July 2022 North County Outlook

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Vol. 15 No. 43 n July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Lakewood offers a more engaging take on summer school courses

By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Lakewood School District is offering a unique variety of project-based summer school courses this year at their first ‘Lakewood Summer Academy’ program. Teachers had more freedom to propose courses they were passionate about this year. “We said ‘we want to put together this fun, engaging, hands-on experience. Forget what you teach in your classroom, what do you want to teach about,’” said Joey Wasson, summer academy principal. “That’s why we’re calling it ‘summer academy’ instead of ‘summer school,’ because we want it to be a totally different feel." See SUMMER on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Volunteer Becca Malean removes some invasive weeds at Jennings Memorial Park as part of the iHeart community outreach week from Grove Church on July 14.

iHeart program helps at community projects By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Students Hunter Bosluy, left, and Maxwell Michener construct some catapults at one of the courses from the Lakewood Summer Academy on July 13.

Marysville's Grove Church helped with community service throughout the city as part of their iHeart community outreach week. From July 13 to 17 volunteers helped at project sites in Arlington, Marysville, Tulalip, Everett and Lake Stevens.

The project helped fight invasive weeds, create new dugouts for baseball fields and provide maintenance to supply sheds near the Tulalip Health Clinic. “It’s a passion of our church to want to make sure we love our community,” said Evan Westerfield, one of the main organizers

See GROVE on page 4

Pioneer Day teaches kids about Stilly Valley settlers By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Local kids got to work a water pump, saw wood and more as they learned about Stillaguamish Valley settlers at Pioneer Day on July 16. The annual event is put on by the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneers. “It’s going fantastic,” said Sue Walde, president of the Pioneers, who said there were about 60 kids who stopped by during the fist couple of hours of the event. The event features a wide range of activities for kids to learn about the experience of settlers. “We just want people to celebrate and experience what pioneer life was like and get a glimpse of that,” said Walde.

Families enjoyed the wide range of hands-on experiences at the event, said Walde. “There’s everything from milking a cow, to sawing a log, to fishing and learning about salmon,” she said. “Inside the hall they can put together a quilt pattern and there’s a scavenger hunt where they can go around the pond and see some of our farm equipment.” Parent Trevor Faucett said his kids were enjoying the event. “This is great. I volunteer at the museum a little bit so it’s fun to see how the pioneers used to do it back in the day and show the kids as well with hands-on activity. It’s a pretty neat experience for them,” he said. See PIONEERS on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Adelynn Walker, right, uses an old-fashioned sewing machine with the help of Stillaguamish Valley Pioneers volunteer Jilene Korthius during the Pioneer Day event on July 16.

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SUMMER Continued from page 1

Students who are a part of the program are learning about a variety of subjects, including project-based science classes or putting on a drama production. “The farm-to-classroom class is one where the teacher has helped kids mill flour into wheat, she brought goats onto campus, and they have their own little garden plot going on,” said Wasson. Teacher Tammy Awe said her students have built fish tanks and terrariums, learned about single-use plastics and experimented with density by seeing how objects float. “It’s been great doing project-based learning. I think kids learn from the hands-on and having an experiment to try and re-do,” she said. Teacher David Corvin is running a course on board game design where students get to create a board game prototype. “I think it’s been really interesting just to see the creativity of the kids and they’re able to go off in wild directions I wouldn’t have thought of,” he said. “It makes me excited to see what they can do.” Designing the game systems encourages students to think carefully about what their product is doing. “I want them to think critically and deeply. When they’re playing a game I want them to think ‘why

