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CREATIVE LIFE MAGAZINE Issue No.15

Inspired reading for creative hands

Hap py N e w Ye ar ! Ed i tion

IN THIS ISSUE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW LAMPWORK ARTIST DORA SCHUBERT

PAGE 34 BLOG SPOT CHARITY NEWS, LAMPWORK, PHOTOGRAPHY, TRAVEL LONDON ART WEEK! 1

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OUR SPECIAL GUESTS IN THIS ISSUE... LATVIAN FELT ARTISANS - IRINA GAVRILONOKA & EKATERINA PODLESNAJA AUSTRALIAN ARTIST – ADAM STANLEY WELSH MIXED MEDIA ARTIST – RUTH MCLEES CLAY ARTISAN – BRANWYN WALLACE January 2014


BLOG SPOT

OFF THE BEATEN TRACK ARTIST MARY BURR IS PICTURED HERE BESIDE AN ANCIENT DRY STONE TRULLO (PLURAL TRULLI) SITUATED ON THE ROAD BETWEEN LECCE AND OSTUNI IN SOUTHERN ITALY. FULL ARTICLE AND MORE IMAGES ARE ON PAGES 35-37. 2

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For me, January will be a busy month as I have accepted the editorial role for the Felt Makers Association journal titled ‘Felt Matters’. Designer Rebecca Feldman is working with me on the March issue which will be published on the 1st. Together we are redesigning the magazine and are thoroughly enjoying the creative process. Felt making is fascinating, if you’re not familiar with it, turn to page 12 to view the fabulous work of Irina Gavrilonoka and Ekaterina Podlesnaja and don’t forget to visit the FMA website www.feltmakers.com for more information about this ancient craft. JOAN GORDON EDITOR IN CHIEF

HAPPY NEW YEAR! We celebrate the start of the New Year with another issue of Creative Life Magazine. Our stunning front cover features the work of my friend and lampwork artist Dora Schubert whose interview may be found on page 8. I met Dora six years ago in the UK and have been in awe of her intricate glass work ever since. This year, instead of making resolutions that I rarely keep I am making this year my year for learning a new craft. In the last few months of 2013 I was fortunate to be able to attend a couple of photography courses at the Cardiff University. Our tutor was a very talented professional photographer. I found the workshops so inspirational I decided to join a camera club this year to further my skills. I hope over the next few months to be able to share some of my amateur images with you.

On page 22 Western Australian based artist Adam Stanley chats about his latest adventures since we featured him last year in My-Creative Diva magazine and our Welsh artist in this issue is the talented Ruth McLees who produces stunning jewel like images using mixed media and resin, view her work on page 25. And make sure you flip over to page 29 where you’ll find the inspirational story about Welsh born, blind clay artist, Branwyn Wallace. This woman is without a doubt exceptional! In our Blog Spot you’ll find lots of informative articles from our CLM team and super new Dremel projects for your home. Don’t forget to enter our fantastic Dremel Competition on page 74. Our aim for 2014 is to provide our readers with entertaining, inspirational and practical reading. May your year be a very healthy and creative one! Warm Regards, Joan

All website and magazine content is reserved: ©www.my-creativelifemagazine.co.uk ©www.creativelifemagazine.com. All articles and projects are for personal use only. Permission to reproduce or copy any of the contents for any other purposes must be obtained from the publisher. Articles are published in reliance upon the representations and warranties of the contributors and without our knowledge of any infringement of any third parties copyright.

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Table of Contents

INTERVIEWS 8 Dora Schubert 12 Irina Gavrilonoka + Ekaterina Podlesnaja 22 Adam Stanley 25 Ruth McLees

PROJECTS 62 Dog Toy 65 Lampwork Tutorial 68 Birdie Necklace 70 Ostrich Egg Lighting 76 Designer Light 78 Easy Meals 80 Infused Oils 84 Almond Biscotti

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FEATURES 34 Blog Spot 54 Book Club 56 Wood Awards

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IN THIS ISSUE INTERVIEWS WITH ARTISTS FROM ARO PAGE 8 – GERMANY DORA SCHUBERT LAMPWORK ARTIST I made a conscious decision, when I started lampworking, to simply concentrate on lampworking. After having spent almost nine uninterrupted years (2003-early 2012) understanding the glass, developing my techniques, style and design, I am now in a position to concentrate on metalworking - learning by doing - and exploring other materials as I wish to create mixed media projects in the near future. I like to be good at what I do; the only way I know how to achieve this is, is to just do one thing at a time, spend the time nurturing it till it becomes part of me.

PAGE 12 – LATVIA IRINA GAVRILONOKA + EKATERINA PODLESNAJA FELT ARTISANS Nowadays felt is becoming more and more popular. Felt retains the warmth of human hands and the Maker’s positive energy. It is the first fabric used in the history of humankind – even the Bible says that the animals saved by Noah, used their coats to weave him clothing and a home. Felt doesn’t work with synthetic materials. Items created during the felting process are handmade from natural fibres. My felt works are unique and my current focus is to open a small boutique cafe in the Old town, where the people could spend time drinking coffee whilst viewing the new exclusive felt items that will be exhibited in our gallery.

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OUND THE GLOBE PAGE 22 – AUSTRALIA ADAM STANLEY ARTIST I am passionate about surfing waves and also painting them. My surf art is constantly evolving, like my surfing style, in a direction of continuous improvement. I believe that no one can ever be so good at their craft that there isn’t more to learn. As each year passes my skills naturally change and evolve.Whether it is a new surfboard design, a different style of wave or working on canvas using brushes that I haven’t used before, I am constantly learning new techniques and the excitement of exploring these new techniques is totally inspirational. Experimenting with new media makes me fell alive and I hope to continue to grow my skills for years to come.

PAGE 25 – UNITED KINGDON RUTH MCLEES ARTIST Within my painted portraits I explore the artistic potential of industrial and scientific materials. My fascination with layering has enabled me to create paintings where glazes, resin and glues skilfully interact with the image underneath, serving to highlight and reveal the painted figure. Inspired by the work of the 19th century German analytical chemist F.F.Runge, and with assistance from an industrial polymer chemist, I transformed my studio into a laboratory.The results emerging from this experimentation are colourful, jewel-like paintings, where pigments are separated into their pure components to create chromatic glazes from which faces and figures emerge.

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LAMPWORK ARTIST DORA SCHUBERT

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being away from it for so long? “Oh wow, my fingers are no longer thick-skinned as before!” - that was literally my first thought. I mean, I work very close to the flame and after the break, I guess my fingers became “normal-skinned” again, i.e. they can feel heat again! Took all but a few weeks before they became “heat-proof” again.

LAMPWORK ARTIST DORA SCHUBERT Singapore-born, mother of two grownup daughters, now living in northern Germany with husband and dachshund. After an extended break from working in the flame, Dora is once again dazzling the world with her exquisite glass beads, focals and jewellery. Here, in her interview with Joan she chats about her current work. What led you back to the flame, Dora? You might think this weird, Joan, the time to get the torch started was right when my mind was clear and not focussed on lampworking. That’s when the itch began again. I can’t explain this but think of this as opposites attracting each other. Mostly we need a clear mind to function in anything we do and in this case, it was just the kick-start I needed. Are you working from your studio at home or have you developed a new premise? I still work from my home studio which is perfect as my home is where I like to be and that’s also where my creativity begins. What thoughts were going through your mind when you first lit your torch after 9

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Where does the inspiration for your patterns and designs derive from? I am and always have been drawn to the beautiful Moorish architecture and mosaic works as well as to the Art Nouveau period. Nature spurs my imagination and ideas evolve which are not necessarily related to what I see at that particular moment; the right environment tends to spark up the ideas. You might say, I certainly have learned to appreciate what I see around me. Is there a specific technique or theme that is unique to your work? My work tends to be Art-Nouveau-ish and Moorishinfluenced when it comes to designs with stringers and with dots respectively. Will you be offering classes and workshops during 2014? I shall not be teaching in 2014. I wish to broaden my metalworking capabilities as well as spend time in exploring other media. I made a conscious decision, when I started lampworking, to simply concentrate on lampworking. After having spent almost nine uninterrupted years (2003-early 2012) understanding the glass, developing my techniques, style and design, I am now in a position to concentrate on metalworking - learning by doing - and exploring other materials as I wish to create mixed media projects in the near future. I like to be good at what I do; the only way I know how to achieve this is, to just do one thing at a time and spend the time nurturing it till it becomes part of you. What advice would you offer to a novice lampworker who is struggling to control their stringers when they are trying to make patterns on their beads? INTERVIEW CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE January 2014


INTERVIEW

Any beginning is difficult. Learn to slow down, work the piece so that it becomes your work. Most of us, me included, are too eager and want to do the impossible immediately. We usually fail to realise that it takes experience to reach a certain level. Several suggestions for novices if I may - start off with a thicker stringer, even if you don’t like it. Make a larger bead to accommodate the stringer work - the bigger the bead, the easier it is to draw with stringers. If you can’t draw your designs with the existing stringer in your hand, then you are not ready for that thickness or thinness. Back up and make a even thicker stringer. When you can control your designs with that thickness, then make a slightly thinner stringer and try working with it. If that fails, then back up again, you are not ready to move on. Most important is, you need to turn the torch down to work with stringers.The slower you turn your bead from the minute you begin making the bead (not just during stringer application) in the flame, the more heat it will develop within the bead which keeps it nice and hot evenly to prevent any thermal shock while working your designs. Where are you currently exhibiting and selling your work? I will be at Art In Action 2014, Waterperry Gardens, Oxford, as a demonstrator where I will also have my work for display and sales. Currently I sell my work mainly online - my website http:// www.doraschubert.com has its own store and on Etsy (beadchatter). When not at the torch what are you doing? Too many other things! Mainly, I love knitting, crocheting, work on designs for glass beads, soapmaking and tackling a couple of software programs. Perhaps on top of of all that, I enjoy the daily long walks with our dachshund. CONTACT DETAILS E dora@doraschubert.com W http://www.doraschubert.com T +49 15121285955 All images by Ralph Kerpa 2013, all rights reserved. 10

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INTERVIEW

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THE OLDEST OF MATERIALS

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EKATERINA IRINA

FELT ARTISANS IRINA GAVRILONOKA + EKATERINA PODLESNAJA Irina and Ekaterina live in Latvia where they make and sell handmade clothing and artifacts. In this interview they talk about their felt making craft. How did your creative career path as felt artisans evolve? In 2008, there was a Riga Fashion Week event occurring in our home town. As artists we attended and it was here that we were introduced to felt artisans. It was this event 13

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that led us to want to learn to make felt.There were a lot of mistakes in the beginning, while we were exploring various techniques. For the next 5 years we expanded our network of felt artists and today we are now linked with over 2,000 artisans from around the world. Is there one particular person who has been influential in furthering your skill in this medium? Yes, it was Riga Fashion Week 2008, where we meet Italian felt artisan Gaia Clerici. We were so impressed with the abstract style of her work. She was our first teacher and since meeting her, felt has played a major role in our creative lives. As artists where do you find inspiration for your designs? We draw inspiration from our small and very clean country Latvia, which is rich with wildlife and artistic culture. Ideas may be stimulated for example from a walk along the sea side whilst enjoying the clean fresh air. How would you describe your style of work? Is there a particular technique that is peculiar to your designs? Since there are two of us, there are also two styles of works. One is more abstract in style whilst the other is more refined classic. Our different styles complement each other’s designs. We cannot talk about our originality, because in the felting world each artist is unique. Very often it is impossible to repeat even your own creation. Do you teach felt making and if so what classes are currently on offer? Up until now we have only provided masterclasses for our friends but we are now offering courses in Riga that offer techniques that can be used to make items such as scarves, hats, dresses, coats, bags, or winter boots etc.We January 2014


INTERVIEW

can also organize accommodation and excursion programs. What type of fleece do you use and what are the special characteristics that make using these wools preferable over others? For winter boots and coats we use a rough carded felt, but for the clothing we use superfine merino wool, lama or a goat cashmere. The choice of wool that we use depends on what we wish to achieve and how the item is to be used or worn. Do you blend wool with other media when creating your designs? For sure! Felt may be blended with a wide variety of natural fibers, yarns and fabrics, especially – silk! What has been the most challenging design you have worked on to date? A pair of traditional style Russian winter boots called “Valenki”. The technique used to make these boots is very demanding and not ideal for maintaining nice hands, but the result was awesome! Are you a member of any felting groups or guilds? if so would you please tell us about the benefits of belonging to one? There is a guild of craftsmen in Latvia, which help us to participate in various exhibitions. We also belong to a small group called “Able felt”. The aim for our group is to develop into a Cultural Society which will provide felt training, creating new traditions and reviving the ancient cultures of our ancestors. CONTACT DETAILS W ablefelt.com E ablefelt2010@gmail.com P +371 29587887 F www.facebook.com/able.felt 14

