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Omit

The removal of peripheral vision


SPOOKED

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TUNNEL VISION


SPOOKED

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DO NOT GET SPOOKED

Tunnel vision (also known as Kalnienk vision) is the loss of peripheral vision with retention of central vision, resulting in a constricted circular tunnel-like field of vision. There are many biological/ medical reasons that can cause tunnel vision such as • Glaucoma • Blood Loss • Alcohol consumption • Hallucinogenic drugs, in particular the dissociatives. • Extreme fear or distress, most often in the context of a panic attack. • During periods of high adrenaline production. • Altitude sickness • Exposure to oxygen at certain pressures. • Prolonged exposure to air contaminated with heated hydraulic fluids and oils. • Severe cataracts, removing most of the field of vision.

• During the aura phase of a migraine. • Intense anger, due to the body being rapidly flooded with adrenaline and oxygen. • A bite from a Black Mamba and other snakes with the same strength venom. • Mercury poisoning (especially Methylmercury). Tunnel vision medically can be temporary but is usually permanent. There are also objects that can inflict temporary tunnel vision such as eyeglasses and diving masks. Another example is blinders which are used on horses to take away their peripheral vision so they do not get spooked by crowds and concentrate on the track ahead. Optical instruments such as binoculars and microscopes also create a sense of extreme tunnel vision.


TECHNOLOGY

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TECHNOLOGICAL VISION Tunnel Vision

In real life, human vision covers a substantial arc (roughly 60° horizontally toward the nose, 100° away, 60° up, and 75° down.) Try it: Inside a building, look straight ahead, and see how much of the ceiling you can see while looking straight ahead and not at the ceiling—quite a bit, except for the part directly over you. This tends to get ignored in fiction. Someone can see things that are directly in front of them, but it’s easy to hide on the ceiling, to the sides, or even up in the air if you can fly.

Video Games

This may also be related to the Rule of Perception and Behind the Black, since as long as the audience can’t see the ceiling, it’s assumed that nobody can. There may be some real-life support for the idea of not noticing things on the ceiling. Police and military training spend a great deal of effort on teaching trainees to check “Up” when they are searching or entering an area. On the other hand, fiction tends to apply this to things which would be much more obvious than a typical sniper (who by definition is trying to stay hidden) or ceiling bloodstain. There’s really no reason why Spider-Man should ever be able to hide on the ceiling unless it’s either 40 feet high or a really small room.

In fiction people may even ignore moving objects that aren’t directly in front of them, despite the fact that peripheral vision is sensitive to motion. A variation happens in video games where things can be hidden on the ceiling. The Player Character, in real life, would be able to notice most of them casually. But the display seen by the player doesn’t have much peripheral vision, being locked in by the frame of their monitor, so the player can’t see them normally and must purposely look up. Most players don’t do this much. This is why third person cameras are usually seen as acceptable breaks from reality, as they give back some of the awareness a real person would be expected to have. Note that some games justify the tunnel vision effect by putting the player in a full-face helmet. Video games can also cause the player to have tunnel vision themselves as the concentration means they are less likely to notice someone walk up beside them.

Driving

This kind of tunnel vision has been recognised in other occasions for instance driving. Preliminary results of a University of Rhode Island analysis of the eye-movements of automobile drivers using cell phones found that the drivers have a reduced field of view

– tunnel vision. Further studies may have significant implications on the use of cell phones in automobiles. URI industrial engineering Professor Manbir Sodhi and psychology Professor Jerry Cohen used a head-mounted, eye-tracking device on volunteer drivers and concluded that the alertness of the drivers decreased considerably when they were conducting cognitive tasks, such as remembering a list of items, calculating in one’s head, or using a cell phone. Their research also found that the tunnel vision caused by cell phone use continues well after the conversation ends,“The debate surrounding cell phone use in cars has been directed toward concerns over holding the phone,” said Sodhi. “Holding the phone isn’t the main issue. Thinking is.”The research also found that even when drivers do tasks that require brief glances away from the roadway, like adjusting the radio, wide-ranging eye-movement suggests a higher level of alertness than when speaking on a cell phone. The study found that most drivers seldom glance away from the road for more than about 1.6 seconds when doing such tasks.


