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YEARS 2006-2018

october 2018

G E T C R E AT I V E MAKE A DIFFERENCE B R I N G AWA R E N ES S


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October 2018

O c tob e r 2 0 18

Issu e On e Hu n d re d For ty- E i g ht

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inside

Joey Coakley Beck Publisher & Owner jbeck@beckmediagroup.com •••

editorial

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For editorial consideration: editorial@beckmediagroup.com

making a difference

Ready to go above and beyond your local 5k? Take the next steps in the fight against breast cancer with the first annual Komen on the Creeper 10-mile walk.

Contributors: Dr. Ally Bowersock, Faith Jones, K.L. Kranes, Member One Federal Credit Union, Sarah Raines, Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Intern: Cassandra Kuhn, University of Florida

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advertising

To market yourself and your business to the women of Southwest & Central Virginia, call us at (540) 904-6800 or email advertise@beckmediagroup.com Shannon Peters Advertising Sales Representative shannon@beckmediagroup.com •••

operations

For general inquiries: bella@beckmediagroup.com

get creative

Check out this unique guide to drawing filled with beautiful illustrations and paper goodies!

••• With over 12 years experience in Southwest & Central Virginia, Bella is your BEST advertising option with proven results, loyal readership, wonderful content, and an award-winning design!

bella finds

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We’ve found great items for the creature comforts of October!

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save smarter

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local women

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bella eats

This month, Member One Federal Credit Union provides excellent tips for keeping your smartphone secure.

Meet Frances Bosch as she makes a difference with Toy Like Me in Salem.

Check out this gorgeous new book, Southern from Scratch, filled with southern essentials and downhome recipes.

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mind • body • soul

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young female writers club

You aren’t a runner... yet! Dr. Ally Bowersock can help get you on track to be the runner you don’t realize you are. And Sarah Raines steps out of her comfort zone right in her own neighborhood.

Meet 16-year-old author, Paige Brotherton.

Sara Coakley Office Manager

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virginia made

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happenings

Urban Flora has blossomed in our region! Meet Katelyn Summerville.

LLC

P.O. Box 107 Roanoke, Virginia 24002 540.904.6800 Bella Magazine is the property of Beck Media Group LLC. It is a free publication printed monthly and is distributed throughout Southwest and Central Virginia and beyond. The Publisher reserves the right to refuse ad space for any advertisement or editorial content the staff deems inappropriate for our readers. The concept and design of Bella Magazine, as well as the design, advertisements, art, photos and editorial content is property of Beck Media Group LLC and may not be copied or reprinted without written permission from the publisher. ©2006-2018 Beck Media Group LLC All Rights Reserved. PRINTED IN VIRGINIA w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

The crisp fall air, the changing colors of the leaves... the plethora of events taking place in our region!

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profile

One woman’s quest to bring her family’s rich history and legacy—along with the beautiful home and gardens­—to the community. Meet Shaun Spencer Hester of the Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum of Lynchburg. october 2018

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making a difference

Komen on the Creeper Ready to go above and beyond a 5K? Take the next step in the fight against breast cancer along the Creeper Trail in Abingdon.

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Over 30 years ago, Nancy Brinker began a national organization in honor of her late sister who lost her battle to breast cancer, Susan G. Komen. With a goal to end breast cancer forever, the Susan G. Komen organization has raised over two billion dollars to date and started many programs to inform women about the effects of breast cancer and the importance of mammograms. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and on October 27th, the Virginia Blue Ridge affiliate of Susan G. Komen is hosting Komen on the Creeper, a 15-mile walk along the Virginia Creeper Trail in Abingdon to raise money for breast cancer research. In order to participate, walkers commit to raise a minimum of $500. (Did you know 75% of all donations received from every walker will stay in Southwest Virginia to help women in the community affected by breast cancer? The other 25% goes directly to national scientific research.) The walk will take you through downtown Abingdon and on the Creeper trail in a 10-mile loop. All participants are welcome to a Happy Hour and Sponsor Expo at the Heartwood on Friday and a Celebration Brunch the morning after the walk. Throughout the day of the event, there will be live music, food, and drinks for guests and walkers. Once registered, there is a training plan available, hydration tips, and mentors to help you prepare for the journey. If you’re looking for more motivation, you can also join a team or make your own! Although each member is still responsible for raising the minimum of $500, you can set a team goal and make a significant impact to end breast cancer. If you’re not interested in walking the 15 miles and are still passionate about the cause, you can join the event as a Volunteer and help with organizing the event before and the day of. Registration is currently open to the public and can be done online at komenvablueridge.org/creeper or over the phone at 540-400-8222 ext. 3. More information about the Komen on the Creeper and the Virginia Blue Ridge chapter of Susan G. Komen can be found at www.komenvablueridge.org. Written by CASSANDRA KUHN october 2018