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INTERVIEW

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LONDON ART FAIR

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London Art Fair 2014: museum partnership with The Hepworth Wakefield announced 15 - 19 January 2014 (Preview evening 14th January) Business Design Centre, Islington

London Art Fair, the UK’s largest art fair for Modern British and contemporary art returns to the Business Design Centre, Islington, between 15 and 19 January 2014. As the first in a series of new developments, The Hepworth Wakefield has today been announced as museum partner for the 26th edition of the Fair. New curators for Art Projects and Photo50 have also been revealed.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS FOR 2014 The Hepworth Wakefield Frances Guy, Head of Collections at The Hepworth Wakefield, will curate an exhibition focusing on works by Barbara Hepworth and her contemporaries including Terry Frost, Patrick Heron, Peter Lanyon and others. Housed in a pavilion at the entrance to the Main Fair, 'Barbara Hepworth and the development of British Modernism' will provide a significant opportunity for patrons and collectors to engage with a presentation of exceptional museum quality works, whilst highlighting The Hepworth Wakefield’s role in preserving a key moment in British Art history. Main Fair One of several new galleries joining the Fair for 2014 and following on from a major exhibition at the Guggenheim NY, Tokyo-based Whitestone Gallery will be exhibiting a presentation of GUTAI, a Japanese avantgarde artist group from 1950's, which will feature artist Chiyu Uemae at its core. The main section of London Art Fair continues to welcome galleries from across the UK and overseas, exhibiting work by artists from the early 20th Century to the present day. Art Projects A new ‘Dialogues’ section is launched this year. Curated by Adam Carr, it features collaborative presentations between invited UK and International galleries. Many of these galleries and artists are working together for 17

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Maisie Broadhead Keep them Sweet, 2011. Digital C-Type print. Represented by Sarah Myerscough Gallery January 2014


LONDON ART FAIR

the first time and the section promises unique, shared presentations featuring the freshest contemporary art from across the globe. Adam has previously been guest curator for Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art, Turin and Kadist Art Foundation, Paris. Art Projects garners widespread critical acclaim and a distinct audience, featuring large-scale installations, solo shows and group displays, alongside an extensive Film Programme.

LONDON ART FAIR 2012 AT BUSINESS DESIGN CENTRE, ISLINGTON, CREDIT JAMES CHAMPION

Photo50 Photo50, the Fair’s annual showcase of contemporary photography returns for 2014. Entitled 'Immaterial Matter',this year's exhibition,curated by Charlie Fellowes and Jeremy Epstein, Directors of Edel Assanti Gallery, examines the increasingly indiscernible distinction between the digital and the material. The exhibition presents a selection of artists’ works that investigate our understanding of these two classifications, and to what extent they effectively delineate our world and fields of experience in the information age. The Photography Focus Day takes place on Wednesday 15 January with talks, tours and discussions examining contemporary photographic practice and market concerns.

CATLIN GUIDE 2013 AT LONDON ART FAIR 2013. CREDIT JAMES CHAMPION

Sponsors The private jet charter,Air Partner has been announced as a VIP Sponsor for the Fair and VIP Partner of the Collectors’ Lounge for the 2014 edition. Air Partner is the world's leading provider of aviation charter services to industry, commerce, governments and individuals. Tickets London Art Fair tickets are now on sale at £13 (plus £1.50 booking fee) in advance, including a copy of the 2014 Fair Guide (to be collected at the Fair).Tickets on the door are £17. www.londonartfair.co.uk

TICKETING INFORMATION Day Ticket: £13.00 adv. / £17.00 on the door / £12.00 conc. Six Day Ticket (includes Preview Evening): £30.00 adv. / £35.00 on the door Preview Evening: Available only in advance £25.00 Child under 12 years old (accompanied by an adult): FREE Please note: £1.50 booking fee applies per ticket purchased in advance 18

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ALAN DAVIE, ,MACHINE FOR WITCH WATCHING NO 3, 1963, CREDIT WATERHOUSE AND DODD

SCOTT CARTER, DEPARTING FROM THE RULES OF HARMONY, 2011, DRYWALL CUT FROM SURROUNDING WALLS AND GALVANIZED STEEL STUDS, BEERS CONTEMPORARY 19

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‘Immaterial Matter’ curated by Charlie Fellowes and Jeremy Epstein Photo50 at London Art Fair 2014 15 - 19 January 2014 Business Design Centre, Islington

KATE STECIW Background, Basic, Bright, Burlap, Closeup, Color, Couch, Crust, Dessert, Drink, Exotic, Food, Formal, Fox, Fresh, Freshness, Fruit, Garnet, Glass, Gourmet, Grain, Granite, Healthy, Ingredient, Isolate, Juice, Juicy, Nature, Organic, Pink, Plant, Pomegranate, Racing, Raw, Red, Relax, Romantic, Seed, Speed Sweet,Tasty,Tropical, 2013,  26”X40”, C-Prints, Oak Frames, Bumper Stickers. Unique (c) the artist, courtesy Edel Assanti, London 20

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LONDON ART FAIR

Photo50, the annual guest-curated exhibition of contemporary photography, returns to London Art Fair 2014 from 15 - 19 January. Entitled ‘Immaterial Matter’, this year’s exhibition is curated by Charlie Fellowes and Jeremy Epstein, Directors of Edel Assanti. Each year, Photo50 provides a critical showcase of some of the most interesting and distinctive elements of current photographic practice. ‘Immaterial Matter’ examines the increasingly indiscernible distinction between the digital and the material. The 50 artworks selected investigate our understanding of these two classifications, and to what extent they effectively delineate our world and our fields of experience in the information age. Displaying traditional lens-based photography alongside digitally-generated imagery, video and web-based work, the exhibition features artists such as: John Houck; Andrew Norman Wilson; Kate Steciw and Joe Hamilton. Curators Charlie Fellowes and Jeremy Epstein say: “‘Immaterial Matter’ will demonstrate the irrevocably altered state of photography as a classification in the post-internet era, in which images exist in potentially infinite alternative manifestations.” “This exploration is enacted playfully at times, in work that attempts to situate itself on the boundary between the ascribed realms of the digital and material, and progressively elsewhere, in works that describe new ontologies and geographies that are developing as a result of the prevalence of free circulating digital information.” Alongside Photo50 a number of galleries at London Art Fair will be exhibiting work by contemporary photographers, including: 21st Editions; Purdy Hicks Gallery; Crane Kalman Brighton; Cynthia Corbett Gallery; Danielle Arnaud; Flowers Gallery; GBS Fine Art and Jack Bell Gallery. A Photography Focus day at the Fair on Wednesday 15 January will see a programme of talks, tours and discussions examining contemporary photographic practice and market concerns. For a full list of galleries and the latest London Art Fair news visit: www.londonartfair.co.uk

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AUSTRALIAN ARTIST ADAM STANLEY

ADAM STANLEY GALLERY AT NGILGI CAVE YALLINGUP 22

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FEATURE

Adam Stanley is passionate about surfing waves and also painting them. His surf art is constantly evolving, like his surfing style, in a direction of continuous improvement. He believes that no one can ever be so good at their craft that there isn’t more to learn. As each year passes Adam’s skills naturally change and evolve. Whether it is a new surfboard design, a different style of wave or working on canvas using brushes that he hasn’t used before, he says that he is constantly learning new techniques and that the excitement of exploring these new techniques is totally inspirational. Experimenting with new media makes Adam feel alive and he hopes to continue to grow his skills for years to come. In 2013 Adam left his art gallery during the Western Australia winter to travel for six months driving around Australia. He also flew to Switzerland during this sabbatical with the aim to seek out more galleries where he could exhibit his unique surf art.The trip was inspiring, encouraging and well worth the effort. He journeyed along some of the most pristine coastline of Australia, surfed prefect waves and marketed his paintings both in Australian and Europe. One of the most rewarding achievements during his six month adventure was to be asked by Torquay indigenous artist Nathan Patterson, to join him in producing a compilation painting. Both artists enjoyed working together and were well pleased 23

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COMPLIATION PAINTING WITH TORQUAY INDIGENOUS ARTIST NATHAN PATTERSON January 2014


FEATURE

CASTLE ROCK

with the final result. During his road trip Adam entered the Surf Coast Art competition in Torquay where he was delighted to win the people’s choice award. His painting made the front cover of the Torquay Sun Coast Calendar. Despite winning the Torquay competition and the successful marketing of his work over the past 12 months, his most satisfying achievement to date is the raising of nearly $10,000 for charity from the sale of six of his paintings. Adam says that he is equally passionate about helping others as he is for his art and surfing. Selling his work to raise funds for others less fortunate in life, enriches his own life experience. Now back in his Yallingup Ngilgi Cave art gallery, he is working as the artist in residence, actively painting six days a week. His aim for 2014 is to create beautiful works for his clients that will harmonise with their dÊcor and add ambience and a natural flow of energy within their homes. For more information please visit his website. Adam may be contacted through his website at: www.adamstanleyart.com 24

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ARTIST RUTH MCLEES

ENTROPY – 2011; 80CM X 50CM; POLYURETHANE ELASTOMER, VARNISH AND PIGMENT ON VINTAGE TEXTILE; PHOTO BY MATT CANT 25

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INTERVIEW

ARTIST RUTH MCLEES

“Glazes, resin and glues skilfully, interacting with the image underneath, serving to highlight and reveal the painted figure.” I describe my work as rich, decorative and jewel-like! I’m fascinated by the figure, the face and pattern, and it’s always been a goal of mine to combine them seamlessly, layering them to create an illusion of depth within the flat picture plane. It’s also highly experimental. I love trying out new materials; when I find something new, my question is always “How can I use it?” Never 26

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“Can I use it?” There’s always a way! Throw away the rule book! No matter what materials I use, my goal is always to create a beautiful image. In her interview with Joan, Ruth answered the following questions. Where do you find inspiration for your paintings? I’m a hoarder of fabrics so I’m inspired by the colour and patterns around me in my studio. I love patterned clothing, and love to layer pattern on top of pattern in my paintings; for portrait commissions I often ask my sitter to wear something patterned. Currently I’m drawing inspiration from science, working (and learning) from a polymer chemist, which leads my creativity in all kinds of inspiring directions. Do you have formal training or are you self taught? I come from a creative family and have always loved art. I’ve wanted to be an artist for as long as I can remember but tried several jobs before going to university and studying fine art. Is there a particular medium or technique that is peculiar to your work? I think most of what I do is particular only to me! I use patterned textiles instead of canvas, allowing the fabric pattern to combine with the pattern of figure, face and clothing in the portrait. Since beginning my art/science collaboration I’ve also been painting in 3D using industrial polymers (including resins from North Sea oil rigs) January 2014


INTERVIEW

and incorporating mineral salts, natural pigments, starches and oxidised metals into my surface glazes. What theme are you currently working on? Art and science! Working with a polymer chemist in my explorations of unusual industrial materials and scientific processes and their transformation into painting mediums. I’m hooked on science and completely fascinated by the experiments, the learning and the outcomes.Alongside this I’m also painting a number of portrait commissions, which are my bread and butter whilst I’m experimenting. What exhibitions have you been featured in? Recently a solo show in gallery / ten, Cardiff. I exhibit regularly at Battersea Affordable Art Fair, and with Panter and Hall Gallery, Pall Mall, as well as Welsh Artist of the Year and the Eisteddfod. Do your travel and if so, do you sketch, photograph or paint to record memories and events to record your adventures? I love to travel but prefer to absorb as much as I can with my eyes and use it to feed my vivid imagination. Where do you see yourself in 5 years time? Further immersed in art and science I hope. I’d love to have a residency in a research department within industry or university and get the chance to collaborate with a whole new range of experts. VIEW MORE IMAGES ON THE NEXT PAGE 27

