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Dr. Carol Wray Carol A. Wray, M.D. is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.


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april 2017

Ap r i l 2 0 1 7

Issu e On e Hu n d re d T h i r ty

Joey Coakley Beck Publisher & Owner jbeck@beckmediagroup.com Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Director hworgan@beckmediagroup.com Sara Coakley Office Manager bella@beckmediagroup.com ••• ADVERTISING Meredith MacKenzie Advertising Sales Representative meredith@beckmediagroup.com (540) 904-6800 ••• Contributors Member One Federal Credit Union, Aaren Nuñez/Well Fed Farm, Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Inquiries editorial@beckmediagroup.com

inside hidden treasures

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Exploring the little libraries thoughout our area.

shaping the future

Planned Parenthood honors Dotsy Clifton.

meet the maker

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pages 14-15

Artists from Open Studios Roanoke give us a preview of the tour.

save smarter

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Preparing your budget for mortgage and renovation costs.

common good

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pages 25-26

Exploring the local food culture in Southwest & Central Virginia.

poppyseed

Celebrating the connections that create diverse families in the region. LLC

P.O. Box 107 Roanoke, Virginia 24002 540.904.6800 fax 540.904.6803 Bella Magazine is the property of Beck Media Group LLC. It is a free publication printed monthly and is distributed throughout Southwest and Central Virginia and beyond. The Publisher reserves the right to refuse ad space for any advertisement or editorial content the staff deems inappropriate for our readers. The concept and design of Bella Magazine, as well as the design, advertisements, art, photos and editorial content is property of Beck Media Group LLC and may not be copied or reprinted without written permission from the publisher. ©2017 Beck Media Group LLC All Rights Reserved. PRINTED IN VIRGINIA w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

strong women unite

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The fearless pursuit of things that matter in our community.

bella loves

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Fun ways to use Pantone’s 2017 Spring Colors around your home and in your wardrobe!

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hidden treasures

make reading an adventure

Exploring the Little Free Libraries in our area

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Little Free Libraries are steadily growing in number across the United States and the world. The movement began in 2010 with its creator, Todd H. Bol, giving away 30 Little Free Libraries. Over the next few years, he watched them multiply. Today, they number over 50,000 registered locations, with a goal to reach 100,000 by the end of this year. For those unfamiliar with the concept, the Little Free Library is a place where one can take a book or leave a book in a common neighborhood area. They come in many shapes and sizes, but the most common version is a small wooden box of books. There are several little libraries scattered throughout neighborhoods in our area. Although the exteriors are different, the overall sense that each library steward is not only fostering a love for reading, but also cultivating a sense of social responsibility emanates from each carefully crafted box. At Oak Grove Elementary, for example, a small green and blue library greets parents, students, and visitors near the entrance to the school. Fourth grade students designed, painted, and built three libraries as part of a Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oak Grove Elementary (LFL #14031) Engineering/Project Based learning project in 2013-14. They april 2017

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hidden treasures

Waxmyrtle Drive, Roanoke (LFL #44308)

Laurel Woods Drive, Salem (LFL #21400)

31st Street, Roanoke (LFL #13970)

chose this library for the school, and organized a book drive to stock it. In the years to come, they have pledged to continue to care for the location. From a young age, this encourages students to nurture their reading habit, seek out new books to read on a regular basis, and share their favorites with neighbors and friends. Just as the students poured their creative spirit into this design, artists, craftsmen and women, designers, and architects are all expressing themselves through the new medium. Locally, Marijke and Steven Barber spent the better part of a cold winter making one. The beautiful painted library is located on 31st Street. They completed it as the weather turned warm, and it has attracted visitors ever since. Like many of the others we visited throughout Roanoke, the façade almost echoes the exterior of their home. On Waxmyrtle Drive, a small red and white library accents a family home with similar features. The library was built by a grandfather and grandson as a birthday present. When families love to read, and share that love with their neighborhood, it becomes a gift for everyone around them. These locations make for quirky and unique family road trips around the county, but also serve as an opportunity for local groups to promote civic engagement, and awareness about social and environmental issues. In fact, several of the locations we visited contained copies of the Constitution, left by a local political outreach group. Of course, each library offers something for everyone, and not just in the form of literature. Our favorite stop was located at the trailhead of the Chisom Trial in the Roanoke County community of Laurel Woods. There is a picnic bench just beyond the little library, and it is an easy stop for hikers and explorers. “The library was established in memory of Charlene Lenox Denton (1942-2012),” steward, Brian Chisom, explains. “Charlene enjoyed outdoor activities: gardening, hiking, camping, and walking with friends. And, in many settings, she found ways to help others. The Little Free Library that bears her name is a testament to Charlene’s devotion to service and community.” There are also six newspaper boxes, donated by the Roanoke Times, interspersed throughout the map. The Roanoke Arts Commission hired artist Dan Kuehl to transform them by covering the exterior with Melrose Avenue (LFL #45381) familiar landmarks from the Roanoke region. Each box has a steward that is responsible for its upkeep. Although every library is different, they serve as a direct reflection of our community’s growing dedication to the arts, literature, and service. If you are interested in exploring the locations with family and friends, or simply looking for a new book to take you on an adventure, visit www.littlefreelibrary.org.

