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october 2015

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free

breast cancer awareness issue


made ya look

bubblecake

3 delicious locations

south roanoke • roanoke county • nrv www.bubblecak e.c om

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October 2015 | Issue One Hundred Twelve

Joey Coakley Beck Publisher & Owner

jbeck@beckmediagroup.com

Hayleigh Worgan Editorial Director

hworgan@beckmediagroup.com

Sara Coakley Office Manager

bella@beckmediagroup.com

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Want to advertise in Bella? Email us at bella@beckmediagroup.com or call (540) 904-6800 Let us get your business in front of the decision makers of Southwest & Central Virginia... WOMEN!!

Advertising Inquiries advertise@beckmediagroup.com bella@beckmediagroup.com (540) 904-6800

•••

Contributors Magen Calland NP, Centra Health, Member One Federal Credit Union Bob Wilkerson, Hayleigh Worgan

Editorial Interns Hannah Bridges, Roanoke College Lani Maddox, James Madison University

Editorial Inquiries editorial@beckmediagroup.com

LLC

P.O. Box 107 Roanoke, Virginia 24002 540.904.6800 fax 540.904.6803

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Bella Magazine is the property of Beck Media Group LLC. It is a free publication printed monthly and is distributed throughout Southwest and Central Virginia and beyond. The Publisher reserves the right to refuse ad space for any advertisement or editorial content the staff deems inappropriate for our readers. The concept and design of Bella Magazine, as well as the design, advertisements, art, photos and editorial content is property of Beck Media Group LLC and may not be copied or reprinted without written permission from the publisher. ©2006-2015 Beck Media Group LLC All Rights Reserved. PRINTED IN THE USA w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


october 2015

breast cancer awareness issue 7

Breast Cancer 101

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Save This Buy That

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Fall recipes that will satisfy your wallet AND your sweet tooth!

Shop Local!

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Why your mammogram or clinical breast exam could be the most important appointment you make all year.

Locally made dry rubs and seasonings that you should have in your kitchen

How you can help in the fight against breast cancer.

Get Involved

A Charlottesville microcreamery creates artisanal treats perfect for gift giving and indulging this fall!

Young Women & Breast Cancer

Bella Girls Day Out

13 16

Bella Eats

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Courageous stories of fighting and overcoming a disease typically associated with older women.

Join us for a day of fun and shopping in Downtown Lewisburg, West Virginia later this month!

Mind • Body • Soul

Local Business Spotlight

Centra’s palliative care teams and how their holistic approach can help both patients and families.

find us:

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A few of our favorite companies doing big things for Central and Southwest Virginia

lovelybella.com bellamagazine bella_mag bella_ _magazine

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breast cancer 101 How a clinical breast exam or mammogram could save your life