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bella finds

October Comfort From the seasonal change of temperatures to the ‘change of life’, we’ve found several great products to help provide October comfort for your or someone you love. (Be sure to keep an eye on our Facebook page all this month. We’ve giving away some of these products!!

TriDerma

TriDerma offers a line of true, botanical-based, cruelty-free skin care products made from certified virgin organic aloe vera without harmful side effects. Also, TriDerma is proudly woman owned and customer approved for the past 25 years! Check out their full product line at www.triderma.com

Waxing Kara

Kara Brooks, founder of Waxing Kara, found it hard to replicate an at-home spa experience so she created her own line of ‘farm-to-body’ treatments with natural ingredients straight from Maryland’s Eastern Shore. www.waxingkara.com

Oralgen NuPearl 32x Advanced Teeth Whitening

This advanced teeth whitening system is 100% peroxide-free, gluten-free, all-natural and perfect for sensitive teeth. This complete system whitens teeth up to 8+ shades in one week! www.oralgen.com

Elemental Bottle

During the month of October, 20% of sales of this pink insulated stainless steel bottle will benefit Bright Pink! This bottle will keep your beverages cold for up to 24 hours or hot for up to 12! BPA free and food safe. Perfect for all your daily activities! www.elementalbottles.com

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Jerdon Mirrors

Makeup aficionados­—everyone knows one or maybe you are one! While going for the newest makeup palette or lip kit may be a safe bet, why not elevate your beauty regiment with the glam of a Jerdon Mirror! Founded in the late 1970’s, today Jerdon is the leading manufacturer of beauty appliances and indulgent bath amenities. Available at Amazon and Bed, Bath and Beyond.

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Sweatopause Cooling Scarf

Renee Hanson started getting menopausal symptoms at just 38! After her doctor told her she could be experiencing symptoms for a full 10 years, she decided to do something about it. Sweatopause was born. They are icy cold when wet but air temperature when dry maling them cute and comfortable all year long! (No messy gels or crystals, no need to freeze them!) These scarves come in many stylish prints and color and are a perfect, yet functional, accessory. For all the details visit www.sweatopause.com

Love Goodly

Leading toxin-free beauty, cruelty-free and eco-friendly bi-monthly subscription boxes from Love Goodly are the perfect gift under $30. Check them out for yourself and for your upcoming holiday gift-giving too! www.lovegoodly.com

Thirty-One Gifts Backpacks & Thermals

We love Thirty-One Gifts, and their new fall line for back-to-school favorites is no exception! As always you can personalize them with initials, a name or a special phrase. The Going My Way backpack (left) is sure to brighten someone special’s day with so many pattern options and the Around the Clock thermal is perfect for all those after school practices you’re heading to now. To find a local consultant visit www.mythirtyone.com

this is a bike helmet!

Vermont Village Green Energy Functional Vinegar Flavored vinegars are growing in popularity for their many health benefits. Vermont Village has created Green Energy that offers all the same benefit while also providing a balanced alertness thanks to added matcha. www.www.vermontvillage.com w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

Bike Pretty

We’ve found the cutest helmet ever!! Bike Pretty has created a line of helmets for the Bella Girls on the go. This straw hat helmet features a ‘real’ bike helmet underneath and a stylish overlay straw hat so you have ride with confidence. Check out all their styles at www.bikepretty.com october 2018

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get creative

A Unique Guide to Drawing International magazine, Flow, presents an unparalleled guide to drawing.