PIONEERS Continued from page 1

Local child Keegan Walker said he has learned things at the event.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Teacher David Corvin, left, helps student Jose Miguel Olguin Soto with his drawing of a board for his board game during one of the courses at the Lakewood Summer Academy on July 13. is this fun, what is the moment that hooked me?’” said Corvin. “Thinking critically like that is something that they can apply to any product.” The program was created in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and was funded primarily with federal pandemic relief funds. Wasson’s job with the district is helping students catch up on learning they missed because of the disruptions of the last couple of years. “How can we get their learning accelerated to get them back to standard. One of the ways we wanted to do that was around summer

school,” she said. Parents agreed with the district that a summer school program could help bring students' learning back up. “We wanted it to be something that was fun, engaging and hands-on,” said Wasson. “We do want it to be rigorous, but not traditionally rigorous.” The Lakewood Summer Academy has been successful in pulling more students back to the classroom during their summer break. “We doubled our enrollment from our traditional summer school,” said Wasson. “We’ve had kids in first

session who come back and say ‘we want to get signed up for second session,’ but our second session is full already." Feedback has been positive about the program so far, which will run until Aug. 4. “This is our first year trying it out and I think so far we feel like it’s been pretty successful,” said Wasson. “We hope to expand and continue.” Next year she hopes to bring in more community members to teach their specialties and hopes to bring in more culturally diverse courses as well.

“I think it’s cool,” he said. “I like working with the yarn.” The Stillaguamish Valley Pioneers also run the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneer Museum.

“We have the museum open today,” said Walde, with entrance by donation. The museum serves as a repository for historical artifacts from around the area, including many items

left by the families of settlers. “There are lots of things there. Over 10,000 objects cataloged and 3,000 photographs of historical images of the Stillaguamish Valley and pioneer families,” said Walde. Many local families come out to the event each year and Walde said she enjoyed helped facilitate it this year. “It warms my heart to see everyone have so much fun. Especially the kids, they’re having a ball,” she said. “It’s just fun working with all these people. We have a really fun crowd.” More information about the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneers and their museum is available at stillymuseum. org.

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Aug. 2 Primary Election will include new districts

Arlington, Marysville voters will see changes to their state and federal legislative districts

By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Ballots have been mailed out in Snohomish County for the upcoming Primary Election which will select candidates for U.S. and state legislature seats for local voters. Completed ballots are due by Aug. 2. The Primary Election will select the top two candidates to advance to the General Election, even if they are from the same political party. After the 2020 census, the state had drawn new districts which are scheduled to last until 2032. Those new districts bring some changes to local voters in Marysville and Arlington as they will be represented by new senators and representatives. U.S. Congress Seats Congressional District 1 now includes all of Marysville and Arlington city limits, which were previously mostly part of Congressional District 2. The district stretches from Arlington to Bellevue and formerly included only a small part of Arlington. Running for the seat are candidates Tom Spears, who has no party preference, Republicans Matthew Heines, Derek Chartrand and Vincent Cavaleri and incumbent Democrat Suzan DelBene. The 2nd Congressional District includes Skagit, Whatcom, San Juan and Island counties, as well as Everett and a portion of Snohomish County. The district formerly included the majority of Arlington and Marysville but those sections have been removed. The Tulalip Reservation and the Silvana area remain part of the district, as well as some areas of Lakewood. Candidates for the position include Dough Revelle, who has no party preference, Democrats Jason Call and incumbent Rick Larsen, Jon Welch, who said he prefers the Conservative Party, and Republicans Cody Hart, Dan Matthews, Bill Wheeler, Brandon Stalnaker, Leif Johnson and Carrie Kenney. The 8th Congressional District formerly did not include any part of Snohomish County. However, now

it includes the Stillaguamish Tribal land as well as parts of unincorporated Snohomish County near Arlington and the Island Crossing area. There are many candidates for the seat, including Democrats Emet Ward, incumbent Kim Schrier and Keith Arnold, Ryan Dean Burkett who stated he had no party preference, Libertarian Justin Greywolf, Republicans Reagan Dunn, Matt Larkin, Dave Chapman, Jesse Jensen and Scott Stephenson and Patrick Dillon who stated he preferred the Concordia Party. State Legislature Seats The Sunnyside neighborhood will be added to Legislative District 38 which now covers the majority of Marysville city limits, as well as Tulalip and north Everett. A small portion of north Marysville was removed from the district. The district has three seats up for election. At the senator level, Democrat incumbent June Robinson will face Republicans