For many women, the thought of a clinical breast exam or mammogram is absolutely terrifying. They fear the procedure itself, hospitals, and/or financial burdens associated with healthcare. However, others will tell you—their fear is less of the procedure and more of the potential outcome. Statistics show that one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. This number is shocking—as many of us can immediately think of eight women that we love who could possibly hear this diagnosis. The good news is that the five-year relative survival rate for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer (or cancer confined to the breast) is 99 percent. Unfortunately, not all breast cancer is diagnosed in an early stage. Every minute, somewhere in the world, someone dies from it—and that fact, coupled with the knowledge that early diagnosis could help save them—is unacceptable. Mortality rates vary across demographics. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Hispanic women in the United States, and it is also their leading cause of death. Caucasian women have a higher incidence of breast cancer than African American women, yet African American women are more likely to die from breast cancer at every age. The answer to why those numbers are so staggeringly different may lie in that fear—a fear of being diagnosed, of going through the same turmoil and pain they have watched other family members experience—a fear of dying. But there is hope. “Breast cancer at it’s earliest stages is almost always curable—over 95 percent,” says Dr. Bob Williams, of Salem Surgical. “Yet 40,000 American women will die of breast cancer this year. Most of those women will die of a disease that would have been curable if found at an earlier stage.” Pam Adams, Mission Manager of the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen, agrees. “If multiple people in their family have died from it, then [a patient] may resign themselves to thinking that they could die from it too. But it is not a death sentence,” she emphasizes. “The fact that there are 3.1 million survivors illustrates that. We want them to get that yearly mammogram so that if it does happen we can catch it early and increase their chance of survival.” It is also important to understand that a nonexistent family history of breast cancer does not mean you shouldn’t get mammograms and clinical breast exams on a regular basis. “There is a greater risk for breast cancer if other members of your family have had it, but just because no one in your family has had it provides no safety net for you,” says Adams. “Family history starts w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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breast cancer 101 somewhere and most breast cancers that are diagnosed are in women who do not have a history of breast cancer in their family.” Breast cancer can impact anyone—at any time. Men and younger women tend to be diagnosed at later stages because it is not something they suspect. They are not the picture they often associate with those impacted by breast cancer, and so they don’t understand their level of risk. That is why it is so important to see your doctor regularly for these exams and make an appointment if you notice something unusual. “The most important thing we want to emphasize really goes along with our mission—early detection saves lives. People are dying from a curable disease. If breast cancer is detected early, your survival chances are so much greater,” says Catherine Turner, Executive Director of the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen. The mortality rate for breast cancer is something we, as a community, can change together. There are people and organizations, like Susan G. Komen, ready and willing to help. If breast cancer has impacted your life (or the life of someone you love) consider reaching out to them. “So much of the money that we raise is helping our neighbors within our community. We are very proud of that and I think it is what differentiates us from many other organizations,” explains Turner. “The money we spend is spent very deliberately. We do a study of our affiliate area every five years to see where the late stage diagnoses are happening, the mortality rates, and the barriers creating those numbers. That allows us to put our money where it is most needed and avoid duplicating assistance where resources are already available.” It is also important to know that it is ok to ask for second opinions and form a medical team of experts who will be there with you, every step of the way, to fight the disease. A diagnosis doesn’t have to be a death sentence—and the earlier you discover breast cancer, the quicker you can begin taking measures to fight and eliminate it. “Having a mammogram can be scary, but not getting the mammogram can lead to a cancer that continues to grow and spread and can be more deadly,” says Dr. Williams. “Breast cancers that are found by a mammogram are usually very curable. In most cases, our focus is a cure. We can’t ever promise that, but it is our goal for [a patient] to be a survivor. It is a team effort and we are with you through the whole thing.” There is a lot of information available on the internet on the subject of breast cancer. Some of it can be overwhelming or misleading. If you are doing your own research, Dr. Williams recommends you start with any of the following websites: www.komenvablueridge.org www.cancer.gov www.mskcc.org www.mdanderson.org

Above all, know that you do have options and don’t be afraid to ask for help. There are 3.1 million people that will attest to the fact that breast cancer CAN be defeated. The fight starts somewhere—and the earlier you identify your enemy, the better chance you have of winning.

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Breast Cancer Awareness

finding a Cure Starts with You

October events and items benefiting breast cancer research

Although breast cancer may not have directly impacted you, chances are it has or will impact someone you know. There will be many ways to donate towards finding a cure this month—be sure to do your research to better understand where your money will be going when you purchase products or attend events that promise donations to various organizations. Check out a few of our favorite opportunities to help fund a cure—and stay tuned to our Facebook page for more event information all month long!

All month long

Cupcakes for the Cure at bubblecake! During the month of October, enjoy a regular-size or mini Pink Ribbon cupcake from bubblecake. Portions from each cupcake sold will be used in funding a cure by being donated locally to the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen! www.bubblecake.com

All month long

Panera Pink Ribbon Bagels Available in Panera locations throughout the month of October—portions of the sales from this delicious bagel made with cherry chips, dried cherries and cranberries, honey, and brown sugar will help various breast cancer charities. www.panerabread.com

Sunday, October 4

Pink Pumpkin Day at Layman Family Farm (11 am-6 pm) A portion of all Pink Pumpkin sales from that day will go towards finding a cure. www.laymanfamilyfarms.com