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From the creative directors of the groundbreaking international magazine Flow comes an unparalleled guide to drawing: 50 Ways to Draw Your Beautiful, Ordinary Life: Practical Lessons in Pencil and Paper. Inside these pages, you’ll find a drawing guide filled with beautiful illustrations and plenty of “paper goodies,” from bound-in tracing paper and colored paper to a daily drawing pad, a paper doll fashion sketchbook, and DIY postcards. While encouraging readers to draw inspiration from personal items that carry meaning (things on your desk, furniture in your home), 50 Ways includes fun, approachable step-by-step drawing lessons from professional illustrators across the globe; each exercise allows readers to put techniques into immediate practice as they develop their unique artistic style. 50 Ways celebrates the mindfulness inherent in artistic work, creative energy and enjoying the simple pleasures in everyday life. www.flowmagazine.com october 2018

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Take me to

2 Piccadilly A shopping destination of women-owned boutiques featuring designer clothing and accessories to exclusive home décor and professional interior design services. Everything is at Piccadilly Square!

When Your Wardrobe Needs a Little ‘Punch’ After owning several stores in the south, former owner Tammy Theoharis decided to introduce some Florida fashion to the Blue Ridge Mountains. In September of 2011, Punch Boutique opened its doors to Roanoke and added a unique style to the area. Just six years later, Punch was taken over by Whitney Greene and Catherine Justice with an envision to keep the bold pink and orange-walled paradise with colorful merchandise open to the community. Featuring a wide selection of upscale resort-style clothing brands such as Southern Tide, Crosby, and Lola Australia, you are sure to find something that fits your personality! Punch offers three rooms and 2,000 square feet of merchandise, and their staff is always available to help you put together an outfit or find that missing piece for your wardrobe. We love that they have a little something for women of all ages, and they’ll even offer a fashion tip or two if you need it! If you’re looking for a little inspiration onthe-go, Punch’s Instagram features monthly arrivals and showcases customers out and about fashioned in Punch attire. If you can’t shop in-store, don’t worry because their website has a wide selection of merchandise to buy online! The ladies at Punch also feature their “Punch Picks” with their favorite items at the moment. Any new arrivals to the store are on their website and posted on Instagram as well, so you don’t miss out on any fun finds. Punch is much more than a store with racks, and there is always something fun going on. Be sure to stop in and check out the fabulous finds Cassandra is a sophomore at the University Florida studying Journalism. Shefollow Punch Boutique on Instagram @ andofwelcoming faces! You can enjoys hiking, kayaking, and listening to punch_boutique or from visit Roanoke, their website at www.punchboutique.com. all kinds of music. Being

Catherine & Whitney

she enjoys coming home to the mountains and going to her favorite local shops and eateries.

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3107-3117 Franklin Road • South Roanoke

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save smarter

Six Tips for Keeping your Smartphone Secure

How your device could be just as vulnerable to hackers as your computer. Presented by Member One Federal Credit Union

What’s shiny, contains some of your most precious memories, and is rarely out of sight? No, it’s not your child after being slathered in sunscreen at the beach. It’s your smartphone. You hear about the importance of securing your computer from hackers, but are you aware of how vulnerable your smartphone could be too? In honor of National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we’ve rounded up tips to help keep the sensitive data on your device safe. 1. Set a personal identification number (PIN) on the lock screen. While it may be more convenient to keep your phone unlocked, setting up a PIN is one of your first lines of defense against fraudsters in the event your phone is lost or stolen. Many devices prompt you to complete this step upon setup. Pick a PIN that’s difficult for a criminal to guess but easy for you to remember. 2. Make sure your software and apps are up to date. Many devices will send a push notification when a software, app, or security update is ready to install. When you receive those notices, install them. It’s also a good idea to occasionally visit your phone’s settings to look for any updates you may have missed. 3. Log out of applications when you’re done using them. If you access mobile banking, email, social media, or websites that contain personal data with your phone, get in the habit of logging out when you’re done. You’ll be thankful that fraudsters won’t have easy access to your personal information in case your phone is lost, stolen, or hacked. 4. Understand what apps you’re downloading. Before installing an app, consider reviews from previous customers and look over the permissions before downloading it w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

onto your device. Try to stick to only downloading apps from the mainstream app stores or from developers that are well-known and have high ratings. 5. Be cautious about public wireless networks. As a rule of thumb, never connect to an unknown wireless network. Cybercriminals may set up a network name that looks very similar to one established by a legitimate venue, so it’s best to ask staff for the network name and password. Avoid opening apps or visiting links that contain your personal information while connected to a public network. 6. Don’t click on suspicious links. This includes links sent through email or text messages. If it’s an email, flag it as spam or junk. If it’s a text informing you that you’ve won a prize or have a special offer awaiting you, delete it right away. Unless you’ve opted in to receive notifications by text, a legitimate company will typically not contact you with important information this way. Taking a few simple precautions now to protect the data on your smartphone could mean fewer headaches and heartbreaks if your phone is ever lost, stolen, or hacked. Our smartphones aren’t nearly as precious as our children, but they contain plenty of sensitive data that needs to be secured. Article courtesy of