Wilshire Avenue, Grandin Road area (LFL #12354) page 8

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shaping the future

women changing lives Planned Parenthood honors Dotsy Clifton Written by Hayleigh Worgan

Dotsy Clifton

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At the Planned Parenthood Spring Luncheon on April 28, attendees will honor Dotsy Clifton with the Spring Luncheon Award. Dotsy has spent much of her life working with the community—specifically women and at-risk children. She started working with Planned Parenthood as a volunteer, but when her zeal for the organization grew, she was asked to take on a larger role as part of the board. “Initially, I was friends with a former director,” she explains. “I helped with some of the fundraisers and they asked me to be on the board. My passion for it continued, but I’ve really just been like a soldier on the line. I address envelopes. I’m not afraid to ask people for money. Sometimes, maybe because I’m older than some people, they will call to bounce things off of me.” Dotsy is humble when it comes to her own accomplishments and contributions. Yet, there is a strength in the foundation of her approach that resonates with the community. In a time when there is so much controversy around the subject of women’s healthcare, she does not consider her advocacy courageous. She does, however, recognize that it is a subject that makes people uncomfortable, and even angry. Everyone’s situation is different, and she admires the bravery of those who speak out in defense of women’s healthcare even when it is difficult. “I have lived long enough to remember when it was an act of courage for businessmen to be involved with Planned Parenthood. One thing I think would say to a young person is my sense is that young people take access to birth control, access to abortion, and the morning after pill for granted. They’ve lived in a world april 2017

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shaping the future

Hayleigh Worgan uses her voice as a writer and the editor of Bella Magazine to tell the stories of women in our community regardless of race, religion, country of origin, or sexual orientation. In her free time, she works on creative pieces that focus on equality. www.hayleighworgan.com page 12

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where it has always been possible for them. Their grandmothers don’t talk about what it was like before.” It is easy to take the things for granted that we have lived with all of our lives. We forget that laws can change to limit access to crucial services with the stroke of a pen. The most frightening part about this attitude, is that no one is offering a reasonable solution to the problems that women are facing. Instead, they are eliminating alternatives that are saving lives. While abortion seems to be the hot topic when it comes to organizations like Planned Parenthood, there are things that people are not talking about that they should be. For example, the mortality rate of women who would not have survived their pregnancy due to complications, the amount of children who age out of foster care because no one will adopt them, and the fact that taking away the option of safe procedures in clean facilities will not stop them from happening. “Before abortion was legal and accessible, a lot of people got married that shouldn’t have gotten married,” Dotsy says. “It was very different and frightening if a young woman was pregnant and she wasn’t ready. When I was in college, girls would go to an abortionist out in the country. I never went with anyone, so this is kind of word of mouth, but it was not clean. It was scary. You had to come with cash. I wouldn’t want to see us get there again, and we could very easily.” As clinics around the country face the possibility of defunding, it is not only the option of ending a pregnancy in a safe, clean facility that may disappear. Without Planned Parenthood, many women will lose their access to lifesaving services like breast exams, pap smears, STD testing and treatment, cancer screenings, and access to birth control. Dotsy is not only an inspiration to continue defending our right to healthcare, but her knowledge of what previous generations faced without Planned Parenthood is invaluable. “I think that women’s health and access to reproductive services are so important to the health of a community,” she says. “It is more fragile than we sometimes realize: access for women who cannot afford a private doctor, as well as women who can, access to birth control, and access to wisdom about their options. The openness to really discuss concerns about sexuality and what kinds of birth control to use. People who go to Planned Parenthood get real time, unlike sometimes in a busy private doctor’s office. Clients feel heard and listened to.” Educating young people about the services the clinic offers before they become sexually active is important to the health of the community. As her children grew up, Dotsy knew the clinic could be a resource for them. “When my children were teens,” she recalls, “I said to my son, ‘You really aren’t old enough to be having sex until you’re old enough to go to Planned Parenthood by yourself with your beloved.’” In the end, it is about having the resources and options to educate our community from the time that each individual becomes sexually active and throughout their relationships. Being open to talk about sexual education, parenthood, and women’s health is imperative, regardless of your gender or sexual orientation. We are thrilled to see Dotsy receive this award at Planned Parenthood’s Spring Luncheon, and that Parkway Brewery will also be honored with the Giraffe Award, for a community partner that has stuck its neck out for Planned Parenthood. For tickets to the luncheon, visit www.ppsat.org/events.