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FLUORESCE -2013; 20.5CM X 25.5CM PLUS FRAME; ACRYLIC, PIGMENT, SURFACE PREPARATION, RESIN AND STARCH ON FABRIC; PHOTO BY RUTH MCLEES

BLACK TO SUFFUSE -2013; 20.5CM X 25.5CM PLUS FRAME; ACRYLIC, PIGMENT, SURFACE PREPARATION, RESIN AND STARCH ON FABRIC; PHOTO BY RUTH MCLEES

FLORIBUNDA NO 2 -2013; 20.5CM X 25.5CM PLUS FRAME; ACRYLIC, PIGMENT, SURFACE PREPARATION, RESIN AND STARCH ON FABRIC; PHOTO BY RUTH MCLEES January 2014


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FLORIBUNDA NO 1 -2013; 51 X 31CM PLUS FRAME; ACRYLIC, PIGMENT, SURFACE PREPARATION, RESIN AND STARCH ON FABRIC; PHOTO BY RUTH MCLEES

CONFUSED.COM - 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY COMMISSION 2011; 120 X 180CM; ACRYLIC ON FURNISHING FABRIC; PHOTO BY CONFUSED.COM

GRAPHIC GREY – 2010; 120 X 84CM; ACRYLIC ON FURNISHING FABRIC; PHOTO BY MATT CANT

CONSUMED – 2009; 122 X 91.5CM; ACRYLIC, MARINE VARNISH AND COLLAGE ON CURTAIN FABRIC; PHOTO BY RUTH MCLEES

SAME AS PAGE 25

CONTACT DETAILS W www.ruthmcleesart.blogspot.com (this is primary site as my website needs some work done on it) W www.ruthmclees.co.uk E info@ruthmclees.co.uk P 07974955824 FACEBOOK Ruth McLees Art TWITTER @RuthMcleesArt 28

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FEATURE

WELSH WALLACE ART Branwyn is a blind artist who I discovered on facebook. I liked the style of her work and approached her with the view of sharing her story with our readers. I hope you find her feature article inspirational. By Joan Gordon I create hand-made clay pieces. They range from individually made clay cards, to 3D pictures to larger one off pieces of clay-work. Each piece will never be an exact replica as I am fully blind and create everything through touch alone. I have always been interested in art. When I was 18 I went to Newport Art College to do a foundation degree however I didn’t finish this as I decided on a completely different career. Despite not finishing my foundation degree I never lost my love of drawing and mainly used acrylic paint, pen and ink to illustrate with whilst carrying a sketchpad wherever I went. A couple of years ago I received some injuries that changed my life. I lost the use of my right arm, internal damage to my heart and lungs and most defining, I lost my sight. At first, learning my blind skills took precedent, but as I progressed I found that I really missed painting and drawing. Someone suggested I try working with clay so that I could feel what I am creating. I tried various clays but being limited to just one arm, which was not my writing hand, made this difficult. It was only a few months ago that I found polymer clay and I have not looked back. I mainly use white clay as I do not think in colour. I concentrate on texture and detail. I think the results can be amazing and yet quite simple. Lately, I have also started using colour in one aspect of my shop where I am creating humorous Welsh dragons. I have created two characters, Dewi the dragon and Dai the sheep. I dress them 29

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FEATURE

in various uniforms and place them in comical situations. The inspiration for these characters is drawn from my proud Welsh roots. Now I concentrate on just two areas when designing with polymer clay which include my white work, plus Dewi the Dragon. Both areas of work are as successful as each other when it comes to sales.The public response to my work, over the past few months has been amazing. Customers including a few famous people, are regularly buying my work and also requesting special commissions. With being blind I do not see what other clay workers make, so am I only influenced by what I can design in my mind’s eye which I think makes my work original and unique. At the time of writing this article, I have only been using polymer clay for about four months. In my spare time I help RNIB run ‘Talk & Support’ groups for other blind people who are dealing with losing their eyesight. As I say, I may be blind but I have 20/20 vision in my fingertips. You can follow me on Twitter @ WelshWallaceArt and see my pieces being made with pictures at different stages where I post progress pictures or you can join me on Facebook. All the best, Branwyn

CONTACT DETAILS W www.welshwallaceart.co.uk E welshwallaceart@outlook.com F 07847 080795 30

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AN UNMISSABLE EVENT TO BE HELD AT CHELSEA OLD TOWN HALL Chelsea Old Town Hall will be the venue for the renowned Desire Fair from 7-9 February. This stunning mixed media jewellery and silversmithing event where visitors can purchase direct from contemporary designer makers selected from the best in the UK is an event not to be missed.  32

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BLOG SPOT Desire offers visitors a choice of around 80 individual jewellers and silversmiths who have been selected for their superb and innovative craftsmanship and have a genuine passion for the work they create. Visitors can see and purchase from an exciting range from both emerging British talent as well as more established designer makers.  Exhibitors include jewellers working in gold, silver, platinum, palladium, aluminium, copper, brass, glass and bronze and incorporating felt, gemstones, seaglass, buttons, pearls, glass, enamelwork and beads into their work. Anyone celebrating a special occasion – maybe a birthday or anniversary - may also like to speak to many of the makers about commissioning bespoke pieces of jewellery or silverware.  Several visitors in the past have commissioned engagement or wedding rings at the event and, by working with the designer maker, have been able to have input into the design and come up with something that means so much more and is completely individual.  Many of the makers will also be happy to speak about remodelling old jewellery to give it a more contemporary feel.  It is also a fabulous opportunity for treating someone to something special for Valentine’s Day! Amongst the silversmiths exhibiting at the event is Rebecca Joselyn who was featured with her work on the Channel Four programme, Four Rooms.  The work, inspired by today’s lifestyle of throwaway packaging is highly collectable and has been purchased by the Duke of Devonshire. Whether you are looking to treat yourself, purchase a unique gift for someone special or commission something for a special occasion, make a date to visit Desire at Chelsea. Opening times for the event are 10 am – 6 pm Friday, 10 am – 5 pm Saturday and Sunday.  Admission is £5.00.  For further information contact the organisers on 01622 747 325 or visit the web site at www.desirefair.com.  Venue:  Old Town Hall, King’s Road, London,  SW3 5EE.

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SPOTLIGHT ON YOU n the following section of our magazine you’ll find blogs from people who live their life in a creative way. If you have a story you’d like to have published that is relevant to living life creatively, email the editor and if space is available we’ll print it in a future issue.

IN THIS ISSUE JOAN GORDON WRITER • TUTOR • MAKER

When not working on my various commissions and projects, I like to travel and explore the world around me.Visiting new places and learning about the culture and historical background of the current inhabitants is inspirational. In this issue of CLM I blog about my recent visit to Southern Italy. This trip was a brillaint experience,I hope you enjoy it..

NICKY TOWNSEND JEWELLERY + LAMPWORK ARTIST

I am a jewellery maker and lampwork artist. Since 2008 I have worked with my partner, Andy Spiers (Army Veteran), to raise public awareness of the plight faced by service men who, after serving their country are left homeless or in need of medical, emotional and financial assistance. My article is on page 38.

RICHARD WALSH PHOTOGRAPHER

Many people love snapping the sunsets and the sunrises that always look so dramatic over the sea but there really is much more to seascape photography than red skies. On page 40 you’ll find some of my top tips for taking better seaside photographs.

YAN FAHEY WORLD TRAVELLER

I am on a ‘change of life adventure’, and since retiring I am exploring the world.This month my blog for Creative Life Magazine is about Dubai. I visited Dubai for a week staying at the Le Meridian Resort overlooking the Arabian Gulf. Read about my latest adventure on page 44.

DEBBIE DEW LAMPWORK ARTIST

My bead making is constantly evolving as I try out new ideas. I play a lot at the torch, coming up with different themes, designs and patterns. My most recent commission was a major challenge and one that I’d like to share with you.You’ll find my blog on page 48 and tutorial on page 65.

JULIA LEWIS EXPLORER OF LIFE

One of the great things about travel is that it inevitably challenges your perspective. When the invitation came in September 2013 I was excited at the thought of spending Thanksgiving with my little family in Philadelphia.The story about my latest adventure starts on page 50.

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LECCE PUGLIA + THE SALENTO PENINSULA

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LECCE PUGLIA + THE SALENTO PENINSULA My sister Mary (who lives with her husband Bob and dog Nellie on their farm in Maine USA) celebrated her 30 x 2 birthday in October 2013. As my husband and I couldn’t make the celebrations in the States we decided on a joint adventure to Southern Italy. Our destination was Lecce, which is described as the Florence of the south. It is the main city on Puglia’s Salento Peninsula. From Wales the easiest way of getting to Lecce was to drive to Stanstead airport, take a two and a half hour night flight to the capital city of Bari, overnight in a hotel near the train station and then catch a train into the city of Lecce the following morning. As with any international travel we encountered several problems which tested our patience, but we made Lecce on the 5th of November and immediately fell in love with the opulent architecture, the delicious food and most importantly the welcoming locals. Lecce is fabulous! As a destination for a short or extended holiday in late October or November it’s perfect, as in this low season, there aren’t any tourists. The weather was warm but not humid, the skies were blue, Salento Peninsula offers dramatic craggy coastlines, ancient hill top fortresses, sleepy charming villages, good food and delicious wine. On arriving into Lecce we based ourselves at Corte dei Memoli, which is just 700 metres from Lecce Train Station. We had separate apartments that opened onto an inner courtyard. A continental breakfast was supplied plus vouchers that treated us to coffee and homemade pastries at a local restaurant. As my sister and her husband had arrived into Lecce the previous day they had already sourced a local food market where I bought daily provisions and practiced my limited Italian on the local grocer, baker, butcher and deli owners all of whom were good natured and helpful. Mary and I cooked food sourced from our local market which we enjoyed in our private courtyard and on a few evenings we dined out at traditional restaurants. The city of Lecce is built from soft yellow hued sandstone. It became the centre for ornate Baroque architecture although its early history dates back thousands of years. At the Sant’Oronzo Square, you may view the 2nd Century AD, Roman amphitheatre.The city is a labyrinth of lanes that lead to homes, shops, restaurants and churches. It is a city that you can easily explore on foot and as all the roads are laid with stone paving, sensible shoes are a must. I don’t have the space in this article to write about the many gallery’s, churches and places of interest so please do visit the websites below to gain a more in depth view of this enchanting city. To further explore the countryside and coast we hired a car. On one of our day trips we headed south to Ostuni which is about 41 miles (65.97kms) south of Lecce. On our journey we passed through villages where the locals lived in flat roofed houses painted in bright pastel colours. Olive groves were abundant; 36

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ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE

CLEAR BRIGHT SKY

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BLOG SPOT the roads leading from village to village were bordered with ancient gnarled trees, twisted with age and more recently planted groves laden with fruit. We witnessed many an ancient dry stone domed building called a Trullo (plural, trulli). After a visit to the Provincial Museum we learned that these building were used for thousands of years as buildings in which the dead were buried or as pray houses. In the 19th century they become home to many of the improvised local people. Beside several of the Trulli that we saw, there was evidence of a well, fig and fruit trees that had once served as basic sustenance for the inhabitants. This area of Italy has been inhabited since the Stone Age. Ostuni was named by the Greeks after Hannibal destroyed the original town during the Punic Wars. It has been sacked and regenerated over the centuries. The Medieval town centre that we visited was built from 1300 -1463. Perched high on a hill overlooking the Aegean Sea this is certainly a place we would like to revisit and explore further. The coastline in Southern Italy is beautiful.The rugged limestone cliffs are punctuated with caves, ancient archaeological ruins and rock pools. The Aegean Sea is a deep crystal blue, I can imagine in summer these coastal towns would be packed. Lucky for us as we were there during autumn so we could happily enjoy our picnic by the sea in relative peace and quiet with a few locals who dived from the rocks and swam in the natural rock pools. Six days and five nights later it was time to return to the UK.We had a great adventure and we’ll certainly be returning in 2014 to further explore this wonderful and relatively undiscovered holiday destination.