Bernard Moody and Anita Azariah. State Reps. Emily Wicks (Pos. 1) and Mike Sells (Pos. 2) are not campaigning for another term. The Pos. 1 seat race will be between Republicans Bert Johnson and Gary Kemp and Democrats Julio Cortes and Daryl Williams. There are four candidates for the Pos. 2 seat, including Republican Mark James, Democrat Mary Fosse, Libertarian David Wiley and Christopher Elliott, who has no party preference. Legislative District 10 covers the Stanwood, Camano and Oak Harbor areas and it will add much of the downtown Arlington and Smokey Point areas to the district this year. A small portion of north Marysville is also added to the district while it loses large sections of unincorporated Snohomish County north of Arlington city limits. The State Rep. Pos. 1 race will be between appointed

incumbent Republican Greg Gilday and Democrat Clyde Shavers. The other State Rep. position will be a campaign between Republican Karen Lesetmoe and incumbent Democrat Dave Paul. Most of Arlington city limits have been removed from Legislative District 39 while some areas of north Marysville have been added. The district still retains most of the unincorporated Snohomish County area east of Arlington, such as the Arlington Heights area. Four candidates vie for the State Rep. Pos. 1 seat, including Republican incumbent Robert Sutherland and Sam Low and Democrats Claus Joens and Karl de Jong. There are also four candidates running in the State Rep. Pos. 2 race, including Democrat Jessica Wadhams, independent Kathryn Lewandowsky and Republicans Tyller Boomgaarden and incumbent Carolyn Eslick.

July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Center for Public Safety Excellence appoints M'ville comms manager Marysville Communications Manager Connie Mennie has been selected as a peer reviewer by the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) Commission on Professional Credentialing. In that role, Mennie will participate in beta testing for CPSE’s new Public Information Officer (PIO) designation. The review committee includes a select number of professional Public Information Officers from throughout the country with differing functional areas, expertise and geographic representation. “It’s essential that Public Information Officers are well-trained to prioritize public safety messages and communicate clearly, especially in an emergency,” Mennie said. “Credentialing is a positive step for our profession and I’m proud to represent Marysville as part of this process.” Over the next several months, Mennie and fellow beta testers will volunteer their time to test the initial PIO credentialing process. Mennie earned her Master PIO designation

Connie Mennie

COURTESY PHOTO

through the Emergency Management Institute in 2019 and holds a master’s degree in Organizational Management and a bachelor’s degree in Journalism. Hired by the City of Marysville in 2016, she previously worked in local government and communications for Sound Transit and for the Snohomish County Executive, County Council and District Court. The Center for Public Safety Excellence is a not-forprofit 501(c)(3) corporation that helps high-performing public employees and organizations improve through accreditation, credentialing and education. Learn more at www.cpse.org.


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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Gleneagle Golf Course hosts Summerdaze event By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Community members enjoyed golf, kids activities and a Vegas night with music at the Gleneagle Summerdaze event on July 16. The event was put on by the Gleneagle Golf Course for residents of Arlington and beyond. “This is a community outreach event,” said Paul Melohusky, general manager and golf pro at the local course. “It’s a three pillar day, so we have a golf tournament in the morning, then we have a field day for the kids and parents to come out and enjoy the day, and the evening we have a band from Las Vegas." The golf course received a postpandemic grant to create the community event. “A big part of it is that we applied for a grant through the city of Arlington and won it and this is what we proposed to do,” said Melohusky.

He said people were enjoying the event. “I think everybody loves it so far,” he said. “Golfers love to golf and kids love the games, and in the evening I think people will like the concert.” Local Tyler Pollard also said he was having a good time at the event. “It’s been great so far,” he said. “It’s well organized.” The golf tournament in the morning sold out. “There was a full turnout so we had 144 people and paid out for first, second and third and gave a last place prize and a lot of other little prizes,” said Melohusky. “I like running the golf tournament, that’s what the pro in me likes doing,” he added. The field day in the afternoon brought out many family activities to the golf course. “We have a bouncy house and a dunk tank. We’re going to do putting and chipping contests, basketball contests,” said Melohusky.

