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february 2018

C E L E B R AT I N G O U R 12 T H Y EA R M I N D • B O DY • S O U L FA S H I O N • S K I N C A R E


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Fe b r u a r y 2018

Issu e On e H u n d r e d For ty

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Joey Coakley Beck Publisher & Owner jbeck@beckmediagroup.com Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Director hworgan@beckmediagroup.com Sara Coakley Office Manager bella@beckmediagroup.com

inside

••• EDITORIAL Contributors: Bryan Christon, Tina Hatcher, Faith Jones, Amanda Morgan Marshall, Member One Federal Credit Union, Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Interns: Samantha Fantozzi, Roanoke College Lilith Turman, Hollins University Taylor Ward, Roanoke College For editorial consideration: hworgan@beckmediagroup.com ••• ADVERTISING & MARKETING With over 12 years experience in Southwest & Central Virginia, Bella is your BEST advertising option with proven results, a loyal readership, wonderful content, and an award-winning design! To market yourself and your business to the women of Southwest & Central Virginia, call us at (540) 904-6800 or email advertise@beckmediagroup.com •••

LLC

P.O. Box 107 Roanoke, Virginia 24002 540.904.6800 fax 540.904.6803 Bella Magazine is the property of Beck Media Group LLC. It is a free publication printed monthly and is distributed throughout Southwest and Central Virginia and beyond. The Publisher reserves the right to refuse ad space for any advertisement or editorial content the staff deems inappropriate for our readers. The concept and design of Bella Magazine, as well as the design, advertisements, art, photos and editorial content is property of Beck Media Group LLC and may not be copied or reprinted without written permission from the publisher. ©2006-2018 Beck Media Group LLC All Rights Reserved. PRINTED IN VIRGINIA w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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February 2018

Smart Girls Groups around the nation (and right here in our neighborhood!) are working to bridge the digital divide by creating accessible educational opportunities in tech regardless of gender, race, or age. In this article, we focus on national programs for teens and local classes that may appeal to a variety of age groups.

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February Happenings Don’t let the cold weather keep you indoors! February is

the month to show love. Whether that be for your family and friends, or for the community: we have you covered with a list of ways you can give back to local nonprofits and artisans.

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Virginia Made A monthly column focusing on local makers in Virginia. Take a closer look at handmade products and find out how you can support local artisans.

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Save Smarter Member One Federal Credit Union shares monthly

financial wisdom and guidance. This month, they provide tips for transitioning from a double-income household to a single-income.

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Mind • Body • Soul Health and wellness topics for the whole family! In this

issue, Earth Girl Wellness discusses probiotics. We talk about different ways to take care of your skin in the winter months. Bryan Christon encourages us to play while we exercise, and the American Heart Association reminds us to take care of our hearts.

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Bella Eats Enjoy this delicious recipe for Rustic-Vegetable Beet Soup! In the winter especially, it is important to put healthy food into your body whenever possible. This recipe is full of all the good stuff like beets (obviously), zucchini, carrots, chickpeas, and more!

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Pardon Muah A monthly fashion column with advice to help you feel

beautiful inside and out! Don’t miss these fun Valentine’s Day outfit ideas that are perfect for the office!

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Profile: Melissa Aldana On February 17, Melissa Aldana will perform at Jefferson Center. We sat down with her to discuss her most recent album and how her travels, experiences, and heroes influenced its creation. february 2018

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smart girls Written by Hayleigh Worgan

