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The 25th Anniversary Issue


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highlights | 2012

VOL 2

IN THIS ISSUE

FEATURES 04

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Laying the Groundwork What our other cofounder, the late Bon Appétit Management Company president Ernie Collins, brought to the mix.

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LETTERS 02

Fedele Bauccio

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Michael Bauccio

Bon Appétit and Compass Group: A Special Combination

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Liz Baldwin

Compass Group North America CEO Gary Green on the two companies’ relationship.

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Maisie Greenawalt

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Helene York

2011: Celebrating Our Farm to Fork Suppliers

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A few words from the farmers, fishers, and artisans with whom we partner.

Timeline: 1987 - 2012 A year-by-year look at our major milestones — openings, awards, and commitments — along with photos and memories from our team members.

I Met My Sweetie at Bon Appétit Some Bon Appétiters have it all — they’ve found work they love and they found love at work!

The Roots of Bon Appétit Management Company How a couple of contract food service veterans turned a rambunctious little catering company into a food-industry pioneer

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The Back Page Travel back to Bravo 1995 and solve this puzzle!

2 0 1 2 Vo l u m e 2

B R AV O | 0 1


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fedelebauccio Chief Executive Officer and Cofounder, 1987

“A dream you dream alone is only a dream. But a dream we dream together is reality.“ – John Lennon and Yoko Ono

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’ve always liked that quote, and I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately, as Bon Appétit Management Company turns 25 years old. A quarter century! Wow! We can be proud, and we can celebrate.

Twenty-five years ago, Bon Appétit’s “headquarters” opened in a dingy South of Market warehouse in San Francisco. My desk was a rickety card table. My view was of the jail across the street. I remember one of my sons stepping into my “office” and turning to me with a worried look: “Dad, are you crazy?” I had to admit, it was a valid concern. The road ahead was completely uncertain. All I knew was that I had a dream of building a company that could make a significant difference in our industry, and a burning desire to succeed. I hit the road, trying to convince clients to take a chance on us. I promised to deliver a new kind of food service: one that would offer high-quality, fresh, authentic food, prepared from scratch by talented, passionate chefs. We started with a few clients who believed in us, and we delivered on our promises. I began to feel that we could fulfill the dream of charting a new course. Today, we have hundreds of clients and serve more than 130 million meals across the country every year. We’ve established game-changing standards. We’ve embraced small farmers, ranchers, and artisan producers; we are fighting hard to create protections for farmworkers; we are leading the way to improve animal welfare; we created the

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Low Carbon Diet to show our clients how they, too, can make a difference for the planet. Our initiatives are helping to nourish a sustainable future for the generations that follow us. And through it all, we have built a tradition of excellence by delivering the highest quality of food in the industry. How did we get this far? There’s only one answer. It’s the people — it’s every one of you. Each time I travel around the country and visit our cafés, we talk to each other, just like families do, and you tell me your stories. I am always proud to see the ways in which you carry forward our company’s culture and values. I see you in the kitchen, never taking shortcuts, but staying true to authentic food preparation. I see you working with local farmers, connecting our company with the community. I see you giving of yourselves, creating Chef ’s Tables and volunteering wherever you think we can make a difference. I see you embracing new employees, and teaching them what we’re about so they, too, can feel like they’re part of the dream. That’s what a good family does. In the Bon Appétit family, we encourage one another and find the best in each other. Over the years we’ve invested in and believed in our own people, and it’s never been a mistake. I’m very proud of the fact that Bon Appétit dishwashers have become managers; that janitors have become chefs. Our employees bring their best to the


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Humberto Gueverra from Market Café at Cisco - San Jose. Humberto started as a dishwasher and is now Chef de Cuisine at Cisco’s flagship café.

table, and in so doing, make our company stronger with the quality of their dedication. It’s been a long road from the warehouse across from the jail to the company we are today. Even as we celebrate our accomplishments, we know there are many more mountains to climb. With the support of our wonderful partner, Compass Group, we will continue to flourish and to stretch our imaginations. We will help build a new model in agriculture — one that is economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially equitable. We will continue to create more initiatives that will help restore the beauty and bounty of this Earth. We will keep on raising hell and standing up for what is right. As Bon Appétit turns 25, I find myself wishing there were a farm table big enough for all of us to sit down at together, as the family that we are. We would break bread together, as we so often do, and I would lift my glass to you, and say the two words that I most want to say on this occasion: Thank you. Thank you for dreaming this dream with me. I am proud, and I am humbled. You have my deepest gratitude. Office administrator extraordinaire Vicki Field

General Manager Francie Gilmer, Friendsview Manor

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Cofounders Fedele Bauccio, CEO, and Ernie Collins, president, in a full-page December 21, 1987, San Jose Mercury News story about Bon Appétit's busy catering season. "Every night is like opening night. I don't think I've worked this hard before," said Fedele.

The Roots of Bon Appétit Management Company How a couple of contract food service veterans turned a rambunctious little catering company into a food-industry pioneer By Bonnie Azab Powell, Director of Communications

hese days, when the news is once again full of Internet startups making gazillions, it’s easy to forget that most of these companies will not exist in five years, let alone 25. To survive, a company needs not only a great product (or two), but experienced leaders and a strong culture that can flex as it grows. A little luck never hurts, either.

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In the 25 years that followed, cofounders Fedele Bauccio, CEO, and the late Ernie Collins, president — joined a year later by COO Michael Bauccio, another Saga leader — turned a failing off-premises catering company into a $700 million on-site operator of corporate, education, museum, and specialty cafés. And along the way, they not only transformed the industry, but also made strides toward a more sustainable food system in this country.

Bon Appétit Management Company has been fortunate to have possessed all of these advantages from the beginning. It was never a baby-faced startup. It came into the world more or less fully formed in 1987, when two veterans of Saga Corporation, a billion-dollar contract food-services and restaurant company, bought a zany 10-year-old Bay Area company — Bon Appétit Catering — that was hanging on financially by its fingernails, and relaunched it as Bon Appétit Management Company.

Can you spot the young Fedele Bauccio in this photo from Saga’s 1966 annual meeting?

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In 1987 Fedele had a clear vision of what the food industry needed, even if the industry didn’t know it: Real food, cooked from scratch by real chefs, and delivered with great service.To understand where that dream came from, and how Bon Appétit made it a reality, we’ll have to go back. Way back. WHEN LIFE HANDS YOU LEMONS, JUICE THEM FOR YOUR COWORKERS

Contract food services are believed to have been born in 1897 when a worker at a locomotive plant in Richmond, CA, quit his job to sell lemonade for “a penny a dipper,” according a fascinating October 1997 history of the industry in Food Management. The plant’s managers saw a subsequent drop in the accident rate, which they ascribed to making cold drinks available — the genesis of today’s corporate belief that good food services are directly correlated to improved productivity.

From a 1980s Saga Brochure

Cal State University in Northridge. In 1970, Saga promoted Michael to his first management post, at South Dakota State in Brookings, SD.

As giants of manufacturing built ever more plants and factories, companies emerged to feed these expanding workforces, many of them from origins as humble as that lemonade stand. J. Willard Marriott’s empire, for example, was launched in 1927 from a nineseat root-beer stand. That decade also saw advances in mechanization that gave rise to the vending machine industry. (The Automatic Canteen Co., founded in 1929, was an innovative early developer of vending services and products; in 1993, Canteen was acquired by the UK-based Compass Group PLC — a major play by Compass to enter the US market so it could compete against Marriott.)

Throughout its growth, Saga’s culture stayed rock-solid. “Bill [Laughlin] and the others wanted people who could turn on a dime, who could be ‘relationship people’ — who understood how to take care of the clients and motivate managers,” recalls Michael. “And once you found the right person, you knew you’d have them forever. None of us ever felt there would be life after Saga. It was a very tight family.”

AN EDUCATIONAL SAGA

MEATLOAF? IT MUST BE WEDNESDAY

In 1948, three college roommates at Hobart College, in Geneva, NY — Harry Anderson, W. Price Laughlin (known as Bill), and William Scandling — hated their college food so much that they decided to compete with it. They would run food from an empty college cafeteria and sell two-week meal tickets to their fellow students. The venture was successful, and in 1949 the trio incorporated it as Saga Dining Halls.

The people side was very strong; the food, not so much.“Saga was not a good food company,” Fedele admits.“We were like a machine, with menu cycles and recipe boxes.”

In the postwar boom, millions of returning World War II veterans were attending college at government expense. Under Bill Laughlin’s leadership, Saga did well, dominating the college market by the 1960s. One of Saga’s biggest advantages, Food Management writes, came from the workforce available to it:“the opportunity to employ students part-time let it identify college-educated management trainees who were a good fit for its food service culture.”

But we’re jumping ahead. The 1960s saw both consolidation and diversification: Marriott and Saga acquired many other companies and expanded into new restaurant businesses.

Everyone was cooking like that back then. Writes Food Management: At colleges in the 1960s and ‘70s, “menus were presented in predictable cycles at all accounts. …Vegetarian and authentic ethnic items were unknown and unwanted, … food quality was only middling in most instances. …In short, the overwhelming majority of contractors’ foodservices were mediocre and not at all like the commercial restaurants … that were then the undisputed trendsetters in American foodservice.”

Hmmm…sound familiar? Bon Appétit CEO Fedele Bauccio started washing dishes for Saga in 1960, while a freshman at the University of Portland. He was originally planning to be a dentist, but when the manager quit, he was handed the keys. “I wouldn’t have been a very good dentist — I can’t sit still that long,” he laughs. His first management post was at Marylhurst College in Portland, OR. COO Michael Bauccio, Fedele’s younger brother, meanwhile, began his food service career with Saga in 1968, mopping floors at

Fedele and Michael Bauccio, CEO and COO, with the late Regional Vice President John Nelson

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Fedele, however, “wanted to do better.” In 1982, he was named president of Saga’s Specialty Foodservices Group, which consisted of the Business Food Service division, Hotel Food Services, and several restaurant chains. He loved being in the restaurant business, and being around food. The Bauccio family is Italian and, as Fedele says,“I grew up next to my mother’s apron, cooking the big Sunday dinner with her.” His father was always inviting strangers from all walks of life to join them at that meal. “There would be people eating with us who no one knew.‘We should share our table with everyone,’ my father said. I never forgot that lesson,” recalls Fedele.“I believe food should be about community.” From his family, he also learned about respecting your ingredients and making the most of them. His grandmother would take the

‘None of us ever felt there would be life after Saga. It was a very tight family.’ young Fedele to empty lots to pick wild mustard greens. “She’d cook those greens with a big pot of beans that lasted for at least three dinners,” recalls Fedele. Saga’s chain-restaurant businesses did make an effort to serve good food, but it wasn’t a high priority for the educational or corporate accounts. Not yet, anyway... In the mid-1980s, the booming U.S. economy spurred another wave of consolidation for contract companies, and Marriott went on a buying spree. To everyone’s surprise, it staged a successful hostile takeover of Saga in the summer of 1986. All of a sudden, Marriott was the largest contract food service provider in America, with control of Saga’s 425 education accounts (most of which Michael ran), 300 business, and 175 health care accounts; its 121 Stuart Anderson’s Black Angus/Cattle Company restaurants (which Fedele ran, along with

Fedele Bauccio has always liked cooking for a group, whether family gatherings or in this case, Saga colleagues on a camping trip

a lot of the B&I); and hundreds more chain restaurants in various categories, from white tablecloth to fast food. “We were just stunned,” recalls Michael. An era had come to an end. A few months later, Michael was on a plane with his new boss. He offered to tell him about his key players during the five-hour flight. “And he said to me — I’ll never forget this — ‘I don’t really give a crap about your people. What I really want to know is whether you’re going to make your numbers,’” Michael recalls, his blue eyes ablaze. “That stuck with me.” After never imagining they’d work anywhere but Saga, Fedele and Michael didn’t think they could stomach staying much longer. BON APPÉTIT, BABY!

The newly hatched Bon Appétit CEO making stock at the Bank of America opening in 1988

In San Francisco, only 40 miles or so north of Saga’s deluxe corporate offices in Menlo Park, a brash catering company in a very different world of food was struggling to stay afloat. Founded in the late 1970s by Gregg Patyk, a former monk, Bon Appétit Catering was located over a meatpacking plant. Its talented staff of event planners and chefs — including a young Mario Batali — worked and played hard into the wee hours. CONTINUED ON PAGE 106

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Cofounders Fedele Bauccio and Ernie Collins

Ernie Collins Laying the Groundwork for Bon Appétit’s Success By Bonnie Azab Powell, Director of Communications

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ook at many successful companies, and you’ll find a yin-andyang team at the top: two complementary personalities with dissimilar emotional makeups and non-overlapping talents. Bon Appétit Management Company is one of them.

Ernie Collins, Bon Appétit cofounder and president until his retirement in 2003,“was a very laid-back kind of guy, very different than I am,” says cofounder and CEO Fedele Bauccio.“And as it turned out, he was the best partner in the world, because we had two different skill sets. We never had one argument in all the years we worked together.”

Ernie did just that, building the support system as Fedele built the client base. Ernie’s attention to detail and his experience in law, finance, and administration were critical to keeping Bon Appétit afloat in the early years, when everyone scrambled to do everything and it wasn’t unheard of for Liz to poke pinholes in checks to vendors, which would cause the banks a few days’ delay in processing the checks. “Ernie spent a great deal of time alone on the roof of the building. We watched as he paced the roof smoking cigars and wondered if he intended to jump,” wrote Liz in a Bravo tribute to Ernie after his death from cancer in 2007. “He didn’t. I learned later that’s just how Ernie processed things. Quietly.”

A corporate lawyer by training, Ernie tended not to argue with people. He was a quiet, unflappable guy, and according to Chief Financial Officer Liz Baldwin, one of his Those who worked alongside him soon greatest powers was his ability to just wait learned that he might be quiet, but he also silently until the opposition caved in. “Ernie had a dark, sneakily funny sense of humor, only raised his voice maybe three times in the and a powerful compassion. Ernie’s back-ofwhole time I knew him,” recalls Liz, who was The tradition of “everyone does everything” for the-house support was not just about legal started early. Here’s cofounder Ernie with the original company, Bon Appétit openings processes and accounting. He and Fedele Collins manning a cash register on opening day at Catering, that Fedele and Ernie acquired in Stanford in 1988! agreed that the company’s first priority 1987. “He and Fedele were polar opposites, should be to take care of the people who take which could have been absolutely deadly but luckily ended up being care of the business. They never missed payroll once. It was Ernie very good.” who established that Bon Appétit’s corporate office’s primary function should be to support its operations side. Ernie encouraged Liz Luckily indeed, because Fedele and Ernie’s partnership was an impul“to find ways to solve problems for our employees in their work, and if sive one. Ernie had served as vice president, general counsel, and secnecessary, their personal lives. Having faced several family difficulretary of Saga Corporation since 1973, managing the billion-dollar ties/tragedies as a young man, Ernie was particularly sensitive to company’s law department as well as acquisitions and dispositions employees struggling with an illness or caring for a family member,” and capital-raising transactions; developing employee benefit plans; wrote Liz in 2007. That commitment is still true today. and overseeing alcoholic beverage licensing and franchising programs. After Marriott’s hostile takeover of Saga in 1986, he too had When Ernie retired in 2003, his final Bravo letter talked about how begun looking for a new job. In 1987, when Fedele asked him to draw Bon Appétit might have started in a less-than-impressive setting, up some legal papers on the side to help Fedele to purchase this compared to the splendors of Saga headquarters. Yet “the vision of scrappy, San Francisco-based catering company, Ernie said he wantwhat Bon Appétit would become was clear and unwavering,” he ed to join him. wrote. His parting words to Bon Appétiters were to“remember, when problems arise — as they always will — seek solutions, not blame.” Fedele, being Fedele, wasn’t so sure he wanted a partner. However, That advice, which was invaluable when the company began, remains Ernie made him a very appealing proposal: “He said he’d completely a part of Bon Appétit’s culture. take care of the ‘back of the house’ for me, to free me up to build the company the way I wanted to build it,” recalls Fedele. So does Ernie Collins.

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A food service star is born: Fedele Bauccio and Ernie Collins buy Bon Appétit Catering on Seventh Street in San Francisco and re-launch the business as Bon Appétit Management Company

MILESTONES

FIRST CORPORATE ACCOUNT OPENS: Bear Stearns, CA

Bon Appétit’s mobile catering kitchen was state of the art for 1987 Photo: Glen Jay Photography

The old Bon Appétit Management Company logo was meant to invoke four-star service and fine dining (with a folded napkin)

District Manager John Engstrom and CEO Fedele Bauccio

The first Bon Appétit Management Company location was far from glamorous.

We asked our employees, "If Bon Appétit were a person, how would you describe him or her?" Here's how they responded:

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. .passionate (that’s the reason for our success), responsible (we do our homework in regards to


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87 Bon Appétit Catering has the knack of turning a celebration into a personalized extravaganza. Its forte is styling a party to any theme, from a down-home rodeo to an upscale black-tie bash with iced seafood bar, fresh fruit cascades, vegetable crudités baskets and imported cheese and free-form bread displays. In its 10-year history, the firm has catered some of the largest and most lavish Bay Area events, ranging from attorney Melvin Belli’s “street” birthday party for 10,000 guests to Apple Computer’s 10th anniversary celebration for 5,000. —Times Tribune, March 15, 1988

ZOE SMITH

President, Zoe’s Cookies and Other Delights, Richmond, CA

Despite some big-ticket bashes, cash was a little tight sometimes in the early days

I first began working with Bon Appétit in the mid-1980s, when the offices were located in South of Market. Over the years, Zoe’s Cookies and Other Delights has definitely benefited as Bon Appétit has grown. Although there were some bumps, I have a great deal of respect for the people at Bon Appétit. You guys make such great food and are always a pleasure to work with. Thank you so much for bringing my company along for the ride!

farm to fork

“Exhibition” cooking was a big deal in the days of meat defrosted in boiling water

the environment), caring (not just for the customer but the people behind the scenes).

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lizbaldwin Chief Financial Officer Joined Bon Appétit in...1985

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ime flies when you’re having fun.” That’s what comes to mind as I think back on the last 27 years with Bon Appétit. Twentyseven years…

I am the last of those “grandfathered in” from the original Bon Appétit Catering, the small company Fedele Bauccio and Ernie Collins purchased in 1987. I had come to the kooky catering company intending to spend two weeks helping the owners get control of their finances, then return to my banking career. Almost two years later, we were still at it. Loitering in this little food service company proved to be the best procrastination of my life. Returning from lunch one day in early 1987, I noticed a handsome gentleman in a suit fidgeting in the parking lot of Bon Appétit Catering’s corporate offices. (I use the term loosely, as “BAC corporate” was office space above a meat-packing plant, across from the San Francisco City Jail. We usually had to step over some bodies to get to the front door.) That gentleman, of course, was Fedele, and though he may have looked out of place, he was not lost. He’d been given the address of Bon Appétit Catering, which he would buy and use as a base from which to launch Bon Appétit Management Company. As he followed me up our rickety stairs, little did I know I would follow his vision of a different kind of company for the next 27 years. I may be the only person at Bon Appétit who is not a foodie. It is my role to care for the people who care about the food. You all are a passionate group. I’ve had the incredible good fortune to have made a career at Bon Appétit, lending support to the people who bring Fedele’s dream to life every day, day in and day out.

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Fedele told us from day one: “If you’re not an operator, then your job better be to support the operators. If not, get out.” I always liked clear direction. Fortunately, we received additional details from Ernie. We set up the corporate functions as support services. We were encouraged to be flexible and think beyond the status quo. Michael Bauccio’s arrival cemented a true partnership between corporate services and operations. It made sense to me: take care of the people who are running your business. We were encouraged to manage departments with the same entrepreneurial spirit the operators used to run their accounts. Do it right, but get it done. Because we “owned” our respective elements, we were fastidious with the numbers, passed every audit, got our folks paid properly and on time, no matter what. We worked with vendors, solved problems and helped open business, but the needs of the operators always came first. The changes in the model Fedele espoused affected how our corporate departments functioned. In 1987 this was a different way of doing business. We all operated with this focus and, while this may evoke some laughter from the field, we manage to the same principle today. People think I have a big job, but the real work is done by our operators and their staffs every single day of the year. If I fail to answer my phone or respond to an e-mail right away, life goes on. I can set many of my own deadlines and then extend them. Our operators don’t have the luxury of waiting until later. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner need to be on time, 365 days a year. Since I can barely boil water, putting out meals for thousands of students and corporate employees every day is nothing short of miraculous to me. I am pleased to support our people with the multitude of


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me. I could not imagine another company whose passion and high ideals were consistently turned into real change, as was the case with Bon Appétit. Where else could I work in a company whose leaders knew everyone’s name, at every level of the organization, who helped at openings by running kitchens or cash registers — whatever it took? To this day, I am hard pressed to keep up with Fedele and Michael. I simply cannot imagine myself anywhere else. This has been way more than a job; it has been an astonishing adventure. And like reading a great book, I have to see what will happen next. CEO Fedele Bauccio with CFO Liz Baldwin, Bon Appétit Management Company’s first employee

things they manage, after the meals are served. It is a privilege to lead our corporate resources that provide support to the field. We have department heads of such important functions as Information Technology and Audit who began as student workers for us 20 years ago. They understand the demands placed on our operators — they have worked in that world — and now personify support to the field in their respective areas. We also have many who have not come from the operations side, but love the excitement of openings and go above and beyond helping operations after they finish their regular jobs. We understand our role and have formed a shared bond, helping move the company forward. From creating an award-winning meal to producing an accurate unit P&L statement, it takes all the parts to be what Bon Appétit is: creative, responsible, successful, and in the end, a family. To me it will always be the people who are the magic that is Bon Appétit.

The past 27 years have flown by. I haven’t been bored for one minute. Our work has been a series of enormous challenges, but never, ever dull. The word “fun” appears in our beliefs, and it has been fun. The journey has also been exhilarating, inspiring, scary, and challenging. Fedele, Ernie, and Michael encouraged my growth in ways that I would not have dreamed possible. We have been challenged to accomplish the unimaginable, and we’ve discovered ourselves in the process. I am humbled to think that I am even a small part of this success story. Time does fly when you’re having fun, but I believe that with this company, and the passion that is Bon Appétit, the best is yet to come. Human Resources Director Patricia Dozier

Our growth came in fits and starts, challenging both our resources and flexibility. At each stage, I held my breath to see if we might lose the magic. But because we were able to attract the very best talent, the dream remained secure. Working near Silicon Valley, I saw people leaving their jobs for the next big thing. That never appealed to

Happy Birthday from HQ: Corporate Controller Nubia Tirado-Caoili, Human Resources Assistant Sherry Lee, Web and Database Developer Benjamin Ng, Support Services Manager Joshua Eisenberg, and Director of Payroll Jee De Leon

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Michael Bauccio joins the company, and Bon Appétit opens its first education account — the Santa Catalina School

CHRISTINE SEITZ

Consultant, Bon Appétit headquarters, Palo Alto, CA Joined us in...1988, as executive chef at Xerox

MILESTONES

OPENINGS* Santa Catalina School, Monterey, CA Xerox, CA Sundeck, CA Hawthornes, CA Floor Fifty, CA Concord Bank of America, CA Amdahl, CA LA Data Center Bank of America, CA* *Only current clients will be listed subsequently in this timeline

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I was excited about the opportunity but nervous about corporate food service. Were they really going to let me write my own menus and create my own food? How was I going to explain to my parents that I was no longer a restaurant chef? Mostly I was thankful that I was going to get to work Monday through Friday and start a family. What I’ve learned: I’ve learned to never say “I can’t,” and instead to say,“How can I?”That attitude is imbued in our culture. It’s about taking that extra step to make it right for our employees and our customers, and to do so while protecting our resources. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We are larger, and more complex — but the passion for great food has not changed one bit!

Consultant Christine Seitz, in 1992 (with then-chef Jill Bartolo, now general manager at Altera) and above right, in 2011

And another thing: My first Bon Appétit baby was born March 30, 1990 and now has graduated from college! Although I have been a contractor for the past 11 years, I have always felt part of the family.