Saturday, October 24

The 7th Annual B Cup Roanoke Rugby Match (4pm) Four rugby teams will come together for a match to raise money for breast cancer awareness. Event will be held at Highland Park in Old Southwest, Roanoke. www.roanokerugby.com

Tuesday, October 27

Komen Paint Nite Fundraiser at the Hilton Garden Inn (7-9 pm) Tickets are $45 with $15 of every ticket donated to the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen. Plus, you get to take your masterpiece home! www.komenvablueridge.org page 10 | bella magazine | october 2015

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young women & breast cancer The brave faces of a new generation impacted by this illness Written by

Decca is a young breast cancer survivor and coordinator of the local Young Survival Coalition’s Face 2 Face Support Group w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

Decca Knight

You might see us out and about around the Roanoke Valley. We look like most 20 and 30 year olds. But our paths and our challenges are rare among our generation. Our peers are concerned about finding “the one,” buying their first home, their careers, and starting a family. But we, in our Young Breast Cancer Survivors Group, often have a more varied focus. For us, we worry about the same challenges as other people our age, but we also struggle daily with the understanding that we are rare among our peers. We are like some strange anomaly in the cancer community. We go to our breast surgeon and sit patiently in the waiting room, often having people ask if we are there to support our mom or grandmother. We fade in and out of sleep in the chemotherapy room while dealing with the horrified stares of others who are shocked by our presence. We talk with well meaning medical technicians who say, during our PET scans, that they have “never seen someone so young with breast cancer.” We do this all while living our lives, working, and taking care of our young families. Breast cancer is rare among young women. Fewer than five percent of all breast cancers diagnosed in the U.S. occur in women under 40. Though our group is small, our prognosis is often worse than in older women. Our cancers are more likely to be fast growing, aggressive, and higher grade. We therefore face lower survival rates than older women. Our cancers are also different biologically then the cancers of older women. Although some of us have a family history of breast cancer, most of us do not, as only 5-10 percent of breast cancers are genetic. Because we are not old enough to get mammograms, many of us found our tumors while performing a breast self-exam, during an OBGYN visit, or by accident. All of us were blind-sided, in the prime of our life. Some of us were pregnant. Some of us had babies at home. We rocked them while suffering from overwhelming hot flashes due to early menopause. Those of us without children wondered about our fertility. Our husbands or significant others went into shock. Our parents, who had so recently launched us, were haunted by the fact that they may lose their daughter at a young age. Though we are rare, we are also strong, beautiful, independent, and enlightened. We see the world a little differently than our peers. We appreciate small things—the sunset, our child’s laugh, the rustle of the leaves, and smiles from strangers. We know that each moment is precious in a million different ways. We relish the time that we have with our loved ones as we fear that those moments may be cut short. But, we soldier on, lifting each other up as we walk our path. october 2015

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Need more info:

American Cancer Society • www.cancer.org Susan G. Komen • www. komen.org Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen • www.komenvablueridge.org Young Survivors Coalition • www.youngsurvival.org

the One in eight Three local young women courageously share their experiences with breast cancer Gwendolyn Miller

It all started out as no big deal. This past February, I noticed a spot of blood in my bra. After it occurred for a few days, I went to see my doctor. She did a breast exam and told me it was probably an intraductal papilloma—nothing to worry about. I had just turned 33, and she assured me that, being so young, it was most likely something benign. She also reassured me that breast cancer doesn’t typically bleed. About a week later, I went in for my first mammogram at the breast imaging center. There was no one near my age in the lobby or the waiting room.   Nothing appeared on the mammogram so they sent me to have an ultrasound. The radiologist saw a flicker of what they thought was a papilloma but nothing conclusive on standard imaging. Over the next few weeks other tests and imaging were scheduled. During an MRI, they saw something concerning. The next thing I knew, I was going in for an X-ray guided double biopsy. They found a papilloma, but behind it they found breast cancer. I was diagnosed with invasive ductile carcinoma.  Life as my husband and I knew immediately turned upside down. A whirlwind of doctor’s appointments began, so I took medical leave from my job that I loved. I saw surgeons, medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and a reproductive endocrinologist. The best advice I received from other young survivors was to get a second opinion—especially for surgery. I decided that I would consider more than one doctor’s approach and looked at it as hiring the best medical team to take care of me and my needs. Ultimately, I had a bilateral mastectomy and immediate DIEP Flap reconstruction on both of my breasts. My surgery was supposed to last 12 hours because it’s so specialized, but actually went on for 17 hours because they found a hernia they had to repair. While the recovery has had a few bumps along the way, and I will page 14 | bella magazine | october 2015