The Digital Divide Working together to bridge the gap

As the majority of us become more dependent on technology—be it in the form of smart phones or laptops—we often take for granted our ability to use the machines we carry at all times. However, there are a startling number of men, women, and children who do not have access to the information required to use that same technology. Economic and social inequalities often prevent education that would allow people from diverse backgrounds to enter and benefit from the world of tech. This phenomena is called the “digital divide.” Fortunately, there are groups around the world doing their part to close the gap. Black Girls Code began with the vision to “increase the number of women of color in the digital space by empowering girls of color ages 7 to 17 to become innovators in STEM fields, leaders in their communities, and builders of their own futures through exposure to computer science and technology.” Kimberly Bryant founded Black Girls Code after feeling culturally isolated as a freshman in college pursuing an Electrical Engineering degree. Although she has noticed many changes since her college days, she was still troubled by the “dearth of African-American women in science, technology, engineering, and math professions.” She goes on to explain that a lack of interest in the fields is likely not the reason for the disparity. Instead, the digital divide is more likely to blame. Without access to information about educational opportunities, the option to pursue them often feels nonexistent. Currently, Black Girls Code hosts events like Hackathons and Coding for a Brighter Future in both San Francisco and New York. They are offering a Black Girls Code D.C. Chapter Parent-Daughter Circuits and Internet of Things Workshop (Arlington, VA) on February 10. During the workshop, participants and their parents will explore coding fundamentals combining circuits, and Makey Makeys or littleBits as they introduce The Internet of Things (IoT): a network of physical objects and devices that can be controlled with a series of sensors, electronics, and software used to control objects in the physical world. For this workshop (and others), they offer a limited number of financial-need based scholarships on a first-come, first-serve basis. Check out www.blackgirlscode.com for more information on upcoming programs and services. Girls Who Code is also playing a part in educating teens across the nation. The organization was founded five years ago “with the belief that computing skills are a critical path to security and prosperity in today’s job market.” Reshma Saujani, founder and CEO, was the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress in 2010. During that time, she visited locals schools and saw the gender gap in computing classes firsthand. She founded Girls Who Code as a result. What began as a group of 20 girls in New York w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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City will soon reach 40,000 girls in all 50 states. Their mission page explains, “girls everywhere are united by their passion to use technology to solve problems in their day-to-day lives and make a positive impact on the world.” Working together, they believe that the gender gap in technology can be solved. Locally, students can become involved with Girls Who Code at Martinsville High School, Franklin County High School, and Andrew Lewis Middle School. For those who are not students, Reshma has written a book called, Girls Who Code: Learn to Code and Change the World. It’s a great read for girl coders of all ages and their parents. Visit www.girlswhocode.com for a complete list of locations offering programs and resources. Don’t forget to check out your local library for adult technology programs! On February 15 from 2-4pm, Glenvar Library will host a class on email basics that will include how to send and receive email, how to add someone to your contacts, and how to open and send an attachment. The Glenvar Library will also host Windows 10 for Beginners on February 13 from 2-4pm. There, you can learn the Windows interface, including how to change basic settings and save files. They will also teach participants how to access the Internet and perform a basic search. For those looking for additional information, Hollins Library will host Word 2016: Beyond the Basics on February 28 from 2-4pm. In this class, they will cover creating lists, using columns adjusting margins and layout, inserting text boxes, tables, headers/footers, page numbering, and using the find/replace tool. Each of these classes are for adults 18+ and have a small fee. Go to www.RoanokeCountyParks.com for more information on programs offered locally throughout the year and to preregister for them. Regardless of your experience level with computer programming and technology, confidence is one of the best assets for students of all ages. To bridge the digital divide, we all must work as a community to increase the diversity in tech. That means offering programs to all ages and backgrounds throughout the nation to elevate individual confidence, and finding ways to multiply scholarship opportunities and/or funding to public schools so they can offer tech clubs with the same vision. A person’s race, gender, or economic background should not limit their opportunity to succeed in a technology-related field. It’s 2018, and it’s long past the time to make a change.

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Hayleigh Worgan uses her voice as a writer and the editor for Bella Magazine to help share the stories of local women doing amazing things. See more of her work at www.hayleighworgan.com.

bella finds

Tech Toys

Teaching your child to code

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Nurture your child’s interest in tech with a doll from SmartGurlz! This line of friendly self-balancing robots and action dolls was created to engage and encourage an interest in coding from an early age. Kids six and up can connect to their doll via smartphone or tablet and immerse themselves in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). SmartGurlz was “born of necessity, by a mother who became frustrated when trying to find educational, but fun, toys for her daughter, Nina.” The company’s goal is to empower girls everywhere with skills to become confident, inspiring women in the tech field. Customers can choose between the following: Jun, a “Chemistry Star;” Jen, a “Mechanical Engineer;” Zara, a “Tech Wizard;” and Maria, a “Math Genius.” Each doll comes with her own segway to ride, allows the user to go on game-like adventures and missions, and has the option to participate in dances, obstacle courses, fashion shows, and talent shows. Users can begin coding in less than five minutes! Learn more at www.smartgurlz.com.