There was also tournaments such as a cornhole tournament and threelegged races. Face painting for kids was also available. Many local organizations and businesses also brought out vendors booths to meet with community members during the event. “We made it a way for the local businesses to come out and show what they have so they could get some eyeballs on their businesses too,” said Melohusky. Finally, the day was capped off with a Vegas-themed night with two blackjack tables, a roulette table and a live cover band that performed an Elvis Presley impersonation, as well as covering some classic rock hits. The golf course hopes to bring the Summerdaze event back next summer as well. “We’re hoping to do this every year,” said Melohusky. “Anybody in Arlington or in the area in general is welcome to come down.”

GROVE Continued from page 1

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Volunteer Margaret Medina helps to sand some supply sheds next to the Tulalip Heath Clinic as part of the iHeart community outreach week from Grove Church on July 14.

of the outreach project. “One of the things that our pastor asks is ‘if our church was to disappear tomorrow, would the community know we were gone.'” The program has run for several years in the community. “There were two years we had to take off because of COVID,” said Westerfield. “The church loves it and we were hearing all throughout COVID ‘hey, when is iHeart coming back,’ so it’s good we get to do it this year." The iHeart community

outreach typically brings around 200 volunteers each day to go out to various sites. This is the first year that volunteer Margaret Medina has been able to participate. “I’ve been looking forward to this for a couple of years but COVID slowed it down. I just wanted to go out and help in the community,” she said. She said she enjoys “just getting out and helping and changing things in the community.” Westerfield said volunteers help in a lot of areas of the community such as Jennings Memorial Park. “There is something to

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Tyler Pollard practices cornhole tosses at the Gleneagle Summerdaze event on July 16.

____

It's a passion of our church to want to make sure we love our community. One of the things that our pastor asks is 'if our church was to disappear tomorrow, would the community know we were gone.'

____

Evan Westerfield

say for getting to a site and seeing all the work that needs to be done and looking back at the end of the day and seeing how much it has changed,” he said. Helping to organize the event is enjoyable because he gets to facilitate that. “Just being able to make

sure that people are on teams they’re going to enjoy and where they will thrive,” said Westerfield. Participants also said the volunteer work was a part of practicing their faith. “As a church we believe that God loves us so much so it’s taking that love and showing it to other people,” said Westerfield. Volunteer Becca Malean said she enjoys taking part in the event. “It’s my favorite week of the year. I just love being able to give back to our community and have people see our love for Jesus,” she said.

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Coconut Kenny's restaurant holds July 6 grand opening This is the seventh location for the restaurant which has been expanding across Washington state By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Coconut Kenny’s, a new pizza and sandwich restaurant has opened in Marysville. The restaurant held their grand opening on July 6 at their location at 3943 116th St. NE, Suite 107. Local officials gathered during the day to cut the ribbon for the business’ first official day of operation. “Coconut Kenny’s is a tropical-themed island-vibe restaurant,” said Chay Tan, one of the co-owners of the business. The restaurant has six other locations, with three in Whatcom County and three in Skagit County. “So the progression has pulled us south and we’re super excited that Marysville is the next city along the way of expansion,” said Tan. Tan said customers like the food available at the restaurant. “The pizzas are a deepdish pan style pizza and we’re kind of known for our toasted cheese crust,” he said. “It’s really cool and flavorful when done that way.” The sandwiches are

made with Hawaiian bread that the restaurant makes in-house every day. In addition to those items there are salads and appetizers on the menu and beer on tap at the restaurant. The environment in the restaurant evokes a tropical island with décor and seating that mimics oceanside venues, said Tan. “Our theme is a taste of paradise,” he said. “Not only are we known for our pizzas and sandwiches, but the vibe in our restaurant is very cool. We want our customers to feel, whether they’re dining in for half an hour or staying for more than an hour, that they’re on a tropical vacation.” Tan said he hopes the restaurant provides a welcome place for customers to come and enjoy some food. “It’s just relaxing. We take a lot of pride in customer service and not just being another pizza restaurant. We know customers have a lot of options and we want to make sure that we’re

____

If you haven't tried us, come down and give us a try and we look forward to serving the Marysville community.