need another surgery to fine tune some of the reconstruction, I wouldn’t change my decision.   I’m lucky in that I don’t have to go through radiation or chemotherapy, but breast cancer may have affected my ability to carry a pregnancy. I will be on three types of hormone therapy over the next 10 years. My husband and I are currently in the process of figuring out what a family will look like for us, as we haven’t had children yet.  I want others to know that if something seems off, weird, or you feel a lump, go to the doctor—don’t put it off. If you are diagnosed with breast cancer, be sure to get a second opinion so you know all your options for treatment and breast reconstruction.

Decca Knight

I was diagnosed at the age of 32. At the time, I was a healthy, active, young mother who ate well and loved running. My son was 1 ½ years old and I was working at a part-time job that I loved. My OBGYN found a mass during a routine clinical breast exam. He thought that it was probably a cyst and said I could wait a few months and come back or get an ultrasound. Luckily, I chose the ultrasound. It looked suspect so they sent me for my first mammogram and then a biopsy. I can remember my next appointment like it was yesterday. It was there that my breast surgeon told my husband and I that the mass was cancer. We heard that it was aggressive and that the tumor was large. We went into shock. A stream of doctors appointments with the breast surgeon, medical oncologist, radiation oncologist, and reconstructive surgeon followed. We felt like we were at the hospital all the time. Soon I had a bilateral mastectomy and the insertion of expanders. The latter are slowly pumped up to stretch your skin to allow for implants. During this operation they did a biopsy of my lymph nodes on the infected side and found that the cancer had spread there. This meant that I would have to have radiation. After sometime to heal, I started my chemotherapy regimen— every three weeks for six rounds. Soon after my first round, my hair started falling out so my husband shaved my head. My sweet little son thought that it was silly. I am so thankful that at that time he was too young to understand what was going on. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


Following months of grueling chemo, we went head on into radiation—everyday for six weeks. I kept joking with hospital staff that I should have some type of frequent flyer card that accrued points. After healing from radiation, I had another surgery called a Lat Flap surgery. During this procedure, they take a part of your lattisimus dorsi on your back, cut it out along with the skin, nerves, and blood supply, and transplant it to your chest. This would allow my affected side to hold an implant. After healing from this harrowing surgery, I finally had my last surgery where they took out my expanders and put in my implants. The whole process lasted about one year. I was lucky that I didn’t have to work while in treatment. I needed all my energy to be able to interact with my young son. My husband, sister, parents, and in-laws took such great care of me. My friends were amazing. They raised about $15,000 for the first Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate Race for the Cure here in Roanoke. Five years out now, I am doing well. I still take medication that will hopefully keep the cancer from returning.