GREETINGS FROM LECCE

OPPOSITE MY FAVOURITE COFFEE SHOP

Safe Travels, Joan

RESOURCES Accommodation: www.cortedeimemoli.it Corte dei Memoli 3 - 73100 Lecce (Italy) - Tel. +39 334.9937796 +39 392.5033039 Fax +39 0832.1831021 - email: info@cortedeimemoli.it UK Ryan Air flies to Bari twice a day from Stanstead airport Train from Bari to Lecce – approx 2.5 hours 10 Euro per person Read more: www.roughguides.com/destinations/europe/italy/puglia/ lecce-salento/#ixzz2ogNnObB2 VISIT Roman Amphitheatre Church of Santa Chiara, famous for its ceiling with paper mache’ decorations Archaeological Museum, and remains of a Roman theatre, that once held 6000 spectators are behind Santa Chiara. Basilica of Santa Croce, richly decorated facade and is considered the emblem of the city. Castle of Charles V was built in the 16th century and was the royal residence. Provincial Museum, on Viale Gallipoli,houses important finds from the city and the region. 37

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BLOG SPOT possible make a donation to this worthy cause. Even if you can only donate a little, together we can help improve the lives of those who deserve it. Let’s share our creative spirit and make a difference. Joan Gordon, Editor.

WELCOME TO ONCE, WE WERE SOLDIERS. JEWELLERY MAKER + LAMPWORK ARTIST NICKY TOWNSEND

ONCE, WE WERE SOLDIERS Nicky Townsend is a jewellery maker and lampwork artist. Her work has been published in several magazines including Beads & Beyond, Making Jewellery and My-Creative Diva magazine. Since 2008 she has worked tirelessly with her partner, Andy Spiers (Army Veteran), to raise public awareness of the plight faced by service men who, after serving their country are left homeless or in need of medical, emotional and financial assistance. I have known Nicky for more than 10 years. I have enormous respect for her as an artist and woman. Creative Life Magazine offers our support to her, Andy and all those involved in this charity. We ask that our readers like them on facebook to raise their status in social networking search engines and if 38

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We are a UK Small Charity founded in 2008 by Army veteran Andrew Spiers. Our purpose is to raise awareness and offer support to the homeless veterans of the British Armed Forces around the UK. Did you know that at least 10% of the UK homeless population is made up of ex-forces personnel? This number is only likely to rise as more and more serving members are forced to leave their Armed Forces career because of redundancy, government cut backs or for medical reasons. The number of military personnel now suffering with PTSD or other mental health conditions is rising rapidly.  As our troops come out of Afghanistan these numbers are only likely to increase. Many, in fact too many, of these veterans find themselves homeless, with no hope, no support and through no fault of their January 2014


BLOG SPOT own. They turn to alcohol or drugs or both to help them through each day, to block out the horrors they have persistent flashbacks of. It is estimated that in London alone there are in excess of 1000 homeless veterans! These men and women put their lives on the line for our country, they deserve better!  

WHO DO WE SUPPORT? Once, We Were Soldiers support veterans from ALL Forces Army, Navy and Air Force. If you have been proud enough to wear the British Armed Forces uniform then we are honoured to be able to offer you our support. Once, We Were Soldiers support veterans from ALL conflicts. If you served in WW2, Northern Ireland,The Gulf, Bosnia, Kosovo, Iraq,Afghanistan or any other conflict we are here to help! Nobody will be turned away!  

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE – PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT Find Us on Facebook: Once,We Were Soldiers

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Feel free to contact me with any questions, I’m always happy to help. CONTACT DETAILS W www.rjw-photography.com PHOTO CREDITS RICHARD WALSH

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TAKING BETTER SEASIDE PHOTOGRAPHS Living on the South Coast, one of my favourite pastimes is to walk along the various beautiful beaches we have, with my camera of course! The scenery changes every time I go and for a photographer that is a major invitation to stop, listen and look for the unusual or a different way of seeing the sea and the seashore. Many people love snapping the sunsets and the sunrises that always look so dramatic over the sea but there really is much more to seascape photography than red skies. Here are some of my top tips for taking better seaside photographs. The normal approach for most people taking these seaside shots is to try and get everything possible in focus which means choosing a small aperture setting (a large number) The smaller your aperture the greater the depth of field in your shots and the sharper your photograph will be throughout the picture. However, sometimes it may be more impactful to open your aperture setting to the widest setting (smallest number) so that only your intended target object is sharp and the background has a blurred effect. Don’t be afraid of experimenting with your settings, you can delete them later if it didn’t work out. 1. Choose your Time While coastal landscape photography can be done at any time of the day or night, most photographers who are consistently getting great results will favour golden hour or blue hour (early & late) as their favourite times to shoot. Getting there around these times 41

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1.

2.

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BLOG SPOT allows you to capture stunning changing lighting conditions. Get used to shooting from before sunrise or until after sunset.A word of warning though that due to the low ligh levels at these times I would recommend a tripod is used. 2. Look for a Focal Point However intersting and stunning the scene may look to you at the time it is worth reminding yourself that the world is full of red sky photographs, now I’m not saying “don’t take red sky shots” what I am saying is to try a be a little more adventurous and look for something as a foreground focus. 3. It Doesn’t Have to be in The Middle Whether you are taking a red sky shot or something a little more creative try something different and place the focus of the photo offcentre. Making the viewer focus at he subject towards the edge of your shot really can produce a more interesting image. 4. Shutter Speed and Water Remember that if you are taking photographs in low light, with a slow shutter speed then water can appear blurred or misty. Personally I like that effect. If you don’t then you will want to make your shutter speed faster and adjust your other settings accordingly.Waves crashing on rocks can look more dramatic if you use a faster speed so that the water and foam is suspended midair. 5. Get on Down One of the simplest methods of making your photography look amazing is to get as low as you can and take the shot from a position as close to the ground as you can get. Most of us get used to seeing the world from a standing viewpoint so bringing the view down to ground level really does create impact. 42

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3.

4.

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BLOG SPOT 6. It’s Behind You At popular photography locations on the coast around the time of sunset you will see most (if not all), looking towards the sun. Trust me, the best photographs are often had by turning around and looking at where the light is falling – especially if there are a few clouds around! Don’t forget to at least look at what is happening in the rest of the sky. 7. Don’t forget Black and White Most cameras and even some mobiles have the facility to take photographs in monochrome (black & white). Although most of us wouldn’t dream of taking a seaside shot unless it was in colour you may be surprised at what creativity you can achieve by getting rid of the colour… give it a go next time!

4.

7.

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BLOG SPOT DUBAI VIEW FROM THE BEACH OF LE MERIDIAN RESORT

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YAN IS ON A ‘CHANGE OF LIFE ADVENTURE’, AND IS EXPLORING THE WORLD. SHE JOINS US THIS MONTH FROM DUBAI. This month, I visited Dubai for a week staying at the Le Meridian Resort overlooking the Arabian Gulf. I was pleasantly surprised at how clear and warm the water was.The service was superb and the staff friendly. Alcohol is expensive in Dubai, so it was a bonus that champagne, wine and cocktails were included in our holiday package. These we enjoyed at sundown at the end of each busy day. It was also wonderfully decadent having champagne breakfasts watching the skydiving championship which ended with a spectacular air show. A restaurant that I would recommend you try is the Indego Indian Restaurant at the Grosvenor House Hotel where the chicken madras and lamb shank rogan josh were wonderful. We dined here on our first night and it was so good, we returned to enjoy their delicious cuisine the next day.

BIG BUILDINGS

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BLOG SPOT In Dubai you’ll find the buildings are larger than life and the shops are bigger, brighter and tastefully decorated than almost anything else you’ve ever seen. The magnificent Burj Khalifa is the tallest building in the world. Unfortunately, being the busy season and fully booked up, I couldn’t get to see the view from the top floor. Whilst on vacation I met up with a friend Gina who lives in Dubai. We went shopping at the huge Dubai Mall which houses many designer shops. It also features an aquarium where one can dive and swim with sharks, rays and lots of species of fish. We also visited the Mardinat Jumeirah which boasts many restaurants, shops and a lagoon where you can cruise in a wooden boat enjoying views of the famous Burg Al Arab. Another relaxing thing to do when visiting this city is to hop on a water taxi at the Creek for an hour. As you cruise past sky scrapers and boat restaurants you may also watch the locals as they go about their daily business loading dhows. After you have enjoyed the cruise and rested your tired feet, return to the busy souk, to shop for pure sandalwood, jasmine oils and pashminas. There are also many spice, nuts and dried fruits shops that fill the air with their heady aromas. During my visit, Dubai celebrated its 42nd National day and winning the bid to hold the 2020 Expo. The locals celebrated with fireworks and parades. The mood was upbeat and patriotic. Dubai is a great holiday destination to get away from the winter chills of UK and Europe. Add it to your escape list for 2014.

BURJ KHALIFA

NIGHT LIGHTS AT DUBAI MALL

Till next issue, thanks for reading my blog, Yan x 46

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ABRAS, THE TRADITIONAL WATER TAXIS

RESTAURANTS AT MADINAT JUMEIRAH 47

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SAND ARTIST AT MADINAT JUMEIRAH January 2014


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LAMPWORK ARTIST DEBORAH DEW

EXPERIMENTING IN MY LAMPWORK STUDIO I love this time of year, not the wind, rain and cold, but the time I have for experimenting now that ‘fair season’ is over and I’m not in a rush to prepare for my next fair. I’ve experimented with colour mixing, some new designs and making my own murrini. I even found the time to have a play with seed beads. The most fun I’ve recently had was from a commission that came through my website. I received a message through my contact form from a Gent in Scotland. In his message he explained that his wife was very upset after having broken one of his grandfather’s antique crystal whisky glasses. He wanted to know if I could maybe turn the pieces into a pendant of some sort so he could show her it didn’t matter that the glass got broken. I’ve used lots of recycled glass in my work before, champagne bottles, gin bottles, the odd Carlsberg beer bottle and even an old window pane from 48

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a greenhouse that was being demolished, but I’ve never tried melting lead crystal. Now here was a challenge I couldn’t refuse........ After several emails and a telephone conversation, we came up with a heart shaped focal bead and some small round beads that I would also make into jewellery for him. A few days later, a little box was delivered to me, containing the remains of the whisky glass.The time had arrived when I could really play! It was quite nerve-wracking working with lead crystal for the first time, especially since it wasn’t for my own entertainment but for a customer who was paying for my work. I couldn’t afford for this to go wrong. Since I was working with lead and didn’t know how much lead would get into the air when I started melting it, I turned my ventilation up to full, turned the kiln on, pulled out one of the masks I usually keep for working with enamels and set to it. Here you see the final heart pendant. On page 65 you can see the whole process in the mini tutorial. I have to say it was a brilliant challenge! All the best, Debs VIEW DEBS BEADS AT: http://79.170.44.81/silverartz.co.uk/ www.makeglassbeads.co.uk/Reviews.html www.britishlampwork.co.uk/tag/debbie-dew/ www.etsy.com/uk/shop/Glassmania

January 2014


BLOG SPOT LEAD CRYSTAL HEART WITH SEAD BEADING

EXPERIMENTAL IMPLOSION BEAD

PLAYING WITH STRINGERS

ENCASED MURRINI

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TRAVEL BLOG JULIA LEWIS

PHILLY UGLY??