Bon Appetit’s second office at 444 DeHaro St. in San Francisco

The first issue of the Bon Appétit Management Company newsletter didn’t have a name — it offered a contest instead. This list shows CEO Fedele Bauccio’s favorites, but the winning entry of Bravo came from Jessica Collins, cofounder Ernie Collins’ daughter.

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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...proud!

Terry McGhee

...scrappy.

Jill Koenen

...creative.

Bryan Bruin


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88 General Manager Suzanne Peterson, Sister Claire Barone, and Executive Chef Jeffrey Walker from Santa Catalina School - our very first education account!

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s the first account in the Bon Appétit Management Company Educational Division… Santa Catalina School is most proud of our affiliation with such a wonderful company. Fedele, Michael, Mary Clark [former district manager] and our wonderful management staff at Santa Catalina School treat us like family and serve us with all the graciousness and generosity possible. We are deeply grateful to you for all that you have done in establishing a standard of excellence within your industry which benefits our educational program. We look forward to a long affiliation with Bon Appétit. —from the Sisters of Santa Catalina School in 1997

Santa Catalina School’s Sisters Christine Price, Claire Barone, Jean Gilbully and Carlotta O’Donnell in 1997

EDWARD JARRELL

Executive Chef, Pacific Union College, Angwin, CA Joined us in...1988, as a sous chef at Bank of America Technology Center

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... Bon Appétit was brand new but already had a vision of making restaurant-quality food in a corporate setting. It was great timing because I was getting ready to return to restaurants. What I’ve learned: No limits. Do what it takes to make it great and the business will follow. It gives me satisfaction to know that I have played a part in changing the way people eat for the better. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I’ve seen us go from a catering company with a big heart — a very little fish in a big pond — to an industry leader that’s making a difference. Bon Appétit is a great company for chefs who care about food because it allows us so much freedom to make good food and do the right thing for the planet. Moments I’ve felt proud: Serving as a founding member of Fedele’s “kitchen cabinet” [an informal advisory board to CEO Fedele Bauccio]. My favorite Bon Appétit memory: Back in the day, when the whole company pitched in on openings, Fedele would help wash windows and stuff rotisserie chickens while wearing a three-piece suit.

The 2003 Kitchen Cabinet: Compass Group Vice President for Corporate Sustainability Initiatives and Culinary Marc Zammit, Rio Rancho 5 Executive Chef Sylvia Oliveira, Pacific Union College Executive Eddie Jarrell, Resident District Manager Helene Kennan former Exxon Executive Chef Ben Whorton, Colorado College Executive Chef Edward Clark, former Macalaester College Executive Chef Donald Fleming, Hamilton College Executive Chef Reuben Haag, and CEO Fedele Bauccio

Eddie Jarrell, executive chef at Pacific Union College, in the old days

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michaelbauccio Chief Operations Officer Joined Bon Appétit in...1988, to head the education division

A

s Bon Appétit Management Company turns 25, I’ve been thinking a lot about what has gotten us to where we are today.

From the beginning, we saw Bon Appétit as a relationship company. A relationship company has clients for life, or tries to. One of the most rewarding things about this business is that our clients feel very proud to partner with Bon Appétit. They end up feeling like family. That happens because we grow with them, we deliver on our promises, and we innovate for them. We look each other in the eye and say, “OK, we’re doing great, but what’s next? What can we improve?”

The late Sister Carlotta O’Donnell once wrote a letter to me that I saved. In it, she said: “When I reflect on past events of our work together, I often remember not only your 10-year Bon Appétit anniversary, but also one even longer. For Santa Catalina began with Saga and you in 1965. We have been with you two times in beginnings, which is a rare bond of friendship and of our teamwork.…May all your years ahead continue in the same successful spirit and bring you and those you serve the joy and realization that your dreams and effort have come to fruition. Your warm, personal, careful approach guarantees that this will come about. For us, engaging with Bon Appétit has been one of the most satisfying experiences in the realm of administration.” I cannot tell you how proud it makes me that Santa Catalina was our first account and that the remaining Sisters are still part of the Bon Appétit family. A true relationship company also has employees for life. There are hundreds who’ve been with this company for a decade or more, at all levels. Early on, we had an idea of how we would grow our business, and if you look at how we open new accounts today, you’ll see that formula has never changed. We believe in training people, not training manuals. We send our best chefs, cooks, managers, and

COO Michael Bauccio with Santa Catalina Sisters Claire Barone, Christine Price, and the late Jean Gilbully in 1999

Santa Catalina School in Monterey, CA, was our first education account. The Sisters of Santa Catalina had been my clients for more than a decade before that — and they had become true friends. They took a real risk in switching to this brand-new startup. They did it because they trusted that I would not let them down.

COO Michael Bauccio with former district manager Jan DeGalla and SVP Cary Wheeland at a picnic in the early 1990s

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Fedele reads a thank-you letter to staff

front-of-the-house folks in, to work for a few days or weeks alongside the local team and the new employees. They instruct and troubleshoot on the fly, and they move heaven and earth to deliver on our promises to the new client. No printed manual can do that. Those of you who know me, know that I’m not a sentimental man. Yet when I hear a new Bon Appétit employee exclaim at the end of a long transition weekend,“I’ve learned how to make a real marinara sauce!” — I’m moved beyond words. You can see the pride blossom in that line cook as she learns new skills, and as she realizes this is a company that values her contribution; indeed, that depends on it. Thank you to each and every one of you for your hard work and sacrifices over the years. There would be no Bon Appétit without you.

Finance/Operations Director Lucretia Cotton

Michael and Armando Maes, chef/manager at Oracle – Redwood Shores

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carywheeland Senior Vice President Joined Bon Appétit in 1988, as graveyard shift supervisor at Bank of America

H

ow I started: I worked within COO Michael Bauccio’s organization in the late ‘70s when he was a regional vice president at Saga and I was a student manager at Western State College of Colorado, a Saga account. Saga hired me out of college and Michael sent me to Santa Barbara. Six months later he promoted me to general manager at Thacher School, which would later become a Bon Appétit client. Fedele started Bon Appétit in 1987: I was then the general manager at Loyola Marymount working for Marriott, which had acquired Saga two years earlier; Michael was then the division vice president within Marriott. In April of 1988, Michael left to join Fedele and not long after phoned me with an offer. I came on board in July to help launch the education division with him.

I knew from the minute Michael called me about Bon Appétit, as long as he was leading the charge, it was going to be great.The experience has exceeded everything I could have imagined! I never hesitated when the offer was made, and there hasn’t been a day over the past two and a half decades that I have not considered myself blessed to work for Bon Appétit!

While Fedele has been the face of the organization, Michael has been the heart. Fedele has been the driver, and Michael the strong and steady mechanic who’s kept the engine running. Bon Appétit has thrived, often in the face of adversity, because Fedele and Michael have always had faith that, given the opportunity, people are going to do the right thing.

The only way they could afford to hire me was because Fedele had just sold the Bank of America Data Center in Los Angeles, and it was a 24-hour facility. If I worked the swing or graveyard shift, they could pay my salary. I’d work there late at night and be out trying to sell business during the day. During the spring of 1989, we sold Biola University, our very first college, then Woodbury University and Stanford University’s Tresidder Union.

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What I’ve learned: I’ll never forget the summer of ‘89. We had just opened Biola, then Stanford. I’m in the Oak Room at Stanford, and across the fax comes the operating report for the month of August at Biola. We’d lost $39,000. Remember, we were just a little company. And I almost tear up, and I say to Fedele, very sincerely, “If you need to let me go now as a result of this, I’d totally understand.” And he said, “Cary, what is wrong with you? Get the program in place, and the financials will take care of themselves.” And that philosophy has been proven right over and over again. I, like so many others in Bon Appétit, would go through a wall for Fedele and Michael. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Amazingly, through all the years, our culture has remained intact, although our hair is a lot more gray — just look around! While the Shidax investment and then the Compass acquisition would typically have signaled significant change, I think Fedele’s will to survive has seen us through and kept us from being gobbled up.


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Moments I’ve felt proud: Whenever a student employee, such as Masa [Sasaki] from Biola joins Bon Appétit and thrives. [Masa is now our director of audit.] Or when unit managers such as Bob Rall, David Herbert, Lori Flashner, and Fabio Soto become general managers, then district managers. Or seeing Michael Venckus, who started as a general manager at Concordia, become a regional vice president — those are the moments that make me very proud. Fedele and Michael have fostered an atmosphere that allows people to feel they are part of something bigger than themselves and that each contribution counts, from dishwasher to chef, and from student manager to general manager. Everyone counts.

Execu tiv Friend e Chef Lou is Ehli sview nger, Manor

My favorite Bon Appétit memory: Probably opening a certain corporate account in Arizona back in 2005. We had a cadre of folks from up and down the West Coast, and RVP Mark Swenson and I were like the Pied Pipers. It was amazing to see the camaraderie of so many people working their butts off, all committed to a central cause. It was also great to see folks from different regions interface and build relationships. And one other thing: I love seeing our people take their craft seriously and take great pride in delivering unparalleled service and dining programs to our clients. Those things make me proud to be a part of Bon Appétit.

Cary Wheeland, fourth from left, with the Stanford University opening team

Proposal Manager Kim Ravizza

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Business really starts to pick up, hitting $15 million

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Biola University, CA FileMaker, Inc., CA Tropicana Gardens, CA Woodbury University, CA

Bon Appétit’s late cofounder, Ernie Collins, and his daughter Jessica at the Apple picnic

HEIDI BALIS

Director of Operations, Biola University, La Mirada, CA Joined us in...2008, in same position

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: When Bon Appétit and Biola began their partnership in 1989, Reagan was in office, the International Space Station was barely conceived, and the entire current undergraduate population of Biola had not been born. Many of our current managers were line workers then — our own General Manager Stephen Rall started out as retail manager here 18 years ago. Like the French say, “The more things change, the more they stay the same” — at least the best parts do. We’ve gained and lost friends, seen students and faculty alike move on to better things over the years, and most recently a changing of guard among our beloved head chefs. As we celebrate the past and its memories, we look forward to our future here at Biola. Boots on the ground: CEO Fedele Bauccio dons galoshes at an opening

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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...always evolving and learning!

Stuart Leckie

...formidable - a force to be reckoned with.

Lydia Kumpa


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89 Steve Rall, general manager at Biola University and Jeremy Glennon, general manager at Tropicana Gardens

iola University has been partners with Bon Appétit for 23 years — the first higher-education account — and I’ve been the client this whole time. When Bon Appétit approached us, we had a different provider, and if we were having spaghetti, then it must be the third Thursday of the month. Bon Appétit guaranteed us that there would be no menu cycles, no processed foods, only fresh, healthy food.

B

The reason we’ve been partners for so long is Bon Appétit is the best in their field. The food is always fresh and they support the local farmers whenever possible. We make decisions together about where we’re going, what we want to change, and what our goals are. Working together, we can assure our students, faculty, staff, and guests that they will never be disappointed when they eat here. For our students who have food allergies or digestive issues, Bon Appétit will make special food just for them, but they make sure the student doesn’t feel isolated or different from the other students. I have visited other Bon Appétit university and corporate accounts, and I’ve found equally wonderful food, no matter where you eat. Bon Appétit is always on the cutting edge of the latest trends. Over the years, I have seen the other food service companies change the way they do business to copy Bon Appétit. I can’t say enough kind words about Fedele [Bauccio, CEO], Michael [Bauccio, COO], and all of their staff: they are honest, hard-working, reliable, professional, and have been a pleasure to partner with all of these years.

Biola’s Carolyn White and General Manager Steve Rall

—Carolyn White, Auxiliary Operations Manager, Biola University, La Mirada, CA

Cisco-San Jose says Happy Birthday!

...a cherished friend who is honest, supportive, and values your opinion.

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The food service industry press begins to take notice

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Lewis and Clark College, OR Oracle – Redwood Shores, CA

“I used to think we’d get to the $50 million or $60 million mark and then growth would slow,” says Bauccio. “I don’t think that way any more. The market is calling for what we do.” -Restaurants and Institutions, September 1990

MICHAEL WEINER

General Manager, eBay, San Jose, CA Joined us in…1990, as assistant general manager at Bank of America

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I felt fortunate to find a company that embraced cooking from scratch. I had seen too many companies using premade food, and not caring about what their customers actually wanted to eat. I was immediately impressed with the freedom we were given to create menus based on customer preferences. I also liked the fact we could express our opinions and disagreements without fear. I saw it was OK to make mistakes, learn from them, and not be penalized. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We have matured as far as number and breadth of programs and systems, but at our core we are still the same — a company that cares about great food and people. Moments I’ve felt proud: Every day I come to work. The early issues of Bravo, edited by Employee Services Director Jean Silveira, included company-centric trivia quizzes and announcements of births and marriages

My favorite Bon Appétit memory: Bon Appétit was providing service for Apple’s summer “family picnic” at Stanford University in 1990. Steve Samuelson [now regional operations manager] and I were in charge of sanitation, also known as picking up garbage. We were given an electric cart to use to pick up garbage bags from the site and take them to the dumpster. With 8,000 to 10,000 people, you can imagine what a huge amount of garbage there was. About halfway through the event, our cart ran out of juice. We plugged it in and grabbed a second cart to use. Unfortunately, the second cart only ran in reverse and was low on juice. We spent the rest of the afternoon alternating between carts, going backward and forward, about every 30 minutes. It became a very long afternoon, and people laughing at us didn’t make it better. The topper was at the end of the day. We were both tired and crabby, and making our last pickup while driving backwards. As we arrived back at the dumpster, Steve picked up the last bag of garbage, and it broke open and spilled all over him. Luckily there was a large audience of Bon Appétit people to laugh at Steve standing in the pile of garbage.

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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...committed, serious about his or her ideals.

Meg Colleran Sahs

...a passionate artist expressing his


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MASA SASAKI

Director of Audit, Palo Alto, CA Joined us in...1990, as a student employee at Biola University

How I started: I was born in Tokyo but grew up in Taiwan, and went to an American high school there, a boarding school. It was religiously affiliated, and a lot of my classmates were applying to go to Biola in the States. I decided to do so too, thinking I would start there and transfer out, but I ended up staying out of laziness, as an accounting major. At the end of my sophomore year, a friend of mine who worked for Bon Appétit said he’d get a referral bonus (a whole $25) if I applied, because they needed people — students drop like flies in finals seasons. So I took like two shifts a week, serving food, and I found I quite liked this extra income. In the fall of 1990, when Fedele’s son, Scott Bauccio, was café manager at Biola Café, I worked for him. He put me in the kitchen working the grill, making omelets for brunch and 120 pizzas every Sunday for dinner. At the end of that term he promised me I’d become student manager. By spring I was overseeing 25 students, and around graduation, Cary Wheeland offered me a full-time position managing the café. I was enjoying what I was doing, so I took it. I’ve never worked anywhere else! I had taken some computer science, and I decided to get into information technology around 1995, when there was an opening. I worked at our Oracle

account as a controller, which was really baptism by fire, 8am til midnight every day, juggling all these different jobs. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: When I was in operations, back in 1995-ish, we didn’t really think about local, sustainable food — it was all about food that was Masa in 1999 fresh and from scratch. Not where did this salmon come from, is this meat antibiotic-free? Chicken was chicken and milk was milk. That’s been a big change. Even though we’re so much bigger now, there’s still this whole smallcompany, family-run business feel. People have easy access to Fedele and Michael; it doesn’t seem like there’s much corporate bureaucracy. Moments I’ve felt proud: When it comes to relationships with our clients, we’re very different from our competitors. We have integrity. If we have something going on, we’ve always discussed it with our clients and come clean. We never try to hide stuff or sweep it under the rug. We say what happened, and what we’re going to do about it.

Directo r of A udit M asa Sa saki

The secret to bringing this small, regional food service contract company from $4 million to $20 million in sales in just two years is quality, say several Bon Appétit clients. CEO Bauccio has a reputation for choosing his clients rather than the other way around. — “50 to Watch,” Restaurants and Institutions, April 1990

or her creativity through food and sustainable actions.

Randy Kruse

...caring.

.

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Bon Appétit acquires Consul Restaurant Corp., entering the Midwestern market

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Marymount College, CA Stanford University – Graduate School of Business, CA Target Corporate, MN Thacher School, CA University of Portland, OR

DAVID WARTMAN

Executive Chef, Target Bullseye Café, Minneapolis, MN Joined us in...1991, as a cook at Minnesota Club

My first impression of Bon Appétit was...That it was a place to expand my creative knowledge of food and share some of my recipes that I have created for all to enjoy. What I’ve learned: Before working for Bon Appétit, I was already using local foods for freshness and flavor, but since being with the company, I’ve expanded my knowledge of the local food movement and gotten so many new ideas. [Also, Regional Vice President] John Nelson always made a point to say hello to all of the employees at the Minnesota Club, every day. This is a standard I still follow. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: As time goes on, we’ve served so many great foods, seen so many great people come and go, but the best part is that we haven’t changed our core beliefs. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I think the one that stands out is when we were doing a catering at Macalester College in the middle of a rainstorm and the tent sunk into the ground.

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“This is an important step for Bon Appétit,” said Fedele R. Bauccio, chief executive officer. “It is our first expansion away from the West Coast and marks our entry into new geographic markets with excellent growth potential. From the base of accounts we have acquired, we intend to grow rapidly and become a strong player in these markets.” …John M. Nelson, Vice President and Division General Manager of Consul’s Foodservice subsidiary, said “I am very excited to be reunited with Fedele Bauccio, the CEO of Bon Appétit and Ernie Collins, President, both longtime fellow Saga Corporation employees, which was acquired by Marriott Corporation in 1986. Fedele, Ernie, and I all share the same excitement and commitment to outstanding food quality and service for all of our clients.’” —From the press release announcing the acquisition of Consul

GUIDO LAMBELET

Executive Chef, Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico Joined us in...1991, as a sous chef at the Thacher School

My first impression of Bon Appétit was…Here’s this new and energetic company focusing on freshness and taste above the bottom line that also offered great growth and learning opportunities. I thought, “Sign me up!” What I’ve learned: I’ve been able to expand my cooking skills because all of our teams are incredibly talented. We learn from each other. Working closely with community food producers and farmers (wherever the account is located) has made me more aware about where our food comes from and the work the farmers/ranchers do to provide it. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: The biggest changes in the company have been the steps taken to ensure the quality and safety of the food we prepare through initiatives like antibiotic reduction, healthy cooking, and more, as well as better treatment and acknowledgment for the farmworkers who provide it. Moments I’ve felt proud: There really aren’t any moments I am not proud to work for, and with, the best team in food service around, especially when I read about the work Fedele and others within the company do every day to improve the food system in the US.

Guido Lambelet around 1997


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91 The Target team hits the bulls-eye with best wishes!

T

arget and Bon Appétit are both celebrating big birthdays this year, which makes me look forward to my daily trip down to Target Café even more. Bon Appétit has managed food service at Target headquarters for more than half of my career. I’ve enjoyed countless meals and quick pick-me-ups, and I’m always proud to bring visiting family members, friends, and business associates to lunch in the Café. Thanks for the great food and service, and happy 25th! –Gregg Steinhafel, Chairman, President and CEO, Target Corp.

JIM KLEIN

Resident District Manager, Target, Minneapolis, MN Joined us in...1991, as executive chef at the Minnesota Club

What I’ve learned: That food served in a corporate café can be every bit as good as — if not better than — a sit-down restaurant. It’s not the setting that matters, but the ingredients and how you treat them as a chef. Like many chefs, I moved from hotel, to club, to restaurant every few years, just for something new and exciting. But at Bon Appétit there is always something new happening, and plenty of opportunities to challenge oneself at new accounts and in new positions. Moments I’ve felt proud: I started at the Minnesota Club 25 years ago as Executive Chef. I was hired by John Nelson [the late former regional vice president], who had worked with Fedele Bauccio previously. John was instrumental in helping Fedele acquire the food service company Counsel, which is how we started in the Midwest. I didn’t actually meet Fedele myself until Bon Appétit took over the food service contract in 1991.

We continue to see an increasing preference for nutritional and healthy, uncomplicated foods. We see retailers diversifying their formats to include in-store bakeries, full service delis, salad bars, and fresh single serve entrees. What succeeds today is not only giving the customer what they want in a traditional sense - a comfortable, clean, convenient, well-lit space with a degree of ambiance — but also a bouquet for their senses. They want to see what they buy and they want to see it well displayed, coordinated, and accessorized. —Bravo, 1991

Executive Chef Philip McNally, Target Courtyard Café

I’ll never forget that moment. I was showing Fedele the box of recipe cards that we’d been given from the previous company’s corporate office. He told me that I would never see such things in a Bon Appétit kitchen. “We hire great chefs who have their own recipes,” he said. “If you go to 100 different accounts, you will taste 100 different chilis and they will all be great!” When he told me that he hires chefs to run the accounts and trains them to do the books, instead of the other way around, I was so proud to be one of those chefs.

Chris Gumm, Chef / Manager, Target Northern Campus

General Manager John Mensen, Target Courtyard Café

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Moving on up: Bon Appétit transfers headquarters to the famous Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, and wins the prestigious Ivy Award

MILESTONES

Bon Appétit wins the Ivy Award from Restaurants and Institutions Magazine, the first contract food service company to win this award in its 22-year history. The announcement cites our “passion for food” and lauds our menus, staff, and style.

OPENINGS Willamette University, OR National Semiconductor, CA (now Texas Instruments) Minnesota History Center, MN

STEVEN P. SINGLETON

Café Manager, Target City Center, Minneapolis, MN Joined us in… 1992, as a prep cook at Carlson Companies

Bon Appetit’s third office on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I didn’t really know much about the company. One of my instructors at culinary school knew [Regional Vice President] John Nelson, and suggested that I apply. He must have seen my passion for food and thought I would be a good fit. It was only after I started that I realized he was right. Here we are, working with real food and a bunch of super-talented people — all with the same great passion for food. And we’re getting paid on top of it! What I’ve learned: Support your local businesses. Go to restaurants where you know the people working in back are as passionate about food as you are. Pay attention to where your food is coming from — fresher is better — and practice what you preach.

The sign for the Sand Hill Road offices, with our old logo

Cofounder Ernie Collins, former Regional Vice President Beth Henniger, and revelers at a company function

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Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: From the business side it has changed a lot. We’ve become more corporate than we used to be, but the focus still remains on the food, the people, and doing what’s right for the farmers, the land, and the community. I think it’s amazing that, as big as the company has gotten, the focus has never changed. It’s always been about the food and the people, and it always will be. Moments I’ve felt proud: As my wife would tell you, any time one of our accounts gets mentioned on the news, I always lean over and say “Who does the food there? That’s right, we do!”


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KATHY VIK

Operations Manager, Café Target, Minneapolis, MN Joined us in...1992, as sous chef at the Minnesota History Center

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Wow! This is one cool company and full of excitement. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I remember the early Midwest managers’ meetings in the Twin Cities — just a handful of us around a table. Boy, has that changed! Today we have so many great, creative colleagues to share ideas and resources with. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I will always remember [the late] John Nelson, our vice president from the early days. He was always interested in everyone as a person. From openings there are always those, “I can’t believe that happened” moments: driving a Macalaster catering truck while nine months pregnant; thousands of canapes being made for the grand opening of the Minnesota History Center, during which John Nelson had to go buy flaming orange stocking caps for the employees working outside in the tents. It was hunting season in Minnesota, after all!