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Work by Diane Patton

Jamie Nervo in her studio

Meridith Brehmer Entingh in her studio

Work by Ann Glover Elaine Fleck

Work by Lisa Pitcher

Gina Louthian-Stanley in her studio

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MEET THE

MAKERS

Written by Hayleigh Worgan

A small preview of the work featured in this year’s Open Studios of Roanoke

The 17th Annual Open Studios of Roanoke Tour will take place Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30. The tour is self-guided, free, and families are welcome. This year, the tour will feature twenty-five professional artists representing mediums ranging from mixed media, assemblage, sculpture, painting, drawing, ceramic sculpture, pottery, textiles, and photography. These tours are special, because they allow the public to not only visit the studios where local art is created, but also see several of the artists at work. Several of the artists on the tour are women, and interviewing them gave us the opportunity to preview their talent before visiting their studios in person. Gina Louthian-Stanley has participated in the Open Studios tour for 15 years. She enjoys experimenting with different mediums including painting, print-making, and jewelry. “All of my inspirations come primarily from the earth and nature,” she explains. “I have a particular piece, Bent Mountain Marsh, that was created from a memory of a place. Most of my pieces are not of a particular place, but of the ephemeral quality of the landscape around us. I want my work to be the beginning of a conversation about how nature affects us.” Not surprisingly, each of the artists we interviewed began practicing in their youth. The intermittent years have nursed their talent, allowing it to grow with their passion for the work. Meridith Brehmer Entingh, local weaver and textile artist, began knitting when she was seven years old. Although she graduated with a business degree, she never lost her love of working with fiber. Her talent continued to flourish as she pursued friendships with local weavers, signed up for classes, and volunteered to work at a yarn shop in Northern Virginia. “When we moved to Roanoke 11 years ago, part of the criteria was that there be a room for my weaving studio,” she recalls. “I quickly outgrew the room with the purchase of my second floor loom in 2007, so we built a new weaving studio.” Once the studio was completed in 2014, Meridith asked to be involved with the Open Studios Tour. Much of the inspiration for the work on this tour comes from both traveling and appreciating the beauty of what Roanoke has to offer. Elaine Fleck, a multi-media artist who works with oil on fabric, has been featured on the tour off and on for ten years. She likes the work of artists that use a lot of texture or color like Gustav Klimt and Matisse. “Lately, I am inspired by mosaic artists, and this has led me to creating some new mosaic sculpture, specifically my mosaic shoe collection that will be featured on the Open Studios Tour this year along with my paintings,” she adds. Jamie Nervo has also participated in Open Studio’s tours for the last ten years. She works with encaustic mediums, and creates beautiful oil paintings. Her landscape paintings are a reflection of living on Bent Mountain, where changing cloud formations, colors, and shadows keep her inspired to paint. “Sometimes I create ugly messes,” she says, “but out of the mess there is always beauty or something interesting. Discovering the unknown and pushing the envelope always feels good. “ For the full interviews with Meridith, Jamie, Gina, and Elaine, visit our website: www.lovelybella.com. You can also visit www.openstudiostourroanoke.com for more information on the many artists participating in the tour later this month! Our monthly Meet the Maker feature is proudly sponsored by HomeTown Bank. Each month, we recognize local makers selling their unique handmade products. Visit our website, www.lovelybella.com, to view these features throughout the year.

