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BECK PROPERTY GROUP Jaynee Beck, Principal Broker 541-480-0988 Pete Van Deusen, Broker 541-480-3538 Lynette Van Deusen, Broker 543-771-2212


Property Description Unique location in the heart of it all! MidTown location that is close to Juniper Park/ Fitness complex, Pilot Butte State Park and downtown’s numerous shop’s and dining amenities. Lots of updates including a new roof, exterior paint, electrical service, vinyl windows, hardwood floors and much more. Great rental history for investment, owner occupied or short term rental.


Property Disclosures


Property Details


Property Summary


D e sch u t e s Cou n t y Pa r ce l I n for m a t ion

Pa r ce l I n for m a t ion

Asse ssm e n t I n for m a t ion

Parcel # : 1 0 5 8 1 7 Tax Lot : 1 7 1 2 3 3 D B0 9 3 0 0 Record Type: Re side n t ia l Sit e Address: 913 NE Franklin Ave Bend OR 97701

Market Value Land:

$104,550

Market Value I m pr:

$186,620

Market Value Tot al:

$291,170

Assessed Value:

$190,530

Ta x I n for m a t ion

Owner: Murphy, Keit h J & Lori K

Levy Code Area: 1- 001

Owner Address: 1696 NW Cit y View Dr Bend, OR 97703

Levy Rat e: 15.2631

Twn/ Range/ Sect ion: T: 17S R: 12E S: 33 Q: SE

Tax Year: 2015

Parcel Size: .23 Acres ( 10,019 SqFt )

Annual Tax: $2,908.08

Plat / Subdivision: Bend Par k 1st Add

Le ga l

Lot : 5.+ PT.6

FI RST ADDI TI ON TO BEND PARK Lot : 5.+ PT.6 Block: 123

Block: 123 Census Tract / Block: 001800/ 3023 Wat erfront :

La nd Count y Land 111 - Resident ial - Resident ial zone - I m proved ( t ypical of Use: class) Zoning: RS - Resident ial St andard Densit y

Land Use St d: RMFD - MULTI FAMI LY DWELLI NG ( 2- 4 UNI T) Neighborhood: 000

Wat ershed: McKenzie Canyon- Deschut es River

School 1 Bend - La Pine School Dist rict Dist rict :

I m pr ove m e n t - 2 3 4 Fou r ple x Year Built : 1961

Finished Area: 2,880 SqFt

Bedroom s: 4

1st Floor: 1,440 SqFt

At t ic Finished Area: 0 SqFt

Bat hroom s: 4.00

2nd Floor: 1,440 SqFt

Bsm t Finished Area: 0 SqFt

Full/ Half Bat hs: 4 / 0

FirePlace: 0

Garage: 0 SqFt

Carport : 0 SqFt

Tr a n sfe r I n for m a t ion Rec. Dat e: 5/ 22/ 2007

Sale Price: $490,000.00

Doc Num : 0000029005

Doc Type: Warrant y Deed

Orig. Loan Am t : $382,000.00 Loan Type: Variable

Finance Type:

Lender: FI RST HORI ZON HOME LOAN CORP

Sent ry Dynam ics, I nc. and it s cust om ers m ake no represent at ions, warrant ies or condit ions, express or im plied, as t o t he accuracy or com plet eness of inform at ion cont ained in t his report .


Deschutes County Property Information Report Date: 10/14/2016 12:00:02 PM

Disclaimer The information and maps presented in this report are provided for your convenience. Every reasonable effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the data and associated maps. Deschutes County makes no warranty, representation or guarantee as to the content, sequence, accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any of the data provided herein. Deschutes County explicitly disclaims any representations and warranties, including, without limitation, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Deschutes County shall assume no liability for any errors, omissions, or inaccuracies in the information provided regardless of how caused. Deschutes County assumes no liability for any decisions made or actions taken or not taken by the user of this information or data furnished hereunder.

Account Summary Account Information Mailing Name:

Ownership Mailing Address:

MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K

MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K

Map and Taxlot: 171233DB09300

1696 NW CITY VIEW DR

Account: Tax Status:

105817 Assessable

Situs Address:

913 NE FRANKLIN AVE, BEND, OR 97701

BEND, OR 97703 Valuation

Property Taxes

Real Market Values as of Jan. 1, 2016

Current Tax Year: $2,990.88

Land

$118,140

Structures

$212,750

Total

$330,890

Tax Code Area:

1001

Assessment

Current Assessed Values:

Subdivision: FIRST ADDITION TO BEND PARK

Maximum Assessed

$196,240

Block: 123

Assessed Value

$196,240

Assessor Acres: 0.23 Property Class: 111 -- RESIDENTIAL

Veterans Exemption

$0.00

Lot:

5.+PT.6

Warnings, Notations, and Special Assessments Review of digital records maintained by the Deschutes County Assessor’s Office, Tax Office, Finance Office, and the Community Development Department indicates that there are no special tax, assessment or property development related notations associated with this account. However, independent verification of the presence of other Deschutes County tax, assessment, development, and additional property related considerations is recommended. Confirmation is commonly provided by title companies, real estate agents, developers, engineering and surveying firms, and other parties who are involved in property transactions or property development. In addition, County departments may be contacted directly to discuss the information.

Valuation History All values are as of January 1 of each year. Real Market Value - Land Real Market Value - Structures Total Real Market Value

Tax year is July 1st through June 30th of each year.

2012 - 2013 $61,710 $104,240 $165,950

2013 - 2014 $67,670 $115,700 $183,370

2014 - 2015 $83,920 $146,940 $230,860

2015 - 2016 $104,550 $186,620 $291,170

2016 - 2017 $118,140 $212,750 $330,890

$179,610 $165,950 $0

$179,610 $179,610 $0

$184,990 $184,990 $0

$190,530 $190,530 $0

$196,240 $196,240 $0

Maximum Assessed Value Total Assessed Value Veterans Exemption

Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 1


Tax Payment History Year

Date Due

Transaction Type

Transaction Date

As Of Date

Amount Received

Tax Due

Discount Amount

Interest Charged

Refund Interest

2016

11-15-2016

IMPOSED

10-13-2016

11-15-2016

$0.00 Total:

$2,990.88 $2,990.88

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

2015

11-15-2015

PAYMENT

2015

11-15-2015

IMPOSED

11-12-2015

11-12-2015

10-14-2015

11-15-2015

$2,820.84

($2,908.08)

$87.24

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00 Total:

$2,908.08 $0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

2014

11-15-2014

2014

11-15-2014

PAYMENT

11-12-2014

IMPOSED

10-13-2014

11-15-2014

$2,737.90

($2,822.58)

$84.68

$0.00

$0.00

11-15-2014

$0.00 Total:

$2,822.58 $0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

Sales History Sale Date

Seller

05/18/2007

JAEGER LIMITED LIABILTY CO MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K

04/18/2006

JAEGER, JASON

04/17/2006

MALANGA, ROBERT V JAEGER, JASON MATTOX,CHARLES D & ELOISE MALANGA, ROBERT V A

03/17/2005

Buyer

JAEGER LIMITED LIABILTY CO

Sale Amount $490,000

Recording Instrument

Sale Type

$420,000

33-CONFIRMED SALE 2007-29005 06-GRANTEE IS RELATED/FRIENDS/BUSINES 2006-28072 S ASSOCIATES 30-UNCONFIRMED SALE 2006-27136

$270,000

30-UNCONFIRMED SALE

$0

2006-26582

Structures Stat Class/Description

Improvement Description

Code Area

234 - MULTI-FMLY: Fourplex

1001

Floor Description FIRST FLOOR

Sq Ft 1,440

Rooms

Inventory

Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 2 (For Report Disclaimer see page 1)

Year Built Total Sq Ft 1961

2,880

Type of Heating FORCED AIR HEATING


LIVING ROOMS

4

LAVATORY

4

ROOF CVR - COMP

DINING ROOMS

4

TOILET

4

FORCED AIR HEATING

KITCHENS

4

BATHTUB W/FIBRGL SHWR

4

CARPET

BATHROOMS

4

FOUNDATION - CONCRETE

VINYL FLOOR

SIDING - LAP

DRYWALL

SIDING - SHAKE

KITCHEN SINK

4

WINDOWS - WOOD

HOOD-FAN

4

WINDOWS - SINGLE PANE

WATER HEATER

4

2,880

ROOF - GABLE

Floor Description SECOND FLOOR

Sq Ft 1,440

Rooms BEDROOMS

Type of Heating

Inventory 4

Accessory Description

Sq Ft

ASPHALT-PAVING

1,400

Stat Class/Description

Improvement Description

300 - FARM BLDG

- CLASS 4

Code Area

Quantity

Year Built Total Sq Ft

1001

160

Land Characteristics Land Description

Acres

URBAN LOT MULTI-FAMILY

0.23

Land Classification

Ownership Ownership Percentage

Name Type

Name

Ownership Type

OWNER

MURPHY, KEITHJ

OWNER

100.00%

OWNER

MURPHY, LORIK

OWNER

100.00%

Related Accounts Related accounts apply to a property that may be on one map and tax lot but due to billing have more than one account. This occurs when a property is in multiple tax code areas. In other cases there may be business personal property or a manufactured home on this property that is not in the same ownership as the land. No Related Accounts found.

Service Providers Please contact districts to confirm. Category

Name

Phone

Address

COUNTY SERVICES

DESCHUTES COUNTY

(541) 388-6570

1300 NW WALL ST, BEND, OR 97701

CITY SERVICES

CITY OF BEND

(541) 388-5505

710 NW WALL ST, BEND, OR 97701

POLICE SERVICES

CITY OF BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT

(541) 322-2960

555 NE 15TH ST, BEND, OR 97701

SCHOOL DISTRICT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREA MIDDLE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREA HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREA EDUCATION SERVICE TAX DISTRICT

BEND - LA PINE SCHOOL DISTRICT

(541) 355-1000

520 NW WALL ST, BEND, OR 97701

JUNIPER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

(541) 355-1800

1300 NE NORTON, BEND 97701

PILOT BUTTE MIDDLE SCHOOL

(541) 355-7400

1501 NE NEFF, BEND 97701

BEND HIGH SCHOOL

(541) 355-3700

230 NE 6TH ST , BEND 97701

(541) 693-5600

145 SE SALMON AVE, REDMOND, OR 97756

(541) 383-7700

2600 NW COLLEGE WAY, BEND, OR 97701

COLLEGE TAX DISTRICT PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT LIBRARY DISTRICT IRRIGATION DISTRICT GARBAGE & RECYCLING SERVICE

HIGH DESERT EDUCATION SERVICE DISTRICT CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT (541) 389-7275

799 SW COLUMBIA ST, BEND, OR 97702

DESCHUTES PUBLIC LIBRARY

(541) 617-7050

601 NW WALL ST, BEND, OR 97701

ARNOLD IRRIGATION DISTRICT

(541) 382-7664

19604 BUCK CANYON RD, BEND, OR 97702

CASCADE DISPOSAL

(541) 382-6660

1300 SE WILSON AVE, BEND, OR 97702

Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 3 (For Report Disclaimer see page 1)


Development Summary Planning Jursidiction: Urban Growth Boundary:

Bend

Jurisdiction

City Zoning Description

Bend

Bend

RS

Urban Reserve Area:

No

RESIDENTIAL STANDARD DENSITY BEND UGB

City of Bend Permits Permit ID

Permit Type

7-4902

Electrical

Applicant

09/21/2007

7-4718

Mechanical

09/10/2007

ALL FINALS RECEIVED APPROVED

7-4324

Mechanical

08/14/2007

APPROVED

Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 4 (For Report Disclaimer see page 1)

Application Date

Status


STATEMENT OF TAX ACCOUNT DESCHUTES COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR DESCHUTES SERVICES BUILDING BEND OR 97703 (541) 388-6540 14-Oct-2016 MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K 1696 NW CITY VIEW DR BEND, OR 97703 Tax Account # Account Status Roll Type Situs Address

105817 A Real 913 NE FRANKLIN AVE BEND 97701

Lender Name CLG - NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE Loan Number 1001 Property ID Interest To Oct 14, 2016

Tax Summar y Tax Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996

Tax Type ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM ADVALOREM Total

Total Due

Cur r ent Due

Inter est Due

Discount Available

$2,901.15 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$2,990.88 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$89.73 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$2,901.15

$2,990.88

$0.00

$89.73

Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 5 (For Report Disclaimer see page 1)

Or iginal Due $2,990.88 $2,908.08 $2,822.58 $2,665.28 $2,444.13 $2,655.32 $2,621.58 $2,519.55 $2,434.48 $2,319.76 $2,254.14 $2,197.64 $2,143.00 $2,088.00 $2,027.01 $1,904.36 $1,852.23 $1,823.92 $1,772.51 $1,689.48 $1,745.66

Due Date Nov 15, 2016 Nov 15, 2015 Nov 15, 2014 Nov 15, 2013 Nov 15, 2012 Nov 15, 2011 Nov 15, 2010 Nov 15, 2009 Nov 15, 2008 Nov 15, 2007 Nov 15, 2006 Nov 15, 2005 Nov 15, 2004 Nov 15, 2003 Nov 15, 2002 Nov 15, 2001 Nov 15, 2000 Nov 15, 1999 Nov 15, 1998 Dec 15, 1997 Nov 15, 1996


REAL PROPERTY TAX STATEMENT J ULY 1, 2016 TO J UNE 30, 2017 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON 1300 NW WALL ST., SUITE 200 BEND OR 97703

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION CODE: MAP: CLASS: SITUS: LEGAL:

1001 171233-DB-09300 111 913 NE FRANKLIN AVE BEND FIRST ADDITION TO B 123 5.+PT.6

MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K 1696 NW CITY VIEW DR BEND, OR 97703 VALUES: REAL MARKET (RMV) LAND STRUCTURES TOTAL RMV

LAST YEAR

THIS YEAR

104,550 186,620 291,170

118,140 212,750 330,890

MAXIMUM ASSESSED VALUE

190,530

196,240

TOTAL ASSESSED VALUE

190,530

196,240

EXEMPTIONS NET TAXABLE:

0 190,530

0 196,240

TOTAL PROPERTY TAX:

2,908.08

2,990.88

ACCOUNT NO: 105817

SCHOOL DISTRICT #1 HIGH DESERT ESD C O C C EDUCATION TOTAL:

925.27 18.74 120.51 1,064.52

DESCHUTES COUNTY COUNTY LIBRARY COUNTYWIDE LAW ENFORCEMENT COUNTY EXTENSION/4H 9-1-1 9-1-1 LOCAL OPTION 2013 CITY OF BEND CITY OF BEND LOCAL OPTION 2014 BEND JUNIPER RIDGE URBAN RENEWAL MURPHY CROSSING URBAN RENEWAL BEND METRO PARK & RECREATION GENERAL GOVT TOTAL:

248.28 106.83 198.12 4.38 31.44 39.25 544.51 39.25 19.31 4.69 285.67 1,521.73

FAIRGROUNDS BOND CITY OF BEND BOND BEND METRO PARK AND REC BOND SCHOOL #1 BOND 2007 SCHOOL #1 BOND 2013 C O C C BOND BONDS - OTHER TOTAL:

23.06 37.19 34.07 229.68 56.67 23.96 404.63

This is your copy and not a bill if your mortgage company is responsible for paying your taxes. This statement was sent to: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE Lender Reference #:

ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS TAX QUESTIONS

Date Due 11/15/16 02/15/17 05/15/17 Total

(541) 388-6508 (541) 388-6540

PAYMENT OPTIONS 3% Option 2% Option 1,954.04 2,901.15

2,901.15

996.96 2,951.00

2016 - 2017 TAX ( Befor e Discount ) Tr imester Option 996.96 996.96 996.96 2,990.88

TOTAL DUE (After Discount and Pr e-payments) Tear Her e

PLEASE RETURN THIS PORTION WITH YOUR PAYMENT

2016 - 2017PROPERTY TAXES PAYMENT OPTIONS Full Payment Enclosed or 2/3 Payment Enclosed or 1/3 Payment Enclosed

Discount

Date Due

Amount

Date Due

05/15/17

996.96

05/15/17

996.96

DISCOUNT IS LOST & INTEREST APPLIES AFTER DUE DATE

ACCOUNT NO. 105817 Amount

02/15/17

Date Due

996.96

Amount

11/15/16 11/15/16

2,901.15 1,954.04

11/15/16

996.96

Mailing address change on back Enter Payment Amount

MAKE PAYMENT TO: 3940 - 018271 - 290115 MURPHY, KEITH J & LORI K 1696 NW CITY VIEW DR BEND, OR 97703

2,901.15 Tear Her e

DESCHUTES COUNTY REAL

3% 2% 0%

2,990.88

$

DESCHUTES COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR

0 9Disclaimer 1 0 0 0 0see 1 0page 5 8 11)7 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 6 9 6 0 0 0 0 1 9 5 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 2 9 0 1 1 5 1 Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 6 (For Report


Maps


Deschutes County Property Information Report, page 7 (For Report Disclaimer see page 1)


�

This m ap/ plat is being furnished as an aid in locat ing t he herein described land in relat ion t o adj oining st reet s, nat ural boundaries and ot her land, and is not a survey of t he land depict ed. Except t o t he ext ent a policy of t it le insurance is expressly m odified by endorsem ent , if any, t he com pany does not insure dim ensions, dist ances, locat ion of easem ent s, acreage or ot her m at t ers shown t hereon.