JAMES BERNHARDT

General Manager, PayPal, Chandler, AZ Joined us in...1992, as swing shift supervisor at National Semiconductor

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… “Wow, this is strange. Our kitchen is in a semi trailer out in the parking lot, and so is our dry storage.” This was because the new café was under construction. Once the café was finished, and I found the food coming out of the kitchen to be as good, if not better, than the food in the finest restaurants in town, I was so very proud to be working for a company that cared about the food! What I’ve learned: I’ve learned so much from so many different people and experiences over the years. The most important thing is that if you provide people with the vision and tools, they can do some amazing things. Like all of my colleagues, I’ve also learned to always think outside of the box. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Even through all the new initiatives and challenges that’ve been introduced over the years, not much has really changed, except our size. The passion and drive I witness every day is still the same as it was almost 20 years ago when I started. Moments I’ve felt proud: Probably my proudest moments have occurred during the many opening days of new accounts that I’ve been lucky enough to attend. When our customers see the difference in what we provide, compared to what the previous food service companies offered them, they are always so appreciative and astounded. Nobody ever believes that the food in their workplace or school could possibly be so delicious, or that the atmosphere could be so welcoming.

Happy Birthday from the Willamette U team!

Off to the races: cofounders Fedele Bauccio and Ernie Collins with Jessica Collins and early employees Jean Silveira and Kai Hawkins

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Revenues reach $55 million–a short-lived venture into the world of Indian casinos notwithstanding

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Hitachi, CA Carlson Companies, MN California Institute of the Arts, CA Seattle University, WA Reed College, OR

The much-beloved late Regional Vice President John Nelson at an Indian gaming convention.

DAVID RAMLOW

District Manager, Central Region Joined us in...1992, as executive chef at Café MSA, Dunn & Bradstreet Softwaredstreet Software

My favorite Bon Appétit memories: In 1993, we took a brief foray into the world of Indian gaming. We opened first at Black Bear Casino in Cloquet, MN, and then at a bingo hall in the middle of nowhere, Oklahoma. I still remember working a booth at the national Indian gaming convention in an effort to drum up more business. I remember receiving a long overdue check from the tribe for $250,000, and when I told [Vice President] John Nelson about it, he literally dragged me to his car and floored it to the bank. The whole experiment wasn’t so great from a financial point of view, but it sure was fun! Around that time I also remember an impromptu ice fishing trip with our original auditor, Tom Czsnowski. He was a real character. His favorite saying was, “I’m the auditor, and I’m here to help.” He was doing an audit in Minnesota one winter, and asked if I’d take him ice fishing. We were on our way and he was real excited — until he realized we were driving across the lake in my truck. I thought he was going to jump out of the vehicle. Eventually he settled down, we caught a few fish, and he had a blast.

Medtronic General Manager Jerry Palmer, Opening Sous Chef Randall Tonges, and District Manager David Ramlow, at the Northwestern Opening

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .a woman who’s smart, posh, trendy, stylish, and socially responsible. Note: Please don’t tell


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Directo r of In fo Marco s Uech rmation Te chnolo i gy

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MARCOS UECHI

Director of Information Technology, Palo Alto, CA Joined us in...1993, as a student manager at Seattle University

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Great food, and an agile, entrepreneurial company, full of caring executives.

Well-wishers from Reed College

What I’ve learned: Financial and managerial skills. I’ve grown to be interested in cooking and appreciate the fact that it’s the fresh local ingredients that makes for a good dish. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: When I started, Bon Appétit was at $33 million in revenues. Now we are in the mid-$600 millions, so obviously, we’ve grown. The one thing that hasn’t changed is the fact that we allow our field managers to be creative and entrepreneurial while focusing on customers and food quality. Moments I’ve felt proud: Every time I get to work with highly skilled, hard-working, and passionate people during openings. I also feel proud when I look at a café on the first day of operations and appreciate the skills our peers bring to the table in so many areas, including décor, marketing, food, and service. My favorite Bon Appétit memory: I wouldn’t call it a favorite, but it was memorable. It was the two months I spent on the road opening a series of education accounts on the East Coast. I drove from Utica, NY, to New Hampshire to Boston and back so many times.

CARRIE BUCKLEY

Director of Merchandising, Palo Alto, CA Joined us in...1993, as director of catering at Dominican College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... Cary Wheeland [now senior vice president]. Need I say more?! I interviewed with Cary and immediately knew that I was supposed to be working for this company. He made me feel like I had been a part of the Bon Appétit family — crazy as we may be — from Day One. What I’ve learned: That it’s possible to love what you do and love the people you do it with daily. Moments I’ve felt proud: Every time an account receives their GE certification and also “opening day” of each new café. I’ve seen the pride all of the employees take in their cafés and the joy it brings them when they are “Certified GREAT”! I’m constantly amazed at how hard people work during openings, and, without fail, they come to work on opening day with big smiles on their faces and pride in who they work for and represent. It warms my heart each and every time.

Marcos Uechi, now director of information technology, with Heidi Markham, then unit bookkeeper, at Seattle University

my wife, because she will get jealous.

My favorite Bon Appétit memory: When the employees of George Fox University received their GE certification. For years, they’ve worked in one of the oldest facilities we have in the company and they cried when they were told they had passed! There were hugs all around… I’ve never seen a group of people so proud and excited. No matter how big we get, it’s the employees of this company who keep me coming back for more.

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93 ELIZABETH SIMMONDS

General Manager, SAS-Cary, Cary, NC Joined us in...1993, as a café manager at Target

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I was struck by how different the philosophy was compared to most companies in food service. It was evident from day one that this company wanted to make a difference and set itself apart from the competition. What I’ve learned: I have never felt so privileged to work with so many talented and professional people. I have learned that, although our focus is on the food, it’s the relationships that we foster with our peers, staff and clients that really sell the Bon Appétit dream. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I remember feeling apprehensive when we were acquired by Compass that we’d lose that family feeling that I had grown to love. We haven’t.

LUCINDA ANDERSON

General Manager, Thomas Aquinas College, Santa Paula, CA Joined us in...1993, as chef/manager at Sony Music

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… What great food and people! And yes, I know that sounds like a cliché. The first person I met was Chuck Hall, general manager at Bank of America in Los Angeles. He was so friendly and really impressed me. The account was beautiful, too, and they were serving such great food. What I’ve learned: There’s always a network of folks ready to help you out. I couldn’t have opened Sony Music without Cary Wheeland and his “entourage.” The opening event for that facility was enormous, but the many, many hands made the task lighter. Today, the same is true. Instead of Cary, it is Bob Rall’s group I call upon when Thomas Aquinas has an event. I’m grateful not only for that network, but for the camaraderie among all Bon Appétit people. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We’ve become a bit more corporate, but in today’s marketplace, it was inevitable. Still, Bon Appétit is like a curious child. It never really grows up. Like a child, we’re constantly learning, and always excited about what little tidbit we learned today. Also, we’re always outgrowing our clothes, meaning a “one size fits all” approach never works. This childlike quality is what makes us innovative and creative. A child is in awe of the wonderment of the universe — too young to be tainted or crippled by labels or the words “can’t do.”

Moments I’ve felt proud: Every time I give an employee orientation and have to articulate our philosophy and our dream to new employees!

CEO Fedele Bauccio gets soaked in the dunk tank at a Cisco picnic

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .a student always wanting to learn more.

David Wartman

. .devoted.

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19 Made the cover of the San Francisco Chronicle Food Section

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MILESTONES

OPENINGS Cisco Systems, CA Dominican University of California, CA The Master’s College, CA Northwestern College, MN Whitman College, WA HONORS Finalist for Northern California “Entrepreneur of the Year” award Restaurants and Institutions Magazine

Bon Appétit at Oracle-Redwood Shores

The sleek 300 Market [at Oracle] is the latest in employee lunchrooms — in this case, for the exclusive use of the workers and guests of software giant Oracle Corp. In its resemblance to some of the Bay Area’s most fashionable Italian restaurants, Oracle’s new mess hall exemplifies several hot trends in corporate caféterias… Call it a café, call it a restaurant, but don’t call it that awful word that suggests plastic trays and stainless steel steam tables. —“Company Fare,” San Francisco Chronicle Food Section Sept 28 cover story

...courageous, high energy, passionate, strong, humorous.

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maisiegreenawalt Vice President of Strategy, Palo Alto, CA Joined Bon Appétit in...1994, as employee services coordinator

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n 1994 I found myself at a career crossroads. I wasn’t just looking for any old job. I was trying to find an employer that would allow me to be creative, where I wouldn’t be mired in bureaucracy, where I could make a difference at the company.

After a long interview process, I received the call saying I was going to be the new employee services coordinator at Bon Appétit Management Company. Luckily I was standing next to a bed because my knees literally buckled. I knew I had found a home. From my first day, I was struck by how everyone was not just allowed, but encouraged to speak their mind — whether they were in the corporate offices or in the field. Information and ideas that came from the operators were treated like gold. I was also wowed by the approachability of Fedele and Ernie, Bon Appétit’s leaders, and how much they cared about people. At that time, we didn’t talk a lot about “values-based business,” but their values showed through loud and clear in the concern they expressed for everyone who worked for Bon Appétit. One of the first projects I was involved with was implementing domestic partnership coverage in our health insurance plan. At that time, the idea of recognizing domestic partners was extremely controversial, yet Bon Appétit enacted a change, quietly and without fanfare. It was simply the right thing to do. Having worked for another large restaurant corporation, I appreciated that people at BAMCO headquarters knew the field was where the real work took place. At that time, all of us had operational experience and we knew how much we benefited from the hard work of those in our cafés. Even everyone in IT, including Marcos [Uechi, now director of information technology] and Masa [Sasaki,

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now director of audit] who moved into the corporate office the same year that I did, had worked in a unit. About six months into my tenure with Bon Appétit, I got a big lesson in values when I came to Fedele with what I thought was a fantastic idea. I had been tasked with reprinting a document that was only used internally. Having just discovered digital printing, I knew we could save a huge amount of money by moving away from offset printing. Yes, we’d need to use a smooth paper instead of a textured one, and the grey tone of our logo would be slightly different, but surely those were easy tradeoffs for such big savings. I proudly entered Fedele’s office with my samples and pricing sheets, expecting a high five and maybe a hug. Instead he turned to me and said, “You mean you want to decrease quality to lower expenses?” I knew I’d made a mistake. That’s when it truly hit home that Bon Appétit was about doing things right. I quickly fell in love with the humor of Bon Appétiters. There is a zaniness at this company that I really appreciate. I got the signal that humor in the workplace was OK when a singing telegram showed up in the corporate office for the 40th birthday of Liz Baldwin, now chief financial officer. This wasn’t your typical tap-dancing telegram though. He was a pale, old guy in a caveman outfit with a terrible voice. Silly! This is not a formal company. Many years later, after attending the pre-opening dry run at our first restaurant at AT&T Park and meeting my coworkers, one of my friends said “You work in a Seinfeld episode … and I think your CEO just hit me!” At her own company, she had never even met the CEO; she couldn’t believe the familiarity with which we all treated each other.


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In 2004 we redefined our mission statement, which had been that“our dream is to be known for our culinary expertise and outstanding customer service,” to reflect our increased focus on social responsibility and sustainability. My proudest moment was taking that new dream into the field for our first-ever road show. We visited every region of the company, looked into the eyes of our peers, and said “reimagine food service.” It was exhilarating. Fedele told everyone to “go out and find farmers. Make connections in your community.” I knew we were onto something magical. I could tell by the reaction from our people. Over and over again I heard things like “this is how I cook at home” and “I can’t believe I get to bring my values to work.” There was that “values” word again. Our new dream connected with people’s values, and nothing is more powerful than that. It certainly connected to mine. I was raised by parents in the social services who studied Buddhism. When I decided to go into business, I thought I was entering a very different world than the one I’d grown up in. But, when we set down our road of responsibility, I pictured the Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path that my mom had taped above the kitchen sink all throughout my childhood. I had found “Right Livelihood.” I do admit I once tried to explain that to Fedele and could see by the glazed-over look I got that I had gone too far with that one.

And, equally important, the unit staff joining Bon Appétit that weekend were embraced and their hard work was appreciated. I overheard one team member thank the client for bringing in Bon Appétit. Does it get any better than that? Not for me. Bon Appétit Management Company has allowed me to grow, be creative, speak my mind, try things out, fail, bring my values to work, and put my values to work. I’ve been pushed to confront some of our nation’s most complex problems, like the lack of rights afforded farmworkers, and do something about our most dire environmental threats, like climate change. I’ve had to learn about the science of antibiotic resistance and the ecological systems of our oceans. I’ve led with my bleeding heart and my strategic mind. I’ve been pushed to manage people, build relationships, broker deals, and balance clients’ needs with my own vision. I’ve had to check my ego and remember to put the field first. Submit budgets, sell our services, and tell our story. Break open the supply chain, put up a website, and uncage chickens.

Maisie Greenawalt, now vice president of strategy, in her 1995 cubicle in the employee services department

I felt a surge of pride again recently, at the opening of the Buena Vista Café in Southern California. It had been a long time since I was on-hand over an opening weekend, and our team knocked my socks off! I loved listening in to the debate that took place during the walkthroughs. Is this heat level right in the mole? Is there a better way to queue? …a sign needed to tell our story? How can we serve the customer the freshest possible food in the shortest possible time? All of these questions were asked and answered by a team of true restaurant professionals that I was honored to work alongside. The level of knowledge and passion was impressive.

Bon Appétit has given me more responsibility than I know what to do with. Most of all, Bon Appétit has pushed me to never think something can’t be done but instead to ask how we’d make it a reality. Bon Appétit has allowed me to dream.

Marketing Project Manager David Kardon

Regional Marketing Director Emily Demers

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Bon Appétit hits the East Coast; receives the Mind to Menu Visionary Award

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Emmanuel College, MA The Getty Villa, CA (the first time) Grove City College, PA Hamilton College, NY Macalester College, MN Whittier College, CA

Human Resources Assistant Christine Stahler, in the Sand Hill Road offices

Front of House Staff Michael Docanto, Student Employee Enrique Ruiz, and Dining Room Manager Shakera Bailey, Emmanuel College

TERRY McGHEE

General Manager, Averett University, Danville, VA Joined us in...1995, as cook at Grove City College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I was happy to discover a company with scratch-cooking principles that allowed me to use my culinary training. My first assignment for Bon Appétit was a support role in New Hampshire with [Hamilton College Executive Chef ] Reuben Haag. I think we both realized after that visit that we were in for exciting careers with Bon Appétit. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I think Bon Appétit has done a great job of not changing its core values and principles. Obviously we have grown tremendously over the years, adding many faces and names, but our original beliefs have remained the same. Moments I’ve felt proud: I’ve had the opportunity to visit the sites of prospective customers, and have seen firsthand some of our competitor’s food programs. Every time I see what others feed their customers, in comparison to what we do at Bon Appétit, it makes me very proud! We’re all lucky to have leaders like Fedele and Michael [Bauccio, CEO and COO], with a special thanks to [District Manager] John Engstrom and [Regional Vice President] Randy DeMers for giving me the opportunity to become the manager and person I am today!! 32


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JOSEPH ABDUL-MASSIH

Head Pastry Chef, Emmanuel College, Boston, MA Joined us in...1995, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was...I thought it was a great company that cared about fresh food and thoughtful preparation. What I’ve learned: That you need a lot of patience to make food from scratch every day. I’ve learned how to educate customers about what that entails and, in the process, helped them understand what makes Bon Appétit different from other food service companies. Moments I’ve felt proud: I have to say that I am proud to come to work every day and know that I am part of a company that stands for so much and continually strives to make a difference. Baker Joseph AbdulMassih working his magic

95 YVONNE MATTESON

District Manager, American University, Washington, DC Joined us in...1995, as sous chef at Hamilton College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Seriously, I thought,“What the heck is going on here?”“Just in time” cuisine took on a whole new meaning — daily fire drill comes to mind! It was a blast. What I’ve learned: I’ve experienced and learned so much with Bon Appétit. The most important thing, and I believe this wholeheartedly, is that together we can accomplish amazing things. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: The company has changed in many ways over the years, but we’ve held onto our core principles. All of our new sustainability commitments have such fundamental connections to the original mission.

of ector ring en Dir ck wh was the cate a b : ’s 90 d) 9 n u -1 ro id the m backg anager ity in n the nivers kley (i e general m ican U ie Buc Domin dising Carr uccio was th a an Merch and Scott B r directo

My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I’ve had the opportunity to work and spend time with many of the Hamilton College Chef Reuben great folks at Bon Appétit. But Executive Haag and the late District most of my fond memories include Manager Lisa Haag Hamilton College Executive Chef Reuben Haag and Lisa Haag [his late wife, then the district manager] — two of my best friends and the people I will always remember. Lisa could move mountains, and Reuben and I were the muscle!

District Manager Yvonne Matteson, District Manager Paul Bulau, and Regional Marketing Director Emily DeMers at a regional meeting hosted by Hamilton College

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randydemers Regional Vice President, Southeast/Midwest Joined Bon Appétit in 1995, as regional manager at Grove City College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I received a call from [COO] Michael Bauccio in February 1995 and arranged a meeting at the Pittsburgh airport Holiday Inn. There I met with Fedele [Bauccio, CEO], John Engstrom [now District Manager] and Michael, all four of us squished together in a booth. As I listened to them describe the Bon Appétit Dream for the first time, I was impressed, but also wondered to myself, “Are these people crazy?” When I learned that the job they had in mind for me was at Grove City College I knew they were crazy – or at least geographically challenged. But they were right! That small school in the middle of western Pennsylvania has produced so many great managers and chefs. What I’ve learned: I learned that, though I’d been in food service for 34 years, I didn’t know what good food was. Fedele told me not to worry — “just pick up a spoon.” When it comes to client relations, if we get the food right, we can sort through almost any issue. And from Michael I’ve learned, “To predict disaster and achieve it is not success!” Moments I’ve felt proud: My proudest have been working with chefs, managers, and local farmers like Ed and Betty Frank who deliver thousands of pounds of potatoes and squash to us. I’ve enjoyed watching our Farm to Fork program expand to mid-size producers such as Gerber Chicken, Blackbird, and others, and seeing it all come together with our chefs freezing and preserving seasonal produce, and smoking and carving fresh local chicken and pork, is so exciting. What I’ve learned at work has carried over into my life. I’ve taught my granddaughter Ellie to garden. She loved helping me harvest lettuce, spinach, and tomatoes all summer, and our own Brussels sprouts for Thanksgiving dinner. Bon Appétit has changed my life and hopefully my granddaughter’s generation as well.

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Regional Vice President Randy DeMers with his granddaughter, Ellie


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Who Loves U? Wash U! Bon AppĂŠtiters at Washington University in St. Louis went all out to wish us happy birthday.


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Education business continues at full speed, and preparations pick up for the Getty Center opening

MILESTONES KIM BLUM

Director of Operations, University of Redlands, Redlands, CA Joined us in… 1996, as a baker at University of Redlands

OPENINGS Wheaton College, IL University of Redlands, CA St. Olaf College, MN Thomas Aquinas College, CA Marylhurst College, OR

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I applied for a bakery position one month to the day after Bon Appétit took over the account at the University of Redlands. The chef who interviewed me was a little hesitant about hiring me, because I was not trained as a scratch baker. I had worked at a grocery store bakery doing“proof and bake,” braiding bread, decorating pre-made cakes, and scooping and baking pre-made cookie dough. The chef told me the philosophy of Bon Appétit, and I loved it. I said,“Just give me the chance to prove myself. I know how to make it pretty; now I need to learn how to make it taste as good as it looks.” I thank God that the chef saw something in me. Here I am, 15-and-a-half years later, director of operations. So what was I thinking when I first started? That I have a future with a great company!

An early example of Bon Appétit’s social responsibility initiatives

When the new Getty Center opens a few months later, it’s an instant hit (featured in a 1998 Food Management issue)

What I’ve learned: What a huge impact the food business has on this earth. We can do a lot of damage or we can be the change to help preserve God’s creation. Bon Appétit is always moving forward to be the change: Seafood Watch, Farm to Fork, Low Carbon Diet — just to name a few. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Bon Appétit started out as a small wave in a big ocean. The more social responsibility Bon Appétit takes on, the bigger the wave gets. It is through the team and the Dream that Bon Appétit stands tall. Moments I’ve felt proud: When the local farmers bring in their freshly picked produce and we get together to share the harvest and the stories from the farm.

Behind the line at the Getty Center opening in 1997

Resident District Manager Brett Martin and Director of Operations Kim Blum at the Bon Appétit holiday party

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .a well-dressed person focused on customer service.

Joseph Abdul-Massih


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F

or me, Bon Appétit has always been synonymous with the word “fresh.” Fresh food for sure, but the most important part of the company’s work at the University of Redlands has been about fresh approaches, fresh thinking, fresh ideas, and always genuine concern for our students who eat with us every day. Bon Appétit has been there to hear student ideas, concerns and needs, and is always responsive – not next year, not after checking with headquarters, but now! So fast that students say to me, “Wow, I wrote a comment card about X, and they already have it available!” Then, on top of that, Bon Appétit is so progressive when it comes to sustainability, for example with the commitment to tough issues like the way the food we eat is raised and how workers are treated. I regularly tell people Bon Appétit is just the best. And when it comes to food, that’s what we all want. Congratulations on 25 years of getting it right! Charlotte G. Burgess, Vice President and Dean of Student Life, University of Redlands

The Wheaton College team sends its congratulations

...a big ball of passion with a dash of ‘craziness’.

Edward Jarrell 37


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96 BRETT MARTIN

Resident District Manager, University of Redlands, Redlands, CA Joined us in...1997, as director of operations

Eighteen years into my restaurant career, I started to think about doing something different, perhaps in an educational environment. I began sending resumes to contract food service companies and schools. Though I had a pretty decent resume, I did not receive a single response. I saw an ad for Bon Appétit in the Los Angeles Times classifieds (that’s how we used to look for jobs!). I applied, and my phone rang a day later. It was Cary Wheeland [now senior vice president]. Though he didn’t have anything for me initially, he wanted to stay in touch. By the following month I had a new job. It’s clear to me that those other companies were looking for food service people, not restaurant people, and that Bon Appétit looks for a different sort of person. And it is those people who make this great company so special.

MARK LaCHANCE

Regional Vice President, Central Region Joined us in...1996, as executive chef at St. Olaf College

My first impression of Bon Appétit... “What am I getting myself into here?” My interview with [then-Vice President] John Nelson lasted from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. We visited every account in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, and then stopped at a behavioral center, where I was subjected to a personality profile test. At the end of the day, John explained to me that he was simply testing me to see if I had the stamina to work for a company like Bon Appétit. Two days later, I received a rejection letter in the mail stating that Bon Appétit did not have any positions that matched my experience. I was crushed after spending the entire day with John. I called him to thank him, mentioning the rejection letter. He said,“WHAT? She was supposed to send you an offer letter!” I accepted the position of executive chef at St. Olaf later that day. What I’ve learned: That good things come to those who work hard and do the right thing. In my 16 years with Bon Appétit, I’ve never been asked to take a shortcut or to find

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a lesser-quality product to save money, and I’m convinced I never will. I’ve learned that if you take care of your people, your customers, and your clients, and you serve great food, everything else seems to fall into place. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: It just keeps getting better — different but better. In the old days, when we opened a new account, it required one email and a couple of faxes to headquarters, today it takes several dozen emails from Marion [Cohen, now with Foodbuy], and several dozen more from treasury. In the old days, if you needed accounting support, you called Winston [Wint, a Jamaican former finance employee] and got a friendly,“Yah mon” followed by a couple of faxes that made little sense. Today you email your accountant in Charlotte and usually get it resolved on the spot. Through all of these changes, we still get to get up and go to work knowing we have the green light from Fedele [Bauccio, CEO], Michael [Bauccio, COO], and Liz [Baldwin, CFO] to do the right thing, and do it with passion and integrity.