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save smarter

Article courtesy of Member One Federal Credit Union

home buying and renovation budget prep Because you don’t want to be “house poor,” do you?

So, you want to buy a house. Or, you’re considering a renovation. Looking at homes and upgrades is exciting, but don’t get ahead of yourself. While HGTV makes it look easy, purchasing a home or getting a second mortgage actually takes a lot of planning and preparation. Here are a few ways to get yourself ready:

Know your budget. You should spend no more than 25-28 percent of your monthly take-home income on a mortgage. Look at your monthly paychecks (after taxes) to see what that percentage would be so you aren’t looking at homes out of your price range. If you’re considering a home equity product (also know as a second mortgage), make sure the extra monthly expense keeps you in that 25-28 percent range. Save the right amount. Traditionally, your down payment should be 20 percent of the purchase price to avoid paying more in interest and private mortgage insurance (PMI). If the home you want is $200,000, you should have $40,000 saved. Additionally, be prepared to pay closing costs, an inspection fee, appraisal fee, and a lender’s fee. There are loans that don’t require 20 percent down, but you’ll pay more in interest over time and PMI could be required. Plan for future costs. If you have enough money to comfortably buy a home now, don’t forget about future expenses. Are you planning on starting a family soon? According to the USDA, a middle-income married couple spends an average of $727 a month on a child. Can your budget handle that with a mortgage? What if something breaks? You’re now responsible for home repairs and must plan for those unexpected expenses. Home Equity Loans or Line of Credit. These options are for people who already own a home; they can be used for renovations, college costs, or even a vacation. When choosing a lender, you’ll want to look at their closing costs, interest rates, and fees. You should also consider if you want a lump sum up front (home equity loan) or a revolving loan that works like a credit card (home equity line of credit). And keep in mind that you’re essentially adding to your mortgage payment, so make sure you’re financially prepared.

Buying or making upgrades to a home should be exciting, but don’t let the thrill of the hunt overshadow the financial preparation. Do your homework and get your ducks in a row; when you’re ready, your dream house will be there. Article courtesy of

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Join Member One here each month for more money-saving tips and financial advice! Be sure to visit their website, www.memberonefcu.com, for more information on the products and services they offer. april 2017

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common good Exploring the local food culture in Southwest & Central Virginia

for the love of asparagus

Photos & written by Aaren Nuñez

Aaren Nuñez is a Mother, Farmer, Cook, and Photographer. She lives with her partner, Craig and two sons in Floyd, VA where she owns and operates Well Fed Farm raising heritage breed livestock. On any given day you can find her milking a cow or two, developing a recipe, driving a tractor, photographing food, and of course thinking about her next meal. Say Hello! aaren@wellfedfarm.com Instagram: @wellfedfarm Facebook: Well Fed Farm, Floyd VA w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

I only eat asparagus in the spring. The sole exception to this would be the spicy pickled spears that I put back during the height of their bounty each year. I am good slipping those into a Bloody Mary any day. Whether due to its fleeting season and thus scarcity over a long period of time, its amazing versatility, or simply my absolute fondness of said vegetable, I look forward to its arrival eagerly each April. When the purple and green tips begin pushing their way up through the mulch in my small asparagus patch I do a little dance, wait until they are the requisite height, and then head out with my favorite purple Opinel pocket knife and a basket to the back of the garden. Here, their massive underground roots have been living for years. I harvest frequently and eat them with grateful abandon until it is time to bid farewell for the year. Then I let the succulent spears grow, unharvested, into the tall ferny plants which will gather energy all summer long to feed those hungry roots that keep this favorite perennial alive and well, sure to return the next spring. The early season farm bustle has begun. There is calving, starting and potting up vegetables, flowers, and herbs indoors, garden bed prep outdoors, working on fencing, and welcoming a new batch of piglets. While there is a general re-greening as the dormant dull colored pastures come back to life and the fruit trees and lilac burst into bloom, there is still not a whole lot going on out in the main garden. There are the rows of garlic that were planted last autumn that have their green fronds pushing up strong. A few of these I’ll pull early and use as green garlic in the kitchen as last years stored bulbs are getting tired, hollow and dried out. There’s self-seeded kale along with a few hardy lettuces. The beautiful, ruby stalked rhubarb is making her way up above the soil, and there’s the nutrient dense welcomed “weeds” interspersed among the mulched rows. Chickweed, violets, stinging nettle, dead nettle, wild mustard, and sorrel can all be used sparingly in salads, or perhaps in a pasta or spanakopita filling, blanched and mixed with freshly made farmstead ricotta. Walking through this early garden as it comes back to life feels like a bit of a party populated by all these scrappy april 2017