Join Member One here each month for more money-saving tips and financial advice! Be sure to visit their website, www.memberonefcu.com, for more info on their products and services. Member One Federal Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration. october 2018

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e g a l l i V t s e W The Shoppes at

SHOPPING DINING SERVICES

Located less than 1.5 miles from I-581 on Electric Road in Roanoke County

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local women

Making a Difference Meet Frances Bosch of Toy LIke Me in Salem.

Meet Frances Bosch.

In addition to teaching Biology, Professor Bosch heads Toy Like Me at Roanoke College, founded in May 2016. Modeled after Toy Like Me based in the United Kingdom, Toy Like Me in Salem, Virginia aims to alter toys so children who are “differently abled” and/or possess certain medical characteristics can play with toys that resemble them. So why is it important to alter toys? As Bosch explains, toys reflect society’s standards for what is acceptable and are “part of defining yourself.” “Toys tell the kids what makes a super hero,” and “who is good and bad.” Thus, one is taught to determine who his or her self is by looking at what is portrayed as suitable through toys. Yet we don’t see toys with hearing aids, gastric ports, or glasses. So how are children who aren’t considered “normal” supposed to feel accepted by society or develop accepting themselves? The answer is to change toys so everyone can be included.

But altering toys doesn’t just foster self-acceptance for children; kids seeing toys with non-mainstream characteristics learn to accept “differently abled” and/or children with medical issues. For instance, in the past, parents requested a doll with an omnipod insulin pump on its arm. “The omnipod looked like a bug” on the child’s arm, resulting in peers teasing the girl and attempting “to knock the pump off.” After receiving the Toy Like Me, the mother was able to visit the classroom to teach the children about how the omnipod pump was a necessity for her daughter to have a healthy life. And the child hasn’t been teased since. As I listen to her, it becomes clear that Toy Like Me is a personal mission for Frances. As someone with a family line of “differently abled” individuals, Bosch says those with supposed disabilities are “my people” and “it is very important to me that they are not defined by a label.” She indicates we tend to focus more on the “dis” rather than the “abled” in disabled. Thus, “differently abled” aspects of individuals become what defines them. But it should not be this way because people are much more than these various features. For more information, visit @toylikemeatroanoke on Facebook. Sarah Raines is a local of Salem, Virginia majoring in Creative Writing as well as minoring in Psychology and Literary Studies at Roanoke College. Sarah currently holds the position of Content Editor of Roanoke Review. And when she isn’t cuddling her pup, she’s most likely typing away at her next poem, story, or nonfiction piece. 

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Written by SARAH RAINES Photo courtesy of Frances Bosch october 2018

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bella eats

Southern from Scratch

Introducing a new book featuring Southern essentials & downhome recipes.

A holistic nutritionist and homesteader, Ashley English was raised in the hills of Southern Appalachia with a strong legacy of female cooks crafting memorable meals. Southern from Scratch combines the foods she grew up eating and the information she learned while pursuing her nutrition degree. The 150 recipes inside all honor the classics of the southern kitchen, but with an emphasis on local, seasonal produce and slow scratch cooking. Ashley shows you how to build your own Southern pantry with 50 key essentials from pickles and relishes to jams and spreads, sauces and vinegars, and more. From there, she shares 100 dishes that incorporate those base recipes. Create your own down-home Southern kitchen with recipes ranging from grits and buttermilk biscuits to BBQ sauce and pickled deviled eggs. Visit her blog at www.smallmeasure.com

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mind • body • soul

You’re Not a Runner... Yet! Starting a running program is hard. Dr. Ally can help!