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Vicente Garcia, salad chef, picking baby greens from Santa Catalina School’s own garden

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Eighty accounts operating! Senior Staff Meeting, 1997

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Aloha, OR AT&T Corporate Center, IL DreamWorks Animation, CA The Getty Center, CA Hawthorn Farm, OR Jones Farm 3, OR Parker, OH/UT Ronler Acres, OR St. Mary’s College of Maryland, MD

CEO Fedele Bauccio checks out the pizza at Oracle 300

Greetings from the Jones Farm 3 and 5 teams

General Manager Kristen Redshaw, Hawthorn Farm

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19 Passed the 100-mark for accounts; won the Golden Chain Award from Nation’s Restaurant News

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MARC MARELICH

General Manager, Willamette University, Salem, OR Joined us in...1998, as chef at Paradise Café at Cisco - San Jose MILESTONES

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I wasn’t sure if it was a good fit for me at first. However, once I was opening our newest café, I found myself entranced by the culinary culture, the friendly, family atmosphere, and the freedom to express myself through food. What I’ve learned: I have been given more opportunities to grow and explore different positions than I ever would have in a standalone restaurant.I’ve got multi-unit management,front of house, catering, and regional operations support under my belt. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: To be honest, we have not changed very much in my eyes. We are still the great company we’ve always been. We have just grown up a bit and have more influence than we used to. Even with economic, environmental, and safety concerns we never forget what brought us to this point as a company: Great food, full of flavor, simply prepared, plus our people whose skills, passion, and creativity shine each day. These two pieces make up the soul of our company. Thank you Bon Appétit for giving me the opportunity to be a part of such an amazing family.

OPENINGS Crossroads Café - Indiana, IN Hillview Café, TX Concordia University, CA Novell, CA (location was later acquired by eBay) Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute, NY Oracle - Rocklin, CA Nordstrom, WA University of Saint Joseph, CT University of Pennsylvania, PA (take one) University Village, CA Washington University in St. Louis, MO

Moments I’ve felt proud: The first time I met Fedele, he had come to meet with me and Cary Wheeland at Cisco about an idea I had. They both listened and pondered the idea. Though, in the end, it was not the right thing to do, the fact that the CEO and RVP came to discuss it with me, and really listened, was inspiring. I will never forget that day. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: All the winners of the culinary challenge were on a bus together with Fedele and Marc Zammit [then-director of culinary support and development, now vice president for corporate sustainability initiatives and culinary at Compass Group], heading out on a trip to the Berkeley restaurant Chez Panisse,and we each had a chance to share about our culinary heroes. It was an emotional, inspiring, and amazing time. I felt so connected to my counterparts from all over the country, including Fedele and Marc. This is a memory I cherish.

Opening team for Novell Café in 1998

eBay Café Manager Paige Smith

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1999 FARM TO FORK PROGRAM LAUNCHES We require our chefs to purchase at least 20 percent of their ingredients from small, owner-operated farms and artisans within a 150-mile radius of their kitchen.

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Marsha Habib, founder of OYA Organics, in Hollister, CA

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We officially launch our Farm to Fork program, giving priority to local food purchasing

MILESTONES

OPENINGS George Fox University, OR Mentor Graphics, OR

farm to fork

CARL SEACAT

Seacat Gardens Phoenix, AZ

Carl Seacat with his heirloom squash

I have been an independent, professional businessperson for approximately 35 years, first with a small software company, and the last six years or so as a grower of premium organic vegetables. I have been a produce supplier for the Café at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix since the day it opened. I have worked with hundreds of businesspeople. At the risk of inflating their egos, I have to say that I have never had a more professional, supportive, and friendly relationship than with Executive Chef Edward Farrow and Sous Chef Chris Lenza. They are the epitome of what “locavore” should be about. It took me a while to recognize that it’s a lot harder for chefs to deal with local producers, with all of our daily variables and lurking and actual disasters, than it is to just buy everything from the “big truck.” But I know I speak for many of my peers here in saying that the depth and quality of support I receive from them and the entire Bon Appétit organization has been critical to my ability to remain in this business and, hopefully, eventually prosper. Few realize how really difficult and risky this business is — I know I didn’t when I started. It’s not only the most physically demanding thing I’ve ever done by far, but the economics of just trying to stay in business and deliver a quality product week after week are daunting. I have called upon Chef Edward on more than one occasion to rescue me from a potential costly vegetable disaster. “Send it to me” is his unfailing response. That sort of support is seldom seen these days, in my experience. Now, having said that, if he knew as much about football as he does about food, he would be a much better human being, but I am working on that…Thank you for this opportunity to express my appreciation. Former Mills College General Manager Merrilee Olsen with COO Michael Bauccio and former Director of Recruiting Lisa Capozzi

Hugs between CEO Fedele Bauccio, Chief Financial Officer Liz Baldwin and former Mills College General Manager Merrilee Olsen

Cofounder Ernie Collins (right), with his wife, Susan, and former Director of Purchasing Jack Spurlock If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .outgoing, easy to get along with, open to change, approachable, and fun to be around.

Danuel Williamson


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BUZZ HOFFORD

Resident District Manager, Seattle University, Seattle, WA Joined us in...1999, as general manager at Seattle University

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Coming from European ski resorts and luxury hotels stateside, I was skeptical about university food service. Still, I was intrigued by Bon Appétit’s commitment to quality and the company’s obvious passion for great food. I decided to give it a two- or three-year trial. That was 13 years ago! Moments I’ve felt proud: I remember being at a managers’ meeting in Portland when Fedele rolled out the new company logo and tagline, with John Lennon’s “Imagine” playing in the background. He made it clear this was more than a marketing campaign. Since then that little tagline, “food services for a sustainable future”, has not only defined our brand, but fundamentally changed how we do business. Our model is based on respect — for our customers, our employees, the environment, the farm workers, and the animals themselves. That’s what makes this company unique, and why I’m so proud to be part of it.

99 ELAINE SMART

Regional Vice President, Northeast/Mid-Atlantic Joined us in...1999, as director of residential dining at the University of Pennsylvania

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Chaos! I thought, “What have I done?” I came from a highly structured, relatively peaceful environment (Harvard University) to open Penn in the summer of 1999, and it was a wild ride.We worked like crazy under very difficult circumstances. To this day, the survivors of the summer of ‘99 (you know who you are) still laugh and trade war stories when we meet up. What I’ve learned: Hang in there, no matter how hard it gets. You can’t make a difference if you don’t show up. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We’ve become better at what we do in so many ways. Our passion for food and service has always been evident, but we’ve become more disciplined in our approach to the“business” aspect of our jobs. The extraordinary vision from Fedele and others in terms of positioning Bon Appétit within the industry has been a textbook example of inspiring leadership and brand development. Moments I’ve felt proud: From a big-picture point of view, I’m so proud every time Bon Appétit leads the way in the industry through our socially responsible practices. I feel incredibly lucky to work for a company that walks the talk and sets the bar for important social issues, while also caring about our guests and associates on so many different levels. On a more personal level, I am most proud when I see an associate who has worked hard to learn and improve receive a well-deserved promotion.

Seattle University Executive Chef Shannon Wilson, Director of Operations Eddie Siow, Catering Director Traci Bailey, and Resident District Manager Buzz Hofford

My favorite Bon Appétit memory: Somehow, as hard as openings can be, they can also be the best and most memorable of times! A few stand out: opening the Cisco cafés on the East Coast during a major snow storm when the smallwares order was stuck on the truck until 1 a.m. of opening day; opening Roger Williams University; and the many shenanigans at Bay Point. It felt like summer camp all over again! Regional Vice President Elaine Smart, District Manager John Engstrom, and the late District Manager Lisa Haag

...a Scorpio, because we’re high energy and always evolving.

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Bon Appétit hits 112 accounts, has more than 6,000 employees in 18 states

MILESTONES

OPENINGS adidas, OR Claremont McKenna College, CA Georgetown University Law Center, DC Goucher College, MD Notre Dame de Namur University, CA Pac Bell Park, CA (now AT&T Park) Pitzer College, CA Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, ME Santa Clara University, CA Target Financial, AZ Tekelec, NC TIBCO Software, CA

What an exciting time as we begin the final year of this century and prepare for the new millennium! Today, Bon Appétit is a great company that is building a powerful, recognizable brand. Our team is comprised of truly talented people with a passionate love for our mission and an all-consuming commitment to success. Our customer base is loyal and special. We are positioned as the premier food service company in America.

—CEO Fedele Bauccio, in Bravo, 2000

Cofounder and former President Ernie Collins at the dedication for the Habitat for Humanity house that Bon Appétit sponsored

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .like the movie Ratatouille. Despite the odds, a small company became big because of its passion


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farm to fork

General Manager, Institute of American Indian Arts, Sante Fe, NM Joined us in...1991, as breakfast/lunch cook at Thacher School

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I’d worked with [COO] Michael Bauccio and Cary Wheeland [now senior vice president] earlier in my career, and experienced their great work ethic and drive for excellence. When I learned that the Bauccios might be taking Thacher School as a new account, it was great news for me. What I’ve learned: That even in food service, an industry not known for great food, it is possible to keep a passion for fresh, from-scratch food alive. One key ingredient is leaders like Fedele, who stay ahead of the times to steer the company’s focus toward all that is fresh and good. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Throughout Compass’s acquisition of Bon Appétit, and beyond, we have not only kept our focus, but we’ve also taught and learned from Compass to create one of the best food service companies possible. Moments I’ve felt proud: Too numerous to name them all, but here’s a few — adopting the sustainable seafood standards of Monterey Bay Aquarium, local purchasing, the agreement with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, and of course, our everyday practice of cooking real food from scratch.

00

TODD CHURCHILL

Thousand Hills Cattle Company Cannon Falls, MN

As the owner of Thousand Hills Cattle Company, a supplier of 100% grassfed beef to St. Olaf College and many others, I do a lot of public speaking. I start and end with the statement that “Food Matters.” Throughout human history, food has always mattered — having enough, and having food that nourished the body, mind, and spirit. Somehow in our modern technological wonder-world, we have temporarily lost sight of this basic truth. As a St. Olaf alum (class of ‘93) it has been a special and meaningful opportunity to partner with Peter [Abrahamson, general manager] and Bon Appétit to nourish the students and faculty at St. Olaf with beef. So, here’s to Bon Appétit Management Company, and to the incredible realization of Fedele’s vision to supply food to those to whom food has always been important!

Todd Churchill and his son Will

My favorite Bon Appétit memory: In 2000, when my husband Guido and I decided we wanted to move out of California, we were both working for Bon Appétit, as we do today. After giving a month’s notice, we stayed an extra month to give our district manager time to replace us. Bon Appétit covered the cost, and even helped us move, even though we were leaving the company. On my last night of work at the Stanford Coffee House, Cary Wheeland stopped in to wish us well. Little did we know, he had called Lou Lathon at Agilent Technologies in Colorado [now a district manager] to tell him Guido and I were moving to Colorado. We had no idea that soon after arriving in Colorado, we would again be working for Bon Appétit! KIMBERLY DRIESCH

General Manager, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN Joined us in...2000, as catering director at St. Olaf College

Mike Brinkman, senior executive chef at Santa Clara University and Micah Cavallo, general manager at Jones Farm

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... That it was a good company to be working for. What I’ve learned: I now know that it is a GREAT company to work for. I love every initiative that our company implements!

for food.

Arturo Guevara

...cares about the world and the well-being of others.

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stuartleckie General Manager, Saint Joseph’s College of Maine, Standish, ME Joined Bon Appétit in 2000, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... When I answered a tiny ad in a little local newspaper I had no idea what Bon Appétit was or what I was getting myself into. Upon arriving for my interview I encountered District Manager John Engstrom. He was running around the café with beads of sweat trickling down his bright red face. “You must be Peter,” he said. “No, I’m Stuart,” I answered. When my interview began, he noted, “I see you have a lot of college experience in England.” I had to explain that I went to college in England, but had no food service experience at colleges.

and local foods, and I know more about cow manure than I ever wanted to! Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We’ve evolved into having a much stronger focus on sustainability than in the beginning. I remember when I started it was all about making everything larger. We bought larger cups, larger plates, served bigger portions, etc. That changed pretty fast. People stories: One day John Engstrom challenged me to start a farm at St. Joe’s. He basically called me up and told me to hire a farm manager and a bunch of interns to work on the farm. I didn’t know the first thing about hiring a farm manager. Somehow we found Michial Russell, and I’ve watched our farm go from one small patch of tomatoes to a full three-acre working farm with livestock, produce, and education programs.

After a whirlwind of three interviews and meeting with the client, I was hired as the general manager in September. Later I learned that John was a little worn out from being acting opening GM for nearly a month. As the new GM, I was in for a rollercoaster ride of work. It was not until around Christmastime that I finally started to understand the business, meal plans, participation, and the Bon Appétit made the farm so sucfinances etc. — at which point I Agricultural apprentice Sierra Bintliff on the cessful that the college saw the benelearned we were way over budget. Saint Joseph’s College of Maine farm fits of the farm to the entire communiLuckily, we turned it around, and I ty and took it over from us. The farm am so grateful to John for hiring me that day and allowing now has its own free-range turkey program, lambing program, me to become part of the Bon Appétit family. and year-round herb garden. The farm also manages nine local school gardens and is integrated with the environmental What I’ve learned: How to cook! I have become a better science class, the business class, and is a required core class for manager. I’ve had the opportunity to learn about farming all students.

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debbybridges General Manager, Reed College, Portland, OR Joined Bon Appétit in 2000, as catering assistant at Jones Farm

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... It seemed like a cool company that was doing some good things. I had a childhood friend who worked at University of Portland and she kept raving about how great Bon Appétit was. Richard Calbow was my first general manager, and he worked harder than anyone. He was my inspiration as I’m someone who rolls up her sleeves and jumps in, no matter what. It was great to see a manager who was part of the team and not above doing any task that needed to get done. It showed me that Bon Appétit was a place where people loved to work and felt part of something great! What I’ve learned: I grew up in rural Oregon, so I know farmers and ranchers firsthand, and I know how hard their jobs can be. I have learned that working for a socially responsible company can have an impact, and that we can be the catalyst for change. I have also learned that it is possible to walk the talk. Working for Bon Appétit has changed me. I am more aware of food, food policy, and food access, and am more committed to being involved with those issues.

Moments I’ve felt proud: A couple of years ago, I went on a trip to the southern coast of Oregon with Sam Currie, district manager, and Mac Lary, general manager at Lewis and Clark. The purpose was to meet with cranberry farmers and figure out a way to get Oregon cranberries into Bon Appétit accounts. We were discussing the price of cranberries with the farmer, Scott McKenzie. He was concerned about what price to ask, because Ocean Spray had not yet set the market price for cranberries. He was afraid if he set a price Ocean Spray would set the market price lower.

Farmer Randy Farr and his wife Gretchen had partnered with Scott McKenzie and his family to form Clearwater Cranberries. Bon Appétit pledged to buy these sustainably grown cranberries, regardless of the price!

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: When I started, we were this upstart, scrappy company with a dream to change the way contract food service was perceived and served. We have had to mature, slow down and make sure that we are living up to our promise to all our clients. We’ve also had to stay ahead because others are now doing what we do.

Sam told him that Bon Appétit didn’t care what price Ocean Spray set. He said he wanted to pay the price that Scott (and the other cranberry farmers) needed in order to continue to grow crops, pay for health insurance, expand their businesses, and to keep themselves whole. Scott sat there in stunned silence, shook his head and replied,“I have never done business this way. I don’t know what to say.” It’s incredible to be part of a company that can change the way that we treat farmers and producers and be able to bring about real change. Wow!

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The tech bubble bursts, but we’re going strong: we launch our Great Expectations standards program, and we start using disposables made from renewable resources

GREAT EXPECTATIONS MILESTONES

OPENINGS American University, DC Jones Farm 5, OR Oberlin College, OH Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, WA Soka University, CA Target North, MN Yahoo!, CA HONORS Award for Best Private Catering over $50,000 from Special Events Catering Magazine COMMITMENTS Commitment to Responsible Disposables: We begin using plates, clamshells, cups, bowls and flatware from renewable sources such as corn, sugarcane, and potato starch in select locations

Yahoo! General Manager Bob Hart SEBASTIAN MATA-ALVAREZ

General Manager, WCL Café at American University, Washington, DC Joined us in...2001, as banquet manager

What I’ve learned: I didn’t know about or pay much attention to sustainability until I joined Bon Appétit. It’s changed me. I incorporate much of what I’ve learned at home. My kids really appreciate it.

Chef's Table at Tropicana Gardens with Jacob Coke, now Thomas Aquinas's executive chef, and the late Todd Ocker, its first executive chef

Former Director of Retail Operations LeeRoy Fitch dressed up for Halloween

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Every day is different at Bon Appétit. There are always more tools for us to use to help us do our jobs better. Moments I’ve felt proud: At Bon Appétit, each and every chef has an opportunity to show how creative they can be. Last year the university named us Most Creative team, which really lifted our spirits.

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michaelaquaro District Manager, Southeast District Joined Bon Appétit in 2001, as hourly cook at Grove City College

Eckerd College Director of Operations Raymond Gallace and District Manager Michael Aquaro at Duke’s opening in 2007

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Having previously worked in the hotel industry as a chef in New York City, I wasn’t sure that this segment of the hospitality industry would be the right fit for me. I had been researching companies, and when I learned about Bon Appétit, I knew that this was the only food service company that I would want to work for. What I’ve learned: Working at Bon Appétit has provided me with an opportunity to work for and with many very good leaders. Striving to become a good leader, and continuing to become a better leader, has been the biggest change for me.

My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I’ve been fortunate to work with many great people over the years. The best part for me is knowing that, while we may not be at the same account together today, the relationships built are still very strong, and no matter what, we can always count on each other to assist in any way necessary. A great example of this is when we took over the West Campus operation at Duke University in 2007. Nate Peterson had been looking to relocate to the East Coast. We spoke on the phone, and I invited him to come out and spend a few days at Duke. Three months later, he finally went back to Arizona to pick up his wife and dogs, and relocated to North Carolina to become the executive chef of West Campus. He is still here with us, as the resident district manager!

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: While there may be many obvious changes, such as the acquisition by Compass, more business in new Here’s another great example from markets, and the progress Bon around the same time. We were Appétit has made as an industry struggling with the baking operaleader on many fronts, the most tions on West Campus. Baker remarkable thing is how little Bon Raymond Gallace from Eckerd Appétit has changed. When I first College had helped us with the East began working at Bon Appétit, we District Manager Michael Aquaro with NC rancher Patrick Campus opening and did a great Harris were a company that was very close job. I called him up one morning knit, prided itself on its commitment to serving great food, and around 7 a.m. and asked him if he could break away for a few attracted some of the best individuals within the industry. All of days to come assist at Duke. After he told me that he could, I that is still true. called him back and said, “Great, you fly out at 4 p.m. today.” Without hesitation he said, “I’ll see you later.” Of course he Moments I’ve felt proud: In 2004, during an opening in Florida, wound up staying much longer than a few days! Raymond is I suffered a serious accident. The support that was provided to now the director of operations at Eckerd College. I could me and members of my family was extraordinary. I have always probably tell similar stories for many great chefs and managers been proud to represent Bon Appétit, but that particular such as Emanuel May, Theresa Varvir, Mike Moroni, Liz occasion made me realize that our company, and the way that Simmonds, Terry McGhee, Ellen “Helen” McGhee, and Sal it looks after its people, is unique. Latona to name a few.

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I Met My Sweetie at Bon Appétit It’s often said that people who truly love their work, happily spending most of their time and energy there, are “married to their jobs.” Some Bon Appétiters have it all - they have found work they love AND they found love at work!

I met my wife at my interview for a job with Bon Appétit! The interview with my boss (and wife to be), Catering Director Amarylla Hayes, went well. We were married in 2007 in Mendocino, and we wrote our own menu and grew our own vegetables for the meal! — Steve Ganner, Resident District Manager, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA

Amarylla and Steve in 2004, at their first corporate catering event together. Chief Financial Officer Liz Baldwin said, “You guys look so nice together. Let me take a photo.” The rest is history!

Amarylla and Steve at their wedding in 2007

Cupcakes by Bon Appétit at Oracle Pastry Chef Ian Farrell, for the wedding of Steve Ganner and Amarylla Hayes

I met my husband, Richard Hays, pastry chef at St. Olaf College, in 2000 when I started with Bon Appétit. We got married in 2004 and had a child together in 2005! We have been very happy ever since. The only spouse I have right now is Bon Appétit. I’m dating the company. —Stephanie Cipolletta, Catering Sales and Operations Manager, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

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—Kimberly Driesch, General Manager, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN


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I met my wife, Ellen McGhee [now regional operations support manager], while working at St. John Fisher College in 1996, and we were married in 1999. Thank you, Bon Appétit! —Terry McGhee, General Manager, Otterbein College, Westerville, OH

I might have... —David Wartman, Executive Chef, Target Bullseye Café, Minneapolis, MN

I was working at National Semiconductor as the swing shift supervisor when, one day, the café manager, Scott Jackson, came into the kitchen. He said, “Hey, I have some visitors from another account that you may be interested in.” I responded, “Not really interested at this point,” as I was more interested in getting dinner ready for my customers. Four months later Scott received a promotion and mentioned that Shannon, the redhead who’d toured a few months ago, was going to be the new café manager. When Shannon started, she worked long hours trying to get herself acquainted and we ended up working together more than I had anticipated. One day Shannon asked me if I wanted to work a Persian wedding with her. I agreed. Afterwards she invited me to a party. I went, and we had a great time together. We kept the relationship a secret at work for quite a while, but word eventually got out. We got married about three years after we met, and Bon Appétit did the food at the reception (thank you, [District Manager] David Whalen!). Seventeen years later, Shannon and I have two BAMCO babies: a son, Jerek, who is 13, and a daughter, Jaden, who is ten. —James Bernhardt, General Manager, PayPal, Chandler, AZ

I met General Manager Leslie Simmonds at a new account opening in Minnesota. Six months later, we were engaged. —Elizabeth Simmonds, General Manager, SAS-Cary, NC

I met my wife, Melody, at Thacher School. (She’s now general manager at IAIA and has one month seniority over me, even though I was hired as her boss!) At that time she was the breakfast and catering cook and I was the dinner cook. She also had her own catering business and worked parttime for Bon Appétit. In the beginning I helped her out with her business on my days off. We built trust and understanding for each other as we traded turns on who’s the boss. We quickly learned that even though we sometimes took a different route, we got to the same results, and also found that we were like-minded. —Guido Lambelet, Executive Chef, Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM 53


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185 locations in 21 states! Compass Group PLC acquires Bon Appétit Management Company, and Bon Appétit begins serving only sustainable seafood and rBGH-free milk

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Best Buy, MN Cisco - Ontario, Canada Cisco - Boxborough, MA Cisco - Research Triangle, NC College of Idaho, ID Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA Marvell Semiconductor, CA Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, TX Oracle - Reston, VA Ronler Acres 3, OR University of the Pacific, CA Villanova Prep School, CA Wabash College, IN HONORS “Best College Food” honors for Wheaton College and Washington University in St. Louis from Princeton Review COMMITMENTS rBGH in Dairy: We vow to serve only milk (and later, yogurt) from cows not treated with artificial bovine growth hormones

SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD COMMITMENT: All of our seafood must be green- or yellowlisted in accordance with the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch guidelines for sustainability.

Compass Group PLC is delighted to announce its agreement to acquire Bon Appétit Management Company, a foodservice company based in Palo Alto, CA. The consideration payable by Compass Group is $155.8 million, which will be paid in cash from banking facilities. This agreement has the support of the Bon Appétit Board and is following agreement with Shidax, the majority shareholder of Bon Appétit Management Company. Fedele Bauccio, cofounder and CEO of Bon Appétit Management Company, said, “We were looking for a company that understood the quality associated with Bon Appétit, and one that would value our culture, our people, and our operating style. I believe we found that with Compass Group.” —from the Compass Group press release, March 6, 2002

MARIETTA LAMARRE

Controller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Emmanuel College, and Lesley University, Cambridge, MA Joined us in...1994, as general manager at Stephens College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I read an article in a food service trade journal and was impressed by the company’s commitment to great food and responsible sourcing. I also knew something about the backgrounds of Fedele and Ernie [Collins, Bon Appétit cofounder] and felt they were running a different kind of company. I knew that, as an associate of this company, I was not going to be a number, but a person. I was ready. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: Watching new employees blossom and grow. For example, Dusko Bogicevic starting in the dish room at MIT when it opened in 2002. He’d only been in the country from Croatia for a few months, but he learned so quickly he was a valued team member from the get-go. Today, he’s indispensable. Not only does he do the utility work, but he also helps with the front-of-the-house duties and makes some of the best pizzas on campus! Any individual who is willing to work hard and learn different skills will always have a place at Bon Appétit.