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common good early birds. There is a tangible excitement at seeing them all after the long winter. However, without a doubt, Asparagus officinalis is the one I am most happy to welcome back. Besides the thrill of wild foraged ramps and morels, asparagus (a plant that has been cultivated and harvested wild for thousands of years) reigns supreme in the early spring. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s break it down with this quick asparagus primer: Spears can be green, purple or white. White spears are either green or purple varieties and are the product of growers covering the plants with thick mulch (which, in effect, keeps the light from producing chlorophyll in the stems). Purple asparagus will turn to dark green when cooked. Thinner spears come from younger plants; older more established roots produce the thicker spears. Well-tended roots can produce for around 15 years. The sooner the asparagus is eaten after being cut out in the field the best. The sugars start converting to starch right away and this is what can make a thicker spear seem more fibrous. (I will sometimes munch on a juicy stem on my way back into the farmhouse. Just picked and raw, larger stems are crisp, and sweet!) Once harvested, I like to stand the collected bunch, tips up, in a narrow vase or jar filled with an inch or so of water and leave them out on the counter. They are beautiful! Why stick them in the dark fridge? This method works for store asparagus as well, just cut off a quarter inch or so before putting them down into the water. Use your asparagus while the tips are still tight. Some folks like to peel the bottom half of thicker stems. When prepping, a good rinse and snapping off the lower, woody part is necessary for both market and garden fresh, usually. If prepping a large number of spears, one can feel where the stem wants to naturally snap, and then a knife can be used to tail the whole lot at the point where one or two want to bend and snap. Tails can be saved and used for quick vegetable stocks (think soup, risottos, poaching broth). Thicker spears can be cut lengthwise down the middle to aid in a more uniform cooking time when using an assortment of different spear thicknesses.

Hot, smoky and charred, cooled to room temperature, or simply rawâ&#x20AC;ŚI do not play favorites. Asparagus can be steamed, boiled, stir-fried, sautĂŠed, roast, pickled, or grilled. I do tend to prefer it cooked over coals or on a cast iron grill plate, as I love the nuttiness that tends to come from a bit of caramelization that occurs when asparagus is cooked with high heat this way. It pairs perfectly with Parmegiano-Regiano cheese, which, in this house, is a must-have staple. Enter this dead simple, and yet deeply beguiling plate that I prepare and eat more than any other during asparagus season. This is nothing new here. I am not exactly sure when I started making this Italian asparagus and fried egg dish. I do know it was years before I lived on a farm, had planted an asparagus patch, or tended a flock of heritage breed hens that seasonally begin to lay in abundance right around the same time the green and purple spears show up. I can say with certainty that each time I sit down hungry, slice across the tender-firm asparagus into that soft orange yolk and take my first bite, it always ends up being the best rendition of this classic that I can remember.

-Aaren

Roasted Asparagus with Parmigiano-Reggiano & a Hen Egg Serves one, scale up for additional servings

You will need: Handful of asparagus spears (8-12) rinsed, woody bottoms removed, rolled in about one to two tablespoons of olive oil with a big pinch of salt 1 or 2 pastured hen eggs at room temperature Flakey salt (such as Maldon or a fleur de sel) for finishing 2-3 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano Freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons olive oil for frying eggs Begin with cooking your asparagus: For oven-roasted place spears in a single layer on a parchment lined baking sheet and slide onto top rack of an oven preheated to 425F. Roast for around 15 minutes (depending on spear size). For pan-roasted preheat a cast iron skillet or heavy, ridged grill plate over medium-high to high heat. Add spears in a single layer. Turn asparagus every couple of minutes until they are turning brown and crispy in spots, about 5-8 minutes. Remove from heat to your plate where it will continue cooking a bit, so always err on the side of under rather than over cooking. Heat a skillet over medium heat and add olive oil. Carefully crack in your eggs and season with a bit of salt. Cook as you please, sunny side up or over easy. Aim for crispy, almost brown and lacey edges on the white with a still wobbly yolk (of course!), 2-3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, slide the cooked egg on top of the asparagus. Scatter egg and asparagus with grated cheese, a few course grinds of black pepper, and the crunchy sea salt taking care to place some flakes across the tips of the asparagus spears.