Locator Map

Deschutes County, OR

171233-DB-09300

Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community Copyright Š 2008, All Rights Reserved Courtesy of:

Date: 10/14/2016

O

0

420

840

1,680

2,520

3,360

Feet

Legend Disclaimer: This map was created from digital databases provided by the Deschutes County GIS. Western Title & Escrow Co. has provided this information as a courtesy and assumes no liability for errors, omissions, or the positional accuracy of the data, and does not waranty the fitness of this product for any particular purpose. Created for the original recipient, not for further distribution.

Subject Property Railroad


Street Map

Deschutes County, OR

171233-DB-09300

Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, Š OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community Copyright Š 2008, All Rights Reserved Courtesy of:

Date: 10/14/2016

O

0

212.5 425

850

1,275

1,700

Feet

Legend Disclaimer: This map was created from digital databases provided by the Deschutes County GIS. Western Title & Escrow Co. has provided this information as a courtesy and assumes no liability for errors, omissions, or the positional accuracy of the data, and does not waranty the fitness of this product for any particular purpose. Created for the original recipient, not for further distribution.

Subject Property Railroad


Taxlot Map

171233-DB-09300

Deschutes County, OR 02500

03800

04200

05601

04301

05600

07100

05900

08200

07401

07000

03700

NE 8TH ST

02600

07400 06000

04300

06900 05500

03600

08201

07500

00099

04400

02700

06001

02801

05400

NE 9TH ST

04600

05400

02800

06800

05401

06100 06700

04700

02900

05300

08203 07700

06200

03400 04800

08204

06600 07800

05200 03000

08202

07600

NE 11TH ST

04500

03500

03300 04900

08100

06500 06300

03100

03200

07900

05100

03201 05000

06400

08000

04900

05000

09100

05100

09200

09101

NE 8TH ST

05200

09400

09500 10403 10402 10405 10404

10400 09600

NE LARCH DR

10700 05202

09300

NE 10TH ST

NE FRANKLIN AVE

09900

10100

09800

10600

05201 10000

10200

00401

09700 00600

00501 00500 00502

00400

NE EMERSON AVE

00200

00300

00800 00703

00704

00100 00900

01701

02600

00701 01700

00700

01000

00702 01100

NE DEKALB AVE

01400

Copyright Š 2008, All Rights Reserved Courtesy of:

01300

01301

Date: 10/14/2016

O

0

50

100

200

300

Feet

Legend Disclaimer: This map was created from digital databases provided by the Deschutes County GIS. Western Title & Escrow Co. has provided this information as a courtesy and assumes no liability for errors, omissions, or the positional accuracy of the data, and does not waranty the fitness of this product for any particular purpose. Created for the original recipient, not for further distribution.

Subject Property Sections

400


Zoning


Zoning Map

171233-DB-09300

NE 9TH ST

NE 11TH ST

NE 8TH ST

Deschutes County, OR

RS

NE 10TH ST

NE FRANKLIN AVE

NE 8TH ST

NE LARCH DR

NE EMERSON AVE

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AEX, Getmapping, Aerogrid, IGN, IGP, swisstopo, and the GIS User Community

NE DEKALB AVE

Copyright © 2008, All Rights Reserved Courtesy of:

Date: 10/14/2016

O Disclaimer: This map was created from digital databases provided by the Deschutes County GIS. Western Title & Escrow Co. has provided this information as a courtesy and assumes no liability for errors, omissions, or the positional accuracy of the data, and does not waranty the fitness of this product for any particular purpose. Created for the original recipient, not for further distribution.

0

50

100

200

300

Feet

Legend Subject Property

400


10-10.10 Section 10.

BEND CODE

10-10.10

Urban Standard Residential Zone or RS ZONE.

(1)

Purpose. The RS Zone is intended to provide for the most common urban residential densities in places where community sewer services are or will be available and to encourage, accommodate, maintain and protect a suitable environment for family living.

(2)

Permitted Uses. The following uses are permitted:

(3)

(a)

Single-family dwelling.

(b)

Agriculture, excluding the keeping of livestock.

(c)

Rooming and boarding of not more than two persons.

(d)

Home occupations subject to the provisions of Subsection (15) of Section 25.

(e)

Park rehabilitation, minor betterment and repairs.

(f)

Accessory dwelling in a subdivision or Planned Unit Development (PUD) approved after December 2, 1998, provided that overall density in subdivision or PUD does not exceed 7.3 dwelling units per gross acre.

Conditional Uses. The following conditional uses may be permitted subject to a Conditional Use Permit and the provisions of Section 29. (a)

Mobile home subdivision subject to standards of Subsection (11) of Section 25.

(b)

Churches.

(c)

Cemeteries and mausoleums, crematories, columbariums and mortuaries within cemeteries provided that no mortuary or crematorium is within 100 feet of a boundary street, or where no street borders the cemetery, within 200 feet of a lot in a residential zone.

(e)

Public, parochial and private schools, including nursery schools, kindergartens and day nurseries; but not including business, dancing, trade, technical or similar schools.

(f)

Parks and recreation facilities, fire stations, libraries, museums; but not including storage or repair yards, warehouses or similar uses.


10-10.10

BEND CODE

10-10.10

(g)

Recreation facility, including country clubs, golf courses, swimming clubs, tennis clubs; but not including such intensive commercial recreation uses as a race track or amusement park.

(h)

Utility substations or pumping stations with no equipment storage and sewage treatment facilities.

(i)

Planned Unit Developments subject to provisions of Section 30.

(j)

Temporary subdivision tract offices.

(k)

Rear lot development subject to Subsection (14) of Section 25.

(l)

Lodge and fraternal organizations, except those carried on as a business for profit.

(m)

Duplex in areas designated RS provided that each lot occupied by a duplex shall have a minimum area of 12,000 square feet for lots created before December 2, 1998, or 8,000 square feet for lots created after December 2, 1998.

(n)

Two single-family dwellings on one lot in areas designated RS provided that each lot occupied by two single-family dwellings shall have a minimum area of 12,000 square feet for lots created before December 2, 1998 and 8,000 for lots created after December 2, 1998, and also provided that all yard and coverage requirements set forth in Subsection (5) of Section 10 are observed. In addition, no dwelling unit shall be located within 10 feet of any other dwelling unit on the same lot. There shall be provided for the rear dwelling unoccupied and unobstructed access not less than 15 feet wide to the street fronting the lot.

(o)

Keeping of livestock, subject to Subsection (7) of Section 25.

(p)

Moving in a single-family dwelling built prior to January 1, 1961.

(q)

Mobile home park.

(r)

Radio and television transmission facilities.

(s)

Plant nursery subject to Section 25, Subsection (19).

(t)

Condominiums.

(u)

A building or structure over 30 feet in height.

(v)

Timeshare unit or the creation thereof, subject to the provisions of Section 25.

(w)

Bed and Breakfast Inn, subject to the standards set forth in Section 25(24).


10-10.10

BEND CODE

10-10.10

(y)

Hydroelectric facility, subject to the provisions of Section 25, Subsection (20).

(z)

Diagnostic testing, counseling, administrative, office and meeting facilities for nonprofit and public community service programs for children and families limited specifically to Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10, Block 25; and Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block 24, NW Townsite Company's Second Addition to Bend.

(aa)

Public or not for profit facility that provides temporary residential care or shelter. Such facility shall be licensed by the State of Oregon and be within 1000 feet of an arterial street.

(bb)

Other dwelling types when part of a new master planned subdivision or Planned Unit Development (PUD) approved after December 2, 1998, that provides and protects areas of special interest and/or open space approved by the City.

(cc)

Temporary Housing, up to 10 beds, subject to the Special Use Standards in Section 25.

(4)

Height Regulations. No building or structure shall be hereafter erected, enlarged or structurally altered to exceed 30 feet in height without a conditional use permit.

(5)

Lot Requirements. The following lot requirements shall be observed, provided that the approval authority may allow smaller lots of different housing types in a new subdivision or Planned Unit Development (PUD) approved pursuant to this ordinance and consistent with the Comprehensive Plan designations for preservation of areas of significant interest when these lots or housing types are internal to the subdivision or PUD. (a)

Lot Area: A lot in a subdivision or Planned Unit Development approved after December 2, 1998, shall have a minimum area of 4,000 square feet provided that the overall density does not exceed 7.3 dwellings per gross acre. All other lots shall have a minimum area of 6,000 square feet. New lot development is subject to Section 10.10.10(8) below and shall have an overall density range of 2.0 - 7.3 units per gross acre.

(b)

Lot width: Lots shall have a minimum width of 60 feet except in subdivisions or Planned Unit Developments (PUDs), approved after December 2, 1998, where the minimum width is 40 feet.

(c)

Front Yard: The front yard shall be either a minimum of 20 feet except an existing 40 or 50 foot corner may have one front yard of 10 feet, provided the garage or carport is at least 20 feet from the property line, or a minimum of 10 feet from the property line when the following conditions exist: A B.

The lot is within a subdivision platted after August 6, 1997 and the garage is setback a minimum of 20 feet from the front property line, and The lot fronts on a local public or private street.


10-10.10

BEND CODE

10-10.10

(d)

Side Yard: A side yard shall be a minimum of 5 feet and the sum of the two side yards shall be a minimum of 15 feet except that in subdivisions or Planned Unit Developments (PUDs) approved after December 2, 1998, a side yard shall be a minimum of at least 5 feet and the sum of the two side yards shall be a minimum of 10 feet except for zero lot line subdivisions approved pursuant to the City’s subdivision ordinance.

(e)

Rear Yard: The rear yard shall be a minimum of 5 feet.

(f)

Lot Coverage: Maximum lot coverage by buildings and structures shall be 35 percent of the lot area.

(h)

Solar Setback: The solar setback as prescribed in Section 26A.

(6)

Off-Street Parking. Off-street parking shall be provided as required in Section 24.

(7)

Other Required Conditions. See Section 25 applying to Special Uses.

(8)

Residential Compatibility Standards The following standards shall apply to new subdivision lots created after (XXX) the date of adoption and shall be observed (a)

Purpose. The residential compatibility standards in this section are intended to provide added protection to residentially zoned properties and existing neighborhoods from potential impacts sometimes associated with increased residential density development.

(b)

Applicability. The residential compatibility standards shall apply to all RS zoned development properties that are abutting existing residential lots, excluding lots in the RM and RH zoning districts, that have been legally created through a subdivision plat and have a minimum lot size of 8,000 square feet or greater.

(c)

Lot Development Standards. i. No more than two new lots or portions thereof shall adjoin an existing lot boundary. ii. New lots along an adjoining subdivision boundary where existing lots are 20,000 square feet or greater shall be at least 15,000 square feet in area.

(d)

Building Setbacks The building setback regulations of the Residential Compatibility Standards shall apply to the side and/or rear setbacks of lots that abut the existing development in accordance with the following standards: i.

Minimum Rear Yard Setback. The rear yard setback of the subject property shall be the same as the required rear yard setback of the abutting existing


10-10.10

BEND CODE

10-10.10

subdivision. ii. Minimum Side Yard Setback. The side yard setback of the subject property shall be the same as the required side yard setback for the abutting existing subdivision. (e)

Exceptions. i. When the adjoining existing lot width is greater than 300 feet, the developer may establish a lot pattern along the adjoining subdivision boundary consisting of 15,000 square foot lots with a minimum lot depth of 100 feet. In no instance as described above, shall the new development lots be required by this section to exceed 15,000 square feet in size. This exception may result in more than two (2) new lots abutting an existing large subdivision lot. ii. All lot configurations subject to this section shall conform to the. Residential Compatibility Standards or be approved through a hearing process. iii. Public or private alleys, streets with less than 60-foot right of way, and open space tracts less than 30 feet in width shall not be allowed to abut an existing subdivision boundary as a means of circumventing the compatibility standards provided herein. iv. When the adjoining existing residential development is bordered by a common open space tract less than 30 feet in width, the new development shall be subject to the Residential Compatibility Standards in Section 10.10.10 (8) above.

[Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1201 passed February 21, 1979.] [Section 10(2)(f) added by ORD. NS-1260, passed December 5, 1979.] [Section 10(2)(g) added by ORD. NS-1308, passed January 7, 1981.] [Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1308 passed January 7, 1981.] [Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1372 passed March 2, 1983.] [Section 10(4) amended by Ord. No. NS-1372 passed March 2, 1983.] [Section 10(5) amended by Ord. No. NS-1372 passed March 2, 1983.] [Section 10(5) amended by Ord. No. NS-1378 passed June 1, 1983.] [Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1380 passed June 15, 1983.] [Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1418 passed August 21, 1985.] [Section 10(3) amended by Ord. No. NS-1439 passed June 4, 1986.] [Section 10(3) amended by ORD. No. NS-1444 passed July 16, 1986.] [Section 10(3) amended by ORD. No. NS-1464 passed November 18, 1987] [Section 10(3)(x) repealed by ORD. No. NS-1531 passed April 17, 1991] [Section 10(3)(z) added by Ord. No. NS-1587 passed April 7, 1993.] [Section 10(3)(aa) added by Ord. No. NS-1601 passed September 15, 1993.] [Section 10(5)(c) amended by Ord. No. NS-1685 passed August 6, 1997.] [Section 10(2)(e),(f); 10(3)(d),(k),(m),(n),(bb); 10(5)(a),(b),(c)(A),(d),(g) amended by Ord. No. NS-1708 passed December 2, 1998.]


10-10.10

BEND CODE

10-10.10

[Section 10(3)(z) amended by Ord. No. NS-1718 passed April 7, 1999] [Section 10(3)(cc) added by ORD No. NS-1866, passed May 21, 2003] [Section 10(5)(a) amended, and Section 10(8) added by Ord. NS-1908, passed Jan. 21, 2004]


Neighborhood Information


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Juniper Elementary School 1300 NE Norton St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­1800 www.bend.k12.or.us/JUNIPER

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Dan Wolnick GRADES SERVED K­5

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

FROM THE PRINCIPAL

Please contact me if you have any questions or concerns. We look forward to working with you this school year.

Dear Parents and Community Members, Oregon produces school report cards to communicate information to parents about school progress and achievement while meeting the legislative expectation for school and district accountability. Current report cards provide a wide variety of data on schools, but do not contain overall ratings for schools. To support the learning and development of every child in a manner that is consistent with our district’s vision for a broader definition of student success, schools are engaging in design work that emphasizes academic excellence, qualities of thriving learners, and indicators of future readiness.

Thank you, Principal      |      Dan Wolnick

SCHOOL PROFILE

STUDENTS

ENROLLMENT 2015­16 K­3 4­5 6­8 MEDIAN CLASS SIZE Self­Contained Departmentalized

School

25.5 ­­

554 SELECTED DEMOGRAPHICS 354 Economically Disadvantaged 200 Students with Disabilities ­­ Ever English Learner Oregon Different Languages Spoken 25.0 Regular Attenders ­­ Mobile Students

IMMUNIZATION RATES Percent of students with all required vaccines: 91 Percent of students without all required vaccines: 9

59% 12% 10% 4 89.0% 14.4%

American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% Asian, 1% Black/African American, 2% Hispanic/Latino, 18% Multi­Racial, 1% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 0% White, 75% 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

(Visit www.healthoregon.org/immdata for more information.)

(This value includes students with medical exemptions, nonmedical exemptions, no immunization records, or up­to­date but incomplete immunization records.)

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when data are unavailable or to protect student confidentiality.

*** indicates that this school offered lunch at no charge to all students.

OVERALL SCHOOL RATING Given the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the expiration of Oregon's ESEA flexibility waiver on August 1, 2016, the State of Oregon will not assign ratings (i.e., overall and comparison school ratings) to schools for the 2015­16 school year.

l5 ve Le

ve Le

ve Le

90%

l4

45%

l3

15%

l2

ve

Le

Le

ve

l1

5%

Below Average

About Average

Above Average


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Juniper Elementary School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Dan Wolnick GRADES SERVED K­5

1300 NE Norton St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­1800 www.bend.k12.or.us/JUNIPER

PROGRESS

ARE STUDENTS MAKING ADEQUATE GAINS OVER TIME?

Performance of students enrolled in the school for a full academic year SCHOOL PERFORMANCE Did at least 95% of the students at this school take required assessments? Yes Participation rate criteria are in place to ensure schools test all eligible students. The Smarter Balanced and alternate School Performance (%) assessments have four performance 2012­13 2013­14 2014­15 levels where levels 3 English Language Arts (Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11) and 4 are meeting the standard for 68.2 All students in tested grades 2014­15 was the first school and district operational year of the new 13.9 accountability. English language arts 17.9 assessment. See report cards from previous years to view historical OAKS performance data.

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

Mathematics

School Oregon Performance (%) Performance (%) 2015­16 2015­16

Level 1

Science (OAKS)

55.3 29.8 14.9

All students in tested grades

76.1

33.7 42.4 23.9

78.5

Visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/data for additional assessment results.

70.9

18.4 52.4 29.1

75.5

Levels 3 & 4

44.9 28.5 26.6

Did not meet

29.0 49.5 21.5

55.2 21.2 23.6

Level 2

63.9 23.2 13.0

(Administered statewide in Grades: 5, 8, 11)

Levels 3 & 4

52.4 21.3 26.3

Level 1

2014­15 was the first operational year of the new mathematics assessment.