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February Happenings February is packed with plenty of culture and well-being events

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happenings

Sponsored by Garland Properties Friday, February 2 is National Wear Red Day! You can support Go Red For Women, educational programs that increase women’s awareness, and critical research to discover scientific knowledge about cardiovascular health by wearing red and donating to the American Heart Association. Why is this important? One woman dies every 80 seconds from cardiovascular disease in the United States. Education and lifestyle changes can help prevent 80 percent of cardiac events. Use this special day to show off your best red dress, but also to learn your numbers: total cholesterol, HDL (good) cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and body mass index. Take charge of your health in style, and go red on February 2! www.goredforwomen.org

The Charlottesville Ballet, along with the Southwest Virginia Ballet, will perform at the Taubman Museum of Art on Friday, March 2 at 6:30pm and Saturday, March 3 at 2pm. These collaborative performances takes a sentimental journey through a time period that inspired many women to join the workforce and become the nowlegendary Rosie the Riveters, with Letter to My Love, a WWII-era dance theater piece choreographed by Rainey Jarrell. Students from the Southwest Virginia Ballet will also present segments from Ties, Pedro Szalay’s original ballet on the historic Roanoke railroad featuring live music from Dave Austin. www.svballet.org

Winter Farmer’s Market

The indoor Forest Farmer’s Winter Market will be open Saturday, February 10 from 8am-12pm. Enjoy delicious local food like meats, eggs, and hearty winter produce. Indulge in baked goods, and check out beautiful crafts from local artists. On any given trip, Bella girls have seen handpainted silk scarves by Nancy O’Neal, one-ofa-kind prints by Tab O’Neal, Bluebird houses made by a Flicker, SoulShine Farms Micro greens and Micro salad greens, locally free range chickens, free range eggs, and heritage pork products from IdleWild Farm, and more! For location and all the details: www.forestfarmersmarket.com

Our monthly Happenings feature is sponsored by Garland Properties, a proud supporter of the local arts and small businesses in our community. Each month, we look forward to sharing our favorite local events with you! Visit www.garlandpropertiesva.com for more information. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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Written by Faith Jones of Hill City Handmade

Spotlighting amazing local makers with an array of unique products! February is here and we are finally adjusting to writing 2018 instead of 17. It is a month often associated with love and one dedicated to celebrating Black History. As women, there’s one form of love that sometimes finds itself at the bottom of the list. That is self-care. Whether through body, fashion, or art, these women have their priorities in order.

Danicole Accessories

Growing up in England, Nicole Rule became fascinated with garments of her Ethiopian culture. “Even thinking about it now brings back great memories of my mom with a scarf draped over her head as either a fashion statement or to keep warm.” Fast forward a few decades, living in Lynchburg and married with kids, Danicole Accessories was born. Her designs include pieces for infants to adults like headbands, turbans, berets, and bonnets. Nicole also offers specialty pieces such as fascinators, hats, and silk flowers. With a husband and four “love bugs” (five and under) while running a business, life has challenges but Nicole handles them with grace. Her family and serving at church are top priorities while self-care involves sneaking in date night, a delicious meal (dessert included), uninterrupted talk, and a new pair of shoes. www.danicoleaccessories.etsy.com IG: @danicoleaccessories

Nicole Rule

Herbal Body Blessings

What woman doesn’t dream of soft skin and fragrant products that make you say, “Mmmm…”? Janie Brodie captures that with Herbal Body Blessings in Henrico. Receiving testimonies from customers of how the products have helped them in some way keeps her creating. Janie feels blessed to have her husband, three sons, and goddaughter always ready to pitch in. Body butters, made up of natural ingredients including cocoa and shea butters, combined with scents like coconut lemongrass and honey almond are the company’s best sellers. “Beauty is broad and diverse to me. There is no limit and it can be found everywhere. I find beauty in nature, people, and art. It is truly in the eye of the beholder.” For Janie, self-care involves a cruise to a warm beach. www.herbalbodyblessings.com IG: @herbalbodyblessing

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Christina Ball Davis

Artist Christina Ball

Raised in Lynchburg, Christina (Ball) Davis was homeschooled allowing time to explore her creativity. Growing up in a generation where African-American princesses and strong women figures on posters were few and far between, Christina created her own images. Her (mostly acrylic) paintings reflect emotion through expressive eyes, bold lines, and strong color palettes. Two of the best things about being an artist for Christina are pet commissions and the diversity in creating something unique for each client. Road trips, hiking, good food (Thanksgiving being her favorite holiday), and drinking wine with her new husband are Christina’s ode to self-care. www.squareup.com/store/artistchristinaball