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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BETH GENTRY

General Manager, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO Joined us in...2002, as general manager at College of Idaho

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I worked for the College’s Residence Life division and was on the committee that decided to switch food service providers. My first experience with Bon Appétit was touring Lewis and Clark and University of Portland as a prospective client. I was so impressed with the food I tried and the people I met that, once Bon Appétit came on campus at College of Idaho, I was happy to be hired as general manager. District Manager Sam Currie, Google Executive Chef Doug Rust, and University of Portland General Manager Kirk Mustain convinced me that it would be a ton of fun, and it has been! What I’ve learned: That a large company can make a big difference on a local level. We can really add something to the community and rebuild our food system by supporting family farmers. Working for Bon Appétit has changed how I look at the food system and how I live my life outside of work. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: When I started with Bon Appétit, we were just starting to source locally, but our purchasing didn’t encompass all the other issues like climate change, farmworker rights, and community support. Now those issues are the backbone of the important decisions that drive our company.

Moments I’ve felt proud: When I came to Colorado, I was really taken by how hard it is to farm here, with all the struggles around land, water, and weather. One of our farmer families, the Wileys, who own Larga Vista Ranch, a third-generation farm in Boone, CO, work so hard to keep the family farm going and raise their two children. Last year a bumper crop of tomatoes in Colorado meant that Doug would call us each week and ask to deliver 500 pounds at a time. We were happy to let him, as we could cook them down and freeze them for sauces and such. When I last visited him in the fall, he told me the reason the farm was making a profit that year was because of our support. That made me feel so thankful to be part of this company. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: Getting up at 4 a.m. to make coffee for the early shift during one of the openings is burned into my mind. Regional Operations Manager Steve Samuelson wanted everything to be perfect and on time. Our food philosophy is key, but this is a company about people and it’s the people that bring the dream to life. I have met so many inspiring people working for this company and am very blessed to be a part of it.

If there was ever a management company that earned its reputation one meal at a time, that distinction would have to belong to Bon Appétit. It is a company with a heartbeat that emanates from the kitchen, but a kitchen that operates in full view of the customer. The firm’s indelible trademark — a culture of fresh food, authentically prepared and created for each account by dedicated chefs empowered to customize and deliver it — has redefined the high end of food expectations in the managed service environment. Over the 15 years since its founding, Bon Appétit has evolved from a boutique, regional catering company into what many believe has been one of the most influential players in the onsite foodservice community. —Food Management Magazine

The Ronler Acres 3 Team

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KIMBERLY TRIPLETT

Regional Operations Support, Maryland Joined us in... 2002, as executive chef at American University

farm to fork BRETT GROHSGAL

Even’ Star Organic Farm Lexington Park, Maryland

Working with Bon Appétit at American and Gallaudet Universities has been a joy. The executive and sous chefs at both facilities have been superbly creative and eager to dream up exciting new dishes featuring the artisanal foods we grow. From the business perspective, the chefs have been able to use large volumes of our crops in peak season and are always civil and polite, with none of the negative drama of some chefs who have bought from us. Most importantly, every time I deliver I feel that the foods we work so hard to produce are in good hands and will safely feed innumerable diners. That’s why Bon Appétit will remain a core pillar of our farm long into the future.

Chef turned Regional Operations Support Team Member Kimberly Triplett and farmer Brett Grohsgal on her first visit to the farm

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I fell in love with Bon Appétit right away. What I’ve learned: I’ve learned so much working for a company that talks the talk and walks the walk when it comes to cooking in a socially responsible way and being industry leaders in environmentally friendly sourcing. I have benefited both personally and professionally from working here. I believe that Fedele and Michael [Bauccio, CEO and COO] truly care about the people who work for Bon Appétit. Moments I’ve felt proud: Bon Appétit has continued to grow in social initiatives that have influenced the food industry and beyond. Helping the environment, farmers, tomato pickers, and making great food. We just keep getting better. When Fedele received the Leadership Award from Chefs Collaborative, that was great recognition for all of us. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: When I was first at American University, I approached a local farmer, Brett Grohsgal, about selling his beautiful melons to the café. He turned me down! He just couldn’t believe that a food service company would treat his produce with the proper respect. So I went to visit him. I walked through the fields with him barefoot and told him that Bon Appétit was different. I told him we were a company that hired chefs like me who cared about food, and gave us the freedom to purchase the best we could buy locally. I finally convinced him to sell to us. Ten years later, Brett still sells melons and more from Even’ Star Organic Farm to American and other cafés in the DC area.

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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and structure; a long-range visionary with high standards; a natural leader.

Davina Kwong


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LYDIA KUMPA

Chef/Manager, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Joined us in...2002, as catering chef at American University

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Amazement that it truly was a chef-driven environment. Knowing that I really could use my own recipes, cook with the seasons using local ingredients, and create dishes that would satisfy the unique needs of my customers made my transition from the restaurant world much easier than I ever expected. What I’ve learned: Although I had a broad knowledge of many cuisines, Bon Appétit’s signature culinary programs have given me a much deeper knowledge of the flavor profiles and ingredients of the cuisines studied. Programs like Za’tar, Bambooz, and Turmeric Trail have helped me develop solid technique in Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, and Indian cuisines so that, when I’m cooking and presenting the food, I feel I’m representing the true cuisine.

Happy Birthday from Best Buy

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Bon Appétit has blossomed. At every café we’re in the business of educating and changing the historically ingrained ideas of what food service is, should, can, and will be. Throughout the company we’ve internalized Low Carbon Diet, Eat Local Challenge and other purchasing practices. And every year we go further with new challenges such as better animal standards, and addressing labor in the food chain. Through it all we are creating better-educated consumers who will ultimately help us to achieve all that Bon Appétit aspires to do for our world.

JP Dozier, Financial Analysis Director

My favorite Bon Appétit memories: At the outset of the Farm to Fork program, chef Kimberly Triplett and I drove from American University to southern Maryland to visit our first farm. Pulling into Even’ Star Organic Farm, we encountered a barefoot farmer Brett Grohsgal, who showed us around his fields encouraging us to pop sun-warmed grape tomatoes into our mouths as we walked. It was just the most amazing experience I’ve had as a chef!

Human Resources Manager Heather Cunha Peterson

. .on the ball and ‘rock’n!”

David O’Brien

. .loyal, caring, and competitive.

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garygreen Compass Group

Bon Appétit and Compass Group: A SPECIAL COMBINATION In 2002, Bon Appétit Management Company was acquired by Compass Group PLC, the world’s largest food service company. Compass entered the U.S. market in 1994 when it acquired Canteen Vending. Gary Green, then chief financial officer, moved from his native England to help set up Compass’s U.S. headquarters in Charlotte, NC. He became CEO of Compass Group North America in 1999, and began a string of high-profile acquisitions for the company.

Well, I think we were, because we have a track record of keeping companies we buy intact, along with their culture. If you look at the competition, virtually every company they’ve bought — certainly in the food service space — they’ve taken over, changed the name, got rid of the people, and not realized they’ve destroyed everything they’ve bought, in our view.

Bon Appétit Director of Communications Bonnie Powell interviewed Gary recently to get his perspective on the two companies’ relationship.

What about the focus on sustainability? Does that set us apart in your view?

Bonnie: When did you first become aware of Bon Appétit — and why did you consider it as a possible addition to Compass’s portfolio? Gary: We spoke to Bon Appétit two years before we actually did the transaction. In Canteen, our first acquisition, we bought a great vending company, but we needed some great food in our portfolio. And that’s what led us to Bon Appétit. We had to really get the reputation of our food up. We were waiting for the right time for Bon Appétit to consider changing owners. And around 2001, Fedele was under pressure to give his investors some return on their money, whether by going public — which he did not want to do — or finding a buyer. He said that of all the suitors that had come knocking over the years, Compass seemed like the best fit.

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How would you characterize Bon Appétit’s culture? I don’t think there’s anybody who talks more about food in either the industry or certainly within Compass, than Bon Appétit. And you know, at the end of the day, food is what we do. At Bon Appétit, the food culture just comes through in abundance, which it doesn’t always across the whole of the company.

Bon Appétit’s drive for sustainability has led the way for Compass. If you have a look at the Compass sustainable programs, the wellness programs, I think without exception they’ve all originated in Bon Appétit. Now, when we first did the deal, I don’t think that was so much of an issue. It was actually just great food. It’s become a bigger issue since then. That Circle of Responsibility you started in 2004 — that inspired the whole of Compass. You guys have led all the initiatives around that. That’s amazing, considering what a tiny percentage of Compass’s business we are. I think the whole of Compass benefits from the “halo effect” of having Bon Appétit as partners. Your portfolio of clients is second to none. When we’re selling our sectors, the names of your clients come into that sell a lot. And has Bon Appétit benefited from Compass’s support as well, do you think?


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Cofounders Fedele Bauccio, CEO, and President Ernie Collins around the time of the sale to Compass

Well, factually, your growth has been amazing. You’ve tripled in size since we acquired you. And there’s a reason for that. It’s because we have married your great service and food culture with our financial strength. The client gets the best of both worlds. He gets the financial strength of Compass, the purchasing might that we bring, but he still gets the wonderful food and local touch that clients have always gotten from Bon Appétit.

impression. When he came to Barcelona, to the Compass global conference, he got up and just spoke about food for an hour. That was so impactful on the rest of the group, taking us back to why we’re in this business. In a three-day meeting, he was the star speaker. Have you heard the story about him meeting Prince Charles? In Washington, DC, at the Future of Food conference?

Sounds like a happily-ever-after romance. Were there any hiccups? Not from my perspective, no. No cultural differences that had to be worked out? Not really. Fedele has been great. I mean, I shouldn’t say this, but I hardly manage him, let’s put it like that. Not that he’s the kind of guy you manage. [Laughs] He’s been as good as anyone in taking the best of Compass if he thinks it will benefit his clients.

Yes, and then later the Prince invited him to the farm, in England? My understanding was that Fedele told the prince he couldn’t make it because he was too busy. He’s probably the only guy working for an English company who would tell the Prince he was too busy to go and see him. Is that what makes him special? That’s one of the things! Thanks for talking to us, Gary!

This might not mean anything to your readers, but in the UK, there is a soccer manager called José Mourinho, who used to manage Chelsea and now manages Real Madrid. He is probably the best soccer manager in the world. He was nicknamed,“The Special One.” And all across Compass, in all the countries we operate, Fedele is known globally as “The Special One.” I think I’ve heard of Mourinho, actually. He’s rather temperamental, isn’t he? Yes, but that isn’t the connection. It was just — well, ask a soccer fan. Have you ever gone with Fedele to visit one of our accounts? Yeah I have, but I couldn’t keep up! He’s like a whirlwind. Hugging everyone, making you taste things. He makes an

Bon Appétit Chef/Manager at Gallaudet Jay Keller and Gwen Perkins of D.C. Central Kitchen laugh with Prince Charles at the 2011 Future of Food conference in Washington, DC, at which CEO Fedele Bauccio spoke and met His Highness

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We lauch our Circle of Responsibility sustainability education program and a campaign to reduce antibiotic use in America’s meat supply

MILESTONES

OPENINGS American University Washington College of Law, DC Art Institute of Chicago, IL Gallaudet University, DC University of San Francisco, CA COMMITMENTS Antibiotic Reduction: After studying the negative impact that antibiotic use in animal agriculture has on both human and environmental health, we vow to buy chicken never treated with nontherapeutic antibiotics. (We add turkey and hamburger to this commitment later.) Circle of Responsibility program: Both in-café and online, we create comprehensive educational materials to educate our guests on the importance of making sustainable food choices.

ANTIBIOTIC REDUCTION COMMITMENT: After studying the negative impact that antibiotic use in animal agriculture has on both human and environmental health, we vow to buy chicken never treated with non-therapeutic antibiotics. (We add turkey and hamburger to this commitment later.)

A group salute from the University of San Francisco team

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .like Art Rooney, founder of the Pittsburgh Steelers. If you read his book, you’ll know what I mean.


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03 nowing and working with Fedele is one of the highlights of my career. He is an energetic and magnetic force. His passion for food and hospitality is extremely contagious. Fedele knows how to bring the best out of people to work toward common goals. Bon Appétit’s commitment to sustainability and doing what’s right for people and the environment is unparalleled. It is my pleasure to be allied with Bon Appétit. To you Fedele, “Cent’Anni.” Congratulations and thank you.

K

—Tony Mantuano, chef of Spiaggia and partner with Bon Appétit in Terzo Piano at the Art Institute of Chicago

DESMOND RISPER

Café Manager, AT&T Building, Chicago, IL Joined us in...2003, as café hall monitor at Wabash College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I was a student at Wabash, and I saw working for Bon Appétit as both a new challenge and an exciting opportunity. I first met Randy DeMers [now regional vice president] when I was 19. The first time we were introduced, he was kind and friendly. I was surprised and impressed that someone in such an important role would take the time to say hi to someone as young and inexperienced as I was. Little did either of us know that I’d be supervising one of his accounts years later. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: Bon Appétit has become more organized and meticulous. My role is more analytical than it used to be. It’s great to have benchmarks of where we’ve been so we can look at how well we’re doing. We’re constantly evolving in many good ways. Moments I’ve felt proud: I’m most proud when I get to be involved in a project from start to finish and see some of my ideas implemented. For example, I was in charge of procuring the new furniture for McKinlock Café Manager Desmond Risper with Court at the Art Institute, and every time I see Catering Captain Azo Azo at the Garden the furniture I’m reminded of the experience. I Café at the Art Institute in 2010 also launched the Kids Café lunch program at McKinlock and was gratified by its success. Now I’m proud that I was up for the challenge of moving to AT&T and managing the complex here. It’s been great fun!

He has the same beliefs about development, mentoring, diversity, and growth from within.

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Art Institute of Chicago Goes All Out for Birthday Wishes We received submissions from all over the country, from longtimers and newbies for this special issue of Bravo, but one account wins top honors for the most participation. Below are select snippets from our wonderful team at AIC, which opened in 2003 in Chicago: BRYAN BRUIN

JENNIFER MCDONALD

Resident District Manager, Art Institute of Chicago and AT&T, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2006, as director of catering at AIC

Marketing Coordinator, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2010, in same position

What I’ve learned: That it’s possible to run individual operations with an entrepreneurial spirit and meet the needs of guests and clients — all while working for a large organization. This combination of entrepreneurship and a unifying vision has helped me grow significantly as a leader. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We’ve definitely grown in size, and with that there’s always change. But our growth has given so many people the opportunity to move up in the ranks, without causing us to lose our brand identity. Moments I’ve felt proud: After the Modern Wing opened we hosted a Compass Community Council event. I’m still being told by other Compass associates that it was one of the best events they’ve ever attended. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: Recently I was at a meeting in which [Chief Financial Officer] Liz Baldwin was recognized for 25 years of employment. As part of the meeting, Fedele and Michael presented a company overview and timeline of how Bon Appétit began and where it is today. It’s incredibly humbling to be part of an organization this large and successful in which individuals are still recognized with personal attention and respect. That was a perfect example of what this company is truly about. Art Institute of Chicago Cook Sergio Gutierrez demonstrating his concern for safety by showing off the wet floor sign

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… In the year leading up to my employment, I had been making drastic dietary changes as a result of watching Food, Inc, and what I learned conducting research on my own. Bon Appétit’s philosophies matched the changes that I had made, such as only eating cage-free eggs and buying local produce in season. What I’ve learned: I continue to learn every day that I come to work. I think the most important thing that I learned was about sustainable seafood. I am a pescatarian, and even though I was aware of the Monterey Bay Aquarium guidelines, I hadn’t been 100% adhering to the green and yellow choices. I always thought the guidelines were related only to endangered species and mercury levels. Bon Appétit has taught me that those guidelines are about more than my health and saving a species, and that my food choices affect more than just me. I understand now it’s about building a healthier overall system. JUSTIN PAPONETTI

Lead Line Cook, Terzo Piano at the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2009, as line cook

What I’ve learned: I learned how to take a break, which is rare in a restaurant kitchen! Moments I’ve felt proud: Representing Terzo Piano at the RIPE Festival at the Cleveland Botanical Garden. The AIC gingerbread competition

Catering Sales Manager Debi Nolan, former Executive Chef Brian Williams, and Resident District Manager Bryan Bruin at an event in 2006 Art Institute of Chicago Cook Fu Guan chopping chives for an event

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DANUEL WILLIAMSON

KIM LILLEBERG

Special Event Logistics Manager, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2004, as café supervisor

Senior Catering Sales Manager, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2004, as catering sales manager

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... I noticed that everyone was, and is, treated with respect. I liked that it had a “mom and pop” family-oriented feel, and didn’t feel like a big corporation.

What I’ve learned: What haven’t I learned? Working under several bosses has been both challenging and rewarding. It has opened my eyes to different ways of promoting events, and helped me learn to manage all the moving parts simultaneously. CLARENCE WILLIAMS

What I’ve learned: Working here has definitely changed me. When I’m dining somewhere else, I don’t take for-granted excellent service, or the work behind the scenes. Moments I’ve felt proud: It makes me proud to say,“I want to go to work” instead of “I have to go to work.”

ALICIA FAULKNER

Catering Sales Manager, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2009, in same position

What I’ve learned: I came to Bon Appétit as a confident and experienced event professional with nine years in food service. Looking back, I realize I had no idea what I was getting myself into. This venue and catering operation has opened my eyes to an entirely new level of event production, volume, food-quality, and high-profile clientele. I am so proud of how much I have learned and how I’ve grown professionally and personally with Bon Appétit at the AIC.

Café Supervisor, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2003, as dishwasher

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... I really didn’t think this was the place for me, but I needed a job. At that time, the café wasn’t completed, and I wasn’t sure what was going to happen. I have a music studio, and I didn’t think I’d stay here once my music career took off. Restaurant Director Bill Heisler told me that 85% of people stay in a career here at Bon Appétit. I really didn’t think I’d be one of them. After several years, I knew that I had become a statistic, because this is really where I’m meant to be.

It makes me proud to say, “I want to go to work” instead of “I have to go to work.” -DANUEL WILLIAMSON

ARTURO GUEVARA

Café Chef, AT&T Café, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2002, as lead cook at AT&T café (later, sous chef at AIC)

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… That it was going to be a good experience for me to learn what Bon Appétit believes in, things such as cooking from scratch and using fresh ingredients. Arturo Guevara with Catering Sales Assistant Bryanne Clinton and Accountant Stephanie McIntyre during an event in 2006 at the Art Institute

Moments I’ve felt proud: I’m proud every day that I come to work.

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: The philosophies haven’t changed, even if the staff has. Bon Appétit has always emphasized health first. I wish the whole world knew that Bon Appétit food service is better than any Jenny Craig diet plan that you can come up with. It’s so easy and Americans can really learn from us how to keep obesity in check through portion control and healthy choices.

JUAN MILLAN

Director of Retail Operations, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in… 2003, as a catering and restaurant supervisor

What I’ve learned… So much about developing and mentoring my staff, the importance of diversity in our workplace and the contributions made by everyone on the team. Most important though are the core beliefs, the philosophies we live every day in our kitchens. I also feel that Bon Appétit believes in, and invests more in, our employees to develop their skills and abilities.

Like Desmond Risper (page 61), both Devon Quinn and Samantha Katz have gotten the opportunity to move into higher roles at Bon Appétit. Devon became Chef de Cuisine for catering at the AIC. Samantha is now the lead cook for the Garden Café at the AIC. 63


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We’re recognized for our corporate public service

DAN FARRELL

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Bright Horizons Children’s Center, CA Case Western Reserve University, OH Cornish College of the Arts, WA Eckerd College, FL Fresenius, UT Google, CA KNTV - NBC 11, CA Otterbein University, OH Medtronic World Headquarters, MN Plantronics, CA Seattle Art Museum, WA TBWA\CHIAT\DAY, CA Trine University, IN William Jessup University, CA HONORS Golden Dumpster Award from the City of San Francisco William D. Littleford Award for Corporate Public Service Finalist for International Association of Culinary Professionals Award COMMITMENTS Trans Fats commitment: We commit to buy only oils and baked goods free of trans fat, an unhealthy and artificially saturated fat found in many processed foods.

District Manager, Southeast/Midwest Region Joined us in... 2004, as resident district manager at Case Western Reserve University

My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I’ll start with what we refer to as the“2004 Cleveland Challenge” — the opening of Case Western Reserve University. After learning Bon Appétit had won the account, District Managers John Engstrom and David Connolly called in a savvy Bon Appétit team. Staff arrived from all over the country to put together a monster of a program that would serve more than 8,000 students in two residential halls and six retail units. By midsummer the conversion was fully underway. A new group of employees and managers were brought in to put the organization together, but our challenges were great. At one point, John Engstrom gathered the key players together to discuss our progress — or lack thereof — and, after listening to John’s motivational speech, one of the managers broke the ice by saying, “John, we’re not feeling the love.” That moment of hilarity kept us going throughout the fall. And what a fall it was! It brought national Bambooz training with chefs from every region descending on to campus to perfect Asian cooking techniques; a themed, three-day regional meeting highlighting Cleveland’s culinary scene; introductions to Fedele and Michael [Bauccio, CEO and COO], and the rest of senior staff; and a weekly barbecue for the CASE community. But that’s not all. We also had what we call The Race at Case – or the vice-presidential debates. It was a golden chance to showcase the campus nationally, but here we were with a team of new chefs, a new catering director, and a staff that had barely gotten to know each other, and suddenly we were hosting nearly 100 events over a three-day span. And these weren’t just any events. These were events held under the watchful eye of the Secret Service! Everything had to be executed like clockwork. Trucks, linens, staff.... we needed it all! The Secret Service’s scrutiny of temperatures and cooking times killed some of the food, but Case and Bon Appétit were on the map!

Former General Manager Jeff Marshall, Director of Information Technology Marcos Uechi, Former Data Entry Clerk Chris Eschback, and Director of Audit Masa Sasaki at the 2004 East Coast Regional Meeting

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .easygoing and laid back — it’s a very forgiving organization.

Justin Paponetti


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04 In a museum, the food should wow you, says Fedele Bauccio, CEO of Bon Appétit Management Co., a food service company based in Palo Alto, Calif., that runs the kitchens at several museums, including the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and the Restaurant at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Happy birthday from Pacific Northwest headquarters, left to right: Regional Bookkeeper Virginia Clark, Regional Vice President Mark Swenson, Office Manager Maralyn Carley, and District Manager Sam Currie

Gourmet magazine was bowled over by the caliber of museum cuisine at the Modern Art Museum, having recently knighted its café Modern as one of the nation’s best new restaurants. The Texas museum regularly produces what one might describe as American food with Asian grace notes.’ —“Elevating museum food to a fine art,” Knight Ridder Newspapers, 2004

Regional Marketing Director Tonya Flashey STEVE GANNER

A major caféteria management chain has torn up its mission statement and rewritten it to signal its move toward an entirely sustainable system of food delivery. Bon Appétit Management Co., which serves 1 million meals each week at on-site restaurants at over 150 corporations, is asking each of its chefs to use locally grown fruits and vegetables, and meat which is free of hormones, antibiotics and genetically modified feed. Oil used to fry French fries will be recycled and turned into environmentally friendly diesel fuel. Only wild salmon and dolphin-safe tuna is to be served. — Associated Press, 2004

Resident District Manager, Genentech, CA and OR Joined us in... 2004, as a catering chef at Oracle - Redwood Shores

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... I was so excited to discover that such a cool company existed within corporate food service. As a new dad trying to avoid going back to restaurant hours in the city, I was overjoyed to discover this gem of a company. What I’ve learned: So many things, and so many ways! Plant an herb garden, grow your own, save scraps, compost is magic, buy whole, butcher more, make stock, bake bread, make croutons, waste less, want less, work harder, eat well, live better.