Like­School Average (%) 2015­16

Level 2

68.9 18.2 12.9

(Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11)

All students in tested grades

No, Interpret Results with Caution

21.6 53.9 24.5

66.5

45.1 29.6 25.3

Met 15.7 50.8 33.5

Exceeded 71.6

15.6 56.1 28.4

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.

OUTCOMES FOR KEY STUDENT GROUPS AT THIS SCHOOL COMPARED TO THE SAME GROUPS STATEWIDE STUDENT GROUP OUTCOMES

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

American Indian/Alaska Native

Economically Disadvantaged Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

56.3 53.3 61.4

40.7 32.9 56.1

43.0 32.6 61.9

29.1 23.6 38.7

31.5 24.5 45.8

English Learners Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

Mathematics

Science

Mathematics

Science

20.8 8.7 28.6

25.0 22.1 38.4

25.4 17.9 44.6

* * *

24.6 20.4 36.1

21.2 16.4 31.8

Mathematics

Science

Science

* * *

35.5 28.7 51.7

44.7 36.2 62.5

* * *

69.9 68.0 75.6

62.8 57.7 68.3

Mathematics

Science

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

>95 >95 >95

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

93.9 92.7 >95

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

Mathematics

Science

* * *

40.4 29.4 46.5

42.0 22.4 50.0

50.0 33.3 *

Eng. Lang. Arts

76.9 71.7 85.2

59.2 51.7 75.4

60.8 50.8 78.8

Mathematics

Science

67.2 59.4 78.9

57.3 43.8 64.6

60.2 43.6 69.4

70.3 67.5 73.4

47.6 46.0 68.3

50.7 46.5 73.6

Female 31.5 21.6 41.5

30.2 20.8 64.3

37.3 33.3 33.3

34.1 26.5 44.9

38.2 28.7 52.6

71.4 83.3 *

57.1 48.3 70.0

58.9 44.7 63.9

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science Male

Multi­Racial 95.4 95.1 97.7

Eng. Lang. Arts

White

Eng. Lang. Arts

Hispanic/Latino

Talented and Gifted Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Black/African American

Migrant Eng. Lang. Arts

Eng. Lang. Arts

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

Asian

34.4 25.0 23.1

Students with Disabilities Eng. Lang. Arts

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Juniper Elementary School 1300 NE Norton St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­1800 www.bend.k12.or.us/JUNIPER

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Dan Wolnick GRADES SERVED K­5

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

CURRICULUM & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT WHAT IS THIS SCHOOL DOING TO IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING AND TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE?

SCHOOL READINESS

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

EXTRA­ CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES/ AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Universal Breakfast; PAWs program to provide interventions for social and emotional support; Stop, Walk, & Talk Bullying prevention program, weekly PE minutes met, art and technical art programs.

After School tutoring program, ELL instruction providing in­class content support as well as small group, Special Education, Speech and Language Program, and Life Skills program.

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT

Self­contained 4th & 5th grade TAG programs.

Chinese language club, chess club, Take­it­Apart Club, commute options program, intermural sports during lunch, choir, Battle of the Books, Juniper Film Festival, 100 Mile Running Club (after school  MWF)

Data and information in the Curriculum and Learning Environment section were provided by local schools and districts, and were not verified by the Oregon Department of Education.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Pilot Butte Middle School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Steve Stancliff GRADES SERVED 6­8

1501 NE Neff St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­7400 www.bend.k12.or.us/PBMS

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

FROM THE PRINCIPAL

Dear Parents and Community Members,

look forward to working with you this school year.

Oregon produces school report cards to communicate information to parents about school progress and achievement while meeting the legislative expectation for school and district accountability. Current report cards provide a wide variety of data on schools, but do not contain overall ratings for schools. To support the learning and development of every child in a manner that is consistent with our district’s vision for a broader definition of student success, schools are engaging in design work that emphasizes academic excellence, qualities of thriving learners, and indicators of future readiness. Please contact me if you have any questions or concerns. We

Thank you, Principal      |      Steve Stancliff

SCHOOL PROFILE

STUDENTS

ENROLLMENT 2015­16 MEDIAN CLASS SIZE English Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Self­Contained

School

26.5 26.0 32.0 27.0 ­­

671 SELECTED DEMOGRAPHICS Economically Disadvantaged Oregon Students with Disabilities 24.0 Ever English Learner 24.0 26.0 Different Languages Spoken 27.0 Regular Attenders ­­ Mobile Students

IMMUNIZATION RATES Percent of students with all required vaccines: 93 Percent of students without all required vaccines: 7

64% 15% 14% 4 79.1% 17.5%

American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% Asian, 1% Black/African American, 1% Hispanic/Latino, 19% Multi­Racial, 3% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 0% White, 75% 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

(Visit www.healthoregon.org/immdata for more information.)

(This value includes students with medical exemptions, nonmedical exemptions, no immunization records, or up­to­date but incomplete immunization records.)

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when data are unavailable or to protect student confidentiality.

*** indicates that this school offered lunch at no charge to all students.

OVERALL SCHOOL RATING Given the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the expiration of Oregon's ESEA flexibility waiver on August 1, 2016, the State of Oregon will not assign ratings (i.e., overall and comparison school ratings) to schools for the 2015­16 school year.

l5 ve Le

ve Le

ve Le

90%

l4

45%

l3

15%

l2

ve

Le

Le

ve

l1

5%

Below Average

About Average

Above Average


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Pilot Butte Middle School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Steve Stancliff GRADES SERVED 6­8

1501 NE Neff St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­7400 www.bend.k12.or.us/PBMS

PROGRESS

ARE STUDENTS MAKING ADEQUATE GAINS OVER TIME?

Performance of students enrolled in the school for a full academic year SCHOOL PERFORMANCE Did at least 95% of the students at this school take required assessments? Yes Participation rate criteria are in place to ensure schools test all eligible students. The Smarter Balanced and alternate School Performance (%) assessments have four performance 2012­13 2013­14 2014­15 levels where levels 3 English Language Arts (Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11) and 4 are meeting the standard for 61.5 All students in tested grades 2014­15 was the first school and district operational year of the new 24.7 accountability. English language arts 13.8 assessment. See report cards from previous years to view historical OAKS performance data.

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

Mathematics

School Oregon Performance (%) Performance (%) 2015­16 2015­16

Level 1

Science

40.7 31.3 28.0

All students in tested grades

73.4

15.8 57.6 26.6

71.4

Visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/data for additional assessment results.

79.5

7.3 72.3 20.5

67.5

Levels 3 & 4

42.8 27.5 29.7

Did not meet

11.4 60.0 28.6

54.1 26.0 19.8

Level 2

39.0 31.5 29.5

(Administered statewide in Grades: 5, 8, 11)

Levels 3 & 4

56.7 23.5 19.7

Level 1

2014­15 was the first operational year of the new mathematics assessment.

Like­School Average (%) 2015­16

Level 2

62.3 22.3 15.4

(Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11)

All students in tested grades

No, Interpret Results with Caution

10.1 57.4 32.5

63.8

38.2 31.8 30.1

Met 11.6 52.2 36.2

Exceeded 66.7

11.8 54.9 33.3

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.

OUTCOMES FOR KEY STUDENT GROUPS AT THIS SCHOOL COMPARED TO THE SAME GROUPS STATEWIDE STUDENT GROUP OUTCOMES

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

American Indian/Alaska Native

Economically Disadvantaged Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

52.2 29.8 61.9

44.1 29.5 52.7

46.0 30.1 59.3

37.0 24.8 38.1

35.4 21.0 38.2

English Learners Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

Mathematics

Science

Mathematics

Science

15.2 8.9 30.0

20.1 14.6 30.8

16.0 12.0 30.9

* * *

31.4 19.1 33.3

34.9 20.3 36.1

Mathematics

Science

Science

88.9 44.4 *

38.9 25.1 48.6

37.6 22.8 54.0

* * *

75.5 70.0 73.3

66.0 58.3 74.4

Mathematics

Science

34.4 20.6 35.7

47.9 25.7 39.1

33.6 19.6 46.2

39.7 25.0 43.6

42.7 25.1 50.0

62.5 31.3 *

61.0 46.4 69.0

54.0 36.5 70.1

Mathematics

Science

>95 >95 >95

Mathematics

Science

>95 92.9 >95

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

Science

* * *

43.3 29.0 49.6

60.6 45.5 76.9

Eng. Lang. Arts

68.6 43.9 75.4

62.6 48.5 71.5

57.6 42.1 71.2

Mathematics

Science

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

68.1 37.9 65.6

63.3 43.4 62.0

60.8 38.0 65.4

Science

55.5 40.4 69.7

50.5 42.3 65.6

47.8 38.3 67.9

Male

Multi­Racial 95.4 94.3 97.2

Mathematics

Female

* * *

Eng. Lang. Arts

Eng. Lang. Arts

Eng. Lang. Arts

White

Eng. Lang. Arts

Hispanic/Latino

Talented and Gifted Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Black/African American

Migrant Eng. Lang. Arts

Eng. Lang. Arts

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

Asian

29.9 19.7 44.8

Students with Disabilities Eng. Lang. Arts

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

Eng. Lang. Arts

Mathematics

Science

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Pilot Butte Middle School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Steve Stancliff GRADES SERVED 6­8

1501 NE Neff St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­7400 www.bend.k12.or.us/PBMS

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

CURRICULUM & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT WHAT IS THIS SCHOOL DOING TO IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING AND TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE?

SCHOOL READINESS

· Physical Education taken by all students, all grades.

· Active Where Everybody Belongs (WEB) 8th grade student leaders.

· Breakfast served daily. · After­school clubs served a meal. ACADEMIC SUPPORT

· English Language Development (ELD) progr am. · Special education program Academic intervention programs in math, rea ding and writing. · Socio­emotional/academic support class.

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT · MYP courses for all grades, all eight subjects.

· French or Spanish taken by each student all three years. · Design courses taken by each student all three years. · Arts courses taken by each student all three years. CAREER & TECHNICAL MYP Technology Design Cycle emphasized for EDUCATION all grades, all three years.

EXTRA­ CURRICULAR · Drama, Art, Robotics, Homework clubs ACTIVITIES/ AFTER · Band, Orchestra, and Choir. SCHOOL PROGRAMS Data and information in the Curriculum and Learning Environment section were provided by local schools and districts, and were not verified by the Oregon Department of Education.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Bend Senior High School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Christopher Reese GRADES SERVED 9­12

230 NE 6th St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­3700 www.bend.k12.or.us/BSH

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

FROM THE PRINCIPAL

Dear Parents and Community Members,

working with you this school year.

Oregon produces school report cards to communicate information to parents about school progress and achievement while meeting the legislative expectation for school and district accountability. Current report cards provide a wide variety of data on schools, but do not contain overall ratings for schools. To support the learning and development of every child in a manner that is consistent with our district’s vision for a broader definition of student success, schools are engaging in design work that emphasizes academic excellence, qualities of thriving learners, and indicators of future readiness. Please contact me if you have any questions or concerns. We look forward to

Thank you, Principal      |      Christopher Reese

SCHOOL PROFILE

STUDENTS

ENROLLMENT 2015­16 MEDIAN CLASS SIZE English Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Self­Contained

School

26.0 25.5 29.0 28.0 ­­

1,652 SELECTED DEMOGRAPHICS Economically Disadvantaged Oregon Students with Disabilities 24.0 Ever English Learner 24.0 26.0 Different Languages Spoken 27.0 Regular Attenders ­­ Mobile Students

IMMUNIZATION RATES Percent of students with all required vaccines: 94 Percent of students without all required vaccines: 6

36% 14% 8% 11 73.0% 14.9%

American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% Asian, 1% Black/African American, 1% Hispanic/Latino, 12% Multi­Racial, 1% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 0% White, 83% 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

(Visit www.healthoregon.org/immdata for more information.)

(This value includes students with medical exemptions, nonmedical exemptions, no immunization records, or up­to­date but incomplete immunization records.)

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when data are unavailable or to protect student confidentiality.

*** indicates that this school offered lunch at no charge to all students.

OVERALL SCHOOL RATING Given the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the expiration of Oregon's ESEA flexibility waiver on August 1, 2016, the State of Oregon will not assign ratings (i.e., overall and comparison school ratings) to schools for the 2015­16 school year.

l5 ve Le

ve Le

ve Le

90%

l4

45%

l3

15%

l2

ve

Le

Le

ve

l1

5%

Below Average

About Average

Above Average


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Bend Senior High School

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Christopher Reese GRADES SERVED 9­12

230 NE 6th St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­3700 www.bend.k12.or.us/BSH

PROGRESS

ARE STUDENTS MAKING ADEQUATE GAINS OVER TIME?

Performance of students enrolled in the school for a full academic year SCHOOL PERFORMANCE Did at least 95% of the students at this school take required assessments? Yes Participation rate criteria are in place to ensure schools test all eligible students. The Smarter Balanced and alternate School Performance (%) assessments have four performance 2012­13 2013­14 2014­15 levels where levels 3 English Language Arts (Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11) and 4 are meeting the standard for 56.1 All students in tested grades 2014­15 was the first school and district operational year of the new 23.5 accountability. English language arts 20.3 assessment. See report cards from previous years to view historical OAKS performance data.

Mathematics

75.6

15.9 59.8 24.4

73.7

Level 2

48.8 27.3 23.8

26.9 24.0 49.1

Level 2

14.1 29.4 56.5

>95

* * <5

*

Levels 3 & 4 77.9 14.1 8.1

Levels 3 & 4

34.2 27.6 38.2

Did not meet

15.7 58.0 26.3

Like­School Average (%) 2015­16

70.0 17.4 12.6

Level 1

2014­15 was the first operational year of the new mathematics assessment.

Visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/data for additional assessment results.

FRESHMEN ON­TRACK TO GRADUATE

Level 1

(Administered statewide in Grades: 5, 8, 11)

All students in tested grades

No, Interpret Results with Caution

School Oregon Performance (%) Performance (%) 2015­16 2015­16

(Administered statewide in grades: 3­8, 11)

All students in tested grades

Science

OUTCOMES

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

* * *

60.0

Met 7.5 52.5 40.0

41.5 29.7 28.8

Exceeded 64.5

9.7 54.8 35.5

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.

WHAT ARE STUDENTS ACHIEVING IN HIGH SCHOOL?

School Performance (%) 2012­13 2013­14 2014­15

Oregon School Performance (%) Performance (%) 2015­16 2015­16

Like­School Average (%) 2015­16

Students who earned 25% of the credits required for a regular diploma by the end of their freshman year. Freshmen on track to graduate within 4 years

­­

84.7

88.6

School Performance (%) 2011­12 2012­13 2013­14

Note: Graduation methodology changed in 2013­14.

89.5

83.5

Oregon School Performance (%) Performance (%) 2014­15 2014­15

GRADUATION Students earning a standard diploma within four years of entering high school. RATE Overall graduation rate 78.7 85.3 83.0 85.2

73.8

85.9

Like­School Average (%) 2014­15

83.5

COMPLETION Students earning a regular, modified, extended, or adult high school diploma or completing a GED within five RATE years of entering high school. Overall completion rate

DROPOUT RATE

CONTINUING EDUCATION

84.5

85.4

90.4

89.6

81.6

90.1

0.6

4.3

1.7

Students who dropped out during the school year and did not re­enroll. Overall dropout rate

0.5

1.1

1.0

School Performance (%) 2010­11 2011­12 2012­13

Students continuing their education after high school. Students who enrolled in a community college or four­year school within 16 months of graduation

63.0

65.5

66.9

Oregon School Performance (%) Performance (%) 2013­14 2013­14

59.6

59.4

Like­School Average (%) 2013­14

60.7

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Bend Senior High School 230 NE 6th St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­3700 www.bend.k12.or.us/BSH

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Christopher Reese GRADES SERVED 9­12

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

OUTCOMES FOR KEY STUDENT GROUPS AT THIS SCHOOL COMPARED TO THE SAME GROUPS STATEWIDE STUDENT GROUP OUTCOMES

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

School Oregon Like­School Performance Performance Average (%) (%) (%)

Economically Disadvantaged On Track 84.2 76.1 Graduation 80.8 66.4 Completion 85.3 76.2 Dropout 0.8 4.3

75.8 75.0 85.4 2.0

American Indian/Alaska Native On Track * 73.3 Graduation 50.0 55.0 Completion 100.0 67.4 Dropout 4.6 8.6

81.3 78.9 86.8 3.6

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander On Track * 79.9 Graduation 100.0 63.2 Completion ­­ 76.6 Dropout 0.0 5.9

92.6 76.7 100 0.0

English Learners On Track 85.4 Graduation 63.0 Completion 84.2 Dropout 0.9

79.8 66.9 73.4 5.0

81.5 75.0 82.5 2.6

Asian On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

>95 87.5 91.2 1.3

>95 92.7 90.2 0.4

White On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

90.7 89.4 89.5 0.5

85.1 76.0 83.8 3.9

87.0 84.3 91.2 1.6

Students with Disabilities On Track 81.8 68.6 Graduation 81.2 52.7 Completion 77.8 64.3 Dropout 1.1 5.8

74.2 62.5 75.3 3.0

Black/African American On Track 83.3 78.6 Graduation 70.0 62.6 Completion 100.0 72.5 Dropout 4.6 6.2

79.7 78.3 88.6 1.8

Female On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

90.7 86.7 88.9 0.8

86.8 77.8 84.7 3.6

88.9 87.0 92.6 1.4

Migrant On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

Male On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

88.4 83.2 90.4 0.5

80.3 70.1 78.7 4.9

83.0 80.1 87.7 2.0

* 55.6 100.0 0.0

* 0.0 83.3 0.0

78.5 65.9 72.5 5.1

70.2 72.7 78.9 4.0

Hispanic/Latino On Track 85.5 Graduation 68.2 Completion 87.2 Dropout 1.1

77.8 67.4 74.9 5.3

79.4 77.5 84.4 2.5

Talented and Gifted On Track >95 Graduation 91.4 Completion 96.0 Dropout 0.0

>95 93.2 96.9 0.6

>95 96.4 98.4 0.2

Multi­Racial On Track Graduation Completion Dropout

83.0 72.7 79.4 4.7

83.6 82.5 86.6 2.1

85.7 50.0 83.3 0.0

On­Track data are based on the 2015­16 school year; all other data are based on the 2014­15 school year. See previous page for outcome definitions.