“I’m not a runner…”

A few weeks ago, I was running on the greenway with some of our training group members, and we passed another group of runners. They shouted ‘runners coming!!’, alerting the rest of their group that my posse was approaching. I shouted in reply ‘you guys are runners too!’ and we kept on our way, both headed in the same direction, pace notwithstanding. Starting an activity program is really, really hard. There are a lot of pieces that have to align in order for new habits, like exercise, to help people reach their goals. This is not as true of healthy habits like improved eating habits, for example, because we all eat something. We don’t all do something when it comes to exercise, but anything is better than nothing. Take your lunch break for example. It is much easier to swap unsweetened tea for sweetened tea at lunch than it is to remember to pack a gym bag, plan for where you will shower afterward, determine how much time you need to get to/from work if relevant, and know what workout you want to do, if you want to workout on your lunch break. Exercise just takes a lot more effort. When people are jogging on the greenway or walking into our store, and I hear the phrase “I’m not a runner…”, my initial response is to add “yet”, but I realize it is really hard to visualize yourself as a “runner” if you are in a walking program or struggling to stick with any kind of program. The truth is everyone has the potential to be a runner because “being a runner” has no set standard. It can be whatever pace you want it to be! You are racing no one but yourself when it comes to determining what running is for you and your body. In the age of social media, the tendency to frame our definition of fitness even for ourselves can be heavily influenced by the achievements of others. Cliché as it is to say, the journey toward improved fitness and lessons learned along the way are just as if not more important than the final outcome. Traveling three miles on foot whether at a 15 minute/mile pace or 5 minutes/mile pace still is three miles traveled. Every person has the potential to go further or faster, but this potential is shaped by so many variables, it is unfair of us to tell ourselves what we are capable of or not right out of the gate. Our goal with Runabout is not to make an army of runners but to build confidence and empower our community to realize their individual and collective potential to inspire others to be active at whatever pace they enjoy. We only care that you do something, anything, and we would love for you to do it with us. Our training groups all move in the same direction, despite a variety of paces, eventually we all end up in the same spot at the end. Article courtesy of

RunAbout Sports has a mission to support the local fitness community in the Roanoke Valley. They carry a wide variety of shoes, apparel, hydration gear, and nutrition products to meet all of your fitness needs. www.runaboutroanoke.com

Dr. Ally Bowersock is co-owner and director of programming at RunAbout Sports Roanoke. She is also an assistant professor of Exercise Physiology in the Department of Basic Sciences at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. Ally is also a passionate advocate for more recess for children in the Roanoke Valley! When she's not working out, coaching, or teaching, Ally enjoys playing outside with her husband, Tyler, their two children, TJ and Rory, and their dog, Rocco.

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Photo courtesy of RunAbout Sports

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mind • body • soul

Night Offers

Stepping outside your comfort zone in the dark of night.

I’ve walked into the street. To my left is the cul-

de-sac and the streetlight that’s been out for several months. I look right and see the familiar one illuminating the corner and spot light from another further along glowing in the soft haze beyond the crest of the hill. I pause for several moments, listening to the scattered cricks of the bugs yet…nothing, mostly. I’m standing in the middle of the cul-de-sac, once more stalk still. I’ve turned off the flashlight; I want to blend in with my surroundings, experience the darkness as if I’m one of its usual creatures. Looking up, I notice the stars pricking the sky beyond the tops of the trees and I begin to relax. But I soon become aware of Night’s embrace over the house behind me. I turn. Yet…nothing. Inaudible flashes of a thunderstorm off in the distance, over the hill, tinge my gaze as it circles back to the pavement ahead. Knowing I won’t stay here, I can feel my heartbeat quickening its pace as my feet trudge from the darkness and go toward the slope before them. When the muscles of my legs perform their rhythm along the hill, I savor the sweetness of the Wrigley’s Doublemint pressed against the roof of my mouth then chew it repeatedly to hear a sound. Faced with a belief that I won’t be welcome here much longer, I promptly turn around at the crest territory of the incline and take a left onto the street expanding before me. A logical person would have turned for home, but I can’t do that just yet. I don’t know why I’ve committed to journeying out at this particular hour in the night. But I know it’s something I want, something I have to be part of, even if I feel alone and vulnerable in the face of whatever Night offers. I have strived for logic, practicality, safeness. But I love to explore. And I know from experience that if I follow my intuition, my soul, I’ll be just fine.

Sarah Raines is a local of Salem, Virginia majoring in Creative Writing as well as minoring in Psychology and Literary Studies at Roanoke College. Sarah currently holds the position of Content Editor of Roanoke Review. And when she isn’t cuddling her pup, she’s most likely typing away at her next poem, story, or nonfiction piece. 