IG: @artistchristinaball

“I don’t remember having a dream of being an artist, I just was.” We’re giving away something from each featured Maker in this month’s issue! Stay tuned to our Facebook page for your chance to win! w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

Faith Jones is a local entrepreneur, creative, and believer. Her businesses include Faith Inspired and The Hill City Handmade. Faith has a degree in Art and Photography and is a former high school art and culinary teacher. She enjoys spending time with her family and travelling. Faith’s motto is, “Paris is always a good idea.” www.thehillcityhandmade.com february 2018

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save smarter

Presented by Member One Federal Credit Union

Going from a Double- to Single-Income Household Tips for navigating your finances during this transition

Planned or unexpected, major life changes that result in less income like job loss, illness, or becoming a stay-at-home-parent, bring about many challenges. Not only can they throw you emotionally and even physically for a loop, they also have a big impact on your finances. We’re here to offer tips for handling your finances during this sometimes-inevitable life transition. Review your household budget. Having an established budget while transitioning from a double- to single-income household is crucial. You need to be acutely aware of how much money is coming in and going out (and to where). This is the perfect time to find every way possible to cut down on extra expenses, like eating out or gym memberships, and truly focus on paying down debts or building up savings. Consider the extras. If the loss of an income means losing benefits from

a former employer, such as health or life insurance, you’ll have to consider the cost of taking on these expenses and add that to your household budget. On the other hand, you can also count on saving money on gas for your vehicle or a workplace wardrobe, for example, since you won’t be traveling to an office every day.

Reevaluate your savings strategy. If your former employer offered retirement savings, it’s in your best interest to figure out alternative ways to contribute to some kind of savings account or investment fund. Even contributing a small amount is better than nothing. And you’ll still want to ensure you have money put away in an emergency fund for unexpected expenses like home repairs or medical emergencies.

Article courtesy of

Forget about the Joneses. Keeping up with the latest fashion, home décor, and lifestyle trends is expensive! Reducing your household income means making sacrifices, which could include driving older cars, taking cheaper vacations, and searching for free entertainment. If you focus on putting your needs before your wants, you’ll be in much better shape financially. Supplement your income. If you find that you still can’t make ends

Join Member One here each month for more money-saving tips and financial advice! Be sure to visit their website, www.memberonefcu.com, for more info on their products and services. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

meet after cutting every expense possible, consider picking up a side job like tutoring or pet and/or house sitting. You could sell unwanted items at a yard sale or on Ebay, sell crafts on Etsy, or teach online courses. Every bit helps, and it could result in just enough extra funds to make transitioning from a double- to single-income household a little more affordable. february 2018

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mind•body•soul Written by Tina Hatcher

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Probiotics 101

The gut is the new brain...or so research is suggesting. The profound effects the health of your digestive tract has on your cognitive function is gaining momentum in the nutrition world. Regular elimination and the balance of microflora in your intestines has everyone grabbing for more fiber and probiotics. But what are probiotics? Are they really that important? Or are we falling prey to yet another dietary trap trying to grab money out of our pockets? Your gut is filled with bacteria of all kinds. There is a delicate balance of more than 1000 types of bacteria living in your large intestines. This balance helps keep your intestines “moving along” and influences mood regulation and emotions. The millions of neurons (nerve endings) contained in our digestive tract are in constant communication with our brain. Keeping that communication open and smoothly transmitting requires a healthy gut. Probiotics and their far reaching effects on the colon aid in maintaining a healthy gut and the complex communication system of the gut-brain axis. There are a wide range of sources that can provide your body with the appropriate balance of bacteria. Probiotics can be found in many foods, drinks, and supplements. Choosing a proper delivery method depends upon your preferences and lifestyle. Sauerkraut, kimchi, yogurt, and several other fermented foods, such as sour pickles, are natural food sources that contain the healthy bacteria. Advantages to food sources include their close proximity to nature and lack of unnecessary colors and preservatives. However, not everyone has a desire to eat fermented (and sometimes spicy!) foods every day. Plus, yogurt often contains a large amount of sugar (a no-no on the Earth Girl list). Kombucha is a fermented tea that provides an excellent source of probiotics. It comes in a variety of flavors and in easy-to-grab bottles. The taste can be too strong and offputting for some individuals and the price can dent your wallet. Earth Girl suggests you shop around and try a variety of different manufactures to find one that appeals to you. Earth Girls’ favorite pick is the Synergy Trilogy. It is found at most super markets that sell organic foods. A final source can be found in a supplement. Buyer beware when purchasing probiotics in a bottle. Several items to check for are the number of strains of bacteria (look for more than one strain), the volume of bacteria in the product (look for at least 1 billion per CFU), and when the product was made to ensure the bacteria is still alive (probiotics won’t work if the bacteria contained in them is dead). A few products that have been vetted and reviewed by Reviews.com include Islands Miracle-Ultra-30 Probiotics, MegaFood MegaFlora, Renew Life Ultimate Flora Extra Care 30 Billion, and Dr. Formulas Nexabiotic Advanced Multi-Probiotic. In final analysis, Earth Girl Wellness recommends everyone consume a daily probiotic. It is a “no-brainer” when it comes to gut health and is simple to add to any healthy routine. Choose a delivery system that makes you happy! You will be healthier whether you enjoy a great Kimchi grilled cheese sandwich, an Tina Hatcher is the owner of Earth Girl Wellness, LLC. Her passion for overall afternoon glass of kombucha, or throw back wellness has allowed her to work in multiple disciplines from corrective exercise, sports performance and sports nutrition, weight loss, and nutritional a few supplements with your morning glass of water. Your gut (and brain) will love you counseling across all ages from children through the elderly for the last 25 years. Check out her website, www.earthgirlwellness.com, or visit her on for it! Facebook at Earth Girl Wellness. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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mind•body•soul