*, <5, and >95 are displayed when the data must be suppressed to protect student confidentiality.

CURRICULUM & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT WHAT IS THIS SCHOOL DOING TO IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING AND TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR THE FUTURE?

SCHOOL READINESS

Comprehensive counseling and guidance program. ACHIEVE, Gear Up, Link Crew, Safe School Alliance.

Data and information in the Curriculum and Learning Environment section were provided by local schools and districts, and were not verified by the Oregon Department of Education.


OREGON

REPORT CARD

2015­16

Bend Senior High School 230 NE 6th St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 355­3700 www.bend.k12.or.us/BSH

DISTRICT Bend­LaPine Administrative SD 1 SUPERINTENDENT Shay Mikalson PRINCIPAL Christopher Reese GRADES SERVED 9­12

For more report card measures, including detailed demographic information, visit www.ode.state.or.us/go/RCMeasures

CURRICULUM & LEARNING ENVIRONMENT CONTINUED . . . ACADEMIC SUPPORT · English Language Development (ELD) program · Special education program · Academic intervention programs in math, reading and writing ·  Freshman Academy

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION Business, Culinary, Construction Engineering, PreEngineering, Graphic Arts, Video Arts, Family Consumer Science, Future Power and Energy

ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT WORLD LANGUAGE COURSES Spanish, French and American Sign Language   HONORS & DUALENROLLMENT COURSES 40 dual credit / articulated, AP and IB courses offered   SPECIAL PROGRAMS IB diploma and certificates.

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES · 73 clubs, sports/clubs sports offered · Drama, band, choir, orchestra

Data and information in the Curriculum and Learning Environment section were provided by local schools and districts, and were not verified by the Oregon Department of Education.


     

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http://www.mtbachelor.com/winter/crosscountry/trail_map/xc_trailmap.jpg

6/27/2012

Page 1 of 1


Mountain Information With nearly 3,700 acres of lift-accessible terrain, you won’t want to pass up a trip to the ski resort with the highest skiable elevation in all of Oregon and Washington! Mt. Bachelor, located on the eastern flanks of Oregon’s Central Cascades, is known for its light, dry snow, diverse terrain, family-friendliness and long seasons. The Season

Mountain Topography

Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily during the regular winter

Summit: 9,065 feet

season. Spring, summer and fall hours vary. West Village Base: 6,300 feet Season: November to late May Northwest Express Base: 5,700 feet Snowphone: 541-382-7888 or visit mobile site Vertical Drop*: 3,365 feet

m.mtbachelor.com

Acres of Terrain: 3,683 acres accessible by lift with 1,600 acres groomed daily * Mt. Bachelor calculates the total vertical drop from the Summit at 9,065 feet to the base elevation at the Northwest Express lift which is 5,700 feet.

Trail Stats Number of Runs: 88 | Average Maximum Base Depth: 150-200" | Average Snowfall: 462" Lift Facilities

Alpine Terrain Rating

Cross-Country Terrain

x

7 Express Quads

x

15% Green-Novice

More than a dozen trails, 56 km machine-

x

3 Triple Chairlifts

x

25% Blue-Intermediate

groomed and track-set nightly.

x

2 Magic Carpets

x

35% Black-Advanced

x

2 Tubing Lifts

x

25% Double Black-Expert

x

5% Green-Beginner

x

69% Blue-Intermediate

x

26% Black-Expert

Bill Healy founded Mt. Bachelor Ski Area December 19, 1958 with a rope tow and a single lift. Mt. Bachelor has since grown to be one of the largest ski resorts in the U.S. The resort boasts a wide variety of terrain. Guests can ski or ride 360 degrees off the summit, hike the adjoining cinder cone for a thrilling run down, or, ski the trees to find that great cache of powder!

Not only is Mt. Bachelor a great place for expert skiers and riders to get that burn, it is also a fantastic place to learn a snow sport or take the family for an exciting day out. Carrousel, our free beginners lift, offers an easy ride up and gentle slope down. There are also numerous lesson packages to choose from; check out our link to snow sport services.

Conveniently located just 22 miles west of Bend, Mt. Bachelor’s season is one of the longest in the Northwest, usually starting in November by Thanksgiving and lasting well into May. Surrounded by the tall hemlocks and pines of the Deschutes National Forest and breathtaking views of the Three Sisters and other Cascade peaks, you are sure to enjoy that mountain experience you seek at Mt. Bachelor!


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97

Lava Ridge Elementary School

Cascade Village Shopping Center

(Gopher Gulch: Future Park No Public Access)

SEE SHEVLIN PARK INSET

Sky View Middle School

COOLEY

High Desert Park

Cinder Cone Natural Area

KNOTT RD.

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Paved Trail Natural Trail Gravel Trail

Road with Bike Lane Road River Canal



Park District Boundary

Undeveloped Parkland

Footbridge

State Park School

Off-Leash Dog Area

 Mt. Bike Trail

Restroom

Loop Trail Tumalo Creek Trail

Trailhead

The Bend Urban Trails System, developed and managed jointly by the Bend Park & Recreation District and the City of Bend, connects our community and encourages recreation and non-motorized transportation. Trails in the system traverse many different landscapes, including established parks, natural forested areas, and urban areas both sparsely and densely developed. The Urban Trails System currently includes approximately 63 developed miles, with more trails under development each year. The Bend Park & Recreation District is committed to increasing and improving the primary and connector trail routes as rights-of-way and funding opportunities become available.

BEND URBAN TRAIL OPPORTUNITIES

by climbing the trail to the summit of Pilot Butte or can proceed north from the park on a paved trail to Neff Road.

COYNER TRAIL The Coyner Trail extends approximately 1.4 miles between Juniper Park and the Larkspur Trail. The section west of 15th St. to Juniper Park is paved to an accessible grade, while the segment east of 15th St. is a natural surface trail on easement that will be upgraded once the property develops.

CASCADE HIGHLANDS TRAIL Good for mountain bikers and walkers alike, this trail begins at Overturf Park on 17th St. and travels west up and over Overturf Butte through the Skyliner Summit neighborhood to the roundabout at Mt. Washington Dr. It then continues west through Cascade Highlands, before connecting to the Forest Service Phil’s Trail system. 4.6 miles in total length, the trail provides a mix of paved and unpaved surfaces.

LARKSPUR TRAIL

CENTRAL OREGON CANAL TRAIL

The Larkspur Trail extends 4.1 miles between Pilot Butte Middle School and Larkspur Park, passing through Pinewood Natural Area and Pilot Butte State Park. Both Pilot Butte and Larkspur parks have ample parking and restroom facilities. Walkers can add an additional mile

From Blakely Park, the trail follows along the west side of Brookswood Blvd. and then heads southwest through Central Oregon Irrigation District (COID) property to an intersection with the Deschutes River Trail. At this point trail users can go either up or down stream along the

river. Or, from Blakely Park, trail users can cross to the east side of Brookswood Blvd. and head south to the Central Oregon Canal and take the ditch-road east along the canal to American Lane where the COID trail currently ends. Total trail distance is 3.5 miles from Reed Market Rd. to the Deschutes River.

TRAIL ACCESSIBILITY It is the goal of Bend Park & Recreation District to provide trail access for all. However, not all existing trail segments have been evaluated nor are all trails intended to be fully accessible routes. The trails on this map may present obstacles, running slopes, cross slopes, narrow tread widths and unstable surfaces, making them inaccessible for some users. Trails at Farewell Bend, Riverbend, Pioneer and Pine Nursery parks offer the best access for visitors with mobility aids. Updated information about the condition and accessibility of trails is available by calling 541-389-7275. It is the trail user’s responsibility to determine if trail difficulty is appropriate for his or her skill level.

PA R

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Shevlin

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 Parking  Trailhead  Restroom

Approx. 1 Mile Covered Bridge

SHEVLIN PARK TRAILS Shevlin Park is Bend’s largest park encompassing 603 acres in a natural setting. The park offers many different types of trails and provides for a variety of recreational experiences. Tumalo Creek flows through the length of the park.

Shevlin Park is home to the most diverse old growth forest at this elevation in the region and an abundance of animal life. This includes migratory birds, deer, elk, bear and the occasional cougar. Parking is available at the park entrance on Shevlin Park Road and at Shevlin Commons, and picnic sites are dispersed throughout the park. Restrooms are located at the entrance and at the south end. Dogs must be on-leash on all Shevlin Park trails. Loop Trail: This 6-mile trail follows the rim of the canyon, runs through old growth ponderosa pine, includes a few short, steep hills and crosses Tumalo Creek twice.

Fremont Meadows



Tumalo Creek Trail: This 2.5-mile trail follows the creek upstream from the park entrance to the southern end of the park, where it joins the Deschutes National Forest trail system. Mountain Bike Trail: This is a preferred route for mountain bikes, but is open to walkers as well. The trail follows along the canyon on the west side of the park, and links with the Forest Service Mrazek Trail. Riders may also take the east road out to the Forest Service trail system.

OFF-LEASH DOG PARKS Bend has seven areas for people to recreate with their dogs off-leash. Unless otherwise indicated, dogs must be leashed on trails and in parks.

SH EV LI N

 Commons

Road Footbridge

WELCOME TO THE BEND URBAN TRAILS SYSTEM!

Parking

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D

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.

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HA T

SHEVLIN PARK

MAP LEGEND

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Accessibility: The road running through the middle of Shevlin Park is paved and can accommodate most ability levels. The trail system covers a variety of unimproved surfaces. The Shevlin Commons parking lot provides access to a 0.3-mile asphalt path that allows those with physical challenges to view the park and the Cascade mountain range from the east rim of Tumalo Creek canyon.


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Once the site of two large ponderosa pine lumber mills, today the Old Mill reach is a mix of river parks, trails and the Shops at the Old Mill District (see inset). Trails exist on both sides of the river in addition to an extensive private trail system throughout the Old Mill District. Three footbridges connect trail legs on either side of the river, providing convenient walking loops. On the east side, the trails are paved from the Shops at the Old Mill District to the upper end of Farewell Bend Park at the Bill Healy Bridge. The trail on the west side offers a mix of paved and unpaved surfaces. Farewell Bend and Riverbend parks provide boat landings for paddlers using the Deschutes River water trail.

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 Mt. Bachelor Village Resort, in partnership with Brooks Resources and the High Desert Museum, has provided a series of interpretative signs along this section of trail which describe the native habitat, foliage, and other points of interest.

This reach passes through the oldest and most established sections of Bend. The trail isn’t always along the river, sometimes following sidewalks through neighborhoods and downtown. The trail passes through beautiful Drake Park on Mirror Pond and ends at McKay Park and Colorado Street. There are several footbridges along the way offering opportunities to cross the river. Access the trail from any of the adjacent parks. Boat landings at McKay, Drake, Harmon and Brooks parks provide water trail access.

The Deschutes River corridor provides for both land and water-based trail opportunities. The water trail allows paddlers to enjoy the river and connect to parks and other destinations along its bank. Access points and boat landings are available at several locations along the water trail. Be aware that the river difficulty changes dramatically from gentle moving water to Class 4 rapids above the Bill Healy Bridge. Floating the section above the Healy Bridge is recommended only for expert boaters. The Colorado Street, Bend Hydro and Tumalo Irrigation dams require mandatory portaging. il Tra FLOATING THE RIVER ne i p Al Floating is popular from Riverbend Park at Columbia Street (across from Farewell Bend Park) to Drake Park on Riverside Blvd. Be cautious. The current is stronger above the Colorado R. YD Street dam than it appears. Watch for the warning signs and UR NT exit the river on the left above the Colorado Street Alpine pine CE l rai bridge. Floaters must leave the river and portage around the dam. The Parkk Park dT oa Ride-the-River shuttle operates between these two parks throughout the lR u a summer season. For a schedule visit the Cascades East Transit H website at cascadeseasttransit.com or call 541-385-8680. For non-motorized boat launch sites, look for the “crossed oars” symbols on the map.

Pioneer ee

Parrk rk  Park

PIONEER REACH

WATER TRAIL

 The boardwalk here offers a view of Central Oregon Irrigation District’s Hydro site, where irrigation water is dropped back to the river through two turbines, generating electrical power. The public has access to this trail section thanks to an agreement with COID—please stay on the designated trail.

EA TE R

This section of river trail is located on the west bank of the river over the Tumalo irrigation canal pipe. The wide trail surface is unpaved and relatively flat. It runs between the river and a high canyon wall, and passes through the River’s Edge golf course and adjacent neighborhoods. A newer section of the trail located on the east bank connects Pioneer Park to Revere Avenue. Boat landings at First Street Rapids Park and Riverview Park provide water trail access. There are several wetlands in this reach, inhabited by songbirds, trumpeter swans, otter and beaver. Osprey frequently nest and fish here.

This reach has trail sections on both sides of the river, connected by a footbridge approximately 1.5 miles upstream of the Farewell Bend Park bridge. The river flows fast here through a beautiful canyon, cascading over rocks and logs. WEST SIDE: The trail on the west side of the river passes through Mt. Bachelor Village. Bicycles are not allowed on this section of the river trail, but there is an alternative mountain bike route that connects the Bill Healy Bridge to the Haul Road Trail along Century Drive. EAST SIDE: The east side trail at the northern end of this reach is unpaved, narrow and rocky in places. The trail continues to the South Canyon Footbridge and crosses to the west side to loop back to town. Users can choose to divert up to Brookswood Blvd. on a side trail that originates just upstream of the COID power plant and short timber bridge. At Brookswood, the trail follows the sidewalk through various neighborhoods before reaching Wildflower Park then ultimately River Rim Park.

 Farewell Bend Park honors the history of the logging industry at this site with two interpretive signs. Additional signs along the boardwalk explain a riparian restoration project and other steps being made to care for the health of our river and its ecosystem. The park includes a playground and restrooms.

First ir t St St. St. Rapids pd P k Park Pa

RIVER RUN REACH

Look for this symbol along the Deschutes River Trail:

N DR.

 Located across the Deschutes River from McKay Park, Miller’s Landing Park was a holding area for the Miller Lumber Company in the early 1900’s. As the newest riverfront park, it will be open in summer 2013.  Across the river from Farewell Bend Park is Riverbend Park, a popular site for events, river access and picnicking.

TH

This northernmost section of the Deschutes River Trail is constructed on top of the buried Tumalo irrigation canal. It has an unpaved surface and includes a few moderate hills. Along the middle stretch of this reach, the river drops into a deep canyon, but the trail stays high on the canyon wall, offering spectacular views of the river below and of the Three Sisters in the distance. A steep climb up the Archie Briggs Canyon Trail connects to Mt. Washington Drive. Visitors can best access the trail from Sawyer Park. There is limited on-street parking at Sawyer Uplands Park with a connecting route down to the river trail.

 McKay Park is the site of the Oregon Trunk Railroad. An interpretive sign in the park describes Bend’s early railroad history.

Dessch tes Deschutes Riverr Trail Tra l

HINGTO

AWBREY REACH

 This Drake Park interpretive sign (located directly in front of the public restrooms) describes Bend’s early sense of community spirit.

BEND RIVER PRO PROMENADE PR R

5,9(5·6 6 EDGE GOLF F COURSE S

AAwb Aw wbrey ey Viillla VVil lage llag agge ge Par PPa ark ar

The Bend Park & Recreation District, along with the City of Bend and private land owners, is working toward implementing the community’s vision for an uninterrupted river trail. The trail will parallel the Deschutes River running through the heart of Bend. Once fully completed, the 19 mile trail will extend from Tumalo State Park to Meadow Camp with further connections to Sunriver. This map shows only existing trails and access points open to public use. The map also shows the river as a water trail and access points to it. Trail users should respect private property and sensitive riparian areas by staying on the trail. The river trail is divided into five reaches, defined by the surrounding landscape character.

 Located across the foot bridge from Drake Park, Pageant Park was named to commemorate the Bend Water Pageant, a favorite community event that ran from 1933-1965. An interpretive sign describes the event highlight, the launch of large, lighted floats on Mirror Pond.

  

AWBREY REACH

WELCOME TO THE DESCHUTES RIVER TRAIL!

 The historic Rademacher House and plaza overlook Mirror Pond and Drake Park, with the Three Sisters visible in the background. This site includes a sign interpreting Bend’s founding and early history.

3RD ST. T

RD.

Sawyer y Uplands Up plaands Parkk

POINTS OF INTEREST ALONG THE DESCHUTES RIVER TRAIL  Sawyer Park offers the opportunity to spot a variety of birds and wildlife and is included in the Oregon Cascade Birding Trail system.