Armando Maes, chef / manager at Oracle Redwood - Shores, breaking down a whole lamb

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Eat Local Challenge: A fun companywide tradition begins! Every year, accounts prepare a meal made entirely from local ingredients sourced within 150 miles. Chefs get a great challenge, while guests get to know their local food system’s bounty.

Eat Local Challenge heroes Wes Boese, then executive chef at Willamette University (now general manager at Mentor Graphics), and former Regional Executive Chef Joe McGarry carry the “raw” ingredients to make salt

Wes Boese cooks down the salt

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Eat Local Challenge debuts and the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation is born

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Chandler 2, 6 & 7, AZ Folsom 5, CA Folsom 7, CA Getty Villa, CA Hudson, MA Javelina Cantina - Phoenix, AZ Lesley University, MA Medtronic Spinal Biologics - Memphis, TN Mount St. Mary’s College, CA Ocotillo 6 & 8, AZ Palm, CA Patrick Henry College, VA Rio Rancho 5 & 7, NM Santa Clara RNB, CA Santa Clara 12, CA

THE BAMCO FOUNDATION’S SAVE SEAFOOD TOUR: Thousands of students at 30 colleges learn about seafood issues and why their choices matter. Bon Appétit chefs learn how to evaluate which seafood meets real sustainability criteria.

The Getty Villa opening team

Woodbury University General Manager Erin Malleus at the Getty Villa opening

HONORS Trendsetter Award from FCSI for Fedele Bauccio Ecological Society of America’s Corporate Award for ethical business practices COMMITMENTS Cage-free shell eggs: We commit to buying shell eggs from hens raised without cages at farms that are Certified Humane. Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation: We start a nonprofit, educational arm specifically designed to do the research on sustainable practices in the food industry, encourage the culinary world to “think big” about sustainable food, and develop the best possible company-wide purchasing practices. Director of Specialty Culinary Programs Jim Dodge, Director of Information Technology Marcos Uechi, and former Director of Marketing Shelia Turner at a Culinary Institute of America team building activity

The Javelina Cantina team

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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JOANN JOHNSON

Café Lead, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN Joined us in...1995, as café supervisor

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... I was already working at Macalester when Bon Appétit took over. I couldn’t believe the difference in food presentation and quality. What I’ve learned: Bon Appétit expects a lot and gives a lot back to its employees. I have always felt supported in my job, and through that support, I have learned to be more professional in my work and a better manager. Our sustainability initiatives have really opened my eyes. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: We’re continually challenging ourselves to do better and to innovate. The variety of food is always changing, including the addition of many items for special diets. The students are always so pleased that we take into account their needs and desires and continually introduce new programs and stations.

farm to fork JEFF TAYLOR

Tuscarora Organic Growers Cooperative Hustontown, PA

Our relationship with Bon Appétit began in 2005 and in the past few years has truly blossomed. Tuscarora Organic Growers now works with several metro locations and in particular, the folks at American University. The chefs are all a pleasure to work with and their enthusiasm for our produce continues to be a boon to our growth and success as both a cooperative and for all of our member family farms. You are truly the kind of people we like doing business with. Thanks for all of your support.

Moments I’ve felt proud: In 2005 I was chosen as the ABC employee of the year from the Midwest and attended the awards banquet in Orlando, FL. And I love the daily interaction that I have with the students and staff.

ED FOGARTY

General Manager, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA Joined us in...2005, as general manager

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I had heard about Bon Appétit from Elaine Smart, my friend and former boss at another company. She had left her job to go work at Bon Appétit at the University of Pennsylvania. [Elaine is now a regional vice president for Bon Appétit.] Several times she asked me to come work for her at this innovative company. I had just bought a house and was feeling like it wasn’t the right time to make another huge change. When the time came for her to ask me again, I accepted! When I first started my training at Emmanuel College, my immediate reaction was “Wow!” I was blown away by all the fresh food, decor, and the whole feeling of the account.

Sunny Ridge Farm in Spring Run, PA, a member of the Tuscarora Organic Growers Cooperative

What I’ve learned: I’m more aware than ever where our food comes from. I’ve been working in food service pretty much my entire working life. Before working for Bon Appétit, I took for granted how food was shipped and marketed. Moments I’ve felt proud: We catered a party for a group at Lesley that wanted everything to be local. This was in the dead of winter in Massachusetts! Using all of our local resources, we were able to make a really nice, totally local dinner.The client was amazed that we took it to that level. I stood back and said,“Well, we strive to do this every day!”

Time Magazine

want to attend because the lessons are compelling and important!

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heleneyork Executive Director, Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation Joined Bon Appétit in 2005, in same position

“Think big.” I had had lots of professional jobs before I came to Bon Appétit, but never before had my main job responsibility been summarized by a CEO’s command – no, demand – to “think big.” When I did think big in previous jobs, it wasn’t always welcomed as it is at Bon Appétit. Fedele [Bauccio] wanted to use research to educate chefs, guests, and the media about changes needed in our food system. The Foundation was created to do just that: synthesize academic papers, scientific assessments, and supply chain investigations, and then communicate key emerging sustainable food issues rather than send up new marketing claims. Keep in mind, this was before the term ”locavore” was pervasive, Michael Pollan had published The Omnivore’s Dilemma, or anyone was concerned that bees were vanishing.

The Low Carbon Diet (as it was renamed) became the first program in the nation to address the food system’s substantial contribution to climate change. I’ve spoken widely to the media and to lecture hall audiences around the world about how our chefs have created delicious alternatives to entice diners away from eating large quantities of beef and cheese, and how our small-batch, from-scratch cooking reduces food waste before it is created. The biggest selling point? Pictures of the mouth-watering items our chefs create using these guidelines. Real food looks and tastes great. In the years since it was launched, the Foundation has become a reflection of the passion that sets Bon Appétit apart. Few people reading this Bravo aren’t absolutely passionate about food. Real food. We care deeply about preserving healthy ecosystems from which great food springs. We care that small producers are able to innovate and survive, that what we serve isn’t homogenized by singular national supply chains, and that the people who work in the fields, on boats, and in kitchens are respected for the hard work they do.

I thought this was about the coolest job ever created. Plus, it was all about food! At my first Foundation board meeting, Helene York swam with the I proposed a program called “The Oil Summit in 2005 in Your Oatmeal.” I explained how our food system is a giant gas-guzzler, that we use 10 times more fossil fuels to produce one calorie of food than was required 60 years ago. Fedele listened. He was intrigued and also mystified by how that could be true. So he gave me permission to develop the idea further, because what mattered to him was that it was a big, important idea, not a slogan.

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The Foundation’s programs have reflected our collective passion. In Making Waves, we educated our chefs and guests about sustainable seafood; our Fellows Program engages with college students and Farm to Fork suppliers about challenges in the current food system, and the TEDxFruitvale conference focuses on the lack of basic rights or adequate wages for farm workers.

big fish at the Seaweb


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Folsom 5 and 7 send their congrats!

Since 2005, new ideas have taken root in the U.S. and begun to grow. Local, sustainable, certified humane and even low carbon, for example, are no longer unfamiliar terms. The Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation has been a leader in this movement. In questioning previously unquestioned choices and finding sustainable solutions, we are helping to define what socially responsible dining means. Looking back, I’m absolutely tickled to see how we’ve become an important source to which the media, academics, nonprofits, and food producers as well as chefs, managers, and guests can turn for practical information about what sustainability means (or doesn’t). Our accolades in the public realm, as well as our knocks, show that we’ve become a real participant in public discourse about food system changes. I may be the only corporate insider to be publicly labeled an “eco-Nazi” and “out to lunch” in the press for upholding a hard line on sustainable fish purchases. I might not put those references on my résumé, but I’m awfully proud to work for an entity that lets me articulate uncompromised standards and then backs me up. A“foundation,” Michael Pollan wrote in his 1995 book A Place of My Own, is a metaphor for structural support that has existed in philosophy, ethics, architecture, and common discourse for millennia. At Bon Appétit, we’re delighted to have added “food” to this definition.

Strategic Initiatives Analyst Cassie Roth

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06

Food Alliance honors us with its “Keeper of the Vision Award”

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Averett University, VA Duke University, NC Kirkland and Ellis, CA OMSI, OR Roger Williams University, RI White Wave Foods, CO HONORS Humane Society of the United States Award for Excellence in Food Service Best Concept Award (for Eat Local Challenge) from Food Management Finalist for the IACP Award of Excellence in Consumer Educational and Community Materials for Eat Local Challenge Award for Excellence for service to the community, San Mateo County Economic Development Association Food Industry Achievement Award from Anti-Defamation League

“I’m proud of the stands we have taken and the alliances we’ve made. I believe that there are many farms that could not have survived without us.” —Fedele Bauccio, CEO, “The Power of Ten,” Restaurants and Institutions, 2006

CEO Fedele Bauccio named Executive of the Year by Restaurants and Institutions

MERCURY AWARENESS COMMITMENT: We teamed with GotMercury.org to provide the necessary information for people to make educated choices about their seafood consumption, using both in-café signage and web outreach.

rm the fa trip to kes a a m m a ovell te The N

“People are really looking for a way to connect these days, and food is a great way to do that. When you re-elevate the importance of food, and you care where it comes from and what it tastes like, you have to start discussing the issues that surround it.’’ — Maisie Greenawalt, Vice President of Strategy, in the New York Times, 2006

If Bon Appétit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .a stubborn Italian who stands by good quality food with conviction.

Melody Lambelet


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JILL KOENEN

Regional Marketing Director, Northern California Joined us in...2005, as catering sales director at the De Young Museum

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My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Growing up in the Midwest and being a member of a generation used to eating whatever we want, whenever we want it, I was blown away not just by Bon Appétit’s commitment to seasonal cooking but by all of the initiatives around food sourcing. I had a lot to learn, and I was so excited to learn it. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: Early on at the De Young Museum, we needed to promote weddings and catering. However, the building was so new, we hadn’t done any weddings — but we needed photos to show prospective couples. We borrowed a dress and some flowers; the ops manager played the groom, while I played the bride. We hired a professional photographer to take our photos for trade. We were that scrappy! Once the program took off, between the de Young and the Legion of Honor, we were a wedding machine. To cheer up the team at the end of a long week, I would often perform “musicals” for them inspired by the evening’s events!

Executive Chef at Hamilton College Reuben Haag in 2006

Jill Koenen plays bride for a De Young wedding photo shoot in spring 2006

Nick Lanni, owner and farmer of Lanni Farms; Bryan Totel, former Clark University director of operations; and Jim LaChance, MIT executive chef

Nancy Grove, owner of Old Path Farm and Jeff Nayda, Chef/Manager at Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute

. .a warm, compassionate, loving family member.

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06

STEPHANIE KEITH

Controller / Marketing Manager, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI Joined us in...2006, as marketing intern

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I remember being EXTREMELY excited about being offered the marketing internship. I truly believed that this internship was my big break into the working world! And now six years later, it’s proven to be just that. Before Bon Appétit came to RWU, I was working for dining services under a different food service provider, helping with the invoices and catering paperwork. I left for my summer break and came back to a whole new ballgame! Since I was old enough to decide what I should and shouldn’t eat, I’ve been into nutrition, even considering becoming a nutritionist for a while. Bon Appétit was my foodie dream come true. Back in the day, there wasn’t much in the marketing world at the café level. We got some flyers and whatnot, but that was about it. I’m so happy to see how far marketing has come. We’ve got so many positive messages to get out.

Roger Williams Upper Commons Dining Manager Josh Hennessy, Controller/ Marketing Manager Stephanie Keith, Executive Sous Chef Donald Fitting, Executive Chef and Director of Culinary Operations Robert Lavoie, Catering Director Joseph Carney, and General Manager James Gubata

What I’ve learned: I used to be a painfully introverted person. I still get shy and nervous in some ways, but working for Bon Appétit has pushed me to grow tremendously! I love how many different paths my job has taken me down. One day, I’m completely tuned into my computer looking at hundreds of numbers, comparing budgets, figuring out food costs… another day I’m working a farmers’ market, visiting a local farm, or talking to soon-to-be Johnson & Wales graduates. The next day I’m writing articles, working on marketing campaigns, and throwing a huge Halloween dinner bash… AND I get to eat great food every day! Does any other job in the world offer all of this?! Moments I’ve felt proud: Johnson & Wales University has their career fair for graduating seniors each semester, and I get to represent Bon Appétit. I really enjoy spending the day talking with those students and explaining what Bon Appétit is all about. When I tell them how we purchase food, and what we stand for (wholesome, delicious food produced fairly and sustainably) it really brings my job back into focus. We all get wrapped up in our day-to-day responsibilities, but having that day once a semester to talk about why we do what we do makes me super proud of this company!

Duke Resident District Manager Nate Peterson and Café Manager Karen Allen get hands-on in the desert

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20 Regional Marketing Director Kari Menslage and District Manager Lori Flashner

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The northern California team

Regional Vice President Michael Venckus

“Bon Appétit is loath to characterize what it runs in any way, shape or form as ‘cafeterias.’ ‘That word is banned in our company,’ founder and chief executive Fedele Bauccio says, half in jest. ‘We approach our cafés as restaurants.’” — San Jose Mercury News

Fedele expresses not-so-mock outrage at the giant cafeteria sign outside of the new café at the Applied Materials opening

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Bon Appétit turns 20, and celebrates by launching our Low Carbon Diet and racking up a Seafood Champion Award

MILESTONES

OPENINGS AMTrust, OH (now Ohio Savings Bank) Bridgepointe, CA Cleveland Botanical Garden, OH Fort Worden Conference Center, WA Friendsview Manor, OR Grifols, CA Mills College, CA Pacific Café, CA Pacific Union College, CA SAP, CA SCU Adobe Lodge, CA St. Edwards University, TX University of Maryland at Shady Grove, MD VMware, CA VSP, CA Wesleyan University, CT Yahoo! - Boardwalk, OR HONORS Fedele Bauccio named Seafood Champion by Seafood Choices Alliance Food Management’s Best Menu Award (for Getty Villa Menu) COMMITMENTS Healthy Cooking: We implemented more than 25 new guidelines designed to ensure healthy offerings are available throughout our cafés. Low Carbon Diet: We launched the first national program to educate consumers about the impact food has on climate change and to take steps to reduce the food service sector’s contribution to the problem. We set a goal to reduce our own greenhouse gas emissions, created by the highest impact areas of our business, by 25%.

It is said that a wise man or woman is both a dreamer and a person of action; an idealist and a realist; a visionary with feet firmly planted in terra firma. Fedele [Bauccio, CEO], you gave us a dream and you inspired us to act on it. You gave us the ideas and allowed us the freedom to make them real. You gave us a vision and you planted firmly in us the business philosophy of doing the right thing. And always, you instilled in us that at the end of the day, it was all about serving great food.” —Marc Zammit, former Director of Culinary Support and Development (now Compass Group Vice President for Corporate Sustainability Initiatives and Culinary), writing in Bravo 2007

District Managers Bridgeen Keys and Lisa Haag get their dance on at the 20th anniversary party

ARBEE DEL ROSARIO

Director of Culinary Operations, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA Joined us in...2007, as chef de cuisine at Cisco - San Jose

What I’ve learned: Bon Appétit has taught me how important it is to give back to our community. Programs such as Low Carbon Diet and Seafood Watch really educate staff and customers about what it means to cook responsibly, and also shows them how they can make a difference with their choices. Bon Appétit has changed my life by making me aware of the impact I can have as a chef. It’s nice to know that doing this will give my kids a chance to enjoy the same food I enjoy now. Moments I’ve felt proud: The camaraderie during openings of new accounts is always inspiring. The dedication and hard work of every person involved shows through even during the chaotic orchestra of opening. It’s great to see multiple people doing different projects that all contribute to the same goal: opening with a bang, wowing the customers, and representing the vision of Fedele and Michael Bauccio [CEO and COO].

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“We launched our Low Carbon Diet this quarter, a program designed to raise awareness about the significant connection between food and climate change. More people are cognizant of ‘food miles’ — the long distance transport of food — but the Low Carbon Diet is about much more than buying local food. It’s about radically reducing food waste, choosing to eat less beef and cheese, and decreasing the ‘carbon calories’ that are mindlessly abundant in our daily food choices by becoming aware of what they are.” —Helene York, Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation Director, writing in Bravo, 2007


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07 Chef/Manager Lori Sakomoto, Cook Lluvia Lechuga, Cashier/Prep Cook Maribel Salguero, Cook Ana Machan, and Dishwasher/Prep Cook Neldi Moran at Grifols

While there may be a legitimate discourse to be had about the general use of animals for food, there is an emerging consensus that many of the now-standard agribusiness practices are cruel and should be ended. With the abuses faced by farm animals today, how we treat those we eat has become a very pressing issue facing the food industry. Those of us in the business have a responsibility to balance financial success with an ethical duty to reduce animal suffering. Fedele Bauccio, in the San Jose Mercury News, 2007

MIRNA CAPISTRAN

Catering Coordinator, University of Maryland at Shady Grove, Rockville, MD Joined us in...2007, as part-time cashier

What I’ve learned: Working for Bon Appétit has definitely changed my life. I’ve learned that I can make a difference by buying sustainable food, and I understand how what I eat affects the environment. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I’ve seen so many new developments that benefit the environment. For example, at Shady Grove we’ve gone from using plastic and generating waste, to a full composting program. And we’ve switched over to biodegradable disposables. Moments I’ve felt proud: Every year when we celebrate Eat Local Challenge I feel proud of our nice displays of local foods and how we interact with our customers to talk about the benefits of buying local.

The puzzle game was an excellent team-building exercise at the Northern California Regional Meeting

Irvine’s Commons Server Sonia Gallegos, Supervisor Olivia Carillo, Supervisor Claudia Valenzuela, and Supervisor Lupe Ramirez at University of Redlands’ Commencement May 2007. Claudia tragically passed away in February and is greatly missed by her team. Jeffery Walker, Santa Catalina Executive Chef If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .ever-changing, challenging, open, beautiful, and accepting.

Channy Gil


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07 SUSAN MARTINEZ

Operations Manager, University of Redlands, Redlands, CA Joined us in...1996, as a part-time secretary

My first impression of Bon Appétit was...I’ve always loved the University of Redlands so I was thrilled to become a bigger part of it. I started 15 years ago as a secretary working 20 hours a week. I wanted a new car, and my husband told me I had to get a job. My husband asked the operations manager if catering needed some help a couple of days a week and the manager asked if I could type. I started right away — and I also got my new car! Moments I’ve felt proud: I’ve never been more proud of our company than after Hurricane Katrina. A travel party of 63 football players and coaches from the University of Redlands were headed to the New Orleans area to assist with the relief efforts. And Bon Appétit was to provide the food. Because 63 football players are more like 120 regular-sized people, that’s a lot of food. Many people worked together — including Resident District Manager Brett Martin, Senior Vice President Cary Wheeland, CEO Fedele Bauccio, and Chartwells’ President and CEO Steve Sweeney — to handle the logistics of getting the menus, ingredient lists, and food to Behrman Elementary School in the Algiers area of New Orleans in fewer than 48 hours. It was one of the finest examples of total team effort ever.

Bon Appétit chefs and staff enjoyed the ethnic flavor profiles at the first Healthy Cuisines of the World training at Cisco - San Jose

Mike Moroni, now general manager at Averett University, works the carving station at the annual waste-free welcome barbecue for new freshmen and their families at Duke

University of Redlands Resident District Manager Brett Martin, Operations Director Kim Blum, Operations Manager Susan Martinez, and John Rose [then Redlands’, now Biola University’s executive chef] at Redlands’ commencement in May 2007

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08

Low Carbon Diet Day debuts — and we garner an Innovator Award from Nation Restaurant’s News

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Banfield Corporate Office, OR Capital Cuisine, CA Capital Café, VA Carleton College, MN Colorado College, CO Federated Insurance, MN LeTourneau University, TX Payless Shoes, KS (now Collective Brands) Vanguard University, CA COMMITMENTS Low Carbon Calculator: We launch an interactive tool that allows eaters to determine how their meals are contributing to global warming. Low Carbon Diet Day: To highlight our ongoing efforts to reduce our carbon “foodprint,” our cafés are transformed into climate-change learning centers while our chefs work to create a meal from planet-friendly ingredients.

“If it’s frozen at sea and handled right, properly, we can live with it. There’s not a difference,” said [Bon Appétit’s] chief executive, Fedele Bauccio, addressing a crowd at the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Cooking for Solutions 2008 sustainable-foods conference in May. “We have to get consumers behind us, to make a difference in what we eat.” Bon Appétit announced in April it was embarking on a “Low-Carbon Diet” to reduce its operation’s climate impact. As part of its pledge, the company vowed to stop serving air-freighted fish by April 2009 and to adopt new procurement standards that prefer “regionally procured or frozen-at-sea” wild seafood. — “Can Chefs Cozy Up to Frozen Fish?,” Washington Post

CEO Fedele Bauccio and local-food pioneer Alice Waters joined the volunteers at San Francisco City Hall for Slow Food Nation in 2008

k arsole acey M ager L n a M f/ d Che ana an aura D ager L n a M ld Café Banfie

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .a loving grandpa. I say that because your grandpa is always trying to give you life lessons to


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20 The team at Duke University hosted a Regional Meeting in August 2008 at a local farm. Here, Regional Marketing Director Emily Demers, former Regional Controller Stephanie Hooper, and Marketing Manager Sarah McGowan take full advantage of the farm festivities.

08 farm to fork MATT COUZENS

Horse Listeners Orchard Ashford, CT

Through Bon Appétit’s Farm to Fork program, I have supplied apples to Wesleyan University and Saint Joseph College for over five years. Recently, I have begun supplying MIT, Lesley University, and Roger Williams University. As a local apple and vegetable grower, I can confirm that Bon Appétit “walks the walk” better than any company I deal with when it comes to fruits and vegetables that taste great, are grown properly, and are reasonably priced. The families in our community appreciate the opportunity to work at a local farm for their livelihood and have a very good opinion of the places where Bon Appétit is the food service decision maker. Matt Couzens with a young visitor to the farm

RANDY KRUSE

Director of Operations, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO Joined us in...2008, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was...Having come on board from a competitor, I was curious to walk in on my first day to find no chefs in the kitchen. When I asked where the chefs were, I was told they were at the farmers’ market making contacts and buying produce and other items. I was amazed. I thought, “This is a company that puts its money where its mouth is.” What I’ve learned: I’m more of a black-and-white type manager. In my interview, I was informed by a general manager, district manager, and regional vice president that Bon Appétit is more of a “gray” company. Four years later, the experience has been a great learning opportunity, and my ability to work outside the proverbial box has improved!

Regional Vice President Elaine Smart and District Manager John Engstrom at 2008’s senior staff retreat

Moments I’ve felt proud: I grew up on a farm in Iowa, so I speak farmers’ language. Visiting and talking to the farmers from whom we purchase confirms that we are doing the right thing — and not just because it makes us feel good!

make you a better person.

Clarence Williams

. .adventurous and full of life.

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General Manager, American University, Washington, DC Joined us in...2008, as general manager at Washington College of Law

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… Even back in 2008 I was impressed by the number of sustainability initiatives that had been implemented, but now we do even more. What I’ve learned: I have more appreciation for farmers, and what they do every day to feed us. Because I know the farmers, when I cook with local ingredients, it just means more. I have learned how to utilize the best of what’s local, seasonal, and grown by folks I know. REBECCA REPP

Operations Director, Regis University, Denver, CO Joined us in...2008, as catering manager at the College of Idaho

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I felt so lucky to finally work for a company that shares the same beliefs as I hold personally. What I’ve learned: I am more aware of the impact my food choices have on humanity, climate change … everything.

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: A lot has changed. We’ve grown for one, but, even as we continue to grow, we retain the family feeling that was here when I started. Moments I’ve felt proud: I feel proud each day when I talk to students about the wonderful things we do.