____

Chay Tan

not taking those decisions for granted,” he said. The restaurant is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day. Tan said he was glad to be able to bring the restaurant chain’s next location to Marysville. “We’re excited to get open,” he said. “If you haven’t tried us, come down and give us a try and we look forward to serving the Marysville community.” More information about the restaurant is available at coconutkennys.com. Online ordering is also available from the restaurant’s website.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, center, city officials, co-owners of Coconut Kenny’s and their family help cut the ribbon to the restaurant location in central Marysville on July 6.

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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Arlington hosts National Night Out By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Arlington’s National Night Out event will return on Aug. 2 with a centralized event at Legion Park and local neighborhood gather-

ings as well. The Legion Park event is for all Arlington community members to come down and visit with police officials and other city officials. “We have a community event out at Legion Park

from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.,” said Arlington Police Chief Jonathan Ventura. “We’re inviting law enforcement partners from neighboring jurisdictions to join us,” he added. That includes North

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County Fire and EMS. Elected officials such as City Council members and the mayor also plan to be a part of the Legion Park event. Fire trucks and other vehicle displays will also likely be available for the event. “We get to show the public some of our equipment,” said Ventura. Many local organizations plan to have representatives there. “There will be a variety of different nonprofit booths such as the NOAH Center,” said Mandy Kruger, public information officer with the city of Arlington. Food trucks, music and bouncy houses will also be a part of the downtown event. “We will have things for the kids to do as well, such as the Fly-In simulators that will be there again this year,” said Kruger. The city supports the event so community members can come out to meet and talk with their local police officers. “We can meet with our neighbors and answer any questions that they have,” said Ventura. “We can really create that police-community partnership,” he said. Some neighborhoods are also hosting smaller gath-

FILE PHOTO

Arlington locals gather around to see a Getchell Fire District firefighter operate a rescue drone during National Night Out on Aug. 3, 2021. From left, Petyon Pahls, Jamie Pahls, above, Gage Pahls, Sarah McGregor, above, firefighter Jeremy Stocker and Merrick McGregor. erings as part of National Night Out. At least two neighborhoods have scheduled events. “I encourage any of the neighborhoods that want to host an event to do it,” said Ventura. The police department

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typically tries to get some officers out to those events as well. “With our staffing this year we will be focusing on the Legion Park event first,” said Ventura. National Night Out allows for residents to meet with police in a positive summer gathering. “I think they like to come together as a community and support police and fire. They like having another reason to be out and connect,” said Kruger. Ventura said the event is a great way to hear the questions of the community. “This is a chance to interact with the public in a very open way,” he said. “It is an opportunity for us to talk under positive circumstances.”

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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Books: 1. My ________ Is an Alien by Bruce Coville and Mike Wimmer. I’m turning 2. ________ Needs Moms by Berkeley Breathed. on my language 3. Aliens on ________ by Clete Smith translator machine and Christian Slade. so I can 4. Lunchbox and the _____ by speak to you Bryan W. Fields. in English! C E I O G K N S L G A L E V O H B N A I T L W N D S K R Y P T O N W N A B O G I K V C M L K R E R G X F E M A R S N Mars H T O Y S Y S P I G A V A C A T I Teacher