Sawyer wyer er Parkk

Arch ie Can Briggs yon Traili

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KIRKALDY CT. (NO PUBLIC UB BLI PARKING) KIN

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Discover the Bend Urban Trails System.

Discover natural landscapes, wildlife, and scenic byways. Discover exceptional places to exercise, cycle, play, relax, or commute.

B E N D U R BA N TR A I L S M A P

Please help keep the trail experience safe and pleasant for all users:

TRAIL USE REGULATIONS

Please do not walk along the river bank.

 Some sections of the trail are on private property. Please stay on the designated trail.

 Areas along the river are sensitive wildlife habitat.

 Motorized vehicles are not allowed on the trails.

 Bicyclists are not allowed on some sections of the trails. Please observe pedestrian-only trail sections.

 City ordinances require that dogs must be on leash at all times within the city limits (except at designated off-leash areas) and their waste properly removed. Dog “rest stops” along the trails provide you with disposal bags and trash cans.

 Do not litter. Trash cans are located throughout the park system.  No camping, drinking alcohol, smoking or fires allowed.

ADOPT A PARK OR TRAIL

The Adopt a Trail and Adopt a Park programs give community groups, families and individuals an opportunity to keep our parks and trails beautiful and fun for all. Adopters help with litter clean up, special projects and reporting concerns to the district. For more information on these programs call the Bend Park and Recreation District at 541-389-7275.

The Bend Urban Trail System and the Deschutes River Trail are managed by the Bend Park & Recreation District. To report trail concerns, call Park Services Dept. at 541-388-5435. After business hours and on weekends call 541-410-3319.

© Bend Park and Recreation District, All Rights Reserved, 2013

DESCHUTES RIVER TRAIL SYSTEM

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MAP LEGEND Paved Trail Natural Trail

Road with Bike Lane Road

Gravel Trail

Canal

Road/Sidewalk Trail Connection

River



Park

Footbridge

Undeveloped Parkland

Parking

School

Restroom

Park District Boundary

Trailhead

Off-Leash

D Dog Area

Non-Motorized Boat Launch Dam

River Hazard


Quick Reference 1 Top Employers & Industries

13 Telecommunications

3 Wage Information

14 Services

4 Industry Mix

15 Transportation

5 7 7 9 9

Business Costs Employment Trends Housing / Real Estate Financial Services Population

16 17 17 18 19

Travel Distances, Commuting Topography & Climate Top 10 Taxpayers Business Resources Entrepreneurial Landscape

10 Education

19 About EDCO

13 Utilities

20 EDCOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Results

2016 CENTRAL OREGON PROFILE Economic Development for Central Oregon 705 SW Bonnett Way, Ste. #1000 Bend, OR 97702 www.edcoinfo.com 541.388.3236 | 541.342.4135


WELCOME TO CENTRAL OREGON! The region features dramatic snow-capped mountain ranges and high desert plateaus within the counties of Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson. Central Oregon has led the state’s population growth over the last two decades; in fact, Deschutes County continues to be one of the fastest growing areas of the country. A lesser known fact is that our region has also topped the state in job growth over the past year and over the past ten years, creating a region that's characterized by dynamic small businesses and entrepreneurial activity. The region boasts strong clusters in high technology (software, hardware and energy), advanced manufacturing, biosciences, renewable energy, brewing & distilling, value-added food products, and recreation equipment. For most new residents, Central Oregon is a lifestyle choice, offering a friendly environment, year round recreation options, and world class amenities—all with a hassle-free, small town feel. From a ranch in Prineville to an upscale urban condo in Bend, and all the options in between, the region presents a rare diversity of places to live, all with an easy commute to work. For a relocating business, Central Oregon has a reputation for welcoming new companies. The region has some of the lowest operating costs in the Pacific Northwest, without sacrificing workforce talent, quality health care, transportation or telecommunications infrastructure. What sets Central Oregon apart from other lifestyle cities like Aspen/Vail, CO; Sun Valley, ID; Jackson Hole, WY or Lake Tahoe, CA, is that the region is filled with middle-class working people who are not here to escape from the rest of the world, but build and live their dreams here. Dreams of a quality education for their children. Dreams of launching their own business. Dreams of short commutes and breathtaking landscapes. Dreams of interesting, challenging work without the big-city hassle.

TOP EMPLOYERS & INDUSTRIES According to the Oregon Employment Department, over 75% of Oregon firms have nine or fewer employees and the average firm employs 15 people. Recent research released by Dun & Bradstreet and American Express said that 99.1% of businesses in Oregon had less than $10 million in revenues. To an even greater extent than the state, Central Oregon's business environment is typified by innovative, small companies, producing niche-market products and services. Still, a number of large employers operate successfully here, tapping into Central Oregon’s ever-expanding workforce, overall low cost of doing business and business-friendly local governments. Year over year, the region’s Top 50 Private Employers collectively added about 1,154 jobs, and thereby employed over 20,000 Central Oregonians. Large employers include some distinct groups including: x x x x x x x

Advanced Manufacturing Bioscience (pharmaceuticals, medical device) Brewing & Distilling (craft beer, cider, spirits, tea, kombucha) Building Products (doors, windows, molding, furniture) High Technology (electronics, software, data centers) Outdoor Gear & Apparel Value Added Food Products

Selected Central Oregon Traded-Sector Industries Industry Cluster Employment/Establishments Aviation/Aerospace 581 jobs at 33 companies Bioscience 882 jobs at 26 companies Brewing & Distilling 1,011* jobs at 29 companies Building Products 2,729 jobs at 64 companies Specialty Food & Bev. Processing 381 jobs at 62 companies High Technology 1,400 jobs at 101 companies Outdoor Gear & Apparel 578 jobs at 88 companies *includes brewpub operations (non-traded sector)

Healthcare is led by St. Charles Medical Center, the largest private employer in the region. St. Charles owns and operates hospitals in Bend, Redmond, Madras, and Prineville. Additionally, Bend Memorial Clinic is the largest of nearly 100 private clinics and practices in the area. Overall, the health care sector employs over 10,000 Central Oregonians. Headquarter operations play a prominent role among top employers and include Keith Manufacturing, Les Schwab Tires, Bank of the Cascades, Deschutes Brewery, 10 Barrel Brewing and many others. Administrative/call/data centers including Apple, Consumer Cellular, Facebook, IBEX Global and Navis are also among the largest private employers in the tri-county area.

Page 1 Last updated 4/21/2016

Central Oregon Profile

© Copyright 2016 EDCO


Employment in tourism and hospitality reflects the importance of this sector to the region. Central Oregon has the largest concentration of destination resorts in the Pacific Northwest and includes Riverhouse on the Deschutes, Brasada Ranch, Pronghorn Resort, Sunriver Resort, Mt. Bachelor, Eagle Crest (Resort Acquisition Partners), Kah Nee Ta Resort, and Indian Head Casino. Central Oregon's Top 50 Private Employers 2015 Rank 1 2 3 4 9 5 6 7 11 10 12 8 13 14 17 16 19 18 22 21 24 20 25 23 26 28 27 30 15 47 31 29 43 37 31 33 33 35 35 37 42 43 40 N/A 45 41 N/A 46 N/A 48

2016 Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 35 35 38 39 40 41 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 48 50

Employer St. Charles Medical Center regionwide Sunriver Resort Les Schwab regionwide (HQ & CO stores) Bright Wood Corporation regionwide Safeway regionwide Mt. Bachelor McDonald's regionwide Bend Memorial Clinic regionwide WalMart regionwide Consumer Cellular Fred Meyer regionwide IBEX Jeld Wen Windows and Doors Northview Hotel Group Central Oregon Trucking Black Butte Ranch Deschutes Brewery PCC Schlosser Bend Research Bi-Mart regionwide BendBroadband (incl. Zolo Media & The Vault) Costco Mosaic Medical Lowe's regionwide Bank of the Cascades regionwide Contact Industries Home Depot regionwide The Center (Ortho/Neuro Care & Research) Opportunity Foundation Ray's Food Place regionwide Navis Albertson's regionwide Epic Air Keith Manufacturing Co. Athletic Club of Bend The Riverhouse Kah Nee Ta Resort G5 Neighbor Impact regionwide The Bulletin Nosler Indian Head Casino Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village LLC Facebook Data Center Medline Renewal Brasada Ranch BASX Hooker Creek Companies Target US Bank regionwide

2014 2,740 900 905 746 584 756 620 639 686 402 538 700 480 450 286 360 290 243 242 246 285 280 218 229 259 215 225 196 384 135 182 218 N/A 190 240 200 200 170 196 190 170 168 135 140 157 187 N/A 150 106 164

Employees 2015 2016 2,830 3,057 900 936 880 871 870 855 590 828 775 769 668 735 652 701 574 639 585 580 528 564 595 545 460 517 450 450 312 382 360 378 295 358 305 347 264 334 265 317 261 297 285 296 243 268 262 259 237 243 225 240 235 239 213 238 392 221 143 220 211 217 216 216 160 210 190 205 200 200 200 200 200 200 192 194 196 189 190 188 170 186 168 186 178 180 157 178 153 175 172 172 N/A 170 150 150 105 150 126 145

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Central Oregon Profile

Š Copyright 2016 EDCO


WAGES INFORMATION FOR SELECT OCCUPATIONS Below are average hourly wages in Oregon, Washington, and California. The East Cascades region’s wages are typically below those of Oregon, often 10 to 20%. Wages in Washington are typically higher than Oregon, while California wages routinely run at least 20% higher than those in Oregon.

Occupation

Wage Comparison for Selected Occupations (annual average, $ per hour) OR East Cascades

CA

WA

Accountant/Auditor Architect, except Landscape & Naval Carpenter Chef & Head Cook Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologist Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operator

31.65 33.26 20.77 19.49 34.57 18.90

29.24 36.32 20.39 19.03 29.06 18.74

34.71 41.45 24.16 19.60 39.25 18.02

35.56 36.61 25.04 24.93 34.16 25.47

Computer Programmer Computer User Support Specialist Computer Systems Analyst Customer Service Representative Dental Hygienist Electrician Electrical Engineer Financial Manager Food Service Manager General & Operations Manager Graphic Designer Industrial Machinery Mechanic

34.69 23.37 40.21 16.64 36.98 33.02 41.81 50.66 23.56 46.81 23.33 26.39

36.49 23.53 37.61 13.93 37.20 27.71 36.49 46.90 21.35 38.10 21.57 25.97

41.93 27.20 43.62 17.92 48.31 29.91 54.97 62.48 23.20 50.75 26.18 27.27

56.27 27.54 46.58 17.77 44.54 31.96 50.09 54.83 25.88 57.92 26.83 27.20

Industrial Production Manager Landscape Architect Marketing Manager Mechanical Engineer Medical Transcriptionist Middle School Teacher, except Special Ed Multimedia Artist & Animator Network and Computer Systems Administrator Paralegal Physical Therapist Police/Sheriff Patrol Officer Receptionist/Information Clerks

43.02 27.92 49.52 39.01 18.52 28.22 30.39 33.96 26.67 38.17 30.60 13.53

39.84 23.66 43.95 41.42 17.43 26.92 n/a 29.87 22.46 36.26 28.18 12.98

48.24 38.52 72.90 46.77 23.19 n/a 38.90 41.68 27.91 44.57 43.60 14.20

49.86 31.09 66.67 44.53 21.09 n/a 36.92 40.70 27.59 40.79 35.49 15.06

Registered Nurse Secretary/Administrative Assistant, except Legal,

39.87 16.64

39.24 14.89

47.03 18.29

38.29 18.80

Medical, & Executive

Software Developer, Applications 42.82 34.21 56.35 56.24 Software Developer, Systems Software 49.23 40.26 58.71 55.38 Supervisor, Administrative & Office Workers 24.33 22.25 27.22 n/a Supervisor, Retail Sales Workers 18.57 18.54 19.72 n/a Truck Driver, Heavy & Tractor-Trailer 19.34 19.09 20.23 21.54 Urban/Regional Planner 36.48 32.72 38.86 37.44 Sources: Oregon Employment Department, Washington State Employment Security Department, and California Employment Development Department. The data used to create these estimates came from the Occupational Employment Survey. Data is for Q1 2015 – the most recent data available.

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Central Oregon Profile

© Copyright 2016 EDCO


COVERED EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLL Below is employment by sector, payroll, and average annual pay in the tri-county region. Average annual pay is the total of all covered wages paid during the year divided by the monthly average number of covered jobs during the year. Covered employment refers to jobs that are eligible for unemployment insurance, so it is a good barometer of wage and sector trends. Note that while most employees are covered, notable exceptions include the self-employed, those who work solely on commission and some agricultural workers. Deschutes County Industry

Total all ow nerships Total private coverage Natural resources and mining Construction Manufacturing Trade, transportation and utilities Information Financial activities Professional and business services Education and health services Leisure and hospitality Other services Total all government Total federal government Total state government Total local government

Em ployees 72,451 63,557 532 5,138 4,888 13,899 1,656 3,311 8,126 11,692 11,396 2,903 8,894 877 1,384 6,632

Wages $ 2,949,830,197 $ 2,518,795,865 $ 23,997,270 $ 230,303,186 $ 220,461,756 $ 481,163,364 $ 100,112,519 $ 182,176,086 $ 361,720,605 $ 610,000,017 $ 227,474,893 $ 80,838,601 $ 431,034,332 $ 58,444,167 $ 61,636,211 $ 310,953,954

Crook County

Avg. Annual Wage Em ployees $ 40,714 5,878 $ 39,630 4,631 $ 45,107 186 $ 44,823 255 $ 45,102 615 $ 34,618 1,533 $ 60,454 105 $ 55,021 129 $ 44,513 275 $ 52,172 599 $ 19,960 638 $ 27,846 291 $ 48,463 1,246 $ 66,641 286 $ 44,534 239 $ 46,886 721

Payroll $ 251,143,039 $ 192,846,695 $ 6,633,885 $ 12,691,869 $ 23,653,142 $ 71,427,582 $ 19,304,543 $ 4,852,999 $ 9,898,034 $ 25,318,636 $ 12,513,021 $ 6,552,984 $ 58,296,344 $ 18,711,246 $ 8,778,826 $ 30,806,272

Jefferson County

Avg. Annual Wage Em ployees $ 42,725 6,632 $ 41,642 4,162 $ 35,666 476 $ 49,772 95 $ 38,460 1,077 $ 46,593 807 $ 183,852 26 $ 37,620 101 $ 35,992 170 $ 42,268 557 $ 19,612 593 $ 22,518 254 $ 46,786 2,469 $ 65,423 124 $ 36,731 350 $ 42,727 1,994

Payroll $ 237,340,865 $ 137,251,683 $ 15,649,889 $ 4,205,297 $ 42,577,940 $ 25,717,136 $ 803,659 $ 3,917,347 $ 6,819,180 $ 23,742,896 $ 9,314,092 $ 4,485,984 $ 100,089,182 $ 6,696,096 $ 16,662,387 $ 76,730,699

Avg. Annual Wage $ 35,787 $ 32,977 $ 32,877 $ 44,266 $ 39,533 $ 31,867 $ 30,909 $ 38,785 $ 40,112 $ 42,626 $ 15,706 $ 17,661 $ 40,538 $ 54,000 $ 47,606 $ 38,480

Source: Oregon Employment Department QualityInfo.org

The average annual wage for Central Oregon is $40,469, while the average annual wage for all of Oregon state is $48,312.

INDUSTRY MIX Central Oregon has a very diverse mix of industries that create the employment foundation for the regional economy. For example, in 2007, construction accounted for more than 11% of total payroll, while today it is much closer to national averages. A large slice of the overall pie, government, has seen its share of payroll disperse to other sectors such as education and health services (the fastest growing sector). Information, which includes software, IT services, and data centers, has grown by 30% over the past decade. Tourism (leisure and hospitality) has also seen gains in the past 10 years.