YEARS 2006-2018

Winter Skin Care

Keeping your skin hydrated & healthy

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

It’s no secret that winter weather can be hard on your skin. One of the reasons is that we often forget to change up our routines to accommodate the change in temperatures. Harsh chemicals used to reduce natural oils in the summer can cause more damage in the winter. Our diets can also greatly impact our skin. With many of the winter holidays behind us, it is time to refocus on what we are putting into and on our bodies, and how those things are adding up to create the perfect storm. Here are a few of our favorite products for correcting and preventing winter dry skin and damage:

Coconut Oil

Cold weather can be very hard on your hair, specifically on your scalp. Sometimes over-the-counter dandruff shampoos don’t help with dandruff, and occasionally they can even make it worse. Dr. Axe (www.draxe.com) says that adding five drops of essential oils like lavender, wintergreen, thyme, or tea tree to two teaspoons of coconut oil and massaging it into your scalp after washing your hair can be a great intensive dandruff treatment! Do this 2-3 times per week to keep your scalp moisturized and your hair feeling soft! You can also apply coconut oil to your skin at night before going to bed. Be aware, however, that the oil may transfer to your sheets. So you may want to cover the affected area before calling it a night.

Eat Right

By now, you probably know that staying hydrated in the winter is important. You know that you should be drinking water like it’s your second job, and maybe even that a humidifier in your bedroom can help keep your skin hydrated. But did you know that what you eat matters too? That New Years resolution to eat right (and maybe add a few juices into your diet) can help in more ways than one. Fruits like watermelon and apples and vegetables like cucumbers and carrots contain a lot of water. Let them help you get the moisture your body needs to be healthy and comfortable.

Choose Wisely

Some face cleansers have ingredients that strip your skin of moisture. Read the labels, and make sure that what you are putting on your skin (aka the largest organ in your body) will not damage it even further. Look for all natural products and those with soothing ingredients, like oatmeal. We love Briar Mountain Farms (www.briarmtnfarm. com). Their goat’s milk soap is great for sensitive skin (and they are local!). Their soap contains high amounts of proteins, vitamins, and minerals. With plenty of scents to choose from, you can’t go wrong!

Treat Yourself !

Schedule a facial with a skin care professional. If you can’t do that, treat yourself to a facial mask twice a week at home. Our editor uses Innisfree It’s Real Squeeze mask sheets (found on Amazon) and loves them! Choose from trouble care, moisturizing, brightening, and nutritious options. Infused with a blend of herb complex water and ingredients from nature, this real mask adds vitality and energy to your skin. Visit www.lovelybella.com for more skin care tips throughout the month, and stay warm out there!