Kimberly Wyrick

In the fall of 2013, at 38 years old, I felt a small pea sized knot on my left breast while taking a bath. I initially didn’t think much about it. I saw a nurse practitioner and we decided that it was probably just changes in breast tissue. About a month later, I started getting sharp pains that shot into my armpit and through my chest. After a few weeks of sporadic severe pain almost daily, at my mother’s urging, I made another appointment with the nurse practitioner. She said she thought it was a fibrous cyst but she wasn’t a “boob doctor” and wanted to send me for further testing due to dense breast tissue. On Thursday, November 14, I went to the breast care center for a mammogram and ultrasound. The doctor told me that they had detected three masses in my left breast and it was cancer. I asked him if it could be anything else. He said “Well, I guess it could be but it’s not.” I needed to return the next Monday for a biopsy. It was at that point that a tear ran down my face. I wasn’t really concerned about the word cancer. I was worried about telling my mother, who had already lost a daughter to leukemia when my sister and I were young. I was separated from my husband and I worried about who would walk through this with me. I was also sort of hoping that my diagnosis might save my marriage. I was worried about my 4-year-old son. And, as vain as this is, I wasn’t concerned about cancer, but I didn’t want to lose my hair. Finally, my biggest concern was how I going to afford treatment. We prayed all weekend. My doctor called the day after my biopsy and confirmed that I had invasive/infiltrating ductal carcinoma. I was preoperative stage two breast cancer. The MRI showed that there were cancer cells throughout my left breast and it was determined that it would have to be removed. I decided to have a double mastectomy. I chose a wonderful team of doctors and had an amazing support system. Many loved ones, friends, and even strangers rallied around me in support and prayer. On January 20, I had my double mastectomy and started reconstruction which was complete that April. The surgery was far easier than the reconstruction. However, it was neat to see how doctors could make your body transform. I continue to have checkups every six months and have to take a medicine daily for the next 10 years. Never before did I want to be in this club. However, I am thankful that God was present in so many ways, allowing me to persevere. w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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Mind • Body • Soul

Written by

Magen Calland, NP

an extra layer of care Palliative care team offer holistic approach

It never hurts to have another set of eyes and ears in the room. This approach makes palliative care a leading-edge model for treating patients with progressive and life-limiting illness. Palliative care teams work closely with patients, families, and doctors to meet treatment goals, offering medical management of symptoms and supportive care. In doing so, the palliative care interdisciplinary team is nimble enough to respond to a variety of situations. The four critical components that define a successful palliative care team are: delivering aggressive symptom management, working with patients to set treatment goals, providing psychosocial support to patients and families, and planning for end-of-life care. The team uses a holistic approach toward alleviating physical, emotional, spiritual, and social challenges faced by many patients and families. The goal is to enable patients and family members to make informed choices concerning their care and treatment based on their own values and beliefs, and provide time to have their questions answered. The palliative care team includes a registered nurse, a nurse practitioner, a social worker, and palliative care physician. Additional interdisciplinary resources are available, including a dietitian, physical therapist, chaplain, and pharmacist. Palliative care specialists collaborate with physicians to address patient needs including pain, nausea, fatigue, constipation, shortness of breath, anxiety, loss of appetite, and other symptoms. Palliative care is offered at all stages of disease, and while each disease can be managed for long periods of time, the palliative care service understands the need for quality of life for patients and loved ones. A major focus of the service is to help patients and their loved ones cope effectively with every aspect of their illness and to guide patients as they develop goals to address future needs. Palliative care workers find it rewarding to see how each interaction can make a hard situation a little easier for patients. The heart of palliative care is giving patients the fullest life possible in spite of their illness. Patients and families are so grateful to have a dedicated team specially trained to help make the most informed decision about different treatment paths. As an extra set of eyes and ears, palliative care teams help patients and families focus on quality time and collaborative care.

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Article courtesy of

Magen Calland, NP, serves on the palliative care team for Centra. For more information on palliative care, visit Cancer. CentraHealth.com. Patients who wish to receive a palliative care consult after being admitted to a Centra hospital, should ask their physician or nurse to make the referral.

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{

Fall into savings with these delicious recipes!

Article courtesy of

Join Member One here each month for more moneysaving tips, giveaways and all things awesome! Be sure to follow @SaveThisBuyThat on Twitter and check out our board “Save This Buy That” on Bella’s award-winning Pinterest page.