TECHNOLOGY

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PURSUIT

NARROW PURSUIT

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Life Goals

One way of looking at Tunnel Vision in a non-medical sense - is people’s narrow minded pursuit for life goals. People can get so engrossed in the idea of reaching a goal that they omit everything else around them from their minds. Sometimes specific, difficult goals do not lead to better performance than simply urging people to do their best (Seijts & Latham, 2001).

Tunnel Vision

Focusing on reaching a specific performance outcome on a new, complex task can lead to ‘‘tunnel vision’’—a focus on reaching the goal rather than on acquiring the skills required to reach it. In such cases, the best results are attained if

a learning goal is assigned — that is, a goal to acquire the requisite task knowledge. Latham and Brown (in press), for example, found that entering students who set specific difficult learning goals (e.g. learn to network, master specific course subject matter) subsequently had higher satisfaction with their MBA program than did people who simply set a distal (long-term or end) performance goal for GPA at the end of the academic year.

Metacognition

We believe that a learning goal allows or enhances metacognition namely, planning,monitoring, and evaluating progress toward goal attainment. Metacognition is particularly necessary in areas in which there is minimal structure or guidance.


PURSUIT

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OBSESSION

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OBSES WHEN TUNNEL VISION


OBSESSION

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SSION BECOMES UNHEALTHY


LOVE

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HIM

HER

THE REST OF THE WORLD

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LOVE

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Blind

Some things make us lose our sight temporarily. Not in the physical but mental sense. They say that love is blind. Well, for those of us who live in the real world, love is anything but! We start out looking for relationships with good looking people, because we convince ourselves that is what we deserve. Then with the maturity of age we become more realistic, we come down to reality and start looking for a decent guy, with a nice job, car, sense of humour, etc. This continues until we figure out that love is not blind. Love is like tunnel vision.

Personal Account

Now, let me explain. I myself was looking for Mr. Right. I wanted the typical tall, dark, and handsome routine. But as I came to meet those men, I realized that though they may be good to look at, on the inside they were hollow. These men were walking shells full of nothing but hot air. But then one day, I met a man and he was nothing that I though I would want. He was everything I didn’t know I needed. Love is like tunnel vision. Our romance started out as a secret. You see, I was older than him and we just didn’t feel like discussing our love life with others anyway. Our days were full of

TUNNEL VISION

soppy texts and late night phone calls. I have to admit that it was a little taxing on my part to have a boyfriend and not be able to talk about it with my friends. I only got to see him when he would sneak over to my house. Love is like tunnel vision.

TUNNEL (VISION) OF LOVE

Eventually we had to come out of what I referred to at the time as the “love closet.” Our age difference wasn’t as big of a deal as I expected.

had a bad case of “Itunnel vision. And I

hope I am never cured Since we were able to see each other more often, I started noticing annoying little habits. To this day, I will forever hate the word MAYBE, as I have received this for the umpteenth time in regards to making plans. “Do you want Chinese?” “Maybe.” “Can you come over?” “Maybe.” AHH! But, at the same time he was showing me his funny side, and how sweet he can be and I fell for him anyway. His little faults were in my peripheral vision, and I had a bad case of tunnel vision. And I hope I am never cured.


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ONE TRACK

Obsessive Complusive

OCD is a form of tunnel vision. The obsession becomes so important and necessary to the person that everyday life falls to the wayside. The sufferer has a one track mind where all that matters is the anxiety. Feeling anxious is enough to drive anyone to trying almost anything to take the symptoms away, and if you found that this action helped once, then you are likely to try it a second time. Even if it doesn’t work as well the second time as it did the first, the thought occurs that perhaps it’s worth trying again, just in case. The fact that the anxious feeling returns, even though you are doing this action, and the realisation that doing this action is often irrational does not prevent you from doing it if you have obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). To complicate matters, doing this ritual causes the person with OCD a lot of stress because it interferes with their social life, or their education or work. The start of OCD is complex, and not the same for everyone. It seems likely to be genetic, so if a close family member has it, then you are more likely to also develop the disorder. A second proposed trigger for OCD is a problem with serotonin because it is proposed that people who have OSD may not be able to react to serotonin properly, which causes anxiety.People who have OCD often already have another anxiety disorder, and so it is possible that the problem occurs from the stress of having panic attacks for instance. This may be linked into an abnormal stimulation of the fight or flight response. The fight or flight response enables a person to focus on the problem at hand. For instance if a snake is about to bite your ankle, then what your bank manager said this morning about your mortgage is totally irrelevant at the moment, and so it is blanked out. In extreme cases, this ability of the fight or flight response can cause a physical reaction of ‘tunnel vision’, and perhaps in a similar way this intense focus can lead to what is perceived as obsessive behaviour in an attempt by the person to remain safe.