LIBERTY - NYC 50

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PHILLY UGLY?? BY JULIA LEWIS When the invitation came in September I was excited at the thought of spending Thanksgiving with my little family in Philadelphia. What I knew about Philly - not a lot: 1. The city of brotherly love and the home of the Liberty Bell 2. The name of a Tom Hanks film – but I’ve never seen it 3. ‘Off to Philadelphia in the Morning’ – a novel by Jack Jones (and a film) set in 19th century about Welsh valley people moving to Philly but I’ve never read it. What my detailed research revealed was none too promising; a city in the process of reinvention, urban decay featuring derelict buildings in a postindustrial landscape, crime and poverty. And my first impressions were yes - Philly is ugly. But one of the great things about travel is that it inevitably challenges your perspective. At some point in the next 12 days I found I had changed my mind. The city manages to combine its present with its past, with plenty on offer for culture buffs and foodies. Yes Philly is ugly but it has real beauty too. There is so much I’d like to share but here are my much edited highlights: Downtown skyline – not as iconic as Manhattan but it still has a certain something? The Wales flag flying among many on Benjamin Franklin Parkway – the flags represent countries with significant populations in Philadelphia. My first raw oysters and clams at the Oyster House on Sansom Street. Some surprising art deco buildings just waiting to be discovered and I recommend the delights of the Mutter Museum for a serious taste of ‘weird’. 51

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JULIA LEWIS

DECO BUILDING CENTRE CITY January 2014


BLOG SPOT Stuffed Challah French Toast at Sabrina’s – I suspect it packs enough calories to last a weekend but was utterly delicious! I spent a fantastic few hours indulging in the Léger Exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Running (who am I kidding?) Slow - walking up the ‘Rocky steps’ at same. A visit to Macy’s in the Wanamaker Building – how many department stores feature a full sized pipe organ in the atrium? Fantastic food at Di Bruno’s Deli (they even had Caerphilly cheese!). A day trip to New York – drinking hot chocolate with a pistachio macaron while watching ice skaters at the Rockefeller Centre; walking the High Line in Chelsea. What I know now – slightly random stuff...... Great food a plenty is to be found in small scale local restaurants, good old fashioned diners, coffee shops and market stalls. The statue of William Penn (founder of Pennsylvania) sits atop City Hall – his hair is 4 feet long! A combination of beauty and brutal, Philly is both glamorous and louche. A city of contrasts - supersized commercial and public buildings coexist with the derelict, walking through the glass and glare of high end shopping, lines of men waiting for the soup kitchen outside the public library on Thanksgiving. So is Philly ugly? Yes it is a bit, but I fell a little in love with it to tell the truth. This trip won’t be my last. Flight: British Airways (London Heathrow to Philadelphia) Great food at the Oyster House, Little Fish, Bibou, Reading Market, Di Brunos Deli Philly Ugly: check out beautiful time lapse sequences on YouTube 52

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ICONIC IMAGE RE IMAGINED HIGH LINE NYC

OLDEST STREET IN PHILLY ELFRETH’S ALLEY

FIRST OYSTERS AND CLAMS AT THE OYSTER HOUSE January 2014


BLOG SPOT LIBERTY BELL - HAS LEGS!

MUSEUM OF ART

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BOOK

Five fabulous books to entertain and inspire you. By Jennifer Schembri.

Bag: The Ultimate Fashion Accessory by Sue & Huey and Susie Draffan, £9.95 Published by Laurence King ISBN 978-1-78067-019-5

If you can’t resist the allure of a beautiful handbag – and let’s face it, few of us can – this gorgeous little book is for you. As the introduction says: ‘It is impossible to overstate the significance of a handbag to a woman. More than just a repository for our day-to-day essentials, a bag becomes an extension of ourselves.’ Indeed a handbag is more than just a practical item, it speaks volumes about its owner – it is form of self-expression.This book is a celebration of some of the most beautiful, sought after designs and offers an overview of a selection of brands, alongside stunning photographs from the runway and advertising campaigns. From the classic Chanel 2.55 and the Hermès Grace Kelly, to more modern offerings from Chloé, Marc Jacobs and 3.1 Phillip Lim, this is a really enjoyable look at some truly wonderful bags. It’s very easy to see why many of us fall so irrationally in love with handbags. Anyway, a stylish bag might be expensive but it is an investment, right?!

Jewellery Design and Development: from concept to object by Norman Cherry, £24.99 Published by Bloomsbury ISBN 978-1-4081-2497-0

Many artists are intrigued be the way that others work and the thought process behind their creations. I think this book would be of interest not only to jewellery designers, but anyone interested in the way that other designers generate ideas and take them on the journey from initial concepts to finished pieces. Seventeen innovative jewellers are included in this book, and the author explores each one’s personal style, before finding out what inspires them and how they develop those early sparks of inspiration into a tangible item. Helen Britton collects items washed up on the beach and turns what others might view as rubbish into colourful wearable creations. Lisa Juen meanwhile, talks about how she takes individual words or ‘headlines’ and uses them as a topic around which she builds up detail. It is interesting to see how two seemingly abstract words like ‘globalisation’ and ‘carnivores’ can be used as a starting point from which to develop a finished piece of jewellery!

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Incomparable Women of Style by Rose Hartman, £29.95 Published by ACC Editions ISBN 978-1-85149-699-0

Rose Hartmen has been photographing the world’s most glamourous women and New York City’s hottest nightlife spots for three decades. She is known for her ability to capture seemingly intimate moments in very public circumstances, and has been widely published in magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Vanity Fair and the New York Times. Obsessed with fashion since discovering Vogue aged 11, Hartman captures stylish women as only a stylish woman could. This book is a collection of images spanning 35 years and features countless inspirational women captured in real life situations. These aren’t artfully posed and extensively photo-shopped, nor are they gratuitous paparazzi shots; they are honest portrayals of a dazzling group of women in one of the world’s most exciting cities. It’s tough to pick out favourites, but some images that really stood out include, a young Kate Moss at Fashion Week in 1995, a fierce looking Donatella Versace accompanied by Jennifer Lopez at a cocktail party, and Hubert de Givenchy affectionately kissing Audrey Hepburn on the forehead at ‘Night of the Stars’ gala in 1991.

365 Day by Day: Movie Icons £17.99 Published by TASCHEN ISBN 978-3-8365-3862-6

TASCHEN’s 365 Day-By-Day series are a wonderful way to mark the days of the year in an era when our diaries are often electronic and our calendars are on mobile phones and tablets. This book in particular would make a fantastic gift for any film fan, offering daily inspiration through unique images from the world of cinema. There is a page devoted to all 365 days of the year and for each one there is an iconic still from the film. Some have a quote or a film poster too, and a note of the iconic actors and actresses who were born on that particular day. From Wall-E to American Psycho, Hitchcock to Rodriguez, and Marilyn Monroe to Johnny Depp, this book is a wonderful cross section of cinema, packed with iconic actors, directors and fantastic images. A must-have for any film lover.

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FEATURE

WOOD AWARDS 2013 - GOLD AWARD Bishop Edward King Chapel takes the Wood Awards 2013 Gold Award

Bishop Edward King Chapel by Niall McLaughlin Architects has taken the Gold Award in this year’s Wood Awards 2013 competition - the flagship for wood in the best of British architecture, furniture and design. Announced at the Wood Awards winners’ ceremony held on the 19th November 2013, hosted by the Worshipful Company of Carpenters in the City of London, the Bishop Edward King Chapel, Ripon College, Oxford took the Structural category prize before being crowned the winner of winners in front of more than 200 leading industry and architectural figures. Chairman of the judges, Michael Morrison of Purcell UK said, “Niall McLaughlin’s Bishop Edward King Chapel is a stunning and worthy Gold Award winner. It embodies the Wood Awards celebration of excellence in design and craftsmanship in wood, and even exceeds the hope that the building might be ‘a work of art which would touch the spirit’.” The independent judging panel, which includes previous Wood Awards winners Adam Khan and last year’s Gold Award winner David Morley, Hopkins Architect’s Jim Greaves and Andrew Lawrence from Arup, praised the team for its attention to detail, careful use of materials and elegant curved glulam columns and beams which create the light and soaring internal timber structure. The Wood Awards category winners included The Colyer-Fergusson Building in Kent by Tim 56

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January 2014


FEATURE

Ronalds Architects for the Commercial & Public Access Award; Church Walk in London by David Mikhail Architects for the Private Award – the second year in a row this practice has won the Private category; Magheralin Parish Church in Northern Ireland by WaddingtonMcClure Architects for the Repair & Adaptive Reuse Award, and the undulating RoominaRoom in London by Atmos Studio for the Small Project Award. For the first time this year, a surfboard maker was highly commended for their work in wood. Otter Surfboards from 57

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Cornwall was praised by the judges for their creativity and exceptional woodworking as well as their work with the National Trust, and “using wood’s best properties – naturally beautiful, strong and light”. This year, the Wood Awards was launched at Ecobuild in March, the shortlisted Furniture categories pieces were exhibited in person at 100% Design - the biggest event during the London Design Festival, and the full shortlist was showcased atTimber Expo in Birmingham, along with a series of talks from selected January 2014


FEATURE shortlisted projects. Chair of the judges, Michael Morrison said, “All the projects we inspected were showcasing both the versatility of timber as a building material as well as the great pool of talent in the design and construction industries. Two things were particularly pleasing – the high standards of craftsmanship that we saw and, perhaps more importantly, that we were able to give awards this year to some modest schemes where the selection of timber, the design and the workmanship have produced a splendid result on a tight budget.  This must surely be the message that these awards are design to spread – that wood is a beautiful and economical material that can be used to great advantage in any building project.” As the flagship for wood in the best of British architecture, furniture and design, the Wood Awards is made possible by the major sponsorship of the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC), Canada Wood, the Carpenters’ Company, TRADA and Wood for Good. Other sponsors include American Softwoods, BRE and the Forestry Commission. For full project information on the shortlist and winners, visit www.woodawards.com. Find ‘Wood Awards’ on Twitter @ woodawards, Facebook, and LinkedIn. 58

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CREATIVE MAKES DIY PROJECTS

Take time out of your busy schedule to enjoy making something for your home or try a new reci projects to keep you busy over the next few months!

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MAKE A TOY FOR YOUR FOUR LEGGED FRIEND

LAMPWORK TUTORIAL BY DEBS DEW

JEWELLERY PROJECT BY MAGGIE JONES

DECORATIVE LIGHTING FROM DREMEL

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ipe and share good food with your family and friends. In the following pages you’ll find plenty of

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CREATIVE MAKE WITH PAPER PLATES

DESIGN YOUR OWN PIZZA

DELICIOUS HERB INFUSED OILS

AFTER DINNER TREATS

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January 2014


INTELLIGENT DOG TOY Find the treat! Neat dog toy for smart quadrupeds. Clever dogs enjoy the inspiration of intelligent dog toys. A project you can make using Dremel® tools is a toy with a drawer and pull cord. Fill the drawer with a homebaked dog biscuit and you have the perfect, interactive dog toy for your four-legged friend. STEP 1 Use ten birch plywood sheets for the drawer and box. Cut these to the correct size at the DIY store (see below for dimensions). A handy Dremel® Glue Gun 930 is used to stick the parts together to make a drawer open at the top and a fitting box that is open at the front. STEP 2 As soon as the boxes are dry, the Dremel® 3000 comes into play. Use it to sand the edges cleanly and carefully. STEP 3 To make the drawer use a ruler to mark two spots in the middle, 10 cm apart. That is where the cord pull handle will be fitted. STEP 4 To make the drawer handle, knot both ends of a piece of rope that measures about 25 cm long. Screw each knot to one of the marked spots. Do this so that the ends of the screws peek out on the other side of the plywood. STEP 5 The Dremel® 3000 can be used to cut off the protruding screw ends on the inside of the drawer easily and cleanly by means of the EZ SpeedClic metal cutting wheel SC456. STEP 6 Paint the outer box with environmentally friendly acrylic paint, and your dog can start playing with this enticing new toy. MATERIALS From Dremel®: Dremel® Glue Gun 930 Dremel® 3000 Sanding mandrel and sanding band 407 EZ SpeedClic metal cutting wheel SC456 EZ SpeedClic mandrel SC402 From home: Ruler From the hardware store: 1 piece of birch plywood (25 x 18 cm x 12 mm) (drawer bottom) 2 pieces of birch plywood (25 x 10 cm x 12 mm) (drawer sides) 2 pieces of birch plywood (18 x 11,2 cm x 12 mm) (drawer front and back) 2 pieces of birch plywood (26.5 x 21 cm x 12 mm) (bottom and top of outer box) 2 pieces of birch plywood (26.5 x 12 cm x 12 mm) (outer box sides) 1 piece of birch plywood (21 x 13,2 cm x 12 mm) (outer box back) 2 wood screws (c. 40 mm) Acrylic paint, paintbrush and paint roller Rope (25 cm long, diameter c. 2 cm) DIFFICULTY RATING

*** 3 STARS 62

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RESOURCES Dremel® tools are available at http://www.dremel-direct.com, http://www.amazon.co.uk and http://www.tool-shop.co.uk or DIY shops. January 2014


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Are you a member of the International Feltmakers Association? If not, why not? Join now to promote your work, network with talented people from all over the globe, exchange knowledge, learn new skills and share your passion for felt making.Visit their website now for more information and grow your international connections.