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Mini Caramel Apples |

17¢ per apple pop

With fall in full swing, we’re craving oh-so yummy comfort food and all things apple and pumpkin-flavored! We love how simple it is to recreate these recipes and they’re all under $1 per serving. Your wallet will totally love these fall-inspired recipes! Salted Caramel & Chocolate Dip | 78¢ per serving

Four green apples (room temperature) Caramel chips or squares Sucker Sticks Sprinkles or favorite toppings Peel apples. With a melon baller, scoop out pieces of the apples. Insert sticks in apple balls and set aside on wax paper. Follow instructions on caramel chips package on melting chips. Remove from heat and let cool until thick. Dip balls in caramel and rotate to fully cover in caramel. Dip in favorite toppings and place on wax sheet. Place apples in freezer to further “set.”

Oh-So Yummy Pumpkin Spice Latte | $0.52 per serving 1 cup milk 1 tablespoon sugar 1 ½ tablespoons pumpkin puree ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ½ cup coffee/espresso

Mix the cream cheese and chocolate sauce together. In a separate bowl, mix the caramel sauce and sea salt together until combined. In the cream cheese + chocolate bowl, stir in the Cool Whip, powdered sugar, and salted caramel until combined. Drizzle additional caramel ice cream sauce and sea salt on top of the dip. Chill before serving. Serve with graham crackers, fruit, or small cookies.

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Brew coffee. In saucepan, heat pumpkin puree, milk and sugar. Remove from heat and add vanilla and coffee. Pour into mug + enjoy!

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1 pkg of cream cheese ¼ cup of chocolate sauce ¼ cup of powder sugar 1 8 oz tub of cool whip ¼ caramel sauce Pinch of sea salt

Want more Fall tips? Head to www.SaveThisBuyThat. com for budget-friendly recipes, DIY crafts and more! october 2015

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Shop Local!

Stone Spice Company A local business demonstrates their devotion to quality through their handmade dry rubs and seasonings

Surrounded by products that promise a variety of things, it can be hard to choose which ones are going to be the most healthy for your family. Ultimately, it is important to be mindful of what you are consuming—from the pasta, hamburger, and vegetables you enjoy to the seasonings you use to personalize them. That’s why we love Stone Spice Company. Originally, we were drawn to the company because of its local roots and the fact that every dry rub is 100% handmade in Lynchburg, Virginia. After sampling a few of the spices ourselves and doing a little research, we are completely hooked! A quality product free from artificial ingredients, every item sold is a reflection of founder Joshua Stone’s love of creating bold and delicious flavors. He uses the best quality spices to create his line of dry rubs and seasonings, and—if that wasn’t enough—they are also GMO and gluten-free!In Stone’s words, they “are mixologists, but with spices.” Visit www.stonespicecompany.com for additional information on their spices and where you can purchase them. (Recipe follows on the next page!) w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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Shop Local!

If you’re looking for a way to incorporate your new spices into an amazing meal—give Stone Spice Company’s recipe for Kale and Crispy Bacon Salad (featuring BBQT) a try!

You will need: One bunch of kale 1/4 cup of olive oil 1/8 cup of balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup mayonnaise A bit of bacon grease-maybe 2T Fresh ground black pepper BBQT to taste

Pour over chopped kale and massage with your hands—just get in there! We also cooked the bacon on a stovetop griddle and heavily seasoned with BBQT. (Pro tip: always season your bacon, it will change your life!) Crumble the bacon over top, add some pine nuts, and just a bit of feta. And, there you have it—a delicious meal! w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

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Bella Eats

la vache

microcreamery A Charlottesville business sets a new standard for artisanal treats

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There is nothing wrong with indulging in something sweet every now and then! However, even with your desserts, it is important to be mindful of what you are consuming. Fortunately, the owners of La Vache Microcreamery take their commitment to bringing customers high quality caramels very seriously and it is evident in each batch they produce. La Vache caramels are handcrafted using traditional French techniques. They incorporate local and responsibly sourced ingredients from some of the best quality producers. The exceptional ingredients they used are sourced as locally as possible—and they firmly believe that is what makes their caramels so delicious. All of their caramels are created without corn syrup or preservatives, ensuring the most natural, made-from-scratch artisanal treats. Using local honey, organic molasses, and organic brown rice syrup, they create caramels with incredible personality. There are flavors available for every palate. Give their fleur de sel a try—handmade from local cream with a dusting of hand-harvested Fresh sea salt on top, these gluten-free caramels are the perfect treat give a hostess at the next fall party you attend. We also love their lavender and honey flavor. A delightful homage to the garden, these gluten-free caramels are crafted from an infusion of fragrant local Virginia lavender and honey. Their latest flavor is milk stout. It contains hints of malted chocolate enveloping a dark and delicious caramel. A light sprinkle of fleur de sel graces the top of this creation to truly set it apart. In addition to being beautifully packaged (which makes each one a fantastic gift), they are made right up the road from us in Charlottesville, Virginia. You can find them at various retail locations or purchase them online. Visit www.lavachemicrocreamery.com for more information on the flavors available and details on where to purchase them. october 2015

