresholds where emphasized in order to strengthen the characteristics of this type of community. The characteristics focused on throughout the design were those of color and light; public and private; and the perceived and actual depth of spaces. Each unit was organized in a similar fashion in order to organize the spatial experience within the units and the entire complex. As one approaches the unit from the central core of public space, they reach a panel with wavy vertical lines which can roll into the wall allowing the units to expand their activities into the hallway and allow spontaneous interaction by the porous nature of their entry. However, as one progress towards the back of the units, or the faรงade, it becomes more private due to the panels separating each section of space throughout the apartment. Altering the unit in section was also important in order to give variation throughout the circulation inside each unit. The altering in section created platforms separated by a three foot vertical change in height. This vertical change enhanced the privacy of the panels by separating the private spaces vertically from the circulation area.

private space

living space

public hallway

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Jeffrey Bedard

public space

Fall 2007

private public space

private space

natural daylighting

fragmented natural light, passing as colored light through a highly perforated screen

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slightly fragmented, coming from the bedrooms through a colored glass panel

clear glazing and the exterior panel windows on the most private space of the apartment

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Sensory Structure: Outpatient Clinic: Unalaska, Alaska The somatosensory system, simplified and broken down, consists of two forms of touch: kinesthetic and tactile. The kinesthetic aspects of this system deal with the actual forces of touch and use muscles and tendons in order to provide a signal. The tactile side of touch is more specific and signals the details of a touch such as heat, pressure, texture, and contact. Architecture throughout the modern time has seemed to dwell in the visual sense. Rather than interacting with the two dimensionality of images and the three dimensional image produced by the human eye, architecture should stimulate one’s feelings, both physically and psychologically. “The architecture of the eye detaches and controls, whereas haptic architecture engages and unites….Buildings have lost their opacity and depth, sensory invitation and discovery, mystery and shadow.” Through explorations of haptic technologies’ ability to enhance and translate one’s sense of touch, architectural design, too, should be able to implement the ability to enhance and translate one’s sense of space. Although perception and thought will never allow pure feeling to be in control, the ability to transform a perception of space and an understanding of architecture through the means of what creates touch becomes a great opportunity for architectural design.

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touch

cell structure

somatasensory system


Jeffrey Bedard

Spring 2009

Employee

Public Medical Surgical

Laboratory Utilities

Employee

Utilities Medical

Public

Laboratory

Surgical

Employee

Employee

Medical

Laboratory

Public

Utilities Public

Medical

Surgical

Utilities

Laboratory

Surgical

program implementation

facade construction


Transforming the Grid: Sports Complex: UPENN; Philadelphia, PA

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The design of this sports complex was born through the concept of a grid. The overall shape of the building was formed through the manipulation of two grids: one representing the roof plane and one representing the floor plane. These grids were then pulled together where the different sports spaces were arbitrarily placed. This formed a curvilinear surface which had a joint like feature at about eye level. By producing a wall shape like this, the sports spaces could be looked in upon either at downward or upward depending on where the cut was placed on the wall surface. The roof system was also formed through a similar technique where the roof system was formed by the offsetting of lines which then acted similarly to those of the ceiling and floor planes. This roof system and the unique wall formation were both developed through ecological based systems in order to create an efficient building that will not be wasteful towards the environment. The overall design is very useful for when the Penn Relays are present in the adjacent football stadium. For this short period of the year, the sports complex can be doubled as a training and preparatory space for the athletes and vendors as well as providing much space for viewers to use or relax in.

program

grid


Jeffrey Bedard

Spring 2008

Louver Design Strategy

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spatial relationships structure


Urban Shifting: Mixed Use Public Building: Chatham Square; New York, NY Chatham Square is located in the heart of New York City’s Chinatown. This open plaza is at the junction of a unique intersection of both streets and culture. Surrounded by a local population of Chinese and Italian Americans, Chatham Square is an ode to this collision of traditions. Urbanistically, the square is an intersection of angled streets which provides a site that is anything but orthogonal. By addressing these shifts and collisions at multiple scales, the building proposal is just that: a continuation of the urban landscape within a building of shifting planes. As one is absorbed into the fabric of the building, the urban atrium introduces people to the merging of three distinct programs: a youth hostel, a public library, and a community center. This building shifts the boundaries of these programs through the means of sectional shifts that are observed in plan looking both up and down at new and varying spaces. It is these shifts that draw users into, up, and through the building so as to continue the urban condition up the building and then relate the user back to the city through the façade which plays between opaque and transparent depending on the programmatical conditions within the building.


Jeffrey Bedard

lobby 900 owner’s living space 2400 communal space 900 kitchen 3000 bedrooms 4800 bathrooms 600

Fall 2009

lobby cafe communal space games room private meeting rooms bathrooms

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lobby circulation desk employee space children’s collection local collection general collection reading spaces bathrooms

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Bedard Portfolio