DO NOT Forget Sunscreen

Just because it’s winter doesn’t mean your skin can’t be damaged by UVA and UVB rays. Even if the sun doesn’t seem as bright, rays penetrating the clouds can reach your skin. Obagi Medical Skin care products are a great way to protect your skin against the harmful effects of sun exposure. We especially love their Tinted Sun Shield SPF 50 line, available in cool and warm shades for different skin tones. For harsh winter weather, you may also enjoy their HydraFactor Broad Spectrum SPF 30. This sunscreen is a dual-function moisturizer with soothing ingredients. Regardless of which sunscreen you choose, make sure to reapply it every two hours of exposure throughout the day. Check out Obagi’s website (www.obagi.com) for more information on where to find their impressive line of medical-grade skin care products locally at skincare professionals. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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mind•body•soul

YEARS 2006-2018

Playful Fitness

Exercise doesn’t always have to be a chore!

Written by Bryan Christon Don’t just exercise. PLAY!!! So, whatever happened to recess? Is it really true that adults can’t enjoy fitness as much as kids do? Not at all! Here are some suggestions to inspire you to think more like an open-minded child whose only job is to play:

Imagination. Be imaginative. Yes–exercise should be a routine, but not

a bore. Create/design your own routine which centers around your own interests, passions, and childhood pastimes. Throw on your favorite YouTube videos and follow along with the choreography. Or, make it a family project! Involve your kids and do games and fitness competitions around the house. For example, “Monkey in the Middle” is a ball game which improves cardio and coordination, and you only need three people to play! Take ownership of your fitness routine by creating it yourself (instead of just copying what others do). You are bound to take more pride in your daily workouts, all while being more accountable to yourself.

Interval. As a dancer, I can’t just dance at the studio. I have to do it whenever I feel like it! This might mean sliding around the kitchen floor in-between washing and drying the dishes, or busting out a set of pliés and pushups on the living room carpet, instead of sitting watching television on the couch. Much like eating five to six small meals a day instead of two or three, it can be equally effective to exercise in short spurts. Everyone’s metabolism is different. Everyone’s motivation is different. Do not compare yourself to your co-worker or the person doing leg press next to you at the gym. Find what works best for you and go for it! The worst thing that can happen (and the best thing that can happen) is that you will have a good time! Play with intervals! Over time, your energy and resourcefulness will improve.

Practice cartwheels on the front lawn or try bellydancing in the bathroom mirror. In my apartment building, there are a set of stairs leading to the basement garage. Early in the mornings, my neighbors often catch glimpses of me climbing the stairs and jumping rope, as if I am training for the Rocky films. The best part is watching the surprised looks on their faces. Be intentional! Even if you look silly doing it. Last, but not least, when you exercise and play, do it in familiar spaces and places. Look for areas that are filled with acceptance, love, encouragement, and accountability. (Hint: that place is not always at your house or at the local gym). Put some nostalgia in your program! Imagine your own schoolyard recess field. If you don’t find it immediately, keep looking! You will find it. You are the most motivated in familiar places where you garner the most support. No matter where that spot is, remember to PLAY. Being a child is at the core of who we all are anyway. Bryan Christon is a home-grown native of Fairbanks, Alaska and an alumni of the University of California, Santa Barbara. Bryan is a Certified Fitness Coach whose passions range from dance and sport performance to nutrition. He enjoys comic books, quality time with loved ones, and any movie with Emma Stone.

Intentionality. First things first...OPEN your eyes UP to PLAY! Remember that movie Hitch with Will Smith? Will Smith’s character, Alex Hitchens, has a great line, “Begin each day, as if it were on purpose.” Practice this month waking up and immediately doing something off-the-wall FUN! w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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mind•body•soul

YEARS 2006-2018

Awareness Month Let’s talk about heart health Written by Hayleigh Worgan February is American Heart Month. According to the CDC, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. One in every three deaths is from heart disease and stroke, equal to 2,200 deaths per day. Fortunately, there are ways to help prevent fatal complications from heart disease and stroke. The American Heart Association lists several of these on their website, including:

Eat Smart: You can’t eat perfect foods all the time, but you can make healthier choices more often. Did you know that some single-serving fruits and veggies can actually be cheaper than vending machine snacks? Buy in bulk, freeze excess servings, and watch videos on how to prepare healthy snacks using a variety of produce. Check out healthyforgood.heart.org for several hearthealthy recipes that you and your family will enjoy! Move More: You’ve probably heard that the ideal goal is to move at least 150 minutes each week. However, if that seems to daunting, try smaller time frames first. Look for ways in your day to move more. Sometimes it means taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or incorporating 10-minute arm workouts at your desk with small weights. Every small decision you make to move adds up fast. Be Well: Occasionally, we forget the combatting stress is a battle we must fight daily to keep our bodies healthy. Talk to your doctor and make sure you are getting enough sleep. Set aside moments in the day that you will