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Bella Girls Day Out

Saturday, October 24th

bella girls’ day out in lewisburg, West Virginia A day of fun, shopping, and prizes that you don’t want to miss!

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Join us for a fall shopping getaway in downtown Lewisburg, West Virginia on Saturday, October 24! Voted “Coolest Small Town in America” and “America’s Favorite Town” by Travel & Leisure, you will fall in love with Lewisburg’s unique and fun environment when you experience it first hand! Located only an hour and a half from Roanoke, this short, yet scenic, road trip is the perfect opportunity to get a jump start on your holiday shopping (or maybe just treat yourself!). Participating businesses will include clothing boutiques, galleries, restaurants, and gourmet shops. A full list will be available to those in attendance and will include information on discounts, giveaways, and specials available to those present for our Bella Girls’ Day! Bring your friends and family—the more the merrier! As Bella Girls arrive into Lewisburg, start your discovery at Harmony Ridge Gallery (located at 209 West Washington Street) and enjoy a complimentary glass of wine, 10 percent off any purchase, and a welcome reception before exploring downtown! Come hungry because many local businesses will be offering great deals on food and beverages. Those participating in Bella Girl’s Day will enjoy complimentary refreshments from Bella Gourmet and $3 mimosas at The Asylum. With an in-store purchase, they will be entered to win a $100 gift certificate (valid through 12/31/2015) to Studio 40. Wolf Creek Gallery will add a gift to each purchase made by Bella fans, and there will be a 15% discount on artwork purchases exhibited at Carnegie Hall. Additionally, Del Sol Cantina will offer $1 off their House Margarita, and a Lady Primrose Gift Bag (that includes a 10% off coupon for any item in the store!) will be available at The Front Porch. And, at Yarid’s, enjoy a Flash Sale! With many more discounts and giveaways available that day, you won’t want to miss this opportunity to discover downtown Lewisburg! Stay tuned to our Facebook page during the month of October for additional details! You can also visit www.downtownlewisburg.com for more information. We can’t wait to see you there!

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Local Business Spotlight

Blue Ridge Dental Group

women in dentistry

Local female practitioners that stand out in their field According to the University of Michigan, women make up nearly half of all dental students today and 25% of all practicing dentists. That number is significantly higher than it was a few short decades ago. Locally, through Blue Ridge Dental Group, five talented and compassionate female practitioners illustrate the positive impact that women are having in their field. Dr. Sheila Hardee, a practitioner at their Smith Mountain Lake location, has worked in dentistry for over forty years and witnessed the increase of women in her field first hand. “The progression of women in the dental field has been amazing—from being just a little side chair helper to being in control of the office,” she says. She adds, “Blue Ridge Dental Group enables us to be truly independent thinkers. Each practice has their own individual personality. We have the freedom to treat patients like people, friends, and family—not just a procedure.” The women at Blue Ridge Dental Group understand that, in order to take the steps necessary to achieve better dental health, many patients have to first overcome two very common fears: potential physical discomfort and financial constraints created by extensive repairs to their teeth. These reservations are common, but unique to each individual. The freedom to treat patients as more than just a procedure allows each dentist to address her patient’s concerns and help them relax as much as possible. “I desire to give my patients a good experience in the dental office,” says Dr. Breanna Velander, in their New River Valley location. “Having someone working in your mouth is never going to be completely comfortable, but I want patients to feel heard, cared for, and relaxed.” Once a patient feels comfortable visiting the dentist, they have the potential to greatly improve their lives by letting a professional guide them in their dental care. “I love that I get to have that almost instant gratification that someone can come in with a lot of issues with their teeth and quickly turn it around, making a positive impact on their life,” says Vinton practitioner, Dr. Sarah Wilson. “It’s easy and it’s not as scary as some people think.” As for the financial aspect, they also understand how overwhelming it can be to factor extensive procedures into a household budget. Patients facing financial hardship should not be afraid to visit their offices. Dr. Anne Newman, at their Valley View location, explains, “Dentistry is accessible. What discourages me the most is when someone thinks they cannot afford dental care. There are resources out there and we can connect you to those resources.” Dr. Elizabeth Neal, also in Vinton, adds, “We treat patients the way that we treat our family. We always provide the best options for them. If something is out of our realm, we know where to refer them to get the care that they need.” Visit www.blueridgedentalgroup.com to learn more about these amazing women, their staff, and their locations.