A picture-perfect moment at Regis pond

Moments I’ve felt proud: Every year during Eat Local Challenge and Low Carbon Diet Day, when people realize that they have the power to make a difference through what they put on their plates. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I get to relive my favorite Bon Appétit memory every year during the growing season. It’s because of Bon Appétit that I work with Fossil Creek Farm to help harvest produce, pack CSA shares, ready the fields for planting, and even work the farmers’ market stand on weekends. It all started when I relocated from College of Idaho to Regis University in Denver, CO, with Bon Appétit. Through my work to locate Farm to Fork vendors for the new account, I met Scott Richter, the chef and general manager for Bon Appétit at White Wave Foods in Broomfield, CO. Scott recommended Fossil Creek for their certified organic produce, but I soon found that his interest ran deeper when I learned that he worked on the farm on nights and weekends. Once I visited the farm I was hooked, too!

Broccoli and cauliflower growing at Fossil Creek farms

Fossil Creek is run by three generations of the Maitland Family, and I feel fortunate to be able to share in the planning and hard work that goes into making the farm successful. Being able to see the produce from seed to kitchen gives me a great sense of pride and that’s what I think Farm to Fork is all about. I can’t wait to be back on the farm getting my hands dirty!

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .enthusiastic, driven, innovative, ever-growing, always at the forefront, and delicious!

James Bernhardt


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08 The TaylorMade team taps in some well-wishes

. .caring and committed to change; firm and resolute in doing what is right.

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09

A banner year — multiple openings, awards, and initiatives, including a groundbreaking commitment to reducing food waste and to the welfare of tomato pickers

CEO Fedele Bauccio talks with Lucas Benitez of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers about tomato pickers’ conditions in Florida. MILESTONES

OPENINGS BD Biosciences, CA Brocade, CA Google - The Dalles, OR Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, WA Lawrence University, WI Loyola Law School, CA Oracle - Burlington, MA Oracle - Colorado Springs, CO Oracle – Denver, CO Oracle - Nashua, NH Oracle - Pleasanton, CA Oregon Episcopal School, OR Priest Sacred Heart, FL Ralph’s/Food For Less, CA San Francisco 49ers, CA State Auto Insurance, OH Saint Martin’s University, WA TaylorMade, CA University of Maryland - Baltimore, MD University of Pennsylvania, PA (second time) Whittier Law School, CA HONORS Best Sustainability Initiative for Low Carbon Diet, from Food Management Growing Green Award from Natural Resources Defense Council Industry Leader in Innovations Review by Environmental Defense Fund COMMITMENTS Food Waste Reduction: We reduced food waste generated in our cafés by 20% through 1) educating chefs and kitchen staff on proper portioning and prepping techniques, 2) a daily waste monitoring program in all kitchens and 3) a consumer waste reduction educational campaign including weighing and measuring food at dish-return stations and encouraging trayless dining. CIW Agreement: We partner with The Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW), a farmworker organization spearheading the fight for more humane farm labor standards in Florida, to create a Code of Conduct that frames acceptable working conditions. Student Garden Guide: Inspired by the many new student gardens at our college campuses, we designed a road map for managing campus gardens, covering everything from breaking ground to going to market.

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Bon Appétit has built its brand around sustainability: The company… acknowledges the importance of fair labor practices for products such as coffee and bananas. Why not demand the same of domestic agriculture? The Washington Post


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09 The Oracle-Denver Team sends their regards

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imply stated, Bon Appétit is the leading progressive light in corporate and institutional food service and an inspiration to all of us in the food world. Constantly and consistently putting a passionate stake in the ground for a more sustainable and just food system, whether through their support of more local producers in Pennsylvania, tomato farmers in Florida, or lower carbon footprint choices for students in California, Bon Appétit has made a credible and tangible impact with the world these past 25 years. Bravo! And on to the next 25. –Walter Robb, Co-CEO, Whole Foods Market

MEG COLLERAN SAHS

Chef di Cucina, Terzo Piano at the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joined us in...2009, in same position

Celebrity chef Jonathan Waxman, Terzo Piano Chef di Cucina Meg Colleran Sahs, and Terzo Piano Executive Chef Tony Mantuano in April 2011

My first impression of Bon Appétit was... I didn’t know much about the company, but I knew about Compass Group since I came from Levy. I started talking to Chef Tony Mantuano about working here, and he told me about the sustainability practices. After that I did my own research and realized that Bon Appétit and I feel strongly about the same issues. What I’ve learned: I’ve learned a ton about purchasing sustainably and what food issues really represent for consumers and farmers. I knew some of it, but I’ve learned so much more from our regular conference calls and from speaking with Helene York [Director of Strategic Sourcing and Research]. She has an incredible amount of knowledge on these subjects! I’ve become much more strict about my purchasing decisions since starting here.

Mount Angel Abbey Chef/Manager Paul Lieggi gets out and explores Ergo’s Acres with farmer Dave Eskeldson and his grandson

General Manager Carole Ann Beckwith from St. Martin’s University 85


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09 “The extraordinary contributions of these individuals are making a difference for how people produce, consume and think about food and our natural environment,” said Michael Pollan, best-selling author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and chair of the award selection panel. “We’re delighted that Will Allen, Fedele Bauccio and James Harvie are the winners of the first-ever Growing Green Awards.” —News release from the Natural Resources Defense Council, 2009

At the 2009 Best Place to Work ceremony: Resident District Manager Helene Kennan, District Manager Anne Galle, Resident District Manager Holly Winslow, Human Resources Director Patricia Dozier, Regional Vice President Michael Venckus, Chief Operating Officer Michael Bauccio, Human Resources Assistant Sherry Lee, Director of Audit Masa Sasaki, former General Manager Jeff Coats, and former Regional Marketing Director Kathryn Tomajan

Goucher Executive Sous Chef Ty Paup, author Michael Pollan, Regional Operations Support Staff Kimberly Triplett, and General Manager Norman Zwagil after a special dinner discussion about sustainable food

RAUL DELGADO

General Manager, Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL Joined us in...2009, in same position

What I’ve learned: Bon Appétit has the secret recipe to success. [CEO] Fedele Bauccio’s vision of providing customers with responsibly sourced, flavorful food, combined with the freedom at the account level to tailor our programs to our unique audiences, is the reason we’ve been around for 25 years. At Wheaton we’ve used this combination of freedom and strong guidance to introduce many programs uniquely suited to our particular audience. For example, Wheaton Executive Chef Patrick Cassata our weekly takeout dinners and Raul pose in front of Wheaton’s No. 1 and special holiday meals in College Food poster have been very successful. The key is to never lose sight of what Bon Appétit Management Company stands for. As long as we operators run our businesses consistent with our founders’ principles, our accounts will continue to grow and prosper, and our company will enjoy many more birthdays to come!

COO Michael Bauccio and Resident District Manager Holly Winslow

Some of the Roger Williams University crew posing after being GE 3 re-certified in 2009

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09 Happy 25th birthday from the team at Penn (and a certain campus VIP)!

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09 VERA CHANG

Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation West Coast Fellow Joined us in... 2009, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… While I was a student at Carleton College, I dreamed of campus dining that served food from local farms — including Carleton’s own. I longed for a program in which sustainability and social justice values were embedded. After winning a seat on the College Dining Contract Board, I learned about Bon Appétit, found their values aligned with mine, and made it my goal to bring them to campus. Today, as the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation West Coast Fellow, my learning about sustainable food systems continues and my goals have expanded. What I’ve learned: Over the past two years at the Foundation, all my work has been about creating positive, meaningful, and long-lasting change in the food system. I’ve learned that significant change often comes from many small steps. By cutting down cheese purchases 10% and not airfreighting seafood, among other low carbon operational and menu changes, we at Bon Appétit have lowered our carbon footprint to save the equivalent of 255,000 gallons of gasoline a month! In addition to small steps, changing the food system requires a nuanced and deep understanding of an immensely complex system; partnerships across sectors; visionary leadership; perseverance; and a genuine desire to do good. Since joining the Foundation, my idea of what can be accomplished in sustainable food service – and how to get there – has reached new heights. This is because the Bon Appétit vision, “food services for a sustainable future,” is never stagnant but always evolving and expanding to lead the industry. Moments I’ve felt proud: During conversations with Maisie Greenawalt [vice president of strategy], Helene York [director of strategic sourcing], Bonnie Powell [communications director],

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and Haven Bourque [Bon Appétit’s public relations consultant], I’ve realized that Bon Appétit is filled with strong female role models who are working to transform the food industry. Another proud moment was having the opportunity to bring the Inventory of Farmworker Issues and Protections in the U.S. through to publication. This report, written by the Bon Appétit Foundation and United Farm Workers with support from Oxfam America, was the first of its kind to detail the lack of laws and protections for crop farmworkers in the U.S. Attending the TEDxFruitvale: Harvesting Change conference was another proud moment. It was the first-ever farm labor conference of its kind and it was organized by the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation. Countless experiences working with Bon Appétit account staff and local Farm to Fork vendors to host sustainable food events such as talks, film screenings, workshops, and sustainable cooking challenges have given me many more proud moments. Together, we are raising awareness around critical sustainability and justice issues within our food system, while building relationships and dialogue among members of the food community, and inspiring the next generation of food leaders.


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20 CAROLINA FOJO

Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation East Coast Fellow Joined us in...2009, in same position

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My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I thought it was innovative, cutting-edge, and genuinely committed to creating a more just food system. That said, I also thought it was full of a bunch of food snobs who kept talking about how local food was all about “flavor.” I mean, I had been eating produce from my local grocery chain my whole life, and I didn’t think there was anything wrong with it! What I’ve learned: Bon Appétit, and Helene York [director of strategic sourcing and research] in particular has ruined me. I am now incapable of eating grocery-store produce without thinking about how it really just tastes like cardboard. I try to get local, seasonal food whenever I can — because, in fact, it is more flavorful. Yes, I admit it. I have drunk the Bon Appétit Kool-Aid, and now there is no going back! Moments I’ve felt proud: Anytime I read an interview with Maisie [Greenawalt, Vice President]. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: Donald Stauffer, Executive Chef at University of Pennsylvania, left the company last year to work at a local café. Because, let’s be honest, who wouldn’t want a job where you get off work at 3 p.m.? Though the hours were Penn Executive Chef Donald Stauffer, fabulous, the café wasn’t as comwho left and came back mitted to sustainability as their marketing said they were, and after a few months, he wanted to come back — and he did. Last time I talked to him, he had no regrets. Davina Kwong, general manager at Gallaudet University has a ridiculous commitment to highquality food. One time, a lastminute catering order came in for 600 dumplings by the next morning. There just wasn’t the staff to do it. Any other chef at any other company probably would have ordered premade dumplings at that point. Not Davina! She came in, brought her husband along, and spent her entire Saturday making the dumplings herself. And another thing: I am in love with this company. I only hope that, whatever I end up doing in the future after I get my graduate degree, I will be able to have as much of an impact in my field as Bon Appétit has on the food industry.

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We designate 15 foragers to help us take our Farm to Fork program to the next level

Jay Keller, chef/manager of Gallaudet University, beekeeper, and Bon Appétit East Coast forager

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Abercrombie & Fitch, OH Amazon, WA Andrew’s University, MI Fuqua School of Business, NC Institute of American Indian Arts, NM Leftbank, OR Life University, GA Mijita, CA Musical Instrument Museum, AZ Oracle - Broomfield, CO Oracle - Santa Clara, CA Post and Schell, PA Public House, CA State Auto - Indianapolis, IN St. John’s College, MD Western University of Health Sciences, CA Wharton School of Business, PA HONORS Helene York, Bon Appétit director of strategic sourcing and research, named Seafood Champion by Seafood Choices Alliance COMMITMENTS Food Foragers Program: We formally assign 15 of our most enthusiastic local-food-loving chefs to seek out additional Farm to Fork vendors — not just for their own cafés but for all the Bon Appétit accounts in their region.

Left to right: Kelly Chester, Cisco-San Jose café manager; Liane Herrick, former Xilinx executive chef; and Anne Galle, district manager, visit with a sow and her piglets at Riverdog Farm in California

CATHERINE CORBO

Café Manager, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Joined us in… 2010, as catering intern at Emmanuel College

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… When I walked into the Bon Appétit café at Emmanuel College in 2007 as an incoming freshman, it was really just lunch. I never thought that Bon Appétit would become more to me than that, but it became my survival and my start into the real world. Fast forward to 2010: I was a senior at Emmanuel and it was time to choose an internship. I chose Bon Appétit. What I’ve learned: Once I landed the internship, I began to learn more about what Bon Appétit stands for through programs such as Farm to Fork and Low Carbon Diet. In my six months as an intern, I learned a lot about the company and about myself. It was then that I realized that Bon Appétit is something I wanted to be a part of. My favorite Bon Appétit memories: I still remember my excitement when I graduated from Emmanuel in May of 2011 with a position as a manager for the opening of Bon Appétit at MIT. I was not only thrilled to have a job coming out of college, but also to have a position that meant something to me, at a company I was excited to be a part of. I have learned more in the last year than I probably will in most of my work life. Bon Appétit isn’t just a food service company to me. It’s the place where I became an adult, learned how to be a manager, and realized that hard work and commitment do, in fact, pay off in the end.

If Bon Appetit were a person, I’d say s/he was...

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. .caring, compassionate, trustworthy, and intelligent.

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20 Beloved Whittier College cashier Laura Hunt retired after 16 years of being the face of the café and greeting students, faculty, and staff

Whittier College Director of Operations Lucille Alcaraz wins Be-A-star 2010

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on Appétit has done so much to establish the benchmark for other companies as far as sustainability and the environment goes. Fedele is one of the most amazing people I have had the pleasure to do business with. He is an inspiration for big corporations to do better everywhere. Best of all, Fedele remains an approachable and accessible leader who inspires everyone around him with his friendliness, enthusiasm, and passion for what he does. —Traci Des Jardins, chef of Jardiniére and partner with Bon Appétit in Mijita and Public House

farm to fork GUY GILLESPIE

On The Vine Casa Grande, AZ

Our relationship with Bon Appétit’s café at the Musical Instrument Museum has been a wonderful and rewarding experience. We enjoy our weekly conversations with [Sous Chef] Chris Lenza, [Executive Chef] Edward Farrow, and the other staff of the café. Having a close relationship has allowed us to grow fresh specialty items for them. Being recognized as a Bon Appétit Farm to Fork grower has enabled us to expand our business to other local chefs. Because as other local chefs across the Phoenix area know, Bon Appétit requires only the freshest, local produce for their consumers.

Jones Farm General Manager Micah Cavalo teaches kindergartners the art of making foccacia bread

Musical Instrument Museum sings happy birthday (from left to right): General Manager and Executive Chef Ed Farrow, Sous Chef Chris Lenza, Supervisor George Butschek, and Operations Manager Mary Victorino

. .like me! — outspoken, friendly, humorous, hard-working, fun, determined, loyal, and honest.

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An incredible year! We debut Fair Trade baking chocolate, launch the Fish to Fork program, host a high-profile farm-labor conference, and a lot more — CEO Fedele Bauccio racks up three major awards!

Wheaton College takes top honors for Best College Food from the Princeton Review

MILESTONES

OPENINGS Albion College, MI Altera, CA Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, WA Genentech, CA/OR International House, CA Kohl’s, WI McMaster Carr, GA PayPal, AZ Regis University, CO Russell Investments, WA SAS, NC SODO Kitchen, WA University of LaVerne, CA MILESTONE 1,000 Farm to Fork suppliers! HONORS Fedele named Sustainability Pathfinder by Chefs Collaborative Fedele recognized by California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc. for commitment to shining a light on unfair treatment to farmworkers COMMITMENTS Fair Trade Chocolate: We make the switch to Cordillera Chocolate, a Fair Trade, single origin, great-tasting chocolate, in all of our bakeries. Mid-size, Humane Meat: We open up our Farm to Fork program to include the endangered mid-size producer, buying from farms that are bigger than our traditional Farm to Fork producer that have strict, independently certified animal welfare standards Fair Trade uniforms: Expanding our commitment to fairly produced goods, we pilot organic, Fair Trade t-shirts for student workers.

The Whittier College salsa garden

Efrain Mejia, executive chef/manager, and Cherish Gonzalez, cashier, planting a new garden at Fresenius

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. .fun, quirky, unique, inspirational, accountable, hip. A lifelong friend who always does the right


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Maisie Greenawalt, vice president of strategy, emceed the conference

Some dismiss farmworker rights as an immigration issue. As the CEO of a food-service company that strives to be more sustainable, I think it’s about basic human rights. No one — no matter how they got here, no matter what their legal status — deserves the working conditions found on so many of our farms. It’s time we face the truth: America depends on migrant labor to make our food supply viable, and yet despite the heroic efforts of César Chávez and others, farmworkers remain the least protected class of workers in this country.

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—“Why Farmworkers Deserve Same Rights as Any Other Workers,” Bon Appétit CEO Fedele Bauccio, writing in the San Jose Mercury News

TEDxFruitvale: The Foundation hosts the first-ever TEDx event dedicated to the lives of farmworkers and to the future of farm labor. A diverse set of speakers gave a 360-degree view of farmworkers’ lives, both today and throughout history, and more than 100 farmworkers, activists, academics, and business leaders broke bread together. Mills College Executive Chef Jaime Dominguez and Sous Chef Cheylin Hale address the lunch guests

things and who offers you something delicious when you drop by.

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DAVINA KWONG

General Manager, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC Joined us in... 2003, as café manager at Georgetown University Law Center

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I had been desperately searching for a full-time job so I wouldn’t have to leave DC and move back to Rhode Island. The misprinted ad in the Washington Post stated the position was for a “care” manager. The day of the interview, the Georgetown University Law Center café and offices were being renovated, so I was interviewed in the Campus Ministries office, which only added to my confusion. I was introduced to Father Alexei and Sister Dorinda and thought that they were the management team. During the interview, the manager kept saying Bon Appétit. I thought to myself, this job has something to do with food, the elderly, and the campus ministries. It wasn’t until my first day on the job that it finally made sense! I was amazed at how lucky I was to have found a job with a company that had such amazing standards. “Three Generations” at the May 2011 Mid Atlantic Compass Community Council: District Manager David (Grandpa) Connolly, General Manager Davina Kwong, and District Manager Yvonne (Mother) Matteson. As Davina tells it, Dave was Yvonne’s district manager for many years. When Davina was at Oracle - Reston, Yvonne became the regional district manager and reported up to Dave. So Yvonne became Davina’s “mother” and Dave became “Grandpa.” Davina says, “I have so much respect for both of them. Yvonne and Dave have an amazing bond and Yvonne and I have one as well. It goes much deeper then district managing. It’s a family unit!”

What I’ve learned: Bon Appétit has taught me to become more outspoken, adventurous, and brave. Thinking outside the box is what it’s all about and this job has enabled me to dream big and set high standards. Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: The vision and the stance of the company has solidified. Our beliefs are based on what’s right and we back up everything we do with facts. We’ve also become much stronger in regards to human resources and safety. Moments I’ve felt proud: The Washington Post Live’s Future of Food conference at Georgetown in 2011 was definitely one of the proudest moments — I mean the preparation leading up to it. Creative minds from both the culinary and management teams came together to make this event shine. The hours and hours of preparing were grueling, but being a part of a group of people who care so passionately about what they do is truly a humbling experience.

COO Michael Bauccio (second from right) with Duke University managers and employees

Genentech B25 Café Executive Chef Jenem Martin preps for a cooking class

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... dedicated, loyal, fiercely independent, ethical, and warm.

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Happy Birthday from Regis University

The Colorado College Team

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t’s so inspiring when a corporation decides it’s going to do the right thing and ends up proving that it really is possible to do well by doing good. Bon Appétit is as much a part of the food movement as farmers’ markets or CSAs and sets a standard for what food service companies can do. Happy birthday, Bon Appétit. And many more! —Marion Nestle, nutritionist and author of Food Politics, What to Eat, and many others

An even better model is the Bon Appétit Management Company… [where] the food is locally sourced whenever possible and the company has committed — not just given lip service to — sustainable seafood, cage-free eggs, fair labor practices…This is caféteria food that you actually want to eat, food that deserves to be served with wine. —“The Future of Caféteria Food,” New York Times

SARAH PIPER

Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation Fellow, Midwest Joined us in… 2011, in same position

Moments I’ve felt proud: When I see how many lives we’re improving through initiatives like our Farm to Fork program. On a recent trip to Colorado, I visited a couple of our Farm to Fork vendors. As part of the survey we give to farmers, asked, “How has working with Bon Appétit impacted your business?” At every single farm I visited, people said things like, “My business wouldn’t be viable without Bon Appétit,” and “Bon Appétit IS my vegetable business.” And on a related note, as a Fellow for Bon Appétit, I find it’s important for students to hear how I came to be where I am.They always want to know how, as a grassroots activist, I came to be working for this huge corporation. I used to tell them my story, until I heard Beth Gentry’s . Hers is better. Beth, now Colorado College’s general manager, worked for Bon Appétit, but was frustrated that she had abandoned her nonprofit roots. She decided to leave Bon Appétit to head up a farm that did community education, as well as supplying local, healthy food to the community.

After a rough season, she was losing money and having trouble making ends meet. She called up the chefs she used to work with at Bon Appétit. In no time, they bought all of her produce, helped organize a benefit dinner to raise money, and helped her put the organization back on its feet. It was then she realized what a huge difference she had been making at Bon Appétit all along by helping local producers stay viable — and she returned to Bon Appétit. She’s now general manager at Colorado College.

Sarah Piper taking Regis University’s Professor John Sakulich’s environmental studies class to a waste management facility

. .passionate and compassionate, dynamic, energized, exciting.

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FISH TO FORK PROGRAM LAUNCHES: We commit to supporting small-scale and local fisheries with our seafood purchases.

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STEPHANIE CIPOLLETTA

Catering Sales and Operations Manager, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Joined us in... 2011, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I worked at another food service company before I was hired with Bon Appétit, so I was happy and excited to see that Bon Appétit really cares about food, presentation, and sustainability. What I’ve learned: In my short time here, I have traveled, trained, and helped a number of accounts become poster children for catering at Bon Appétit. Working for Bon Appétit has changed the way I look at the food industry. I’ve met so many employees, both front and back of house, who are absolutely committed to excellence in everything they do — and they also have fun! They are truly the best I’ve seen in this industry and have taught me so much about what it means to create a great work environment.

Oberlin Sous Chef Chris Brunst tending microgreens in the team’s mini-garden University of Saint Joseph Executive Chef Derek Roy prepares pizza dough

Moments I’ve felt proud: To see chefs cook from scratch every day from local vendors instead of opening jars and cans. I feel proud and happy every time I’m able to help an account be the best that it can be.

CEO Fedele Bauccio, Nordstrom General Manager Kris McLean, Resident District Manager Anne Galle, LeTourneau University General Manager Doris Wilson, COO Michael Bauccio, Human Resources Director Patricia Dozier, and Art Institute of Chicago Resident District Manager Bryan Bruin at the Be-A-star Awards

The Cisco team getting ready for an Alumni Chef Challenge

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2011: We Sign Our Thousandth Farm to Fork Supplier We’re proud to work with so many small, owner-operated farmers, ranchers, fishers, aquafarmers, and artisans. We truly believe you can taste their passion for what they do in our food. I usually think of anniversaries as a celebration between married couples or romantic partners. But when I heard that Bon Appétit is celebrating its 25th anniversary, I realized that what marks this occasion for me is not that different than what makes anniversaries special in other partnerships – it’s recognizing that relationships between people are what matter most.

farm to fork

David “Suge” Kunce delivering a live white sturgeon to the University of the Pacific

You folks at Bon Appétit have this figured out. Whether I’m filling in Jay Payne [executive chef, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation] with news about Port Townsend, where I used to sell salmon to him at his Wild Coho Restaurant, or talking to Daniel Roberts [general manager at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation] about bicycling, which is how I deliver salmon locally, it’s a pleasure to do business with people who care about what they’re doing and the people they’re partnering with. That’s how we build trust — and if we’re lucky, a better world. So happy anniversary, Bon Appétit! At times like these, when it would be easy to fall back on the old business model of buying unhealthy food from unknown sources, you continue to put people first. While ours may not be a romantic relationship, it is one that is rooted in commitment and mutual respect — and that is something worth celebrating. —Rick Oltman, Cape Cleare Salmon, Port Townsend, WA

We are a small fish ranch and were initially a bit intimidated to do business with Bon Appétit. However, we now serve more than 30 of your cafés and consider you partners as well as friends. You’ve truly worked with us, and worked hard, to bring the very best ingredients into your kitchens to serve your diners. That our fish is so well-prepared means a lot to us. —Michael Passmore, Passmore Ranch, Sloughhouse, CA

Discovering that Biscotti Bari could be a Farm to Fork partner for Bon Appétit was like a big pat on the back for us. Sourcing our ingredients directly from the grower isn’t always the easiest thing to do — logistics can be tricky when Founder Stacey Bruno you’re loading 100 pounds of Migale making biscotti almonds or 25 gallons of olive oil into your hatchback! However, it’s the RIGHT thing to do and we wouldn’t have it any other way. —Stacey Bruno Migale, Founder, Biscotti Bari, Petaluma, CA

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Tom and Amy Ifft, their son Luke, and their dog Abby from Twin Oak Meats, Fairbury, Illinois.