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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Opinion

n BEING FRANK

We need all hands on deck to slow the spread of European Green Crab Efforts are ramping up to control the explosion of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in western Washington. The invasive species reached San Francisco in 1989 and was first detected in small numbers on the Olympic coast in 1998. We’ve now reached the point where thousands are being caught every year in Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay and Makah Bay. The Makah Tribe developed a robust trapping program, which caught 1,200 within the first two months of the trapping season this year. In the Tsoo-yess River channels, they can find up to 40 of them within a span of 5-10 minutes. But not every tribe has the resources to keep up with this unchecked proliferation. My tribe, the Quinault Indian Nation, doesn’t have the staff to trap aggressively in Grays Harbor. It was only a matter of time before the crab reached the Salish Sea. In 2012, a population of green crab was found in the Sooke Inlet of Vancouver Island, and in 2015, the state’s Washington Sea Grant Crab Team began monitoring Puget Sound shorelines. The crab team expanded its trapping efforts to Grays Harbor,

Ed Johnstone

Willapa Bay and Makah Bay in 2020. Last year, we saw exponential increases in green crab numbers in estuaries along the Olympic coast as well as in Lummi Nation’s sea pond in north Puget Sound. The shallow 750acre sea pond is part of Lummi’s hatchery facility. It was designed to cultivate shellfish and juvenile salmon, but unfortunately, that made it a perfect incubator for an invasive species. The first green crab were found there in 2019 and last year, thanks to an extensive trapping effort, the tribe captured 70,000 of them. The Lummi Indian Business Council declared the European green crab invasion a disaster in November 2021. In January 2022, Gov. Inslee ordered his state agencies to implement emergency measures to try to control the spread. The state Legislature made $8.6 million available in the 2022 supple-

mental budget signed in March. Lummi and Makah were given highest priority and received some of that emergency funding this year, and we’re working with the state to direct more resources to population control on the coast. At this point, there’s no hope of eradicating European green crab in our region. They’re here for good and they’re threatening our shellfish industry. They’ve traveled as far south in the Salish Sea as Hood Canal, where a male European green crab was found in May 2022. We’ve seen the damage they cause. On the East Coast, European green crab are to blame for the collapse of the eastern softshell clam industry in Maine. We know they destroy nearshore habitat by burrowing into the mud and damaging eelgrass beds, which are critical habitat for shellfish and salmon. But we don’t yet know what the long-term effects will be on Washington’s local crab populations including Dungeness crab. Last summer, the Makah Tribe began researching the overlap between the habitat used by both species of crab, to learn more about that See FRANK on page 9

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Our Favorite Quotes "The value of life does not lie in the length of days, but in the use we make of them ... Whether you find satisfaction in life depends not on your tale of years, but on your will." Author ­— Michel de Montaigne Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

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RAVE RAVE: We attended the Pioneer Day event last weekend and had a great time. There were a lot of hands-on educational activities that showed our children how the settlers lived. A big thank you to the Stillaguamish Valley Pioneers for putting on this wonderful community event. RAVE: A shout out to the city of Marysville for the work they are doing on Comeford Park. It looks like it will be

a great addition to our community once it is completed. Thankfully the splash pad is open for kids to enjoy during these high temperatures. Also, thanks to the city for adding the pickleball courts at Jennings Park. I'm sure they are getting a lot of use.

RAVE: Local voters should have received the ballots for the Aug. 2 Primary Election. Please take the time to fill it out and return it. Make you voice heard.

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher.

News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sue Stevenson Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott Frank Staff Writers . . Christopher Andersson, Nathan Whalen Display Ad Sales . . . . . . . . .Carole Estenson, Leslie Buell Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christina Poisal Office Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Steve Smith

Ad Deadline: Thursday before publication, 4 PM sue@northcountyoutlook.com

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Weekly Puzzle CLUES ACROSS 1. Eurasian shrubs 7. Strikes and rebounds 13. Group of advisers 14. Modern necessity 16. Top lawyer in the land 17. Philadelphia university 19. Of I 20. Functions as a laser 22. Basketball phenomenon Jeremy 23. Famed island 25. Parent-teacher groups 26. Distributes 28. Self-immolation by fire ritual 29. Ad __ 30. Circulation problem (abbr.) 31. Brother or sister 33. A famous “Squad” 34. Stage actor Anthony 36. Violent seizure of property 38. Saclike cavities 40. Sound units 41. Counts on 43. Dad 44. Woman (French) 45. A digital tape recording of sound 47. Polish Baltic peninsula 48. Recipe measurement