Manufacturing Employment Manufacturing EmStatistical Area ployment Growth (2010-2014) Redmond 26.4% Bend-Redmond MSA 26.5% Oregon 9.7% U.S. 5.8%

Deschutes County and Redmond's manufacturing sectors are adding jobs at a significantly faster pace than the rest of the state or nation. Source: Oregon Employment Department

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BUSINESS COSTS Oregon has achieved national status for being a cost competitive location for business. The table below compares the cost of doing business in Oregon, Washington, and California. Major contributing factors to the Oregon advantage are no sales tax, no inventory tax, an affordable property tax system, and affordable labor costs. Average industrial, commercial, and residential power costs are nearly half those in California and on average 25% below national averages. BUSINESS COST COMPARISON – U.S. West Coast

California

Washington

Average Industrial Electricity Rate (Mar. 2016; ¢/kWh)

Business Factor Oregon 5.59¢

10.49¢

4.13¢

Average Industrial Rate for Natural Gas (Dec. 2015, $/kcf) Average Annual Wage for Production Worker (Q1, 2015)

$5.59 $31,680

$6.92 $32,397

$7.27 $28,825

Base Unemployment Insurance, range of rates (As of July 1, 2015) State Unemployment Insurance Tax Rates (As of July 1, 2015)

.015 – 5.4% (base: $35,700) 2.2% 5.4%

.016 – 6.2% (base: $7,000) 1.3% 5.4%

0.17 – 5.84% (base: $42,100) .17% 5.84%

$4,793

$4,712

$4,973

$3.48 1.0% ($0) 13.3% ($1,000,000)

$2.00

8.84% ($0)

None

Sales or Use Taxes on Construction Costs (FY 2013)

$1.37 5.0% ($0) 9.9% ($125,000) 6.6% ($0) 7.6% (>$1M) None None None None None

None 7.5% (Average) 0.98% 8.48% 8.84%

0.13-3.3% 6.5% (Average) 2.4% 8.9% 8.89%

State Sales Tax Collections Per Capita (FY 2013)

$0

$1,159

$1,978

31.07¢

30¢

37.5¢

State & Local Tax Burden Per Capita (2012)

$4,094.86

$5,237.19

$4,541.48

State Property Tax Collection Per Capita (July 1, 2015)

$1,296

$1,363

Real Estate Transfer Tax

None

0.11%

State Business Tax Climate Index (2016 Tax Foundation)

#11

#48

$1,345 1.28% of sales price + local taxes #12

Min Max Average Annual Premium for Employer Sponsored Single Person Health Insurance (Employer Contribution,2014 data) Workers’ Comp premium index rate (as of Jan 1, 2014) State Individual Income Tax Rates (2015) State Corporate Income Tax Rates (As of July 1, 2015)

Lowest Highest Lowest Highest

State/local gross receipts, operations-based business tax State & Local Sales Tax Rates (As of July 1, 2015)

State Gasoline Tax Rates (cents per gallon) (As of July 2015)

State Local Combined

Excise tax

None

Sources: Tax Foundation, Oregon Employment Department, Washington State Employment Security Department, California Employment Development Department, US Energy Information Association, Employer Health Benefits Survey, Premium rate ranking index, Oregon Insurance Division.

Perhaps one of the greatest assets in Oregon is the structure of how corporations are taxed, known as the Single Sales Factor. The tax rate on corporate income of firms doing business in the state is the greater of a minimum tax based on relative Oregon sales ($150-$100,000, approximately 0.1% of sales by entity) or an income-based levy of 6.6% on taxable income up to $1 million and 7.6% above that. Relative Oregon sales are responsible 100% in determining U.S. corporate income taxable in Oregon. This single interstate factor stands in contrast to states that also use factors for property and payroll to apportion taxable income. It is advantageous to a business headquartered or producing tangible goods in Oregon, but selling products throughout the country, or the world, where it also operates, because its business Oregon tax liability is proportional only to its Oregon customer base, and that liability does not grow directly as a result of greater investment or employment in Oregon. How the single sales factor works: In its Oregon tax return, the business takes the ratio of Oregon sales to total U.S. sales and applies that ratio to its consolidated federal income. The result is Oregon taxable income. Oregon sales are based on where the greater cost of performance occurs for intangible sales. In the case of tangible goods, Oregon sales include the throwback of sales to customers where the entity would not otherwise be taxable. (Source: Business Oregon) This tax policy is a major reason why Oregon is home to Intel’s largest global employment and capital investment. Single sales factor plays an important role for Nike, Columbia Sportswear, Keen, and other outdoor gear and apparel manufacturers’ continued growth of headquarters, R&D and warehouse operations.

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The tables below compare costs for a manufacturing company with 20 employees to one with 200 employees. This example does not factor or include cost savings offered by incentive programs. Oregon offers more incentive programs to traded-sector businesses (companies that sell products or services outside of the area), than Washington and California combined. Attempting to understand all cost factors in different states and how those impact your specific business can be a daunting task. Some cost factors such as the efficiency and approach of regulatory oversight (i.e. implementation of federal EPA rules) can be dramatically different from state to state, but virtually impossible to place a dollar value on for comparison purposes. 20-Employee Firm, Urban Location

1

Oregon

California

Idaho

Washington

$142,014

$206,706

$147,258

$134,616

$1,045,000

$1,053,280

$947,980

$1,184,900

$191,433

$237,811

$183,220

$249,586

$6,869

$10,400

$5,944

$19,193

Property tax

$141,360

$74,080

$102,960

$59,360

3

$0

$16,734

$11,956

$52,819

Tax on capital purchases (first year only)

$0

$239,800

$18,000

$204,240

Total operating costs, initial capital taxes

$1,526,675

$1,822,077

$1,405,362

$1,851,894

+ $295,402

($121,313)

+ $325,219

Oregon

California

Idaho

Washington

$1,327,890

$1,903,410

$1,371,030

$1,281,510

$10,450,000

$10,532,800

$9,479,800

$11,849,000

$878,526

$766,890

$726,294

$1,060,471

$29,430

$67,196

$59,440

$191,925

Property tax

$718,400

$629,600

$978,400

$762,400

3

$0

$167,340

$119,557

$528,190

Tax on capital purchases (first year only)

$0

$2,398,000

$180,000

$2,042,400

Total operating costs, initial capital taxes

$13,404,245

$16,297,896

$12,794,964

$17,187,706

+ $2,893,651

($609,282)

+ $3,783,461

Energy costs Employee gross payroll Payroll taxes/insurance

2

Corporate income or gross receipts taxes Other taxes

1

Difference from Oregon 200-Employee Firm, Rural Location

1

Energy costs Employee gross payroll Payroll taxes/insurance Corporate income or gross receipts taxes Other taxes

1

Difference from Oregon

1 Location affects estimators only for property taxes. 2 Payroll taxes include federal Social Security & Medicare, but not local levies. 3 "Other taxes" includes any relevant business tax that would apply to the business scenario used in the example, including state franchise taxes or sales & use taxes on current purchases. Table source: Business Oregon website.

According to the Workers' Compensation Division of Oregon OSHA, Oregon workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compensation costs, already among the lowest in the nation, will drop in 2016 for the third-straight year, by an average of 5.3 percent.

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Workers Compensation Insurance th

Workers’ compensation costs in Oregon are the 8 lowest in the county, highly favorable compared to other states. The “pure premium” is the portion of the premium employers pay insurers to cover anticipated claims costs for job-related injuries and deaths. State officials attribute the decrease to a focus on improving worker safety, getting injured workers treated and back on the job quickly, as well as the initial impact of medical cost control strategies. The “pure premium” rate has either remained the same or decreased for 23 of the past 25 years. At $1.35, it’s currently the lowest it has been in 20 years, making this cost among the lowest in the country for employers. Employment Gains 2014 to 2015 (Covered employees by payroll) 2014

2015

Gain/Lo

%

Bend/Deschutes County MSA Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro,

69,160 1,076,00

73,850 1,111,40

4,690

6.78%

35,400

3.29%

Salem MSA

150,500

155,600

5,100

3.39%

Area

Medford MSA

79,320

81,730

2,410

3.04%

148,000

40,900

1,170

2.94%

142,188 1,721,90

151,700 1,778,70

3,700

2.50%

Oregon U.S. Average

146,303,

142,877,

56,800 -

-2.34%

Eugene MSA Eugene-Springfield (Lane Coun-

3.30%

Source: Oregon Employment Department; QCEW &BCLS CPS.

For manufacturers in places like California, the cost savings of workers’ compensation insurance in Oregon can be substantial. Even a company with 50 employees can realize six-figure annual savings on this one cost factor alone.

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS From 2014 to 2015, jobs in the nation decreased by a rate of 2.34%. Oregon outpaced the nation’s job growth and Deschutes County grew at three times the national average. The Bend/Redmond MSA is th 1/7 the size of the Salem, Medford, Corvallis, and Eugene MSAs combined, yet it created nearly the same number of jobs.

UNEMPLOYMENT TRENDS Regarded as a lagging indicator by most economists, this chart provides a five-year perspective on unemployment in the Tri-County area. Since early 2011, unemployment rates have been reduced significantly. As of March 2016, Deschutes County’s unemployment rate dropped below 5 percent (4.8%) for the first time since June 2007. Crook County’s fell to 7.1%, the lowest rate since June 2008. The unemployment rate dropped to 6.5% in Jefferson County, down from 7.3% in March 2015, a statistically significant decline. Because of Central Oregon’s sustained strong in-migration, job creation typically lags population growth, a reason why historically, Oregon’s unemployment rate tracks higher than the national rate.

HOUSING / REAL ESTATE TRENDS Average Monthly Rent

Average Monthly Rent

The Central Oregon rental market continues to face heightened demand in the midst of constrained supply. According to the Central Oregon Rental Owners Association, current vacancy rates have shrunk to 1.04% as of March 2015), down from 12.4% in 2009. The high demand has exerted pressure on prices and a growing interest in multi-family residential construction, particularly in Bend and Redmond. In the last year, two and three bedroom rental houses increased more on a percentage basis than apartments and duplexes. 2014 average rent prices for a 3 bedroom home were up slightly

Area Bend Redmond Terrebonne Madras/Culver Prineville La Pine Sunriver Sisters

(3 Bedroom House, listed in $) 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 1003 969 1012 1231 1110

2014 1,221

2015 N/A

884 834 790 890 1000 n/a

1,014 859 895 880 1,180 898

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

863 849 809 905 991 913

911 817 847 861 896 850

975 800 835 889 1086 922

952 765 755 838 1066 875

Source: Central Oregon Rental Owners Association (COROA); March 2015

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from 2013 in nearly all Central Oregon communities. Our expectation is that 2015 annual rental figures will be up sharply in Bend, Redmond, Prineville, and Sisters amidst strong in-migration and near record low vacancies.

Home Prices As with much of the country, residential property prices peaked to all-time highs in 2007 and declined in value by as much as 40% in the following years. Prices are now rebounding substantially, both median and average home prices increased in 2015 across the region, but are still below 2005 levels. (Note: Prices in Sunriver and Sisters include a higher percentage of high end homes and homes on acreage than comparable prices in Bend or Redmond.)

Home Prices of Existing Single Family Homes (residential, less than one acre, $) Median Sales Price 2012

2013

2014

2015

77,750

87,000

127,113

132,450

157,750

190,000

220,790

269,000

116,000

132,500

175,000

289,950 195,605

327,478 223,266

88,500

94,900

133,000

149,900

185,000

223,750

198,500

245,000

300,000

269,078

330,000

402,000

417,500

375,000

347,500

364,000

367,500

375,000

89,900

69,950

68,000

72,500

85,000

111,000

121,000

196,600

172,100

173,200

166,200

176,800

197,100

208,300

222,400

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Crook County

149,375

195,500

199,450

177,500

112,000

91,100

Bend

279,900

351,978

345,000

289,450

212,000

191,750

Redmond

198,818

262,749

250,000

216,000

147,500

123,450

La Pine

148,450

183,500

215,000

160,000

109,000

99,900

Sisters

394,250

460,000

415,000

367,450

286,250

Sunriver

462,500

575,000

548,547

555,738

Jefferson County

133,500

165,080

177,950

139,950

U.S.

219,000

221,900

217,900

2011

Average Sales Price Crook County

154,906

212,173

224,151

206,874

145,040

120,537

96,344

113,980

148,108

162,753

198,455

Bend Redmond

334,570 226,238

406,122 292,268

426,044 286,543

353,142 245,204

266,319 170,739

245,069 142,402

238,312 137,304

263,317 148,117

317,902 197,186

344,720

385,657

217,126

244,904 187,896

La Pine

163,971

202,331

237,665

180,153

126,606

110,632

108,438

100,940

146,802

159,070

Sisters

449,979

514,259

526,626

437,636

372,483

295,488

248,953

292,960

317,442

316,253

376,894

Sunriver

501,764

627,345

637,734

628,979

458,614

455,550

398,948

381,259

408,326

Jefferson County

131,493

170,228

187,367

144,146

145,040

78,376

74,724

83,152

96,185

407,426 127,344

421,927 128,783

U.S.

267,400

268,200

266,000

242,700

216,900

220,000

214,300

225,500

245,500

225,300

226,400

Sources: Central Oregon Association of Realtors (COAR), National Association of Realtors, March 2015

Commercial and Industrial Real Estate Market Trends Central Oregon’s commercial real estate market is marked by substantial positive absorption trends. In their quarterly POINTS report, Compass Commercial Real Estate observes that 2014 marked the beginning of the end of the recession for the office market. Retail and office sectors are experiencing strong growth and low vacancy rates. Absorption of Bend’s 2.48 million square feet of office space has picked up, with the current vacancy rate at 6.26%. Building space in Bend, often driven by high-demand areas such as the Old Mill and downtown have very low vacancy rates, which are currently around 4.7% for retail space. Activity in the industrial market (approximately 5.72 million square feet in Bend and Redmond) has been strong. Since the first quarter of 2015, the Bend industrial market experienced 240,775 square feet of positive absorption resulting in a vacancy rate of 3.36% as of

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Q1 2016. The Redmond industrial market has also performed well in the recovery. The current vacancy rate of 4.80% represents seven consecutive quarters of positive absorption. Building activity is steadily increasing throughout Central Oregon. As a result, the number of building permits issued for new commercial construction, remodels, additions, and repurposing is increasing rapidly, construction prices are on the increase and rents, particularly for newer properties, are climbing.

Land Prices, Lease Rates & Construction Costs Business Costs Across the Region Land costs in the re1 (all costs expressed as costs per square foot ) gion are rebounding Deschutes County Crook Jefferson after seeing as much Category County County Bend Redmond Sisters La Pine as 50% value reducIndustrial land costs $7.00-$11.00 $2.00-$5.00 $2.55-$6.00 $1.00-$2.00 $1.00-$2.50 $1.00-$2.50 2 tions resulting from Lease rates the Great Recession. Industrial $0.55-$0.85 $0.40-$0.65 $0.40-$0.65 $0.15-$0.25 $0.25-$0.45 $0.25-$0.45 Costs do vary by $0.70-$1.00 $0.70-$1.00 Commercial $1.00-$1.75 $0.75-$1.50 $0.70-$1.50 $0.80-$1.00 community, with $0.90-$1.50 $0.70-$1.50 $0.50-$1.00 $0.70-$1.50 $0.70-$1.25 Retail $1.00-$2.50 Crook and Jefferson Construction $80-$150 $80-$150 $80-$150 $80-$150 $80-150 $80-$150 Source: Compass Commercial Construction Services, Steve Hendley, April 2016. The table is meant to represent a range of costs and may Counties generally be negotiable. Please contact EDCO with your specific project requirements. 2Assumes base rent excluding NNN costs having lower land and lease costs. In Deschutes County, Redmond offers lower land and lease costs than neighboring Bend, Sisters is comparable to Bend, while La Pine costs are comparable with Crook and Jefferson Counties. Several years of strong demand for retail, office, and light industrial space are pushing vacancies down and rents higher in 2015. For the first time in seven years, EDCO expects to see a number of new industrial and light industrial construction projects in the year and possible office projects in 20015 and 2016. Banks, Savings Associations, and Credit Unions in Central Oregon (as of April 2016)

FINANCIAL SERVICES Central Oregon is home to 16 financial institutions which collectively have 64 branches in the region. In addition to these banks and credit unions there are a number of alternative financial resources that can be found on EDCO’s website under incentives. Alternative financing includes a number of organizations with local offices that work closely with banks and credit unions including Business Oregon, Craft3 and Oregon Certified Business Development Organization.

Bank of America Bank of the Cascades Chase Bank Columbia Bank High Desert Bank Mid Oregon Credit Union Northwest Community Credit Union Northwest Farm Credit Services OnPoint Community Credit Union

Oregonians Credit Union SELCO Community Credit Union Summit Bank Union Mid Oregon Credit Union U.S. Bank Umpqua Bank Washington Federal Wells Fargo Bank

Source: FDIC, EDCO Business Research

The total FDIC-insured deposit base as of June 30, 2014 (the most current data available) was $3.06 billion. Reflecting higher than average deposit wealth, Central Oregon also supports a significant number of financial planning and investment firms. Many of these firms also provide wealth management for clients nationwide.

POPULATION

Financial Institutions Deposits in Central Oregon (in millions) County Crook County Deschutes County Jefferson County Tri-County Total

2008

2012

$270 $1,623 $133 $2,678

$206 $2,351 $139 $2,696

2013

2014

$205 $2,450 $146 $2,801

$237 $2,682 $143 $3,063

2015 $234 $3,000 $143 $3,377

% Growth 2014-2015 -1.27% 11.86% 0.00% 10.25%

Source: FDIC Summary of Deposits as of 6/30 for each year.

Oregon’s population growth of 1.29% from 2014 to 2015 was again dominated by net migration (movers-in outpaced movers-out). Similarly, but even more dramatic inmigration trends prevail in the Tri-County area. Deschutes County experienced the largest year-over-year percentage gain (2.4%), making it the fastest growing county in Oregon. Deschutes County grew dramatically between the 1990 and 2000 Census and even more so between 2000 and 2010. In 2015, it th was the 7 fastest growing county in the U.S. Bend more than doubled in size between 1990 and 2000 and grew by 47% between 2000 and 2010. While growth flattened between 2010 and 2012, signs over the past 24 months point to a pickup of in-migration Page 9 Last updated 4/21/2016

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and business activity across the region. Since 2010, Crook County has grown at a very slow pace after dramatic growth between 1990 and 2010. At 18.1% growth since 2000, Jefferson County has grown at a steady rate that exceeds that of Oregon and the nation.