St. Olaf ’s Bon Appétit crew has been an enormous, integral part of our farm business since before we even planted anything. Our relationship has benefited both of us for six years now, as we grow food that they enthusiastically purchase, prepare and serve, and also use to educate their campus community. We share a passion for great food, and ideals for making great food even better. It’s fair to say we all enjoy putting our hearts into making great food an everyday occurrence in people’s lives.

Bon Appétit at Wheaton College works hand in hand with us as farmers and makes it possible for us to bring our local, sustainable pork to the students. The relationship that [Executive Chef] Patrick Cassata and I have built through the Farm to Fork program has not only helped us grow our business, but has been educational and fostered a friendship. Keep up the great effort it takes to run such a fantastic and necessary program! —Tom and Amy Ifft, Twin Oak Meats, Fairbury, IL

Shepherd’s Grain cofounders Karl Kupers and Fred Fleming

Bon Appétit helped Shepherd’s Grain gets its start in the sustainable/local market. Thank you so much. The relationship between Bon Appétit and Shepherd’s Grain is nothing less than family. The ability to share the kitchen, the field of grain, the chef and the farmer is a fantastic experience. We wish you another 25 years of success and trend setting.

Alongside the support of our CSA members, St. Olaf ’s steady commitment to using our produce has been critical in helping us make a living farming. This includes giving us the confidence to make capital investments and know we would have a reliable market for our produce to justify and support them — such as a erecting a reclaimed barn, buying a tractor or piece of veggiewashing equipment, or purchasing additional land. Bon Appétit has been and is an invaluable partner in the success of our farm. In August 2006, much of Northfield — including the St. Olaf campus and our little farm — was walloped by softball-sized hail. The next morning, on his way to work, Peter [Abrahamson, St. Olaf ’s general manager] stopped by to check on us. We were distraught about the losses to our crops and were so grateful that he was checking to see how the storm had affected us, and also to see if he could buy any damaged produce. We assured him anything that was damaged was damaged beyond sellable quality, but he persisted. He said that if we brought in anything still usable right away, they’d make a priority of preparing it right away. So we brought in some hail-damaged produce. It wasn’t a huge amount — we lost far more — but at that point any income was a welcome sight, and the gesture of support and caring helped us carry on. We knew from that storm on that we had stumbled on something completely unusual. That level of commitment and partnership is likely to be the strong foundation of a diverse, sustainable food system. —Erin Johnson and Ben Doherty, Open Hands Farm, Northfield, MN

—Fred J. Fleming, cofounder, Shepherd’s Grain, Washington State

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We make the industry’s first and most extensive commitment to humanely raised pork and eggs, and Fedele wins the IACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award

MILESTONES

OPENINGS ABC Riverside Café, CA Adobe, CA, OR, UT Buena Vista Café, CA Circle 7 Café, CA Frank G. Wells Starbucks, CA GC3 Café, CA GC3 Starbucks , CA Lucasfilm at Letterman Digital Arts Center, CA RS5, OR SODO Kitchen, WA Sonora – The Patio, CA The Big D Café, CA The Prospect Café, CA The Rotunda, CA Cleveland Museum of Art, OH Electronic Arts, CA Dreamworks PDI, CA Beloit College, WI Cornell College, IA Mount Angel Abbey, OR Savannah College of Art and Design, GA

The RS5 Team

CRATE-FREE PORK, CAGE-FREE EGGS: Our commitment to pigs everywhere is to completely eliminate the use of pork from producers who use inhumane gestation crates – systems that confine and immobilize a pregnant sow for the majority of her life – by 2015. Like our shell eggs, we vow to transition to third party certified cage-free liquid eggs by 2015.

“Look, they told me I was crazy when I started this company the way I did 25 years ago... I’m not some Berkeley hippie. I do wear a tie and suit,” [CEO Fedele] Bauccio said. “I’m sure they’re going to think I’m nuts [for Bon Appétit’s animal welfare announcement], but I don’t care. This is the right thing to do. — Washington Post, Feb. 21, 2012

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CHANNY GIL

Office Manager/Bookkeeper, Whittier College, Whittier, CA Joined us in… 2005, as on-call catering staff

farm to fork

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I felt welcome. Coming from a large university, I didn’t know what to expect. But everyone was just so friendly.

SARAH GILL

Owner, The Inspired Cookie San Francisco, CA

What I’ve learned: A lot! Over the years I’ve transitioned from on-call catering to full-time catering to bookkeeper to office manager. I learn something new every day. I love the fact that, even though I’m not a cook, I’m given the opportunity to show off my knife skills in the kitchen on occasion. It’s not just about the job. My life has changed in wonderful ways. I’ve always loved to cook and garden, but working here has given me an extra boost. I garden at home with my kids, and I’ve actually donated some produce from my garden for events such as the Eat Local Challenge. I’ve learned a lot about sustainability and being socially responsible. I’ve also gained a new family here at work, and it’s truly an amazing feeling.

Even though The Inspired Cookie is still so new to Bon Appétit and Farm to Fork, we were adopted into the Bon Appétit family from day one. Working with you all feels supportive, warm and friendly — just like family. Every time I go on-site for a demo, I’m greeted with smiling faces, positive, outgoing attitudes, and of course hugs! I feel so thankful for that. The chance to grow alongside a company that shares my food philosophies continually builds my confidence that — one bite at a time — we CAN make an impact in the way we all eat.

Changes I’ve seen at Bon Appétit: I’ve seen us go more in-depth on the issues of sustainability and social responsibility, and I think it’s just amazing. We can really shape the future for our children and theirs. Moments I’ve felt proud: There have been so many openings in Southern California in a short amount of time this year. Even with all the sweat and tears of these openings, I’m always in awe of how our teams work together toward a common goal. I was truly proud to be a part of the magic. Southern California General Manager John Josberger

A leader in the realm of corporate cuisine is Bon Appétit Management.… Don’t expect the standard institutional fare that comes powdered and in big metal cans. The emphasis, for all involved, is on local and creative. — TheStreet.com

Cleveland Museum of Art Director of Catering Sherri Schultz with Chef Douglas Katz, who will head the culinary program for Bon Appétit

Regional Controller Mario Perera

Usually when people think of food pioneers in the Bay Area, they recall restaurant owners like Alice Waters and writers such as Michael Pollan…. The fact that Bon Appétit is a large, for-profit corporation…means that [CEO Fedele] Bauccio often doesn’t get credit outside the industry for being a trailblazer. But let me tell you: His impact on the local-sustainable movement is big. Like 136.5million-meals-served-just-last-year big.

and more powerful when it goes after something it truly believes in.

—Jessica Battilana, “Food, Inc,” 7x7 Magazine

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bonniepowell Director of Communications, Palo Alto, CA Joined Bon Appétit in 2011, in same position

My first impression of Bon Appétit was… I was aware of Bon Appétit for several years before I came to work here. I heard CEO Fedele Bauccio speak at a sustainability conference for journalists in Monterey, CA, and I was struck by his belief that a corporation could make money and also make positive change. Later I moderated panels with both Maisie Greenawalt, vice president of strategy, and Helene York, director of strategic sourcing and research. I was impressed by how seriously Bon Appétit seemed to be thinking about corporate responsibility when it came to things like climate change and local food systems. What I’ve learned… I wouldn’t have taken this job if I didn’t believe that Fedele, Maisie, and Helene walked their talk. But I wasn’t anticipating just how deep the roots of our commitments to good food and social responsibility go throughout Bon Appétit. I’ve learned an eye-opening amount about the practical challenges of striving to offer “food services for a sustainable future.” It’s one thing to say, as I do over and over to reporters, that “all our chefs are required to source at least 20 percent of their ingredients from small, local farms.” It’s another to actually make that happen. I now know the incredible amount of work that goes into our Farm to Fork program. Moments I’ve felt proud... I’ve been here a little more than a year now, and yet I already have too many to list. The TEDxFruitvale conference on farm labor was an unprecedented gathering of both farmworkers and the people striving to improve their working conditions; helping organize it was one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever done. This February, as we prepared to make our animal-welfare announcement, Fedele at the last minute decided to change our target implementation date from 2017 to 2015. When we told him we weren’t sure we’d be

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able to get enough pork raised without gestation crates by then, he exploded in typical Fedele fashion that “we’ll just have to serve less *&^% bacon!” It made me proud to be able to include a safe-for-work version of that statement in our press release. I can’t think of another food company that would be willing to take such a stand for its principles.

Communications Director Bonnie Powell with Will Scott, president of the African American Farmers of California and a speaker at the 2011 TEDxFruitvale farm-labor conference sponsored by the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation

Lastly, this is the sixth Bravo I’ve helped put together. Each of them has had a story or three that really touched me, that reminded me once again how lucky I am that Fedele and Maisie yanked me out of the journalism salt mines. This 25th anniversary Bravo, however, has been an extraordinarily moving months-long experience. Spending time with Fedele, COO Michael Bauccio, and


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Marketing and Communications Project Assistant Liz Sullivan

ry Culina ecialty r of Sp odge to c e D Dir ms Jim Progra

A lot of work goes into our Farm to Fork program — and our signage. Director of Communications Bonnie Powell found that out personally when she chalked this one for the Lucas Digital Arts opening in San Francisco!

CFO Liz Baldwin for the “Roots of Bon Appétit Management Company” feature (page 04) gave me a context for our strong company culture. Reading about Reed College General Manager Debby Bridges’ meeting with an Oregon farmer who didn’t know how much to ask for his cranberries — because he’d never had the luxury of calculating what his true costs and a fair price were (page 49) — brought tears to my usually cynical eyes. So did seeing Regional Vice President Randy DeMers with the granddaughter who he’s taught to grow food (page 34), and hearing about how Arizona farmer Carl Seacat had been saved from “vegetable disaster” many times by Musical Instrument Museum Executive Chef Edward Farrow (page 94).

Retail Marketing Manager Allison Amato

Those and the dozens of other heartfelt testimonials in these pages paint a picture of a company that lives its values every day, in 10,500 unique and deeply personal ways. I’m just a newbie compared to most of you, but I hope to be here to celebrate our 50th anniversary.

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Great Expectations, Great Openings, Great Teams

Regional Marketing Director Jill Koenen sets up shop at the Café Hitachi opening in Santa Clara, CA

COO Michael Bauccio, Director of Merchandising Carrie Buckley, Regional Operations Support team members Marc Marelich and Paula Nielsen, and CEO Fedele Bauccio at the opening of the new Twitter headquarters in San Francisco

t Bon Appétit Management Company, real training has always come from people, not manuals, as CEO Fedele Bauccio and COO Michael Bauccio like to say. That’s why, when we open a new account, we gather our best operators from the region — and sometimes even from across the country — to get new employees up to speed and make sure every little detail of service is just right.

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In summer 2010, Fedele and Michael decided we need a dedicated squad of Bon Appétiters to provide direction in everything from openings and café “refreshes” to spot checks for our Great Expectations 3 standards program. The Regional Operations Support team was born. Under the guidance of Director of Merchandising Carrie Buckley, who’s as famous for her reluctance to be photographed as she is for her toweringheeled shoes, Regional Ops team members Kimberly Triplett, Marc Marelich, Paula Nielsen, and Ellen McGhee all have years of operational experience and a keen eye for the details that make a café uniquely Bon Appétit. During openings, they help the onsite management team and area staff do everything from organizing inventory to setting up the salad bar. During less frantic periods, they conduct the walkthroughs for the Great Expectations program, noting where a café needs to put in a little TLC, or where the service truly shines.

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The Bon Appétit culture has always been that everyone pitches in to do everything. Still, we all breathe just a little bit easier when the Regional Ops Team is around to make sure things look — and taste! — their absolute best.

A Blast from the Past

CEO Fedele Bauccio scrubs down the café, and Operations Manager Steve Samuelson and his kids, now 21 and 24, pose at the Bank of America opening in 1988


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The DreamWorks team is all smiles about their first GE3 certification

District Manager Markus Hartmann and Cisco – San Jose General Manager Daniel Salk at the Electronic Arts opening in Redwood City, CA

The colorful taqueria station at the new SODO Kitchen in Seattle

We feature our Farm to Fork suppliers every day at every café, but on opening day, the chalkboards always get extra TLC

The Gallaudet team poses after getting re-Certified Great!

Hitachi Catering Attendant Ruth McGuy and Yahoo! Catering Coordinator Efrain Zea wave hello at the Café Hitachi opening

The Regional Operations team ensures our décor, such as this Genentech display, is always appealingly elegant

Executive Chef Teddy Mower serves a guest a breakfast taco on opening day at Kohl's San Antonio, TX

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Bon Appétit’s Backers CEO Fedele Bauccio and the late president Ernie Collins founded Bon Appétit Management Company with their own savings — Fedele mortgaged his house in Saratoga — and backing from Michael Bauccio (who joined the company several months later) and about 25 friends and business contacts. But they hadn’t budgeted enough to get the new company up and running.After about six months, and many credit-card advances, Fedele had to go back to the investor pool and scare up close to a million dollars. That gave them the breathing room they needed to open their first set of accounts. In the late 1990s, it was time to give their investors some return on their money. Fedele and Ernie sold a chunk of the company to Tsutomu Shida. Shida was then the chairman and founder of Shidax Corporation, the largest contract food service company in Japan, and he had long ago sent his son to work for Fedele at Saga, to learn the ropes of the chain-restaurant business. Shida was eager to partner with Bon Appétit, and he and Fedele even opened two American-style cafés in Japan together. Then Shida started talking about taking Bon Appétit public, as he’d done with Shidax in Japan, and Fedele got nervous. “I never wanted to be at the mercy of a hostile takeover like had happened to Saga,” he says. “And I didn’t want to have to talk to analysts and deal with all that regulatory stuff.” So he decided to go shopping for a parent company — and that’s how Compass came to acquire Bon Appétit in 2002. Bon Appétit CEO Fedele Bauccio, Shidax Chairman Tsutomu Shida, and Bon Appétit President Ernie Collins

Bon Appétit Catering operated three restaurants, including one in San Francisco’s Galleria from whose tiny hole-in-the-wall kitchen it produced most of its catering food. It had a fancy mobile kitchen as well as a warehouse full of catering props. It was famous for staging huge, legendary parties for the Bay Area’s highest-profile companies and celebrities, including celebritylawyer Melvin Belli’s birthday party for 10,000 and Apple Computer’s 10th anniversary party for 5,500. Theme parties were its calling card. Despite its high profile, the company was perennially on the verge of going broke, living from one event deposit to the next, according to Liz Baldwin, who was then the controller — trying to impose some order on the chaos. “Gregg could not make money to save his life,” says Liz, now Bon Appétit Management Company’s chief financial officer and its longest-running employee. “He wanted the party to be right, but catering can never be ‘right.’ You know, the wedding cake is in the back of the van and it melts. So you’ve got to replace it with 20 wedding cakes from the grocery store that you’ve stuck together with frosting.” Yes, that really happened. More than once! At a certain point, it started to look like the Bon Appétit Catering ship was going down and would not be able to right itself. One of the employees knew Fedele was looking to start his own business and called him to come take a look. He did, and he liked what he saw:“a bunch of really creative, passionate people.” Bon Appétit Catering might not have been able to hold onto a dollar, but it did have an infrastructure in place — and plenty of panache. “They knew how to make food look good,” says Fedele,“and they weren’t afraid to go all out in pursuit of something.” Fedele decided to make Patyk and his partner, Bill O’Rourke, an offer. He asked Saga’s general counsel, Ernie Collins, to draw up the papers for him, on the side. Ernie did so, discreetly — and out of the blue, suggested he join him in the new venture. Fedele decided that Ernie’s back-of-the-house financial experience, not to mention the capital he’d be putting in, could be valuable assets. A partnership was born. (For more about Ernie, turn to page 7.) COOKING UP A REVOLUTION

The opening team for Shidax’s American café in Makahari, Japan.

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The early days of the new Bon Appétit Management Company were stressful but exhilarating, too. Fedele’s desk was a card table; the office was over the warehouse and across from the city jail. It was a big switch from Saga’s lavish corporate digs — which included bathrooms with gold fixtures and offices full of modern art that overlooked a putting green and oak trees. They all worked around the clock, catering parties at night and trying to sell new business during the day.


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Fedele believed that food was going to be Bon Appétit’s differentiating factor. On a legal pad he drafted Kitchen Principles that are very close to what we use today. “Soup was a big thing in corporate America. I wanted to make it from scratch — I wanted to buy bones and roast them for stock. Nobody was thinking about that,” he says. “That was going to be the key to our gravies and sauces. We’d make salad dressings from scratch, too.” Such ideas helped him sign a couple really good chefs. (Telling them that they could cook with as much freedom as they’d had in restaurants, and yet spend nights and weekends with their families, didn’t hurt either.) Still, it was tough to lose access to Saga’s corporate checkbook. After about six months, Fedele and Ernie could see they were going to run out of capital. So could others. “I knew we were broke, but I wasn’t worried,” says Liz, who sweettalked vendors and concocted some creative strategies to stretch their meager cash.“It was obvious that Fedele was not the kind of person who fails. He could not, personally, fail. I knew he would do anything to make it work.” Fedele and Ernie (and later, Michael) lived on

appealing. Bear Stearns, Xerox, Amdahl, and others bit. And after things finally got too uncomfortable for Michael at Marriott, with his brother competing directly with his employer, he left to launch Bon Appétit’s education division. Not wanting to share Fedele’s card table, he worked out of the Red Carpet Club at the San Francisco airport, calling in periodically to get his messages. Michael’s clients were first devastated — and then very intrigued by this new company’s philosophy of cooking from scratch, headed by business veterans they could trust. In 1988, just months after Michael left Marriott, Bon Appétit landed its first educational client: the Santa Catalina School in Monterey, CA, run by four nuns who’d been Saga clients since the 1960s and worked with Michael since the early ’70s. Biola University soon followed, then others. There were a few kinks: no one had ever fed college students such delicious food before, and they were showing up in droves to eat it. “Our ‘missed-meal factor’ was close to zero,” says Michael ruefully. “Plus the chefs were cooking these 8-ounce pork chops. We were getting killed at first.” However, Bon Appétit Management Company was on its way. THE COMMON INGREDIENTS

Fedele and Michael both acknowledge that their time at Saga shaped them, especially Saga’s emphasis on relationships — the way both clients and employees were treated like family. “That stayed true, even as big as they got to be,” says Michael.“And Saga had this incredible reputation; they were the leader in the industry then — sort of like Bon Appétit is today. Everyone wanted to work for them, but not everyone could. You had to be able to turn on a dime. To be a manager there really said something to other people; they knew you were special.”

CEO Fedele Bauccio and COO Michael Bauccio, his brother, have been in business together a long time

credit cards and put their paychecks in a drawer, uncashed,“but always somehow made payroll for the rest of Bon Appétit,” she adds. Fedele was forced to go back to the initial pool of investors to ask for more. He got it. (See“Bon Appétit’s backers,” opposite page.) Fedele recalls:“We ended up getting over that bump and from there, all of a sudden, business started to mushroom.” The Silicon Valley rocket was just taking off, and competition for employees was fierce, not unlike it is in today’s boomtown. Bon Appétit’s pitch of restaurant-quality food — food so good that employees would stick around for lunch — was novel, and

However, Fedele and Michael also emphasize that they never wanted to build another Saga.And they haven’t.They took the best genes from two very different companies’ DNA and created something entirely new for the food service industry: a professional, solidly grounded relationship company that happens to be passionate about creating great food. Saga had been very much a “boys club,” but the new Bon Appétit hired lots of women — and worked to keep them even after they started families. “We created job sharing for a lot of the women chefs, and for some of the women in the main office,” says Liz. “That was not common then, but Ernie and Fedele didn’t mind what we did, or when or where, as long as we did our jobs well.And let me tell you: I would work twice as hard for a place that allowed me to do what I needed for my life. I know I’m not alone in feeling forever loyal to Bon Appétit for that.” Both Fedele and Michael had been frustrated by Saga’s management structure, with separate silos for the educational, business, healthcare,

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CEO Fedele Bauccio (right) with Bob Hart, now Yahoo! general manager, and chefs.

and restaurant divisions.District managers were always flying all over the country, and employees couldn’t easily switch jobs within sectors. “Early on, we felt it was really important to make sure that we didn’t have these lines within the company. We were going to organize our teams geographically,” says Michael. And since Fedele was adamant that all sectors must have the same high food standards,“that meant that trends get shared no matter where you are, which is very appealing to our clients,” Michael adds.“It is also a great way to cross-train our people and promote them. There’s still no one in the industry that operates this way.” Ask any Bon Appétit longtimers — and for this issue, as you’ll see, we heard from quite a few — what the key ingredient to Bon Appétit’s success has been, and it always comes back to entrepreneurship. This is a large company that still acts very much like a small company, with very few layers of hierarchy. “Our attitude has always been,‘Bring me a great person who’s willing to do anything to get the job done and we’ll show them the rest of the stuff,’” says Michael. “Some people want a manual; we don’t really have any. Some people want to know exactly what to do, 8 to 5.We’re too loose for the black-and-white folks; technicians don’t stay with us. And that’s OK.”

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In 25 years, Bon Appétit has grown from a small catering company with just a few hundred employees to close to 11,000.Along the way, our chefs’ focus on flavor led them straight to small, local farms, and that grew into an early commitment to sustainable agriculture, which led to tackling seafood, rBGH in milk, antibiotics in meat, and more. “We’ve held onto our values — great food, caring where it comes from, and taking care of the community around us,” says Fedele.“I’m really proud of that. The minute we lose sight of our principles, our culture, we become a commodity.” He and Michael work almost as hard as they did in the early days, constantly on the road and making calls from dawn til far past dusk. Fedele gets offended if anyone so much as mentions his eventual retirement. “We’re not done yet!” he growls.“We’ve changed the industry, but I want us to change the food system.There is so much left for us to do. Like getting respect for farmworkers, and stopping these factory farms from abusing antibiotics. Besides, I’m having too much fun to stop.”


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Happy 25th Anniversary from Genentech! A couple of accounts went all-out to send us their best wishes. Genentech - South San Francisco sent more than 100 photos!


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FEELING PUZZLED

In the early days of its publication, Bravo was full of bits of gossip, riddles, and games like the one below, from 1995. Can you decode the still-relevant clues to find the secret word?

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2012 Volume 2: 25th Anniversary

BRAVO IS THE ALMOST QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER OF

BON APPÉTIT MANAGEMENT COMPANY |

A Member of the Compass Group

100 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 400 Palo Alto, California 94301 650-798-8000 www.bamco.com LEARN HOW FOOD CHOICES IMPACT THE ENVIRONMENT, COMMUNITY AND YOUR WELL BEING AT www.CafeBonAppetit.com 12-3484

Profile for Compass Group USA

Bravo: The 25th Anniversary Issue  

25 Years of Bon Appétit

Bravo: The 25th Anniversary Issue  

25 Years of Bon Appétit

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