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young female writers club

Lifting Girls Up Through Sports Literature Meet 16-year-old author Paige Brotherton

When it comes to girls and sports, the times

have changed. In 1972, after the landmark Title IX legislation passed, only one in 27 girls participated in high school sports. Over 45 years later, that number has increased to two in five. Although the playing field is still not equal, women have 1.3 million fewer high school and over 60,000 fewer college sports participation opportunities than men, more girls than ever actively participate in sports. But as often happens, particularly with stories for children and young adults, literature has not kept up with the times. “There are girls who like to slide in the mud and get dirty, but there are not a lot of books for girls who like to do these sports,” says 16-year-old Paige Brotherton of Williamsburg, Virginia, author of Avery Appreciates True Friendship, the fourth installment of the Lady Tigers book series. The series, started by her mother Dawn Brotherton, adds a relatable representation of girls in sports to the middle grade literature genre, expanding beyond the overarching subject to explore how athletics can shape a girl’s internal and external world. “I find it important to represent female athletes because there aren’t as many out there,” says Paige, who I speak with while she waits for rowing practice to begin. “The best way to prove girls are physically strong and capable is to fill the world with such women.” Sports played a large role in Paige’s life from a young age. In elementary school during free time, she chose participating in races over chatting with friends. Both the competition and the team camaraderie of sports appeal to Paige. “I’ve learned the benefits of being on a team. I’m not just working hard because I want to win. I’m working hard because I want my teammates in the boat next to me to win as well,” Paige says. Her passion for writing, however, bloomed later than her passion for sports. In 7th grade, while writing a story based on her experiences at school, she discovered her love for creating characters and bringing them through conflicts. Having been an avid reader her whole life, Paige immediately understood the importance of making characters authentic, no matter the setting. “My favorite part of stories are the characters. It’s even more powerful when the characters are relatable and speak to the readership on some level. The nuances of human nature are universal, whether they’re found at Tatooine, in Middle Earth or on a softball field,” she says. Therefore, when it came time to develop the next book in the Lady Tigers series, Paige had an idea. Having already tackled

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themes such as honesty, military deployment and sportsmanship, Paige felt the series should explore a more introspective topic for young girls—positive self-image. Concerned whether an adult writer could accurately depict the struggles girls face today in the tangled web of social media, Paige suggested she write the book and the publisher agreed. “Self-image has been transformed rapidly to such an extent it’s a subject that needs young authors to tell other young readers they’re perfect and here’s why,” Paige explains. Using sports as a springboard for a deeper discussion of self-perception and stereotypes, the book focuses on how girls compare themselves to their friends and often feel they come up lacking. “As social media, general picture posting, and makeup reach ever-younger audiences, girls begin to compare themselves to the girls around them,” says Paige. “I want to explain how every girl has something special about themselves that the rest of the world wishes they had.” Paige felt the backdrop of sports provided the perfect avenue to explore this topic. She witnessed first-hand girls lose interest in sports or become demotivated as the athletic gap between girls and boys widened, thus further affecting selfimage. “When I was in elementary school, a girl could match a guy in running and lifting. Now in high school, no matter how much I train will never be as fast as the guys,” she explains. “After elementary school, it only gets harder and makes girls feel inferior.” Paige believes demonstrating how sports encompass more than just athleticism is critical. Through sports, girls can gain self-esteem and counteract the negative pressures and societal expectations often perpetuated by social media. “We have to look at things girls are better at,” Paige says. As an example, Paige describes her experience in rowing, explaining how synchronization and communication are just as critical as strength. In her experience, when boys and girls first learn to row, the girls’ teams often perform better because the girls intuitively work together. It takes longer for the boys to catch up. As Paige so aptly demonstrates both in her writing and herself, girls can derive a positive self-image from sports, if only they can break through the social cage and embrace the strength within. “Aggressiveness is often seen as a negative trait, for girls at least,” Paige says, describing the stereotypes often associated with girls in sports and in life. “Which I believe is incredibly unfortunate as aggressiveness can also be described as a drive to seek out and earn what you want. I believe more women should wear this trait proudly as we step into the spotlight on the world platform.” With young women like Paige Brotherton in the world, I think that just might happen. Written by K.L. KRANES Photos courtesy of Paige Brotherton

K.L. Kranes is a blogger and author of young adult novels. Her debut novel, The Travelers, was published in 2016 by Saguaro Books, LLC. See more from K.L. at www.klkranes.com/blog. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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virginia made

Urban Flora

Meet Katelyn Summerville, specializing in French garden-style florals.