Population Totals for Central Oregon 1990

2000

2010

2013

2014

2015

2,842,321

3,421,399

3,837,300

3,919,020

3,962,710

4,013,845

Crook County

14,111

19,184

21,020

20,690

20,780

21,085

Deschutes County

74,958

115,367

157,905

162,525

166,400

170,740

Bend

20,447

52,029

76,740

78,280

79,985

81,310

La Pine

Not yet incorporated

1,660

1,670

1,670

1,670

Area Oregon

7,165

13,481

26,225

26,590

26,770

27,050

708

959

2,040

2,115

2,190

2,280

Unincorporated

46,638

48,898

51,240

53,570

55,785

53,151

Jefferson County

13,676

19,009

21,750

22,040

22,205

22,445

Tri-County Total

102,745

153,560

200,675

205,225

209,385

214,270

Redmond

In March 2015, Portland State University (PSU)’s Oregon Population Forecast Program released a population forecast for the tri-county of an estimated 416,764 people by 2065 – the first of its kind in many years.

Sisters

Source: Population Research Center, PSU. 1990 and 2000 Census numbers are for April 1 of that year; 2013, 2014, & 2015 data are for July 1 of that year.

Deschutes County, the fastest growing county in the state, will be home to about 357,345 people in 2065, with 194,793 of them in greater Bend, increasing the city by an estimated 127% over today’s population. The population in Jefferson County in 2065 will reach an estimated 33,779, 48% over today’s population. By 2065, an expected 25,640 will call Crook County home, a 21% increase over 2015. Overall, population forecasters expect the region to continue to be a very dynamic part of the state and country.

Population Projections 2015-2065 Area Tri-County Total Crook County Prineville UGB Outside UGB Deschutes County Bend UGB La Pine UGB Sisters UGB Redmond Outside UGBs Jefferson County Madras

2015 214,547 21,135 11,256 9,879 170,606 85,737 1,687 2,315 27,715 53,151 22,806 7,484

2025 258,899 22,404 11,935 10,470 210,826 109,546 2,263 3,431 33,282 62,305 25,669 8,700

2035 300,926 23,916 12,845 11,071 249,037 132,209 3,014 4,375 39,812 69,627 27,973 9,815

2045 340,739 24,962 13,472 11,489 285,908 154,719 3,872 5,320 47,167 74,830 29,869 10,867

2055 379,237 25,457 13,593 11,864 322,045 176,003 4,816 6,266 55,373 79,587 31,735 11,832

2065 416,764 25,640 13,383 12,257 357,345 194,793 5.836 7,212 64,785 84,719 33,779 12,749

Source: PSU Oregon Population Forecast Program, Preliminary Forecasts, March 2015.

.

EDUCATION Public Schools Central Oregon schools in Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County School Districts serve an area greater than 7,800 square miles, include urban centers such as Bend and Redmond along with smaller towns and rural areas. Over 32,000 students attend 64 schools. TriCounty districts operate 32 elementary schools, 14 middle schools, and 18 high schools, as well as a diverse array of charter and community schools. Of the area’s teachers, nearly 99% meet Highly Qualified standards and over 65% hold a Master’s Degree or higher.

2015-2016 Public School Enrollment Breakdown School District Students Schools Website Crook County Crook SD 3,480 7 crookcounty.k12.or.usU Deschutes County Bend-La Pine SD 17,534 31 bend.k12.or.usU Redmond SD 7,305 13 redmond.k12.or.usU Sisters SD 1,090 3 sisters.k12.or.usU Jefferson County Jefferson SD 509J 2,873 7 Jcsd.k12.or.us Culver SD 688 3 culver.k12.or.usU Tri-County Total 32,970 64 Source: Oregon Department of Education; local school districts

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Central Oregon Profile

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The largest school district is Bend-La Pine with over 17,000 students enrolled and more than 1,750 staff members. Its attendance area spans more than 1,600 square miles - the seventh largest in the state. In the 2013-2014 State School Report Card, 86% of our schools in the Bend-La Pine received overall ratings of 4 or 5, with 25% of our schools rated in the top 10 of Oregon schools. In 2016, the Sisters School District was ranked in the Top 10 in the state. Since 2000, students in the Bend-La Pine School District have continually scored higher on SAT tests than their peers, 108 points higher than the U.S. Average. More than 70% of Bend students continue onto college. Private Schools

2015 Average SAT Scores Bend-La Pine Washington Oregon California U.S. Average

1598 1496 1546 1492 1490

Private schools in Central Oregon have developed a reputation for high academic achieveSources: College Board & Bend-La Pine ment and a focus on giving personalized attention to each individual student. There are 30 School District private schools in Central Oregon; twelve of these are faith-based and represent a variety of Catholic and Protestant denominations. In addition, two institutions – J Bar J and New Leaf Academy offer therapeutic education services to at-risk youth in need of support. While a diverse range of educational methods and services are present in private schools throughout Central Oregon, several institutions stand out for reputation and large student population. Among these select private schools are Trinity Lutheran School, Seven Peaks, and Cascades Academy in Bend as well as Central Christian School in Redmond. Demand for Higher Education

K-12 District Enrollment for Oregon’s Metros District Bend-La Pine 1 Redmond 2J Hillsboro 1J Salem-Keizer 24J Medford 549C N. Clackamas 12 Statewide Average Eugene 4J Corvallis 509J Portland 1J

2004 13,940 6,159 18,951 37,877 12,853 16,170 551,372 18,476 7,063 48,326

2016 17,534 7,305 20,836 41,100 13,836 17,241 576,407 17,203 6,712 48,383

% 25.8% 18.6% 9.9% 8.5% 7.6% 6.6% 4.5 -6.9 -5.0 .12%

Source: Oregon Department of Education, Fall Membership Report ’15-‘16

The populace of Central Oregon has a strong interest in pursuing higher education and improving their vocational skills. The chart to the right shows enrollment for Central Oregon’s post-secondary education institutions over the past thirteen years. The last seven years of demand for higher education have been driven by several forces: Central Oregon’s growing population base, a recovery from the national economic recession, and job training and re-training. Additionally, OSU-Cascades Campus is gaining in reputation, attracting more students, and expanding its program offerings. EDCO works in partnership with Central Oregon Community College (COCC) and OSU-Cascades to ensure that program offerings align with business needs. Both institutions have top leaders that serve as Directors on EDCO’s Board.

Central Oregon Community College (COCC) Central Oregon Community College operates campuses in Bend, Redmond, Madras, and Prineville. Founded in 1949, COCC (www.cocc.edu) is Oregon’s first and consequently oldest community college. The College offers transfer/lower division programs, mirroring the first two years of a university education at a fraction of the cost, plus career and technical education programs to move students into local industry jobs. The COCC District covers a 10,000-square-mile area that encompasses all of Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties, the southern part of Wasco, and the northern portions of Klamath and Lake Counties. A seven-member board of directors governs the College, with members of that board elected from geographic zones in the District. The 200-acre Bend campus includes 26 buildings with a total of 575,000 square feet under roof. The newest buildings are the Jungers Culinary Center, funded primarily by private donations and opened in 2011, and the Health Careers Center and Science Center, funded by a voter-approved bond measure, both opened in fall 2012. The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) operated by COCC provides active support for Central Oregon’s small businesses. SBDC provides programs Page 11 Last updated 4/21/2016

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such as counseling and market research assistance for entrepreneurs at the earliest stages of development. COCC’s Business and Employee Development department delivers industry-specific courses and workshops tailored to business and industry’s changing needs. The College also offers a wide range of continuing education for personal and professional development. The COCC Redmond Campus sits on 25-acres near the Redmond Airport and includes four buildings to serve students with a variety of career programs, educational opportunities, and transfer eligible classes. This past year, approximately 2,400 students enrolled in one or more credit classes in Redmond. In addition to the wide range of services and college courses offered to students, COCC’s Redmond Campus is home to the region’s Manufacturing and Applied Technology Center, a 26,000-square-foot technical training facility with certificate and degree programs readying students for jobs in the manufacturing field. The COCC regional Technology Education Center offers classes for Central Oregon’s business and workforce population at the Redmond Campus. This 34,000-square-foot facility, planned and developed with industry participation, located on the corner of Veterans Way and Salmon Drive, is home to the Center for Entrepreneurial Excellence and Development (CEED) as well as courses and programs in Non-Destructive Testing and Inspection, Digital Arts and Media and Flexible Technology. For more information: www.cocc.edu/redmond or 541-504-2900.

New COCC Technology Education Center in Redmond

Enrollment at COCC has increased dramatically over the years, doubling in the last few years as increasing numbers of area residents turned to the College for education and training after the economic downturn. A record number of students have been earning certificates and degrees, then transferring to four-year colleges and universities or moving into jobs locally using skills learned in the career and technical education programs. Oregon State University – Cascades Campus Founded in 2001, OSU-Cascades (OSUC) offers upper-level and graduate courses in a unique partnership with Central Oregon Community College (COCC), in which students typically take lower-division courses at COCC. Currently, the two institutions share a beautiful, 200-acre campus on the northwest side of Bend. Students who take advantage of this partnership pay about 25% less in tuition and fees than they would at a traditional university. Offering small class sizes, OSUC students may choose from a variety programs (see table at left). OSU-Cascades is in the first phase of constructing a $111 million branch campus on a 10-acre parcel of the 56-acre site at the corner of SW Century Ave. and SW Chandler Ave. in Bend. Envisioned as an urban university, the new OSU-Cascades site plan calls for academic and residential buildings including retail space located within. OSUC aims to begin freshman and sophomore level classes fall term 2016, growing from just under 1,000 students today to 5,000 students by 2025. Faculty hiring and academic course planning is complete to provide the fall 2016 launch with a full slate of requirements OSU-Cascades Fields of Study for the undergraduate baccalaureate core courses. Accountancy American Studies Art: Art History Art: Visual Arts Biology Business Administration Business & Entrepreneurship

Counseling Creative Writing Early Childhood Development & Education Energy Systems Engineering English Hospitality Management Human Development & Family Sciences

Communication

Kinesiology

Computer Science

Liberal Studies

Military Science Natural Resources Political Science Psychology Social Science Sustainability Teaching

Tourism & Outdoor Leadership University Exploratory Studies Program

The Energy Systems Engineering Management program is unique in the state, preparing graduates for a broad range of careers in the energy industry. The Computer Science degree was developed with considerable industry input from many of the region’s software firms OSUC is now offering an executive leadership MBA program through OSU’s College of Business. The MBA takes about two years and is delivered in a hybrid format, blending face-to-face with online sessions and is designed for busy professionals. The university also aims to launch additional MBA programs. Page 12 Last updated 4/21/2016

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Additional Colleges and Universities Additional accredited academic institutions have a presence in Central Oregon, typically combining evening and occasional weekend classes in conjunction with distance learning. ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

University of Oregon is offering its Executive MBA program at its Bend location (503-276-3622) Eastern Oregon University Division of Distance Education (541-385-1137) George Fox University (1-800-631-0921) Linfield College - Central Oregon Center (541-388-2986) Oregon Institute of Technology, Bachelor’s degree in Operations Management, via COCC

UTILITIES SERVING CENTRAL OREGON

Average 2015 Electricity Rates (in cents, per kwh)

Electric Companies Service Class Industrial Commercial

Central Oregon providers of electric power are: ƒ Pacific Power (PPL), 888-221-7070 ƒ Central Electric Cooperative (CEC), 541-548-2144 ƒ Midstate Electric Cooperative (MSE), 541-536-2126

U.S. 7.10 10.74

CA 12.34 15.62

OR 5.97 8.76

CEC* 5.82 7.26

PPL* MSE* 7.37 6.00 9.08 6.60

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 data. *2015 eia data

For all sectors, Oregon’s electrical rates are well below the national average. For industrial customers, Central Oregon providers offer rates up to nearly 16% below the U.S. average and nearly 50% below those in neighboring California. The region is primarily served by one of the largest and most robust transmission systems in the country that is operated by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) a federal department. BPA is the source of most power generation for Central Electric and Midstate Electric cooperatives, although there are a number of other smaller scale renewable energy production facilities within the region including hydro and solar.

Natural Gas Natural gas is widely available throughout Central Oregon and is supplied by Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (CNGC) at 888-522-1130. Headquartered in Kennewick WA., CNGC serves more than 46,000 local industrial, commercial, and residential customers from a regional operations base in Bend.

Natural Gas Rates User Commercial Industrial Large Volume–General*

Delivery Charge/Therm $0.745 $0.262 $0.664 $0.191 $0.627 $0.154

Base Charge Cost Per Therm $3.00 $12.00 Included

*Requires specific contract and usage conditions; 1 therm = 1,000 BTUs. Potential users for the Large Volume–General Service rate Source: www.cngc.com, Feb 2016 should contact EDCO for additional information about their potential usage conditions. Transmission to the region is provided by 36 and 42 inch high capacity lines that run from Canada to southern California.

Water System & Rates Cities in the region have invested in the latest technology for the least environmental impact and greatest savings to residents and businesses. Rates vary between communities in the region. Commercial and industrial rates are typically based on meter size; please contact EDCO for specifics.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS Built largely over the last decade, Central Oregon’s telecommunications infrastructure is one of the Northwest’s most technologically advanced, meeting requirements for capacity, redundancy, and reliability. High-end data services, typically offered only in large metro areas, include Ethernet access rates up to 10 GB. Several local providers focus purely on the commercial market. Services are delivered across a number of access options including land line (copper), high speed fiber optics, and wireless (WiFi, WiMax and secure microwave). Many providers offer DSL, ISDN, Frame Relay, ATM, and Metro Ethernet services, along with the Page 13 Last updated 4/21/2016

Central Oregon Profile

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traditional high capacity TDM services (T1, T3, OCx). All Local Exchange Carrier central offices use digital electronic switches and the entire system is on a redundant, self-healing fiber optic network. Telecom Resources in Central Oregon Carriers & Providers Wireless Internet Cable Resellers & Integrators

BendBroadband, BendTel, CenturyLink, FatBeam, Quantum Communications, Integra Telecom Community Broadband, Webformix, Yellowknife Wireless BendBroadband, Chambers Cable, Crestview Cable, DirecTV Integra Telecom (Internet & voice)

Telephone Interconnect ACT Cascades, CascadeTel AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, US Cellular, VeriCellular zon

With a strong history of investing in cutting edge technology early, BendBroadband’s nationally recognized reputation for innovation has made Central Oregon a telecommunications oasis, on par with far larger metro areas. In 2010, BendBroadband won a federal broadband infrastructure grant of $4.4M to deploy fiber infrastructure to Madras, La Pine, Sunriver, and Prineville, providing broadband connectivity to the region’s historically underserved areas. The new 132mile fiber network is comprised of closed or open rings to points of presence in the four cities, OTN network in the middle mile, and a combination of Optical Metro Ethernet and GePON in the last mile creates a comprehensive, regional 40 Gbps fiber ring.

SERVICES Health Services Top quality health care is one of Central Oregon’s crown jewels. With four hospitals and more than 3,800 employees, St. Charles Health System is the largest provider of medical care in Central Oregon. St. Charles has pledged to partner with the communities it serves to achieve an ambitious vision: Creating America's healthiest communities, together. St. Charles Health System began in 2001 as Cascade Health Services when St. Charles Medical Center in Bend merged with Central Oregon District Hospital in Redmond. Today, the organization owns and operates medical centers in Bend, Redmond, Prineville, and Madras. Medical centers in Bend and Redmond are accredited while St. Charles Bend is Oregon's only Level II Trauma Center east of the Cascades. St. Charles Bend is a fully accredited, 261-bed hospital that includes 24-hour emergency care, intensive/cardiac care, physical, respiratory and nutritional New St. Charles Bend Cancer Center therapy, radiology, surgery and an on-campus rehabilitation center. In addition, they offer quality care services including cancer care, cardiology, neurology, orthopedics, stroke care, and weight loss surgery. Hightech leading-edge services are also present in St. Charles’ telemedicine and da Vinci Surgery programs. As a private, nonprofit Oregon corporation, St. Charles is Central Oregon's largest employer with more than 3,800 employees in Bend, Madras, Redmond, Prineville, and Sisters combined. More than 350 active medical staff members and approximately 200 visiting medical staff members also make it possible for St. Charles to deliver a wide range of excellent care in a compassionate, healing environment.

Media ƒ Print: The Bulletin is the dominant daily newspaper while local papers cover Madras, Redmond, Prineville, Sisters, and La Pine. Cascade Business News, a bi-weekly business publication, 1859, Oregon’s first cultural magazine, and The Source, an alternative weekly newspaper, round out the print news options. ƒ Radio: Three privately-held companies (Horizon Broadcasting Group, Bend Radio Group, and Combined Communications) collectively own 15 radio stations plus there are two independent operators. Spanish language station, Radio La Bronca, addresses the region’s Latino population. ƒ Television: KTVZ TV 21 is the NBC affiliate, KOHD TV 51 is the ABC affiliate, KFXO TV 39 is the Fox affiliate, KBNZ TV 7 is the CBS affiliate, and KOAB TV 11 is the PBS station. BendBroadband airs local original programming through COTV 11, its community cable channel, which provides in-depth local news, sports and information.

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TRANSPORTATION Commercial Airport Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM; www.flyrdm.com) provides commercial air service (15 flights daily) to Denver, Los Angeles, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle via four carriers (Alaska, American, Delta, and United). In June 2016, direct service to/from Phoenix, AZ, will be added via American Airlines. Considerable investment has been made at RDM in recent years Flying Time to Markets Served by RDM including a $40 million terminal expansion, expanded passenger parking (to over Flying Time Flight to: 1,000 places) and tarmac and runway reconstruction. Denver, CO 2 hours 24 min The Airport is home to the USDA Forest Service Redmond Air Center, Cascade Aviation Management, Life Flight, Butler Aviation, Les Schwab, Bonneville Power, RDD Enterprises, Lancair, and Henderson Aviation. RDM also provides air cargo services and hosts general aviation traffic, including extensive corporate and business travel. Fed Ex, United Parcel Service and the USPS provide air freight and package express services.

