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OPINION

50 · MONEY

ISSUE 54

THERE IS NO PLANNING MASTER PLAN, NO STRATEGIC TARGETS FOR ECONOMIC ACTIVITY, NO RESERVATION OF SPACE FOR CONSERVATION AND RELAXATION, NO PARAMETERS THAT GUIDE THE COMMUNITY TOWARDS A GREATER SENSE OF ITSELF AND WHAT IT WANTS TO BE DOING NEXT

Our paralysing experience of transportation, the mismanagement of our waste, our insensitivity to conservation and our pathological inability to place human experience at the centre of our town planning, such as it is, highlight most starkly how growth and greed-driven policies are for the short-term and ironically reduce our readiness to prepare for a different future. There does not appear to be a long-term vision or unifying goal that the resources of the country might be driven to work towards. There is no planning master plan, no strategic targets for economic activity, no reservation of space for conservation and relaxation, no parameters that guide the community towards a greater sense of itself and what it wants to be doing next. But this incoherence is reflected in more than the haphazard manner of our construction or the non-existence of town planning. Consider the fact that no one seems to be working on understanding the way the shape of our society is changing and will be

changing. To say race relations in Malta are strained would be a complete misunderstanding. There are no race relations. People live in parallel existences with an inability to cut across divides that reflect their origins. There is no dialogue – cultural, economic, social or even personal – between people of different race. And yet numbers continue to grow. This is as unsustainable as rampant concreting of the countryside. Consider also the new distances created around an aging population, increasingly made of elderly persons that are detached from any form of community life. Loneliness and isolation are an increasingly overlooked reality. People live longer outliving, but living with, physical illnesses that are no longer

terminal and mental illnesses that are only inevitable in a country with more people and less conversation. This too is unsustainable. Consider also the thinning of our social cohesion. Our racial inequalities graft a caste system on jobs, reserving the fulfilment of satisfactory employment to white people and holding black people to work deemed unsuitable for whites. That is an economic reality that emphasises the social cleavages described above. But they do more. In a context of a masterslave society, white people and natives trapped in poverty or homelessness (in ever

Profile for Be Communications

MONEY MAY 2019 ISSUE 54