INTERNATIONAL FELTMAKERS ASSOCIATION (IFA) BACKGROUND TO THE IFA The IFA was formed in 1984. It has three aims: • to foster worldwide interest in felt • to promote members’ work • keep members in contact with one another for exchange of knowledge and ideas. It currently has over 700 members across the world, including the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA. The members are a diverse group, encompassing professional craftspeople and textile artists, art/craft/textile teachers and leisure feltmakers for whom feltmaking is a hobby.Their interests range from the historical and anthropological aspects of felt to felt as an artistic and creative medium. The principal benefits of membership are: • The quarterly journal ‘Felt Matters’. • Regional meetings and workshops in the UK; with an International Officer representing non-UK members. • Access to the members’ only area of the website and the IFA Facebook group. • Access to the IFA Certificate in Felt Techniques (Foundation). • Occasional supplier discounts and the chance to submit work to IFA exhibitions. More information about the IFA can be found on our website. CONTACT DETAILS: W www.feltmakers.com or Facebook/International Feltmakers Association. 64

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January 2014


LAMPWORK TUTORIAL HEART SHAPED FOCAL Lampwork artist Deborah Dew talks us through using shards of broken crystal to make a heat shaped focal bead. Project steps on this page and project photos on pages 66-67. STEP 1 I sat some of the broken pieces of crystal on top of the kiln to start warming them before I put them in the flame. I didn’t want sudden heat to shatter the crystal. I pulled a few stringers while I was waiting for the kiln to reach annealing temperature. STEP 2 I then picked up the first piece of crystal with tweezers and starting to heat it very slowly in the back of the flame. Dip the piece in and out of the flame until you begin to get a slight glow, once it starts to glow, keep it in the flame but keep it at the back and continue to heat slowly until its glowing nicely, then bring it forward in the flame and melt until its ready to wrap around the mandrel. STEP 3 Warm your mandrel and begin wrapping the molten crystal around your mandrel, working as if you’re using any other glass. Heat enough to smooth out into a nice round shape. STEP 4 Keeping your bead warm, begin warming the next piece of crystal at the back of your flame and add it to your bead using it like a rod of glass ( Keep the tip of the crystal in the flame and the bead below) I’ve lifted it out of the flame here so you can see how I’m wrapping it around the bead. STEP 5 Melt in these first pieces completely. Try to keep the shape as round as possible STEP 6 Keep adding more pieces of glass slowly to increase the size, melt each piece in well and reshape your bead as you go along, it’s easier to shape as you go along than try to shape at the end of the process. STEP 7 Since this is going to be a big puffy heart, I need quite a lot of crystal so I keep adding and melting until I’m happy I have enough. The yellow tinge indicates the crystal is molten (you won’t get a red tinge like you do with glass, look for the yellow) as it cools it will go back to clear. STEP 8 Using a marver, form your bead into a cone shape then try it in your glass press, add more crystal and repress if you need to. You won’t want to be adding more crystal to the bottom of your heart once you start building the shoulders. Add more crystal to one side of your cone shape to begin forming your first shoulder. STEP 9 Keep adding crystal and melting in between pieces to get it nice and smooth. STEP 10 Once the shoulder is melted smooth, press 65

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it in your heart press, check and add more crystal if you need to. STEP 11 Build the second shoulder as you did the first, to finish off the heart shape. STEP 12 Melt it all smooth again after the final pressing. STEP 13 Now to add some colour, I’ve chosen to use a little silver foil and frit. I wouldn’t advise melting it in completely. I’ve also used mica powder successfully in the past, however you choose to add colour, be sparing with it, you don’t want to risk cracks due to incompatibility. I’ve started by burnishing some silver foil over one shoulder of the heart. STEP 14 Next I’m adding some glass frit in shades through lilac and purple. I’m melting it just enough to stick to the crystal without melting it in. STEP 15 I add a few twists in the frit with a thin purple rod to create a bit more interest. And it’s all finished. It just needs a final heat up before it goes in the kiln. STEP 16 Here it’s safely tucked up in the kiln for the next 12 hours. STEP 17 All finished and turned into a necklace.

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VIEW DEBS BEADS AT http://79.170.44.81/silverartz.co.uk/ www.makeglassbeads.co.uk/Reviews.html www.britishlampwork.co.uk/tag/debbie-dew/ www.etsy.com/uk/shop/Glassmania January 2014


LAMPWORK TUTORIAL HEART SHAPED FOCAL

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JEWELLERY PROJECT

ABOUT THE DESIGNER Maggie Jones arranges and delivers demonstrations for jewellery, sewing and general crafts. She also runs workshops and courses, particularly in the Lancashire and north Manchester areas and writes projects, focused on jewellery and stitching, for various magazines. CONTACT DETAILS W www.maggiejonesdesign.co.uk F www.facebook.com/craftdemon

BIRDIE NECKLACE Bird motifs are extremely popular at the moment and this fun design features a removable bird brooch, which is created from craft felt.The necklace uses a variety of beads and there is no fiddly fastening as it slips over your head. It has been designed by Maggie Jones, and is available in a kit from Sophie’s Crafts in Lancashire. 68

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JEWELLERY PROJECT BIRD MATERIALS 2 x felt bird shapes, main colour 2 x felt wings, contrast colour Felt, for bill, scrap. Mustard or brown Mixed seed & e-beads for decoration: red; metallic; white 1 x 6mm bead, black Thread to match beads Embroidery thread, tonal colour of felt Small amount wadding NECKLACE MATERIALS Approx 31 large glass beads Approx 32 small glass beads 23 inches chain, cut into 13 inches and 10 inches. 30 inches beading wire 4 x crimps 2 x 4mm jump rings, 2 x 6 mm jump rings TO COMPLETE 1 brooch back 2 x 4mm jump-rings 2 x 6mm jump-rings YOU WILL ALSO NEED Round nosed & flat nosed pliers Flush cutters Small holed sewing needle Scissors BIRD METHOD STEP1 Sew together two wing shapes then attach to the front bird piece. STEP2 To create the eye, sew the 6 mm bead into position and stitch 2 circles of seed beads round it. STEP 3 If desired: sew on seed beads, in clear on the top part of the wing and copper beads onto the lower part of the wing. Using bugle beads and seed beads in red, stitch in an arc shape to represent a red breast. Sew 4 mm e-beads into position and stitch circles of seed beads around these.  STEP 4 Cut a triangle from the mustard felt and stitch in the beak position.  STEP 5 Sew a brooch back onto the back piece, in a vertical position. 69

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STEP 6 Using embroidery thread, stitch the front and back together, leaving a small gap. Stuff lightly then continue to sew the hole closed. NECKLACE METHOD 1. Use a bead board and lay out your design. Use a small bead in between every large bead. String onto wire and crimp ends onto 4mm jump rings. Don’t do this too tightly. 2. Open a 4 mm jumpring and attach to one end to the 10 inch of chain, then to the beaded string about 4.5 inches from its end. Do the same at the other end. 3.To the jumprings on the end of the beaded wire, add about 13 inches of chain.  COMPLETING 1. Measure down 7cm / 3 inches from the top of the beaded string. Add a 4mm jumpring to the wire, then add a 6mm one to that. Repeat about 3cm / 1¼ further down. 2. Slide the pin of the brooch back into the two 6mm jump-rings. The kit is available in red, pink, sky blue, purple, lilac, navy, as shown on the website. DESIGNER’S TIPS 1.The bird brooch could also be stitched onto the necklace. 2. Don’t crimp tightly as you will be adding jump rings later. 3. An extra bird could be made in a different colour (not supplied ion the kit) to offer a change of colour emphasis. RESOURCES The kit is exclusively available from Sophie’s Crafts, in Oldham, Lancashire. It retails at £7.99 plus postage and colour ways are shown on the website. www.sophiescrafts.co.uk. Enter the competition on page 88 to win a kit!

FELT BIRD KITS January 2014


DIY HOME PROJECT

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CREATE MOOD LIGHTING Use Ostrich eggs to make quirky party lighting. Once they are drilled with patterns, sprayed, hung and lit, these lights are really effective. All you need is your Dremel® 3000 – and off you go! NEW YEAR’S PARTY OSTRICH EGG LIGHTING MATERIALS Dremel® 3000 Dremel® Flexible Attachment Shaft 225 Dremel® Flex-Shaft Tool Holder 2222 Dremel® Sanding Band 430 & 407 Dremel® Diamond Point Engraving Tips 7103, 7105 Dremel® Precision Drill Bit Set 628 Dremel® Diamond Wheel Point 7122 Dremel® EZ SpeedClic Cut-Off Wheel SC546 Dremel® Oxide grinding stone 952 Dremel® safety glasses Ostrich eggs, blown and cleaned – these have a 20mm blow hole at one end Soft pencil Towel to cushion the egg while drilling Slim paintbrush Spray paint, if required Soft eraser, if required DIFFICULTY RATING ** – Fairly Easy STEP ONE Mark the design Buy your blown and cleaned Ostrich eggs online. Wash and dry them thoroughly. Using a soft pencil, roughly mark out a design on the egg. Rest the egg on the folded towel to cushion it while you do this.Take your Dremel 3000, fitted with the Dremel Flexible Shaft 225 and the Dremel Diamond Point Engraving Tip 7103, using Dremel Flex-Shaft Tool Holder 2222 to suspend the Flex Shaft and make it easy for you to work. Use the Dremel Diamond Point Engraving Tip 7103 to scratch the surface of the egg and make a small indentation where each hole is to be drilled.This will act rather like a pilot hole, preventing the tip from slipping on the smooth surface of the egg. Repeat the process to mark out the entire design. 71

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STEP TWO Drill the holes Remove the Dremel Diamond Point Engraving Tip 7103 from the Dremel Flexible Shaft 225 and replace it with one of the Dremel Precision Drill Bit Set 628. Select the size appropriate for the effect you wish to create. Put on your Dremel Safety Glasses to protect your eyes. Allowing the tool to do the work, apply gentle pressure. Drill a hole through each indentation mark. Work your way around the egg to complete the pierced design, changing the drill bit as desired to create holes of different sizes. STEP THREE Remove sections Fit the tool with Dremel Diamond Wheel Point 7122. Use it to carefully remove sections of the egg shell between various holes to join them up into slots. Using the picture as a guide, repeat this to form the dot and slot designs on your egg. STEP FOUR Clean and paint Replace the Dremel Diamond Wheel Point 7122 with the Dremel Diamond Point Engraving Tip 7105. Work around the egg as before. Press the tip lightly into the depression surrounding each of the drilled holes to smooth the edges. When the design is completed, remove particles from the inside of the egg by shaking them out through the blow hole. Pass a paintbrush tip through the blow hole and brush away any dust and remaining fragments. If the egg is to remain natural, use a soft eraser to remove any pencil marks otherwise, spray paint the egg with a colour at this point, then allow it to dry thoroughly. STEP FIVE Create a toggle Make a simple toggle device out of either wooden dowel or metal to hang in the top of the ostrich egg to string it to the ceiling. If using metal: Using your Dremel 3000 with an EZ SpeedClic Cut-Off Wheel SC456, January 2014


DIY HOME PROJECT cut a 50 mm length strip of 2 mm x 19.5 mm aluminium flat bar that may be purchased at DIY stores or online. Cut two slots of 3.5 mm wide x 4 mm deep in the centre, either side of the toggle. Round off the ends of your toggle to fit the inside curve of the ostrich egg using your Dremel 3000 and the Aluminium Oxide Grinding Stone 9,5mm 952. Attach a cable tie, pull it tight and cut off the excess.Tie the top of the cable tie to a piece of fishing line, chain or ribbon to hang up the egg. TIP: If using chain to suspend the egg, pass the cable tie through the last link of the chain before attaching the cable tie to the toggle. Attach a piece of fishing line to the bottom part of the cable tie, underneath the toggle. Alternatively, if you are using dowel: Simply cut to a length of 5 mm and round off the ends using your Dremel 3000 and the sanding band 407 (13mm grit 60). Either, pass your cable tie though the last link of the chain or tie ribbon onto the cable tie and wrap the cable tie around the piece of dowel. Before you pull it tight, also pass your hanging length of fishing line through the cable tie so that you can attach the light balloon to the toggle inside the ostrich egg in order to hang up the egg.

STEP SEVEN Fix LED lights Purchase a packet of white LED light-up balloons from a party shop or online. Using this type of light source means that you can hang your egg light literally anywhere as the light fitting inside the balloon has its own batteries and LED all contained within the balloon itself. There is no need for any external wiring or power supply. Simply insert the LED balloon into the egg, inflate it and tie off. Now simply string it up to the ceiling using a cup hook to secure it into the ceiling. TIP: When the battery/LED light expires after 15 hours of use, simply remove the LED balloon and insert a new one to carry on enjoying your quirky lighting display.