Los Angeles, CA Portland, OR Salt Lake City, UT San Francisco, CA Seattle, WA

2 hours 0 hours 1 hour 1 hour 1 hour

0 min 40 min 30 min 10 min 10 min

Source: Redmond Municipal Airport

General Aviation Airports ƒ The Bend Municipal Airport is located just outside the Bend city limits in Deschutes County and is owned and managed by the City of Bend. The 415 acre airport has a single 5,200’ runway with parallel full length taxiways on the east and west sides. A total of 67 separate structures reside at the airport, 15 city-owned and 52 privately-owned. There are currently 14 businesses located at the airport. Aircraft manufacturing, aircraft parts manufacturing, and helicopter flight training comprise the greatest commercial activity at the airport. ƒ The Prineville/Crook County Airport is located three miles SW of Prineville and has two well-maintained, lighted, intersecting asphalt runways that are able to accommodate small aircraft and corporate jets. The primary runway is 5,751’ in length and 75’ wide and is equipped with GPS instrument approaches. The crosswind runway is 4,054’ long and 40’ feet. An automated weather observation system was installed in the fall of 2013. In February 2013, Hillsboro Aviation began using the Prineville/Crook County airport as a flight training center for international students. Hillsboro picked Prineville because of the favorable weather conditions and services the airport and community provide. ƒ The Madras Municipal Airport and industrial site is a fast-growing Category 4 airport for general aviation and business use. The airport is owned by the City of Madras and is surrounded by a 125-acre industrial park. One of the two runways is 5,100’ in length and can accommodate a wide variety of general aviation aircraft up to C-130’s. The Madras Airport has 2,100 acres for aeronautical and industrial use. A new 39,000 SF hangar facility is leased to Aero Air, LLC, as their base for maintenance and operation of fire-fighting aircraft. Aero Air recently expanded their operations with an additional 65,000 SF hangar and other aircraft related businesses. A $2.2 million Connect Oregon III project provided additional navigation aids and runway/taxiway lighting, an automated weather observation system, and new taxiway and ramp improvements.

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ƒ The Sunriver Resort Airport is a general aviation airport located 17 miles south of Bend in the heart of the critically acclaimed Resort. With a recently upgraded and refinished 5,500’ long paved and lighted airstrip, the Resort airport is the third busiest in the state and is one of the longest private airstrips in the West. The airport serves a wide range of aircraft from small private planes to corporate jets. Also prominent among these high-end services is luxury auto rental provided by Kendall Automotive as well as full services to pilots and flight crews. ƒ Sisters Airport: At 3168’, Sisters Eagle Air Airport is located one mile north of downtown Sisters and is categorized by the Oregon Department of Aviation as Category IV (local general aviation airport). While privately-owned by Sisters Eagle Air, Inc., the airport is open to public use. It is also used for EMS and wildfire aircraft support. The runway dimensions are 3550’ x 60’/ 1082 x 18 m. Originally built in 1936, the Sisters Airport was re-paved, updated, and improved in 2013 and is fast becoming a center for local businesses. Several successful traded-sector companies, including ENERGYneering, have their headquarters at the airport. In the spring of 2014, the airport property was annexed into the City of Sisters. Through this public-private partnership, the airports, and its key companies, have plans to expand commercially/industrially, and with an array of benefits and perks for pilots. Additional Transportation Services ƒ For air freight, Central Oregon is served by Federal Express, United Parcel Service and US Postal Service Express mail. ƒ To move motor freight, U.S. Highways 97 and 20, both of which run through Central Oregon, are two of the state's major trucking routes. To reach the Northwest’s metro areas, trucking companies that operate in Central Oregon use Hwy 97 to access Interstate 5 (north-south) and Interstate 84 (east-west). ƒ In terms of rail service, Burlington Northern-Santa Fe, Union Pacific and the City of Prineville Railway provide direct rail connections for shipping to any market in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Amtrak provides passenger rail service to Central Oregon via the Chemult station, about 60 miles south of Bend on Hwy 97. Transit within Central Oregon: Cascades East Transit (CET) operates the regional bus system, providing service within the City of Bend, and between Bend and the following cities: La Pine, Prineville, Madras, Culver, Metolius, Warm Springs, Redmond, and Sisters. CET is managed by the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC). For more information, visit www.cascadeseasttransit.com, call locally (541-385-8680) or toll free (1-866-385-8680). ƒ Among the most relevant intra-city bus options, Central Oregon Breeze, a division of CAC Transportation, provides service 362 days a year between Bend, Redmond, Madras, Gresham, and Portland. The Breeze connects Central Oregon residents with Amtrak, the MET and Portland International Airport. TAC Transportation operates two lines important to Central Oregonians making connections: Eastern POINT provides service along Hwy 20 from Bend to Burns and Ontario; similarly, the High Desert POINT provides daily Amtrak thruway service from the Chemult Amtrak station to Sunriver, La Pine, Bend, and Redmond.

TRAVEL DISTANCES With U.S. Highway 97 running north to south through Bend, and U.S. Highway 20 running east to west through Bend, travel to other areas in Oregon is relatively straightforward. Using either the northern Highway 26 or the more southern Highway 20 route, Portland is a three hour drive from Bend, while Medford is about four hours away. Outside Oregon, Seattle can be reached in less than six hours and parts of the Bay Area can be accessed in eight or nine hours. Los Angeles, at nearly 14 hours, tests the outer limit of a day’s drive. Distance from Bend Oregon City Portland Medford Olympia Seattle Boise San Francisco Los Angeles

State OR OR WA WA ID CA CA

Miles 145 189 251 311 323 507 838

Drive Time 3 hrs, 3 min 4 hrs, 6 min 4 hrs, 44 min 5 hrs, 42 min 6 hrs, 33 min 9 hrs, 0 min 13 hrs, 48 min

Source: Mapquest

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COMMUTE TIME Averaging just over 20 minutes, drive times for Central Oregon are very manageable. For the majority of people living and working in the same urban center, most commute times are often less than 15 minutes. However, because the workforce throughout the TriCounty area is truly regional, it is common for people to commute between Redmond and Bend or between Sisters and Bend. Even with the Tri-County average of just over 20 minutes, commute times in Central Oregon are substantially lower than average commute times in Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Boise, Los Angeles, and many other urban centers.

TOPOGRAPHY & CLIMATE Every community in Central Oregon has its own variations of temperature and precipitation, relative to its elevation and proximity to the mountains. The region is known for sun, averaging just two weeks fewer sunny days than San Diego, CA. Interestingly, the region lies on one of the nation’s largest rain gradients: Redmond receives an average of 8.6 inches of precipitation and is only 60 miles from a region in the Cascades that receives over 120 inches. The geographical climate for Central Oregon is predominately High Desert. Summer temperatures range from an average high of 82° to a low of 40° F, while winter temperatures range from average highs in the 40s to lows in the 20s. Average precipitation is 11.5 inches, falling mostly in the form of snow during the winter months.

City

Elevation

La Pine Sunriver Bend Sisters Redmond Prineville Madras Warm Springs

4,300’ 4,100’ 3,623’ 3,200’ 3,077’ 2,868’ 2,242’ 1,575’

Bend, Oregon Weather Profile Average High (°F) Average Low (°F) Mean (°F) Average Precipitation (inches)

Jan 41° 24° 33° 1.5

Feb 44° 24° 34° 1.1

Mar 51° 28° 39° 0.8

Apr 57° 30° 44° 0.8

May 65° 36° 51° 0.9

Jun 72° 42° 57° 0.7

Jul 82° 47° 65° 0.6

Aug 81° 46° 64° 0.5

Sep 74° 40° 57° 0.4

Oct 62° 33° 47° 0.6

Nov 47° 28° 38° 1.4

Dec 39° 23° 31° 2.2

Source: U.S. Climate Data

TOP 10 PROPERTY TAXPAYERS Top 10 Property Taxpayers in 2015-2016 Deschutes County

Crook County

Jefferson County

1

TDS Baja Broadband LLC

Property & Revenue Tax Manager (Pacificore)

2

PacifiCorp (PP&L)

Brasada Ranch Development LLC

Gas Transmission Northwest Corp.

3

Gas Transmission Northwest Corp

Les Schwab Warehouse Center Inc.

PacifiCorp (PPL)

4

Cascade Natural Gas Corp

Contact Industries inc

Bright Wood Corporation

5

Bend Research Inc

O’Ryan Ranches LLC

Warm Springs Power Enterprises

6

Touchmark at Mount Bachelor Village LLC

Les Schwab Warehouse Center #11

Keith Manufacturing, Inc./Keith Invest.

7

Suterra LLC

WG Prineville LLC

Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad

8

CVSC LLC

CenturyLink

Safeway, Inc.

9

Deschutes Brewery INC

TDS BAJA Broadband LLC

Union Pacific Railroad Company

10

CenturyLink Property Tax

Gas Transmission NW Corp.

CenturyLink

Portland General Electric Company

Sources: Local County Assessors

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CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE & OTHER BUSINESS RESOURCES Chambers of Commerce

Other Organizations

Bend Chamber 541-382-3221 www.bendchamber.org

Prineville/Crook Co. Chamber 541-447-6304 www.visitprineville.com

Central Oregon Visitors Assoc. (COVA) 800-800-8334 www.visitcentraloregon.com

Crooked River Ranch Chamber 541-923-2679 www.crrchamber.com

Redmond Chamber 541-923-5191 www.visitredmondoregon.com

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Business and Economic Development 541-553-3468 | www.warmsprings.com

La Pine Chamber 541-536-9771 www.lapine.org

Sisters Area Chamber 541-549-0251 www.sisterscountry.com

La Pine Industrial Group 541-536-9042

Madras/Jefferson Co. Chamber 541-475-2350 www.madraschamber.com

Sunriver Chamber 541-593-8149 www.sunriverchamber.com

Visit Bend 877-245-8484 www.visitbend.com

BUSINESS RESOURCES Listed below is a sampling of the broad variety of business support organizations (BSO) that cover the continuum of business development - from early to growth stage. More resources are available, so contact EDCO for a complete list including local resources or customized assistance that brings our longstanding relationships with these organizations. Oregon Resources

County Resources

Business Oregon www.oregon4biz.com

Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) (541) 548-8163 | www.coic2.org

Inventor’s Northwest (541) 317-1154 | www.coinventorsgroup.ning.com

Central Oregon Workforce Coordinating Council 541-504-3306

NEW (Network of Entrepreneurial Women) www.networkwomen.org

City Club of Central Oregon 541-633-7163 | www.cityclubco.com

Oregon Employer Council Central Oregon (541) 408-4557 | www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/OEC

Crook County www.co.crook.or.us

OMEP (Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership) www.omep.org

Deschutes County www.deschutes.org |541-388-6584

Vocational Rehab (541) 388-6336

Jefferson County www.co.jefferson.or.us

Worksource Bend (Oregon Employment Department) www.worksourceoregon.org

Small Business Development Center (SBDC) (541) 383-7290 | www.cocc.edu/sbdc

Tri-County Resources Abilitree (541) 388-8103 | www.abilitree.org COCC (Central Oregon Community College) www.cocc.edu

Opportunity Knocks www.opp-knocks.org OSU-Cascades (Oregon State University—Cascades Campus) www.osucascades.edu

COIC (Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council) (541) 548-8163 | www.coic2.org

SBDC (Small Business Development Center) (541) 383-7290

EDCO (Economic Development for Central Oregon) www.edcoinfo.com

SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) www.centraloregon.score.org

HiDEC (High Desert Enterprise Consortium) www.hidec.org

Tech Alliance www.techallianceco.org

HRACO (Human Resource Association of Central Oregon) www.HRCentralOregon.org

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CENTRAL OREGON’S ENTREPRENEURIAL LANDSCAPE In December 2015, Bend-Redmond climbed 38 spots to finish in eighth place on the Milken Institute’s list of Best Performing Small Cities. “Led by its vibrant tourism industry, Bend finished third among small metros in one-year job growth ending in 2014, outpacing the national average by 4 percentage points during that period. More recent job momentum points to an expanding economy, with the metro recording the third-fastest overall job gains in the nation over the 12 months ending in August 2015.” th (Source: Milken Institute).The next highest-ranking Oregon small metro was Medford at 28 . In addition, an increasing level of startup activity is being seen across Central Oregon. Numerous industry clusters are coalescing in such areas as high technology, bioscience, outdoor recreation and consumer goods, food products, brewing & distilling, energy, advanced manufacturing, and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicles). This activity is being driven by both entrepreneurs relocating to the region and local entrepreneurs embarking on their own enterprises. The region is large enough to support the resources and access to capital that help new entrepreneurs get started, while still being small enough that those resources are interconnected enough to support businesses as they grow. Unique to Central Oregon are the numerous community resources and assets that are available. A few of these include those managed by EDCO, such as the Stable of Experts, PubTalk, and the Bend Venture Conference (BVC). The Stable of Experts (SOE) is a searchable database of over 130 experts that spans multiple industries and disciplines. These experts have agreed to dedicate a certain number of hours to helping entrepreneurs fill their skills gaps and mentor young leaders. Every new business is like a puzzle with certain pieces missing. The SOE helps to fill in these missing pieces and increase their probability of success. Central Oregon PubTalk is a monthly event held at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, which has been converted into a very cool pub. These events are a showcase for entrepreneurs to pitch their business ideas and for previously showcased businesses to provide an update on their progress. Keynote speakers are brought in to add an educational component to the event. A successful pitch is an integral component of securing funding, which all new businesses need. PubTalk offers a platform for emerging businesses to practice and perfect that pitch. Coaching sessions are conducted by EDCO prior to the event. The event has grown from 950 attendees in FY 2014 to an expected 1,500 in FY 2106. The BVC has become the marquee event for the entrepreneurial community not just in Bend, but in the entire state of Oregon. th The annual event takes place in October and is in its 13 year. The 2014-2015 BVCs were pivotal years for the conference, with over $2M in funding secured for many of the participating startups. Over 465 investors, entrepreneurs, service, professionals, and students attend the BVC.

ABOUT EDCO Central Oregon Business Begins with EDCO Founded in 1981, EDCO is a non-profit corporation supported by private and public members and stakeholders. Our mission is to create a diversified local economy and a strong base of middle class jobs in Central Oregon. To do this, we focus on helping companies do the following: Move. We guide employers outside the region through the relocation process as a resource for regional data, incentives, talent, site selection, and more. Start. We mentor and advise scalable young companies from concept to exit on issues such as access to capital, critical expertise and strategy. Grow. We help local traded-sector companies expand by finding suppliers, workforce sourcing, permitting, and incentives.

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In addition, EDCO also works to improve the region’s business climate by influencing state legislation and local policy making, improving our transportation and information links to the rest of the world (air service, telecom) and catalyzing other critical infrastructure or community development needed to be prepared for successful business development. Board of Directors

EDCO Platinum Members

EDCO is a membership organization with roughly half of its funding coming from public entities (counties, cities and higher education) and the other half coming from private companies and individuals. The organization is guided by a 45-member board drawn from across the tri-county area of Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson, and representing a wide variety of industry sectors. EDCO is funded by members

AmeriTitle Bank of the Cascades Bend Memorial Clinic BendBroadband Cascade Natural Gas Central Electric Cooperative, Inc. Central Oregon Community College CenturyLink City of Bend City of LaPine City of Prineville City of Redmond City of Sisters Combined Communications Crook County Deschutes County Jefferson County Mid Oregon Credit Union OSU-Cascades Pacific Power Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt SGA CPAs & Consultants St. Charles Health System

Focused on Results At EDCO, we keep close tabs on economic indicators such as job growth, total payroll and new capital investment made by traded-sector companies. The results of the last three fiscal years and the first three quarters of fiscal year 2014-2015 are as follows: EDCO Offices

EDCO’s RESULTS

Fiscal Year 2015-2016 (Q3)

Jobs Payroll Companies (new & retained) (estimated)* 29 266 $12.5 million

New Capital Investment $59.7 million

2014-2015

35

594

$24.4 million

$102.6 million

2013-2014 2012-2013 2011-2012 TOTALS

30 29 21 80

590 1,136 890 2,616

$25.9 million $40.1 million $30.2 million $96.2 million

$210.9 million $340.0 million $25.6 million $576.5 million

Regional Office (Bend) 705 SW Bonnett Way, Ste. #1000 Bend, OR 97701 | 541-388-3236 Executive Director: Roger Lee Bend Manager: Tom Rowley Redmond 446 SW 7th Street Redmond, OR 97756 | 541-923-5223 Manager: Jon Stark Sisters 520 E Cascade Street | 541-977-5683 Sisters, OR 97759 Manager: Caprielle Lewis La Pine 16345 Sixth Street. | 541-536-1432 La Pine, OR 97759 Manager: Janet Burton Prineville/Crook County 510 SE Lynn Blvd. Prineville, OR 97754 | 541-233-2015 Manager: Caroline Ervin Madras/Jefferson County 2028 NW Airport Way Madras, OR 97741 | 541-390-3121 Manager: Janet Brown

Page 20 Last updated 4/21/2016

Central Oregon Profile

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