Beautiful colors are beginning to emerge as we

transition from one season to the next. Cool breezes are a welcome replacement of summer’s intense heat. The change is gladly welcomed as sweaters, jackets and boots make their debut. French-garden is not the first word that comes to mind when you think of business and psychology but to Katelyn Summerville, the key word is change. As transitions in life brought Katelyn from Oregon to Virginia she found herself drawn to a more creative side of life. Searching for connections in a new place, she found herself searching within the floral industry. For years before moving Katelyn freelanced with well-known floral designers. From Oregon to North Carolina, she took notes as a young designer and learned all she could about the industry. At the age of 22, it was finally time. Time for Katelyn to branch out on her own and dive into the business world of flowers. Urban Flora is a Virginia-based design company specializing in French-garden themed arrangements. Simplicity, romance and femininity are words that immediately come to mind when looking at Katelyn’s work. Leaning towards more muted and saturated colors in her designs, her creations are made to fit any venue. Although Urban Flora embodies many aspects of creativity, Katelyn still finds a way to use her degree in both business and psychology. As someone once advised her, “Empowered women empower other women.” Her relationships with her clients reflect that motto as she

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strives to build healthy relationships with each person who crosses her path. The serious time spent in creating beautiful garden inspired arrangements requires a little comic relief during her downtime. Being a huge tv nerd, Netflix and Hulu often find their way into date nights. Investing in a good series is the name of the game with Modern Place currently in the cue. Katelyn’s secret talent of being able to name all the actor/actresses’ voices behind cartoon characters is one that never fails to amuse her husband. Walks with the dogs along Blackwater Creek and collecting plants add to her list of life’s happy moments. Now settled in Lynchburg, Katelyn believes that the key to her success is a strong community. She embraces the idea that there is room for every creative. Given the same supplies and the same amount of time, each will create something unique and beautiful. Katelyn’s passion and creativity are certainly reflected in her arrangements as is her heart for people. For more details visit www.urbanflorava.com. Written by FAITH JONES Photos courtesy of Urban Flora Faith Jones is a local entrepreneur, creative, and believer. Her businesses include Faith Inspired and The Hill City Handmade. Faith has a degree in Art and Photography and is a former high school art and culinary teacher. She enjoys spending time with her family and travelling. www.thehillcityhandmade.com october 2018

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October Happenings

The crisp fall air, leaves changing... and plenty of events in our region!!! Sponsored by Garland Properties

YEARS

Craftsmen’s Classic Roanoke Fall Show

happenings

2006-2018

Experience the Extraordinary at The Craftsmen’s Classics Art and Craft Festival! The Craftsmen’s Classic was founded 43 years ago by the Gilmore family of Greensboro, NC. Clyde Gilmore, a jewelry maker, wanted to create a “family” of artists and craftsmen, nationwide, that could stage indoor festivals showcasing their totally original works and interact one-on-one with the public. The Craftsman’s Classic Roanoke Fall Show will take place Friday, October 12 (10am-8pm) , Saturday the 13th (10am-6pm) & Sunday the 14th (11am-5pm), 2018. This annual tradition features original designs and work from hundreds of talented artists and craftspeople from across America. See the creative process in action as many exhibitors demonstrate throughout the weekend. There is something for every style, taste and budget with items from the most traditional to the most contemporary. Admission is FREE with a food donation to Feeding America Southwest Virginia. For more details visit www.craftshow.com

Bodies for a Cure Calendar Release Party

Perfectly imPERFECT Women will host their exclusive Bodies for a Cure Calendar Release Party at 213 Lux Lounge in Downtown Roanoke on Friday, October 12 at 8pm! Bodies for a Cure was created by a tribe of women who believe in empowering one another by finding beauty in everyone. The event is all about having fun and raising money for the Susan G. Komen 3 Day. Join them for drinks, desserts, music, and a silent cake auction. Sponsor, donate and/or attend this not-to-be-missed event! See event on Facebook to RSVP or for more details. Calendars can be purchased at www.calendarpreorder.eventbrite.com Our monthly Happenings feature is sponsored by Garland Properties, a proud supporter of the local arts and small businesses in our community. Each month, we look forward to sharing our favorite local events with you! Visit www.garlandpropertiesva.com for more information. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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profile

A Writer & Her Garden

A granddaughter helps her grandmother’s legacy continue to flourish.