51. Requests out of dire need 53. Precious stone weight unit 55. The immaterial part of a person 56. Anoint 58. Golf score 59. Supernatural 60. Northwest Territories 61. Can be made suitable 64. A professor’s helper 65. Having a toothlike edge 67. Got atop a horse 69. Judged 70. Static balance between opposing forces CLUES DOWN 1. Flowing 2. Computer department 3. Lasts 4. DiFranco and Samsonyan are two 5. __ de sac 6. Merchant 7. Hosts film festival 8. State of agitation of fuss 9. A way to praise 10. Opaque gems 11. McKinley is one 12. Smallest interval in classical Western music

13. Famed designer Lauren 15. Occupies 18. Small island (British) 21. Misuse of the sacred 24. Covers with a thin sheet 26. Most valuable player 27. Title of respect 30. Investigated discreetly 32. Belonging to the bottom layer 35. Black tropical American cuckoo 37. Music genre 38. Indicates one is in mourning 39. Secured forever 42. Bodily cavity 43. A dog is one 46. Chose to do something 47. Annoy persistently 49. Large hotel rooms 50. Beg 52. Docket 54. Subway dwelling rodent 55. Sources 57. Mild Dutch cheese 59. Spanish city 62. Consumed 63. Ballplayer’s tool 66. Midway between north and east 68. Atomic #3


Communities

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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

National Night Out returns on Aug. 2 By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville’s National Night Out will provide Marysville residents with an opportunity to meet with local police and fire personnel on Aug. 2. The Marysville Police Department hosts the annual event with support from the city of Marysville and Marysville Fire District. This year’s event will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Jennings Memorial Park, 6915 Armar Rd. Community members can meet with police officers at the event. “We want to build that rapport with the public that is so crucial to making a great city,” said Marysville Police Chief Erik Scairpon. “We’re looking forward to helping the community connect and get to know their neighbors." Information about Neighborhood Watch programs and community organizations will be available at booths around the park as well.

“We’re going to have our standard fare there. We are inviting a lot of community organizations that support public safety,” said Scairpon. Food will be served by Marysville police officers. “We will be cooking hot dogs and providing chips again,” said Scairpon. A police K-9 demonstration will also be held at the event. The annual event is part of community gatherings across the country. “National Night Out was started in 1984 and it has just continued to gain momentum each year,” said Scairpon. He said that after missing the 2020 event it was good to be back last year. “It was the first time in a couple of years we were able to go out and see the community,” said Scairpon. The Marysville Police Department has been able to hold a couple of community events since then as well. Events like the upcoming National Night Out are a good way to know what

FRANK threat. Part of the work involves setting up video cameras underwater to see whether green crab and Dungeness crab are aggres-

the public’s concerns are. “It’s a great way to start a conversation with people in the community,” said Scairpon. “There are lots of things that are on the mind of the public, such as drug issues and community safety, and we want to be there

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to talk with people about them." Police also get to meet a broad spectrum of people at National Night Out. “There have been lots of new people coming into Marysville the last couple of years and we hope to get to

know them,” said Scairpon. Providing a welcoming and fun environment to interact helps the public come out and enjoy the event, he said. “Positive interactions with the police are really crucial,” said Scairpon.

Being Frank is a column written by Chairman Ed Johnstone of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. As a statement from the NWIFC chairman, the column represents the natural resources management concerns of the treaty Indian tribes in western Washington.

ropean green crab, we’re at risk of losing Dungeness crab too. We need all hands on deck if we’re going to protect native species from this invasive threat. We need management and funding to support a coordinated effort with boots on the ground.

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Books: 1. Teacher 2. Mars 3. Vacation 4. Aliens

Movies: 1. toys 2. blue 3. robots

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Noah Wilson, left, Wyatt Wilson, center and Jessica Wilson grab some firefighter hats from the Marysville Fire District during Marysville’s National Night Out on Aug. 3, 2021.