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STEP SIX Re-size the blow hole For the light source inside the egg, increase the size of the blow hole using your Dremel 3000 fitted with the Sanding Band 431 (6.4mm grit 60) to a diameter of roughly 25 mm. TIP - Ostrich eggs are surprisingly strong and can be drilled quite easily. Avoid positioning the holes too close together to reduce the risk of the egg breaking as it is being drilled.

RESOURCES Dremel® tools are available at http://www.dremel-direct.com, http://www.amazon.co.uk and http://www.tool-shop.co.uk or DIY shops. 72

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COMPETITION

WIN THIS!

WE HAVE ONE SET TO GIVE AWAY VALUED AT £159! Spruce up your home for the New Year! Christmas is over, you’ve cleared up after the relatives have left and thrown out the Christmas tree. But somehow the place looks a bit bare and dull after the decorations have come down… So, what better time to get out your DIY toolkit, paint, brushes and rollers and smarten things up in time for the warm Spring sunshine to come.  You’ve got a few months – so inspiration at the ready – get fixing, scraping paint off old furniture that’s seen better days, sanding and varnishing, putting up new curtain rails and fresh curtains, maybe inserting some lights or air vents into the perimeter of your wooden floors, or if you’re really feeling brave, modernising your bathroom or kitchen! Dremel has the toolkit to give you a flying start!  The cordless Dremel Multi-Max MM40 toolkit will give you the perfect cutting, sanding and scraping tool with lots of accessories and attachments to add to it so you can rip up carpet, re-grout your tiling, cut through metal, wood, lino and plastic with ease, plunge cut into flooring or skirting boards, sand back wooden surfaces, scrape off old paint and make your home shine once again.  We’re giving away a Dremel Multi-Max MM40 toolkit which comprises:  the best in class cordless oscillating tool Dremel Multi-Max MM40 with accessories - a Quick Fit hook and loop sanding pad, six sanding papers (three for paint and three for wood), a wood flush cut blade, a wood & metal flush cut blade, a vacuum cleaner attachment (so you can keep your work area free of dust as you go), a DVD packed with useful information and a sturdy and spacious storage case.  It uses the Quick Lock keyless accessory change mechanism to make changing over accessories really fast and easy. If you aren’t lucky enough to win it, you can buy it online at www.amazon.co.uk or www.dremeldirect.com or www.tool-shop.co.uk or from most DIY shops. RRP £159.00 HOW TO ENTER: EMAIL: creativelifemagazine@gmail.com Attach this code: DREMEL WIN – CLM 15 The lucky winners will be published in Issue 16 of CLM. CLOSING DATE FOR ALL ENTRIES – 27th FEB 2014 Conditions of entry: Only 1 entry per household. No further correspondence will be entered into the competition.The winner’s name and address will be forwarded to Dremel for the distribution of all prizes. Creative Life Magazine does not accept any responsibility for the distribution of the prizes. The name of the winner will be published in issue 16 of CLM. 74

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DIY HOME PROJECT PAPER PLATE DESIGNER LIGHT This lampshade is elegant, chic, retro and cool! It’s hard to believe that it’s made out of paper plates. Combined with a simple lamp base and normal bulb, this impressive lampshade will add a designer touch to your home. All you need is a Dremel® Glue Gun 930 Hobby and clear glue stick to make this iconic shade. MATERIALS Dremel® Glue Gun 930 Hobby and 7mm clear glue sticks Paper plates, 18cm diameter, approximately 50. Brushed chrome stick lamp base Drum lampshade, cream, 13 cm high x 15cm diameter Steel rule Pencil Scissors Bone folder or the back of a table knife Ramekin dish or other. DESIGNER NOTES The circumference of the plates must be a little larger than the height of the lampshade. The ramekin dish is used to rest the lampshade on during the gluing process; it assists in the positioning of the plates at a consistent height around the shade. If the dimensions of your shade and plates differ to those given, choose a dish that allows the plates to be positioned centrally on the shade when the shade is resting on it. Light bulb - make sure you only use the wattage which is recommended with the lamp base. You can gauge the approximate number of plates you will need for your particular shade by measuring its circumference; 1cm equals one plate.

STEP THREE Gluing Insert a clear glue stick into the Dremel Glue Gun 930 Hobby and turn it to the cool setting. Rest the shade on the dish with the top edge facing up.Apply a line of glue along the centre of the 1cm wide panel on the first plate. Now position the folded plate vertically on the shade so that one of the folded edges aligns with the vertical seam of the lampshade. STEP FOUR Forming the pattern Repeat the process, aligning subsequent plates adjacent to the previous one, working your way around the shade whilst ensuring that the plates remain vertical and level at the top and bottom of the shade. Repeat the process until the shade is completely covered. Fix the shade onto the base; add the bulb. and your lamp is now complete. RESOURCES Dremel® tools are available at http://www.dremel-direct.com, http://www.amazon.co.uk and http://www.tool-shop.co.uk or DIY shops.

DIFFICULTY RATING Easy STEP ONE Cutting the plates Fold one of the paper plates in half and burnish along the crease line using the bone folder or the back of the table knife. Place a ruler .5cm away from and parallel to the fold. Use the pencil to mark the line keeping the plate folded. Now cut along the marked line with scissors. STEP TWO Scoring and folding Lay another paper plate right side down and place one of the semi circles on top of it, matching the curved edges. Place the steel rule along the straight edge and use the bone folder to score a line down the whole plate. Repeat the process on the opposite side of the plate so that two parallel lines are scored down the centre of the plate. These lines are approximately 1cm apart. Fold in the semicircles with the wrong sides together and burnish the scored lines to achieve a sharp crease. 76

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GOOD FOOD EASY MEALS Looking for an easy pizza recipe to make using spicy salami, onion, basil, tomato, and mozzarella? If you own a bread maker make it authentic by creating your own base or if time is short, purchase a pre-made base from your local deli or supermarket. Serve it using these supper slicers, they are just the ticket for protecting the surface of your pizza trays. Enjoy! INGREDIENTS FOR THE DOUGH 2 x cups flour 1 x tbsp yeast 1 x tsp salt ½ tsp sugar ¾ cup warm water 2 tbsp olive oil FOR THE TOPPING 1 cup tomato pasta sauce Sliced salami Sliced salad onion Grated mozzarella 2 tabs olive oil 1/8th tsp salt 1/8th tsp black pepper METHOD OF WORK Make the dough with the quick rising pizza dough recipe that can be found in your bread maker instruction manual. Smear tomato sauce evenly over base. Place the basil, onion and salami on top of the tomato sauce. Sprinkle with mozzarella. Drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Preheat oven to 200C. Cook 7-10 minutes, until crisp and golden. Serve with a salad garnish.

SCIZZA £19.95 Scizza cleverly combines two precision-ground, hardened German stainless steel blades. Creating perfect cuts with a nifty spatula on the bottom blade, it slides under the pizza protecting your cooking surface and non-stick cookware.

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GOOD FOOD INFUSED OILS Make your own herb infused oils to add flavour and natural goodness to your salads. By blending good quality base oils with fresh or dried herbs these delicious oils can be made in minutes and stored for months. They also make great gifts for food loving friends! INGREDIENTS

200mil extra virgin olive oil 1 clove of garlic crushed ½ teaspoon mustard seeds Juice of 1 lemon 1 tsp sugar ½ tsp of dried marjoram ½ tsp of dried thyme Pinch of salt and pepper METHOD OF WORK Pour the oil into a clean wide mouthed jar. Add all the other ingredients. Shake well and then decanter into clean sterilized bottles. Seal with a cork or screw top cap and store in a dark place for a week before using. Once opened, store the infused oil in a refrigerator. MISTO OIL SPRAYER £7.99 Creative Tops Ltd: www.creative-tops.com Discover the magic of Misto! Simply fill Misto with your favourite oil, pump the cap to pressurize and spray with ease over a variety of foods. You will achieve the even, pure misting that healthy gourmet cooking demands.

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January 2014


ADVERTORIAL

ICE CREAM BALL Hands up everyone who loves ice cream! Almost everyone loves ice cream. And homemade is best. But it can be such a bore to make it..... till now. With the ingenious Ice Cream Ball you can make ice cream anywhere and anytime and without the need for electricity All you do is add ice and rock salt in one end of the ball, then add ice cream mix in the other end and then have fun with the ball as you shake it, pass it, throw it or roll it around. The Ice Cream Ball will make the ice cream and you play with it. After about 20 minutes of playing you’ll have made a pint of scrumptious ice cream But you don’t have to stick to ice cream - why not try shakes, iced drinks or frozen yoghurts. And have fun experimenting with different flavours - just add favourite flavourings and fillings into the Ice Cream Ball’s chamber and you’re ready to roll, or throw, or shake (but never kick or drop the ball!). The Ice Cream Ball is made from lightweight, durable plastic so it’s portable and easy to clean - ideal for camping, boating, picnics, parties, travel etc - young and old alike will have a ball If you’re wondering why rock salt is included, it’s a good question. The rock salt doesn’t come into contact with the ice cream (nothing worse than salty chocolate chip ice cream!) - the rock salt is an essential element in the thermodynamic process that speed-cools the ingredients It takes approximately 20 minutes of playing with the Ice Cream Ball before you have yummy ice cream - full instructions are included. The Ice Cream Ball measures approximately 20cm in diameter RESOURSES The Great Gift Company www.thegreatgiftcompany.com £34.00 82

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GOOD FOOD ALMOND BISCOTTI A cup of good Italian coffee served with homemade biscotti is the perfect finish to a good meal. This recipe makes approximately 40 biscuits that will last for several weeks if stored in an airtight container. INGREDIENTS 180 ml blanched whole almonds 3 large free range eggs 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract 260 grams plain flour 150 grams fine white sugar 5 grams baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt METHOD OF WORK Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C). Place the almonds on a baking sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes or until very lightly brown and fragrant. Allow the nuts to cool and then chop them coarsely. Reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C) and line a baking tray with parchment paper. Whisk the eggs with the vanilla and the almond extract in a bowl. In a larger bowl whisk the flour with the sugar, baking powder and salt. Stir in the chopped almonds. Add the egg mixture to the contents in the large bowl and stir until a dough forms. Divide the dough in half, and on a lightly floured surface roll each half into an 18 cm log that is about 8 - 10 cm wide.Transfer the logs to a non-stick baking sheet and bake for about 35 minutes, or until firm to the touch. Remove from the oven and let the logs cool on a wire rack for about 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the logs to a cutting board. Using a sharp knife. Cut each log into slices on the diagonal that are about 6 -12 mm thick. Place the slices of biscotti on the baking sheet and bake again for about 10 -15 minutes. Turn the slices over and bake for another 10 -15 minutes or until firm to the touch. Remove the biscuits from the oven and let cool. Store in an airtight container for several weeks. PEDRINI FORMA COLLECTION £10.95 Creative Tops Ltd, www.creative-tops.com Introducing the Pedrini Forma Collection, offering great design design and innovation to make food preparation easier and more enjoyable. The items in this collection offer space-saving design, two-in-one functionality and improved performance features. Their composite of high-quality materials gives each item the look and feel of premium kitchenware. 84

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NEXT MONTH

We hope you have enjoyed reading Creative Life Magazine! Now that the magazine has become bi-monthly we are including more interviews and feature articles so that you won’t be short of a good read when you’re taking time out to relax. In Issue 16, which will be online on the 5th of March, you’ll find interviews and blogs from our group of talented professional artists and designers plus articles contributed by fellow makers who would like to share their interests and skills. The true essence of this magazine is about recognising and promoting people who choose to live a creative lifestyle. We welcome our readers input. If you wish to share an event, a project or technique with like minded people, please email me at; creativelifemagazine@gmail.com. Please continue to support us by subscribing, as your subscriptions keep this magazine online and flourishing. Wishing you a healthy, happy and creative New Year! Joan 86

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SUBSCRIBE TODAY! ENSURE YOUR COPY OF CREATIVE LIFE MAGAZINE BY SUBSCRIBING TODAY.