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common good

support your local farmers

An easy way to transition into only purchasing local ingredients Farm share programs, also known as Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), are investment relationships that benefit both the community and local farmers. Too often, as consumers, we take the easy way out and purchase our foods from the grocery store. This habit can be easily changed by making the decision to support your neighbors and know the origin of your food. Here are a few of our favorite local farm share programs. Thornfield Farm takes their relationship with their customers very seriously. In addition to purchasing food from their farm stand, you have the option to become a “member” of the farm, which entitles you to receive a portion of their harvest and participate in the family farm experience. Your membership fee includes fresh produce all season (which begins in April and ends in November). Members choose their vegetables online from those available, and pick ups occur weekly at farm stands in Roanoke. Additionally, members can enroll their kids in summer camp and participate in on-farm dinners, field days, and other hands-on farming experiences. Visit www.thornfieldfarm.com for more information.

Good Food Good People offers a variety of farm share choices. Beginning in May, subscribers can choose a Fruit and Veggie Share that will deliver a box of fresh fruits and vegetables every week from May 3 to October 25. All produce is grown by local farmers, and the share is a 60-40% blend of vegetables and fruits. A Meat and Cheese Share will also be available during this time. It includes choices between beef, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, and duck. Premium dairy selections in this share are cow cheese, goat cheese, and butter. Members can choose two of their 26 weeks as vacation weeks, and will not receive a box for those two weeks. Go to www.goodfoodgoodpeople.net to choose the share that is right for you.

Even if you are unable to commit to a food share program this year, April is the best time to get out and explore your local farmers’ market. Let the warm weather introduce you to neighbors, new friends, and maybe even a healthier lifestyle! Check out the fresh fruits and vegetables available at Forest Farmers Market ( www.forestfarmersmarket.com ) in Forest, Virginia. They offer delicious local foods from honey and eggs to micro greens, crisp local fruit, goat cheese, goat meat, free range chickens, catfish, and freshly baked breads. If you are closer to Roanoke, try the Historic Roanoke City Market ( www.roanokemarket. com ). These excursions give you the opportunity to support local artists as well, who often have pottery, jewelry, and various mixed media available for purchase.

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Follow us on Instagram (@bella_magazine) as the weather gets warmer for photos of our market adventures and finds!

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poppyseed Bella’s guide for all families of Southwest & Central Virginia

lunch fun with bento boxes Themed lunches for your family to enjoy all year!

Yum-Yum Bento All Year Round: Box Lunches for Every Season by Crystal Watanabe and Maki Ogawa is the perfect book for introducing your child to the idea that eating healthy can be fun too! It contains 52 tasty, in-season Japanese bento box lunches. Our favorite is the adorable “Walking Doggies” recipe just in time for spring! Check it out, and show us your creations on Facebook (www.facebook.com/bellamagazine)! “Springtime isn’t fun just for us—our furry friends love it as well! After a long winter inside, they are ready for sunshine, walks, and puddle splashing too. These little pups are happy to go out, rain or shine.”

Walking Doggies 1 or 2 lettuce leaves 2 rice balls 2 slices fish cake or 2 slices boiled or steamed potato pat of butter 1 piece nori ¼ slice white American cheese 1 cocktail sausage 1 serving Chicken and Veggie Stir-Fry* bento fillers such as broccoli, peas, or sliced boiled eggs

Line a bento box with lettuce. Place rice balls on lettuce. Cut 2 ovals out of fish cake slices. Warm butter in a small pan over low heat. Sauté fish cake slices until lightly browned in the middle. Place on top of rice balls. Cut 2 nori strips and place over the doggies as leashes, using a toothpick to tuck in ends. Use a nori punch to create nori eyes, noses, and paw prints. Apply eyes and paw prints using a slightly moistened toothpick. Pinch a small piece of thick straw into an oval and punch ovals out of cheese as paws. Cut off the tops of the ovals. Apply paws to leashes. Cut small circles for the doggies’ noses, applying a small nori dot to each for the tip. Thinly slice sausage and cut edges off for ears. Tuck ears under doggies’ heads. Arrange Chicken and Veggie Stir-Fry around rice balls. Accent with bento fillers.