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I really don’t know, son... I suppose there could be!

C E K N S E V O H B N K R Y P T O M L K R

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT S. DE LAMBERT, Deceased, NO. 22-4-01353-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

Out of This World!

Dad, do you think there might be living beings on Earth?

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sive toward each other or preventing one another from accessing food. Because of the decline in our salmon runs, tribes depend on Dungeness crab to sustain our economies and ways of life. If we don’t slow down the spread of Eu-

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THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE NAMED BELOW has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: July 13, 2022. Personal Representative: Nancy Layton Attorney for Personal Representative: Breanne W. Martin, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 22-4-01353-31.

LEGAL NOTICE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATES OF CHARLES RICHARD HATCH and KEIKO HATCH, Deceased, NO. 22-4-01305-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030 THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE NAMED BELOW has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: July 6, 2022. Personal Representative: Katie Diel Attorney for Personal Representative:cSteven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 22-4-01305-31.

Crossword answers from page 6


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July 20, 2022 - July 26, 2022 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n WHISTLING GARDENER

Begonia grandis — a tropical treasure for the PNW I have always array of colors been drawn to from bright yelbegonias. Growlows to reds and ing up in southoranges and even ern California, bicolors and picthey were a staple otee types. I can in the landscape By Steve Smith remember as a and every public park had 14-year-old working in the masses of them bedded out local nursery potting up tuin grand displays. The most berous begonias in terracotcommonly used varieties ta pots that we first soaked were wax-leaf or fibrous in water to hydrate the clay, begonias, and they are still after which we filled the popular with gardeners as bottom half with a fasta “go to” annual for non- draining soil, placing the tustop summer color in full ber (which we had sprouted to partial sun in a maritime 4 weeks earlier in flats filled climate (although most gar- with leaf mold) on top of the den centers, including ours, mix, and covering the tuber market them as a shade an- with another 3 to 4 inches of nual). a rich organic soil. The last Also popular for shadier thing we would do, was stab locations were tuberous be- a short bamboo stake into gonias, which have larger the pot to support the fleshy leaves and much larger stems so the large and heavy flowers in a mind-boggling flowers didn’t bend the stems

over and break them off from the tuber. Great memories for a budding young horticulturist. As Northwesterners, the above varieties of begonias have to be treated as annuals, although the tubers can be saved if you don’t let them freeze. I had a neighbor, who passed several years ago, that prided herself on the tubers she had saved — some of which were huge, the size of cow pies. What if there was a begonia that was cold hardy and could be treated just like all the other wonderful perennials that we enjoy growing in our gardens. What if that hypothetical begonia came up reliably every spring (likely a little late, much like hardy fuchsias do), grew to about 12 to

15 inches tall, and bloomed non-stop from summer into fall? Too good to be true? Well, I can assure you that, indeed, it is very much the truth and I have a very nice clump growing in my shade bed to prove it. Begonia grandis is a lovely addition to any shade garden, with its graceful panicles of bright pink flowers (we also offer a white flowering form) and pointy angel wing leaves that are bright green on top and fuchsia underneath. It is a well-behaved perennial that will spread slowly by rhizomes and it makes a super companion to other shade lovers like Japanese Forest Grass, Ferns, Hostas, Astilbes, and Baby Tears. While Begonia grandis won’t give us the huge

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The Begonia grandis is a great addition to your garden. masses of color that fibrous begonias will, just like hardy fuchsias, it will brighten up a shady area for the better part of the summer and then return the following season to do it all over again. After all, that is exactly what we expect from perennials. So, don’t despair that your fibrous and tuberous begonias can’t be left in the ground over the winter, you can still use them in con-

tainers as a bright spot of color. But for the perennial border, give Begonia grandis a try. It is available on garden centers benches this time of year. You will be glad you did. As always, stay safe and keep on gardening.

Steve Smith represents Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at sunnysidenursery@msn.com.