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not give into the urge to check social media. This would also be a great time to research the free yoga classes around Roanoke and learn to practice mindfulness. Make it a priority to take care of yourself. The American Heart Association works year-round to reduce fatalities related to heart disease and stroke by providing preventative education, support, and funding for research. Generous volunteers and donors in the community help make that happen. You can support efforts of the American Heart Association in Western Virginia by purchasing a ticket to the 2018 Roanoke Heart Ball on February 17. The evening is a celebration of the lives saved and improved because of donations and support throughout the year. If you can’t make it to the Heart Ball, consider making a donation of time or money to help support their mission of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. You can also participate in Go Red for Women ( www.goredforwomen.org ) on Friday, February 2 by wearing red and donating to the American Heart Association. Visit www.heart.org for more information.

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february 2018

w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


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bella magazine

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february 2018

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bella eats

YEARS 2006-2018

Warm Up to Veggie-Packed Soup When the weather outside is frightful, we could all use a cozy soup for supper. A steaming bowl of Rustic Vegetable-Beet Soup provides instant comfort. The ease and convenience of jarred pickled beets can’t be “beet”—no need to spend time peeling or pickling. (Aunt Nellie’s is our preferred brand.) This colorful mix of antioxidantrich beets, sweet potato, and carrots joins tender zucchini to create a soup that tastes like it simmered all afternoon; but in fact, comes together in under an hour. The sweet-tangy beets add an unexpected but welcome layer of flavor to this hearty soup. For the finishing touch, a garnish of vibrant green, lemony gremolata brightens the soup’s flavor. Garlic, lemon and parsley may seem ordinary, but they come alive when combined. Crisp flatbread makes a perfect accompaniment to this meal-in-a-bowl. For more recipes, or to learn more about Aunt Nellie’s beets and their other products, visit www.AuntNellies.com.

Rustic Vegetable-Beet Soup Prep time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Servings: 6

1 jar (16 ounces) Whole Pickled Beets, well drained (We prefer Aunt Nellie’s brand) 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium onions, coarsely chopped 2 medium carrots, coarsely chopped 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and chopped 2 large cloves garlic, minced 2 zucchini (about 5 ounces each), coarsely chopped 2 cans (about 14 ounces each) vegetable broth 1 teaspoon seasoned salt, optional 1 can (15.5 ounces) chickpeas, drained and rinsed Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill Coarsely chop beets; set aside. In large saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onions; saute about 5 minutes or until softened. Add carrots, sweet potato and garlic. Saute 3-5 minutes or until vegetables begin to soften, stirring occasionally. Add zucchini, broth and seasoned salt, if desired. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, about 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add chickpeas; heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper, as desired. Stir in parsley and dill. Stir in beets. Serve immediately topped with gremolata*, if desired. * Gremolata (or gremolada) is a chopped herb condiment classically made of lemon zest, garlic, parsley and anchovy. Gremolata is used as a fragrant garnish. 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley 1 tablespoon minced fresh dill 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel To make gremolata, combine all ingredients. Use as garnish topping on soup. Nutrition information per serving (1/6 of recipe): 210 calories; 6 g fat; 6 g protein; 33 g carbohydrate; 6 g dietary fiber; 0 mg cholesterol; 2 mg iron; 727 mg sodium; 0.13 mg thiamin; 6981 IU vitamin A; 8 mg vitamin C.

Courtesy of Seneca Foods Corporation w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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Fun and work-appropriate! Fashion Ideas