*Chicken & Veggie Stir-Fry Makes 4 to 5 servings

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7 oz boneless, skinless chicken thighs ½ long eggplant 1 tbsp oyster sauce 1 tbsp sake or cooking wine 1 tsp cooking oil ½ tsp chopped fresh ginger ½ yellow bell pepper, julienned salt to taste ground black pepper to taste

Cut chicken and eggplant into bite-sized pieces. In a small bowl, combine oyster sauce and sake. Set aside. In a sauté pan, heat oil over medium heat. Add chicken and ginger and cook, stirring constantly, until lightly browned. Remove from pan and drain well on paper towels. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel, return to heat, and stir-fry eggplant and pepper until soft. Add chicken and sauce mixture to the pan. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring and tossing, for 1 minute.

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poppyseed

a brighter future Roanoke volunteers advocate stability for children in foster care

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for children is a national organization working towards the best interest of vulnerable children in foster care. Their volunteers use information they gather from talking with everyone in a child’s life from their parents and relatives to foster parents, teachers, medical professionals, attorneys, and social workers to inform judges and others of what the child needs. All of this information is imperative to determining the best home for the child. Locally, there are several amazing dedicated volunteers from diverse backgrounds working to improve the lives of children in foster care. Some of them have full time jobs in addition to the volunteer work, and others are retirees balancing their lives with dedication to these children. Though the task can be delicate and stressful at times, volunteers often find themselves growing personally and professionally as a result. Anne Dunlap, a CASA for four years, had not thought about working with children before she met CASA program director Judi Jacobson. However, it has become something that is both enjoying and fulfilling. “It has made me realize that these children who can’t speak for themselves need to have someone represent them, and try to fight for them,” she explains. Summer Holland is a student at Liberty University. She also works full time in addition to her work with CASA. Volunteering has shown her that the passion she has always had for taking care of children is something that she wants to carry through her life. page 26

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“I don’t want to just go through life and not make a difference,” she emphasizes. “I want to make it my life journey to make sure every child is in a stable environment.” Of course, inspiring stability in the lives of others means taking care of yourself too. Patti Landovek, a new volunteer, finds inspiration and comfort in the community around her when situations become frustrating. “I have a great advisor, Judi. I can’t say enough about her. I can call her with anything and let her know if I’m frustrated. It’s wonderful to have someone you can got to and be honest with,” Patti observes. “It helps me take a deep breath and keep on going.” The support and training that CASA offers their volunteers is essential to their ability to help the children in our area. Angela Rauenswinter, a volunteer for six years, says both the women who run the organization and their suggestions are invaluable. “What I have come to realize is that these children really don’t stand a chance unless someone gets in there to help them. There is a need for more help in the community, in the state, and in the country,” she adds. There are over 300 children in foster care in our area. CASA’s volunteers are able to serve about 1/3 of those children, and they are looking for new volunteers in order to serve a larger number. If you’re ready to stand up for a child who needs you, visit www.casaforchildren.org to find a volunteer program in your area. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


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Written by Hayleigh Worgan

living fearlessly Using awareness in addition to knowledge to increase your personal safety