REATIVE DIVA CCREATIVE LIFE MAGAZINE ISSUE No.12 Issue No.14

MY-

InspiredInspired reading reading for creative hands hands for creative

IN THIS ISSUE IN THIS ISSUE

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW MEET DIVINE ARTIST SCULPTOR - WICK AHRENS JANET POOLE

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PAGE 36 BLOG SPOT SHARING ARTICLES PHOTOGRAPHY, JEWELLERY TRAVEL • ORIGAMI • CROCHET LAMPWORK, FASHION, TRAVEL LAMPWORK • PHOTOGRAPY PLUS COOKING + XMAS PLUS 8 PROJECTS PROJECTS FOR YOU TO MAKE FOR YOU TO MAKE

OUR SPECIAL GUESTS IN THIS ISSUE... UK PHOTOGRAPHER TOm COOK & PSyCHOLOGIST NELLy mARIA OSmA ROjAS - EXPLORE COLOmbIA! PLUS 4 INSPIRING bRITISH RECyCLING DESIGNERINTERVIEWS! CATHERINE POTTER EDITORS GUEST SIMON HURST POLISH FELTER GALINA bLAzEjEWSKA-GALAFILC MOSAIC GLENYS FENTIMAN AmERICAN bAGARTIST DESIGNER STACEy PIGNATORy CROCHET DESIGNER CAROLYN CALDERON AUSTRALIAN LASER DESIGNER mATTHEW mOREy JEWELLERY DESIGNER CLAIRE HUMPHERSON AUSTRALIAN CERAmIC ARTISTS ANNA-mARIE FRONT COVER IMAGE CREDIT JANET POOLE WALLACE AND bELINDA WEARNE PHOTO CREDIT PORTRAIT OF JANET LIAM RYAN

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November 2013

SPECIAL OFFER!

FIRST 6 MONTHS ONLY £9! SUBSCRIBERS MAY DOWNLOAD A PDF OF EACH CURRENT ISSUE. A FREE BANNER AD IN THE MAKERS ADS OVER THE NEXT THREE ISSUES. ACCESS TO ALL PAST ISSUES. PROMOTE YOUR SKILLS AND BUSINESS, JOIN US NOW. TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE! 87

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READER GIVEAWAY

TWO LUCKY READERS MAY WIN A BIRDIE KIT FROM SOPHIE’S CRAFTS (*Kit colours will be chosen at random) HOW TO ENTER EMAIL competitions@my-creativediva.co.uk Attach this code: Birdie 1 The lucky winners will be published in Issue 16 of CLM. CLOSING DATE FOR ALL ENTRIES – 27th Feb 2014 Conditions of entry: Only 1 entry per household. No further correspondence will be entered into the competition.The winners name and address will be forwarded to Sophie’s Crafts for the distribution of all prizes. Creative Life Magazine does not accept any responsibility for the distribution of the prizes.The name of the winner will be published in issue 16 of CLM. 88

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January 2014


PURCHASE UNIQUE IMAGES CONTACT RICHARD WALSH

CONTACT DETAILS

W www.rjw-photography.co.uk

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January 2014


Hand woven textiles, hand spun yarn & all things gorgeous ...

Hattie Rae hand woven textiles. Exciting, elegant and sophisticated style fused with timeless fashion. A blend of rich yarns, contemporary design and traditional techniques. Beverley Hicklin graduated from Winchester School of Art with a degree in textile design, specialising in weave. As a freelance textile designer she has sold her designs to fashion houses, including Donna Karan, Calvin Klein and GAP.

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............................................................................................. Beverley launched Hattie Rae for those who appreciate stunning, fine quality textiles. Each piece is a unique expression of colour and texture. At Hattie Rae we only weave from the finest fibres including Merino wool and silk. We hand spin our textured yarns with our customary blend of colour to create the most scrumptious, unique, one-of-a-kind yarns you can knit, crochet, weave or simply wear as is. And what would be the point of loving yarn if we didn't love colour too? We carefully select our yarns ... silk, cashmere and lambswool, and then hand dye them to achieve a palette of rich colour.

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............................................................................................. Wrap it, twist it, tie it, layer it - meet the new Coco Ruffle from Hattie Rae. Available in a number of styles: long ruffle - enough to wrap, drape and twist - or short neck wraps, perfect for framing that special outfit - see our Yarn page for current styles. Each Coco Ruffle is hand spun using combinations of Merino wool, silk, cotton, angora and mohair in colours we hand blend in our usual Hattie Rae style. They are often finished with additional touches of hand dyed silk twists and hand made felt.

hattierae.com At Hattie Rae we love yarn. Using top quality fibre including silk, Merino wool and cashmere, we hand spin our textured yarns with our customary blend of colour to create scrumptious, unique, one-of-a-kind yarns you can knit, crochet, weave or simply wear as is. We also offer a batt and yarn making service for those who themselves spin or work with felt or textiles. What would be the point of loving yarn if we didn't love colour too? We carefully select our yarns using quality fibres including silk, cashmere and lambswool, and then hand dye them to achieve a palette of rich colour. The process of making our hand woven cloth is a lengthy one. From raw fibre through spinning and dyeing to the final woven product, many procedures are involved. Work starts with visual research and the selection of a colour palette.The warp is then designed when different combinations of weave structures and yarns are selected before we wind and then thread the warp. The prospect of commissioning hand woven cloth may seem prohibitively expensive.This is not necessarily the case - we can weave you a piece of cloth made especially to your specifications and we love to work with clients to help achieve their vision. We offer a bespoke service, colour matching to complement your existing furnishings and designing an original, unique piece. 90

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January 2014


MAKERS ADS

ADVERTISING SPACE FOR MAKERS + SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS ONLY! Only £10 per entry (per issue) to advertise your products, tools, materials, workshops, events and classes. Reach your target market. For more information email: creativelifemagazine@gmail.com Support a Maker or Small Business Owner for tools, materials, products, special commissions or workshops. Together we can make a difference!

ANNELYSE TAYLOR CREATIVE LAMPWORK DIVA & CHOCOLATIER If you’d like to view some of Annelyse’s work visit her website or send her an email. CONTACT DETAILS E info@crescendochocolate.co.uk W www.crescendochocolate.co.uk www.annelysetaylor.co.uk/index.htm FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/pages/Au-clair-de-la-lune-Lampwork-beads/348577015159043 https://www.facebook.com/CrescendoChocolate JILL EGAN CERAMICS DIVA I gain inspiration for my work from the things I see around me every day, I live in the countryside and I’m inspired by nature and her moods, wildlife and textures. If you would like to book a workshop or view more of Jill’s work you’ll find her contact details listed below. CONTACT DETAILS E eganj11@googlemail.com W www.kilnfiredart.co.uk FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/KilnFiredArt HAROLD DOWSE BAKING DON “My passion for making bread began when I moved away from my home town of Albany, NY for the first time and found I was at a loss for Real Bread”. If you wish to learn more about bread making you’ll find Dusty’s (Harold Dowse) contact details below. CONTACT DETAILS P 207-717-4578 E dustydowse@aol.com FACEBOOK www.facebook.Dusty Dowse CLARE JOHN RESIN DIVA “My interest in resin has evolved since I discovered resin at Art College in the 1970sresin has changed so much since then”. To learn more about resin, to book into a class or to purchase product you’ll find Clare’s contact details listed below. CONTACT DETAILS E info@resin8.co.uk W www.resin8.co.uk FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/resin8

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MAKERS ADS OCEAN VIEW ESTATE A PASSION FOR WINE AND TOURISM Ocean View Estate is a stunning destination. It’s based at Mount Mee a picturesque rural area about an hour drive north of the city of Brisbane in Australia. If you would like to visit Ocean View Estate in person or online, all the contact details are listed below. CONTACT DETAILS P 07 3425 3900 E info@oceanviewestates.com.au W www.oceanviewestates.com.au FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/oceanviewestates A WORLDWIDE COMMUNITY OF CERAMIC ARTISTS New Conference - Altered Approach to Clay September 13-15, 2013 Presented by Potters Council. Hosted by The Clay Lady’s Studio, Artist Co-op & Galleries and Mid-South Ceramic Supply. Limited Space Available CONTACT DETAILS W www.ceramicartsdaily.org/potters-council

GILLIAN CORCORAN CREATIVE DIVA “I draw inspiration for my work from my local surroundings and my very vivid imagination”! If you would like to view more of Gillian’s work you will find her contact details listed below. CONTACT DETAILS E gilliancorcoran@gmail.com W www.etsy.com/shop/ResinRoad T twitter.com/ResinRoad FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/ResinRoad B gilliancorcoran.blogspot.ie/ SANDRA YOUNG LAMPWORK DIVA “My greatest pleasure in life is bringing a creation into being from the ideas that crystallise in my mind during the quiet hours, just after dawn, when ‘magic is in the air’.’’ CONTACT DETAILS E sandra@firecreation.com W www.firecreation.com FACEBOOK firecreation.com

THE BEAR INN LLANTRISANT On your next visit to Wales, come and visit us at The Bear Inn. We’re at the top of the hill opposite the Bull Ring and Model House Creative Centre in the charming historic village of Llantrisant. CONTACT DETAILS P (01443) 222271 A Heol-Y-Sarn, Llantrisant CF72 8DA, Wales

BEADS UNLIMITED For all your jewellery making and bead supplies look no further.Visit our website and shop online, we have a fantastic range of products! CONTACT DETAILS W www.beadsunlimited.co.uk

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MAKERS ADS SEWING DIVA I have a passion for sewing and I love to share, inspire and get others as hooked on sewing as I am! CONTACT DETAILS E learnmore@isew.co.uk W www.isew.co.uk T -23 92 261338

NATURES DIVA I decided I wanted to help protect nature’s treasures that provide me with so much peace and pleasure. CONTACT DETAILS E jolene.mclellan@nprsr.qld.gov.au W www.rymich.com/girraween/ W www.nprsr.qld.gov.au/ parks/girraween/camping SHOP Girraween National Park,Via Ballandean Q 4382. P +61 (0) 74684 5157

LEIGH ARMSTRONG Metal Clay is an amazing medium, fabulous on its own or stunning when utilising other mediums. I make to sell and teach metal clay and mixed media workshops from my home studio. CONTACT DETAILS E info@magickminx.com W www.magickminxproductions.com

MICHELLE GRIFFITHS The Resist Gallery/Studio facebook page is a good link for people to view as it’s got the most up to date information as to “What’s On”! Beginners are very welcome. CONTACT DETAILS F www.facebook.com/pages/Resist-GalleryStudio/310300432358252 W www.shibori. co.uk

CAROLYN SCHULZ I am a freelance craft designer, teacher and businesswoman. I love creating jewellery for so many reasons. CONTACT DETAILS E carolyn@schulz.co.uk W www.carolynschulz.com

VICTORIA CONSTABLE I take a lot of my inspiration from nature and my surroundings. I am registered with the London Assay Office and so all my pieces are hallmarked where appropriate and stamped with my makers mark. CONTACT DETAILS E milajewellery@live.co.uk W www.milajewellery.com P 07788 131466

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MAKERS ADS MARY BURR Without discipline a diva won’t achieve success. A diva needs to be passionate about what she does. CONTACT DETAILS Burr and Blue Ribbon Farm. E bburr@tdstelme.net W www.blueribbonfarm.net

SAMARIE DESIGNS Use your hands, enjoy the process, live life, eat well, be strong and use loads of colour. CONTACT DETAILS E sarmarie@sarmarie.com W www. sarmarie.com

MANDY NASH I enjoy making jewellery and accessories that people actually buy! Join me for workshops in aluminium jewellery and felting. CONTACT DETAILS W www.mandynash.co.uk

DEBBIE DEW LAMPWORK DIVA I make glorious glass beads in amazing colours and designs. Check out my website for what’s currently on offer! CONTACT DETAILS E debbie@silverartz.co.uk W www.silverartz.co.uk W www.etsy.com/shop/Glassmania

MOSAIC DIVA SUNNY VICARS My inspiration stems from nature and a love of colour, texture and reflective light. I live in a mini rainforest that is as colourful as my work. CONTACT DETAILS E enquiries@my-creativediva.co.uk

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January 2014


LEARN TO MAKE JEWELLERY

Short and Long Term Classes Fine silver, resin, glass, polymer clay and mixed media Workshops & Classes are on offer in the UK and Australia!

BOOK NOW TO SECURE YOUR PLACE Wales UK: January through to December Llantrisant Wales For more information contact: Joan Gordon: enquiries@my-creativediva.co.uk NB: Class sizes are limited to ensure personal attention.

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CREATIVE LIFE MAGAZINE Inspired reading for creative hands

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Creative Life Magazine Issue 2  
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