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

In early 2008, Shaun

Spencer Hester sat on her mother’s porch contemplating where her career would take her next. She caught sight of her grandmother’s Photo by Susan Saanholland home across the street, and an idea began to take shape. A historic landmark, the Anne Spencer House and Garden Museum (part of the Anne Spencer Memorial Foundation, Inc.), was maintained by Hester’s parents, but closed to the public. A historian, preservationist, and writer, Hester decided to reopen the museum in time for Virginia’s Annual Garden Day. When she stepped inside, she was struck by the feeling that she had stepped back in time. In that moment, she recalls, she knew that it was imperative to preserve as many of the original features of the home and garden as she could. With the windows clean and the floor swept, she opened the doors in time for spring that year. She became the museum’s curator, and introduced a new generation to the life and work of her grandmother, Anne Spencer. Every inch of the Spencer property tells a story. In her time, Spencer used her garden as a sanctuary and gathering place, hosting intellectuals and African American travelers during years when our country was deeply segregated. Both inside the home and out in her community, she understood the value of planting seeds and helping them grow. An important figure in the literary and cultural movement of the 1920s and Harlem Renaissance, Spencer left quite a legacy. Her many accomplishments include being the second African American published in the Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry (1973), assisting in the foundation of the Lynchburg chapter of the NAACP, and working as a librarian for the all-black Dunbar High School for twenty years. “The whole reason she wanted that job was because, at the time, there were no libraries in Lynchburg open to African Americans,” Hester says. “She thought, if she got the job, she would be able to allow access—not necessarily physical access— but she would be able to check out books for people in her community.”

Sources have described Spencer as a recluse because of the many hours she spent, day and night, working in her garden. Although she enjoyed her time alone, this accusation is unsubstantiated. Not only did she welcome people into her garden and home, she listened to their stories. “For my grandmother,” Hester explains, “her garden was a place she could entertain visitors and guests. It was a way for her to connect to people, but it was also a place for her to get away from people, and she used it in both of those ways.” The cottage in Spencer’s garden was built by her husband, Edward. There, she would escape to write poetry and prose that continues to be published in anthologies today. “It was a place to think and just be quiet. I think that is important for everyone, writer or not, and what better place to be than with nature?” Hester adds. By preserving her grandmother’s home and gardens, Hester, the Anne Spencer Memorial Foundation’s Board of Directors, and the advisory board, are doing much more than providing another lovely stop on a garden tour. They are sharing part of the African American experience in American history. “I tell people on these tours, when you think about my grandparents who met when they were young, in the 1800s, they were the first generation of their family to be freely educated just over 100 years ago. It’s really not that long ago. To see how we’ve grown, and understand the African American story over all of those periods of time is just starting to be told and of interest to all people. These stories aren’t written down in our history books, and if we don’t write them down they will all be lost. It’s now time for people to tell their story, whether it’s good or bad,” Hester says. Hester is currently working on a book detailing the history of her family, including the many ways they impacted the Civil Rights Movement and integration. Follow her on Instagram (@shaun.hester) for current information on the project. Visitation to the Anne Spencer House and Garden Museum slows down in October, but the garden is an unforgettable sight, even in the fall. From mid-October to March, Hester encourages those interested in a tour to book it two weeks in advance through the museum’s website. For more information visit www.annespencermuseum.com.

Written by HAYLEIGH WORGAN Photos courtesy of Anne Spencer House & Garden Museum Hayleigh is a freelance writer, independent author, and writing consultant. In 2017, she published her first novel, The Huntsman: A modern retelling of Red Riding Hood. She spends a lot of time traveling and exploring new regions for inspiration, but Roanoke will always be her home. www.hayleighworgan.com.

Photos above L to R: Anne Spencer in 1940; Anne Spencer in downstairs sunroom 1917; Anne & Edward Spencer May 1961


Profile for Bella Magazine

Bella Magazine - October 2018  

The regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond!

Bella Magazine - October 2018  

The regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond!

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