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Fearless. It’s a beautiful word that implies fewer limitations, more opportunities, and a life full of adventure. Yet, so often fear keeps us from pursuing the things that make us happy—including something as simple as going out with friends on a Friday night. That’s why Fearless by Logan Doughty is so important. Written as “A Woman’s Guide to Personal Self Protection,” Fearless is about creating a lifestyle, of which only a portion is physical self-defense. It’s about being proactive, lowering unhealthy levels of anxiety, and deescalating conflict. “When I look at fighting as my only tool, that’s missing the point,” explains Doughty. “Think creatively. If this is going south, I’m going to start moving before it gets out of hand.” The ten principles Doughty promotes can be broken down into three categories: physical, mental, and environmental preparation. Instead of letting your low grade anxiety keep you living in the dark, let it motivate you to act in a way that is healthy for your lifestyle. For example, when you move into a new apartment, ask your landlord for permission to change the locks on your door to make sure you know who has a copy of every key. Run through scenarios in situations that make you fearful to determine how you could take charge and get away. Carry pepper spray, and know how to use it. Doughty decided to publish Fearless as an extension of the classes he offers on Personal Self Protection. It began as a quick way to reach those who may not be able to attend a class. The goal is not only to reach more people, but to provide more relatable content. “The people I train do not want to become martial artists. They just want to learn how to move or react effectively when they need to,” he says. Fighting skills are personal, and too often, perishable. If you aren’t using them on a regular basis, it can be easy to forget them. However, establishing a routine that uses your principles can prove invaluable in situations after certain defense moves are long forgotten. Doughty also talks about how to use weapons like pepper spray and stun guns. “Really, you’re safer now than you’ve ever been. However, we are more anxious than we’ve ever been. The solution is not in the fighting. It’s only a tiny part of the solution,” he explains. “I look at these situations like they’re problems to be solved. If I don’t run around like everything is going to fall apart at any moment, then I’m not going to fall apart.” Learning how to trust your instincts and your abilities is the first step in cultivating your fearless lifestyle. If you are interested in taking one of Doughty’s Personal Self Protection classes, or in purchasing his new book, Fearless, visit his website: www.pspqualified.com.

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strong women unite

Our schedules are full for the month of April! Between spring luncheons, fashion shows, charity events, and supporting local art, there are so many things to be excited about in the region. Check out a few of our favorites below, and follow us on Facebook ( www.facebook.com/bellamagazine ) for updates on all the latest happenings! If you love fashion that supports a great cause, don’t miss the Limited by Sight Not by Style runway show at Holiday Inn Airport on April 8 at 2 pm. Presented by the Roanoke Valley Breakfast Lions Club, in collaboration with the Roanoke Alliance for the Visually Enabled, it will feature models with vision challenges as a fundraiser and awareness opportunity. The event will include hors d’oeuvres, entertainment, and a silent auction preceding the runway show. All proceeds will be used to benefit persons with vision difficulties. For additional information, contact Barbara Pendergrass Richmond of the Roanoke Valley Breakfast Lions Club at revalrichmond@aol.com.

Opera Roanoke will conclude their season with the local premiere of Carlisle Floyd’s award-winning drama, Susannah on Friday, April 28 at 7:30 pm, and Sunday, April 30 at 3 pm. Based on a story from the Biblical Apocrypha, Susannah is a compelling drama whose issues resonate across cultural, social, political, and religious lines. Don’t miss this masterpiece of dramatic power and lyrical beauty, set in the Appalachian Mountains. Met Opera conductor, and Opera Roanoke Principal Guest Conductor Steven White will lead the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra and cast, under the stage direction of Artistic Director Scott Williamson. To purchase tickets, visit www.operaroanoke.org.

The 2017 Komen Virginia Blue Ridge Race for the Cure will take place on Saturday, April 29. This year, the Race Site at Rivers Edge Sports Complex on Reserve Avenue will open at 2 pm. The race will begin at 4 pm. This annual event helps raise money for patients in our area affected by breast cancer. Seventy-five percent of the net proceeds raised through the Race for the Cure stay in our community to help fundraise programs like screening, diagnosis, and treatment services. They also help provide safe and accurate breast cancer information, in addition to patient navigation programs. The remaining 25% goes towards Komen’s national priorities including new early detection technologies, understanding of metastasis and how to treat and prevent recurrence, and more effective treatments. This year’s Race for the Cure will also feature an After Party, beginning at 5 pm. Participants will enjoy performances by local bands, beverage stations, food trucks, and games while having the opportunity to purchase Komen merchandise. Go to www.komenvablueridge.org to register for the race and view a full schedule of events. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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bella loves

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Everything Pale Dogwood Pale Dogwood is arguably one of the most beautiful 2017 Pantone colors. It looks good on everything from dresses and accessories to hair (and even furniture!). Visit Punch Boutique in Roanoke first for your Pale Dogwood clothing needs. If your profession allows it, transform your hair with the color just in time for summer festivals. Personally, we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to do a little redecorating with this color to kickstart the warm, fun season ahead!

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Bella Magazine - April 2017  

The regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond!!

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