w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m

october 2015

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bella magazine

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page 29


Opera Roanoke presents Sweeney Todd

A memorable introduction to their Ruby Anniversary season

Opera Roanoke

Opera Roanoke launches its Ruby Anniversary season with Stephen Sondheim’s musical thriller Sweeney Todd. Audiences can see performances of this popular drama on Friday, October 30 at 7:30 pm and Sunday, November 1 at 3 pm at the Jefferson Center’s Shaftman Performance Hall. Sweeney Todd is an alias used by the main character, Benjamin Barker, who returns to London to seek revenge on a judge who banished him to life imprisonment fifteen years before. Below his former barber shop, he finds a struggling meat pie shop, inhabited by proprietres Nellie Lovett. She recognizes him and, together, they form a plan of murderous revenge against the judge who sentenced him based upon false charges. In this production, Carla Dirlikov makes her role debut as Mrs. Lovett, opposite young baritone Corey Crider, who will play the Demon Barber of Fleet Street title character. Dirlikov is widely- known for her roles in Carmen, The Flying Dutchman, and Julius Caesar. Crider was praised by Opera News for his “seductively sympathetic” portrayal of Sweeney Todd. Together, they are sure to deliver an unforgettable performance. Visit www.operaroanoke.org for additional information on how to purchase tickets for this event.

Open Studios Botetourt

Open Studios Botetourt Art in the Country

page 30 | bella magazine | october 2015

The Fourth Annual Artist’s Open Studio Tour in Botetourt County will be held on Saturday, October 25 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Sunday, October 26 from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Participating artists will open their studios to the public to present their work and show how and where their artwork is produced. Enjoy this free event and rare opportunity to converse one-on-one with artists while experiencing the added pleasure of the beautiful fall foliage and landscape of Botetourt County. The 10 artists on the tour this year are: Linda Atkinson, Ed Bordett, Nancy Dahlstrom, Vera Dickerson, Amy Hertzel, Helen Hubler, Brett LaGue, Willie Simmons, Bill White, and Mark Woodie. Each will have an Open Studios logo on signs outside of their studios to indicate their participation. Some artists will give demonstrations during the weekend to explain the materials, methods, and processes they use. Scheduled demonstrations include printmaking, wood turning and carving, painting, and mixed media processes. Visitors can pick up a “passport card” at their first stop and have it stamped at each studio they visit. Those that leave their card at the last studio will be entered to win a $150 gift certificate towards an art purchase of their own. There is no minimum on the amount of studios one must visit—just enjoy the weekend, the scenic drive, and the artistic culture along the way. Visit www.openstudiosbotetourt.com for more information on the self-guided driving tour and participating artists.

w w w. l o v e l y b e l l a . c o m


Profile for Beck Media Group

Bella Magazine - October 2015  

The regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond!

Bella Magazine - October 2015  

The regional magazine for women of Southwest & Central Virginia... and beyond!

Profile for beckmedia
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