for Valentine’s Day! Love is in the air, chocolate hearts are in high demand, and Valentine’s outfits everywhere are being prepped and planned. If you work outside the home, you’ve probably seen some interesting, and dare I say inappropriate, holiday office attire. Ugly sweaters that weren’t meant to be tacky, skirts too short, heels too high, and, yes, those deep v-neck tops and dresses. With Valentine’s Day right around the corner you may be planning a red hot outfit for a fancy dinner with your significant other or a night out on the town with your girlfriends. Or hey, you might be planning on jammies and a movie date with Ben & Jerry... and that’s okay too! But let’s save those pjs and skin tight dresses for activities outside of work (if, indeed, you can wear pjs to work, I’d love to know where you’re employed... are they hiring?!). A few ways to incorporate Valentine’s Day into your work wardrobe are as follows: Bright Colors. A brightly colored piece of clothing worn in the right way can make the perfect statement while not bringing any negative attention. For example, try wearing one stand out color on either the top or bottom, while keeping the other neutral. You could try a Kelly green pencil skirt with a cream sweater... OR a Kelly green sweater/cardigan with a cream skirt. See what I mean? (I paired my skirt with a pink pump for Cupid’s favorite holiday, but feel free to wear black or nude if your office is on the more conservative side.) Texture, Pattern, & Shape. Look for trendy details in tops like tiered sleeves and understated textural patterns. Crew necks are always a win for work, and choosing to tuck in your blouse or sweater (yes, even sweaters!) is a fantastic way to show off your shape without unveiling too much skin. You can also try classic patterns in pants/skirts like dots or stripes. A black and white stripe or polk-a-dot is an on-trend style that pairs perfectly with a bright color like red, pink, or green.

Photo by Cricket Maiden

Jewelry. For a little pizzazz, you can always add jewelry. This is a great option if your work place won’t allow the suggestions above or requires a uniform. I chose to keep all of my pieces gold but added some detail by layering necklaces and adding a thin hoop earring. Fashion/trendy jewelry doesn’t have to break the bank either. One of my favorite brands is BP. at Nordstrom­­—my earrings only cost $10!

Written by Amanda Marshall of Pardon Muah Amanda is a Kentucky native and author of the lifestyle blog Pardon Muah. She shares beauty products, motivational stories, and fab fashion finds weekly. www.pardonmuah.com w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

You can use these tips for any and every holiday. Remember you don’t always have to wear traditional colors—think outside the box! To find out more about this season’s hottest trends and for more outfit and beauty inspiration, head to my blog Pardon Muah ( www.pardonmuah.com ) or check out my Instagram @pardonmuahinsta. february 2018

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xo Amanda

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profile

Supporting the Arts

Melissa Aldana takes her audience Back Home

Tenor saxophonist Melissa Aldana will perform at Jefferson Center on February 17 at 7pm and again at 9pm. A rising tenor saxophone star, Aldana recently released her second trio album (and fourth as a leader). Back Home unveils a powerful musical creation by Aldana and her illustrious bandmates. Not so much reminiscent of a specific place, Back Home evokes something a little deeper for Aldana. “Back Home is a tribute to Sonny Rollins, who has been a huge influence on me since I was ten years old,” she explains. “It makes a reference to the first time I heard him playing back home in Chile. I completely fell in love with the sound of his tenor. He is organic and funny. Those are some of the most important elements in music. It’s like he’s having a conversation with you, and you can hear how he’s taking risks and trying new things. Those are the elements I want to have in my own playing.” Aldana describes her relationship with the tenor saxophone as a lifelong commitment. The journey with the instrument has allowed her to mature as an artist, and her dedication to it remains. From New York to Montreal (and around the world), she carries that pivotal moment when she first heard Sonny Rollins play with her in addition to the lessons she has learned from other artistic influences. In this page 30

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way, she can allow the music she creates to tell the story of her travels, experiences, and personal growth. On Back Home she includes a track called “Time” that is a “meditation on her life since departing Chile.” She has described the nostalgic track as a reflection of the last nine years of her life. As the tenor saxophone carries the listener through the ups and downs of the accumulated time, it is not hard to give over the memories of one’s own adventures. This is exactly the impact Aldana hopes to have with her work. “I hope [the audience] has fun and goes on a trip with the music. Also, I hope they enjoy it as much as I did when I recorded the album,” she adds. Joining Aldana for her February 17th shows are Sam Harris on the piano, Thomas Crane on the drums, and Pablo Menares on the bass. Together, they project an “uncommonly full orchestral sound, rich in spiritual intensity, all in the absence of a harmony instrument.” The experience is one that Roanoke audiences are unlikely to forget, and Aldana is excited to introduce both new and returning fans to her new music. To purchase tickets, visit www.jeffcenter.org. For more information on Melissa and to purchase her music, go to www.melissaaldana.com. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


Bella Magazine - February 2018  

Celebrating our 12th year as the regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond.

Bella Magazine - February 2018  

Celebrating our 12th year as the regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond.

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