Solution

Most people who suffer from unpleasant symptoms of any kind will go to great lengths to stop the symptoms from occurring. For instance, if a person with hayfever finds that dusting their bedroom before going to sleep will allow them to have a clearer

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nose, then they are more likely to dust their room every week. Because the increased mucus and swollen airways are not only linked to a reaction to dust mite particles, but also to hyperventilation that is fuelled by stress, after a while dusting the room once a week doesn’t seem to be as effective as it originally was, and so the person begins to dust twice a week. As the hyperventilation increases due to life’s long-term stress, the blocked and running nose gets worse, and because the person mistakenly believes that it is caused by the dusty room, he or she begins to dust practically every day. And it may lead up to the point, where this person cannot sleep until every single item in the room has had its surface wiped clean, including every page of every book, every night. This takes up a lot of time, and can lead to the person not getting enough sleep, which leads to more stress. Obsessions are unwelcome thoughts, idea or urges that repeatedly appear in your mind; for example, thinking that you have been contaminated by dirt and germs, or worrying that you haven’t turned off the oven. These obsessions are often frightening or seem so horrible that you can’t share them with others. The obsession interrupts thoughts that you would rather have, and makes you feel very anxious. Often it will make you worry that you or other people are going to be harmed.

Repetition

Compulsions are repetitive activities that you feel you have to do. This could be something like repeatedly checking a door to make sure it is locked or washing your hands. The aim of the compulsion is to ‘put right’ the distress caused by the obsessive thoughts and relieve the anxiety you are feeling. You will be unlikely to feel any pleasure from carrying out the compulsion but you might find yourself doing it again and again. Most people with OCD experience both obsessions and compulsions, but some people experience only obsessive thoughts, and some people have compulsions without knowing why. If you have OCD, you know that the obsessional thoughts are your own. This makes it different to a psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia.

ONE TRACK MIND “Intense focus can lead to what is perceived as obsessive behaviour”


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FOCUS

Focus

Tunnel Vision can be seen as a focus, sometimes focus is positive but it can negative when extreme. Some Examples of Tunnel Vision: • A parent who is so afraid of their child getting sick that they don’t allow them to play with friends. • A spouse who spends the monthly budget on a personal item so they can feel good about themselves. • A spouse who has an affair to overcome feelings of being unattractive. • A colleague who sabotages a project because they are afraid others will get more credit than them. • A person who ends a friendship because the other person violates their unspoken boundary. • A single mother who is so consumed with a relationship that she does not regularly feed the children. • A man who becomes violent whenever he feels disrespected.

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What it feels like

It can be frightening to live with or work beside a person who has tunnel vision. Their behavior may seem irrational and unpredictable. However, they are likely to be unapologetic about the way they treat other people as they become consumed with concern over their obsession. Non personality disordered family members and partners may develop a sense of fear, never feeling secure that their own concerns and needs will be taken care of. They may cycle between becoming submissive and angry towards the person who they

consider responsible for creating chaos in their world and neglecting their needs. They may become engaged in circular discussions as they try to talk sense into the person with the obsession. As they begin to feel more and more powerless they may resort to bad behavior of their own, including threats, ultimatums, violence, deception and retribution. People with tunnel vision will often become irritable and angry at partners, family members, colleagues and friends who do not share their concerns.

with tunnel vision will often “People become irritable and angry at partners,

family members, colleagues and friends who do not share their concerns.

They may have a hard time understanding why those closest to them pay no attention or expend little effort to help them in their timeof need. To them, it is like they have been abandoned by their loved ones to face a crisis alone. They may become incredulous at other people’s complaints. Coping with Tunnel Vision Don’t assume that everyone thinks or sees the world the way you do. People with personality disorders often live in a world of terrifying emotions and desperate feelings of need. Don’t assume that the way you are being treated has anything to do with you - or how you behave. Don’t get into circular discussions or logical arguments with a person who has tunnel vision. State the truth (as you see it) once and once only. Don’t resort to bad behavior yourself and don’t use threats, violence, ultimatums or revenge.


Omit  

A newsprint based around the removal of peripheral vision