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Lincoln University

Social Science Sport and Recreation Management Tourism Management

New Zealand’s specialist land-based university


Bachelor of Sport and Recreation Management

Bachelor of Tourism


Management

Bachelor of Social Science


Where you want to be. The concept of people unites these three disciplines. How we see ourselves and how we play and spend our leisure time are key deďŹ ners of our lifestyle and communities as New Zealanders. They are also important attributes in sectors like tourism because they form the basis for our interaction with visitors. They contribute to the New Zealand experience. Lincoln University offers specialist teaching in each of these areas - part of our wider commitment to transforming land, people and economies. If you are studying these disciplines, exciting opportunities await you. With skills in critical thinking and a strong understanding of human behaviour and the way societies work, Social Science graduates are well prepared to take advantage of employment opportunities in many public and private sector organisations. Potential roles include: Central and local government research, policy and planning; industry training organisations; social work; teaching; environmental consultancy; trade union advocacy and human resources management. There is also ongoing demand for skilled staff in the sport and recreation sector. Our graduates are well equipped to select and apply appropriate management, planning, communication and educational skills and techniques to specific recreational needs and settings. Potential roles range from sports facility manager to marketing roles in a national sports organisation to teaching, open space planning, management or park ranger work. The applied Tourism Management qualification will give you a broad understanding of the industry at all levels. Our graduates have worked in central and local government departments, for organisations such as Air New Zealand, international hotel chains, travel agency chains, domestic and overseas tour operators, convention centres, ferry services and tourist attractions. Others work in marketing, event management or have set up their own tourism businesses or gone on to take postgraduate studies in tourism.

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Social Science, Sport and Recreation Management and Tourism Management

Five reasons to choose our specialist university We have programmes available to suit everyone: From those looking for an undergraduate diploma through to a PhD.

Social Science at Lincoln adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the relationship between the individual and society. This means that students gain and apply knowledge from psychology, human geography, sociology, politics, history and philosophy.

The Bachelor of Sport and Recreation Management degree is a specialised degree aimed at providing graduates with a comprehensive knowledge of sport and recreation in New Zealand and overseas, including the effects and consequences on the environments in which this occurs. Lincoln University’s degree has an established track record for meeting the demands of industry.


The Bachelor of Tourism Management degree focuses on tourism in relation to people and places as well as businesses and has been designed with industry consultation. A wide array of tourismbased research activities are undertaken by the Centre for Land, Economy and People (LEaP) at Lincoln University that lead into teaching.

With a Lincoln University degree, you can incorporate other areas of study into your degree to broaden your career options. Examples include: Business management; marketing; human resources management; parks and outdoor recreation; exercise and health; environmental management and planning; software and information technology; and Ma-ori studies.

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The Programmes Bachelor of Social Science

If you have a passion for helping communities achieve their goals and make a difference, this could well be the degree for you. The Bachelor of Social Science degree incorporates a multi-disciplinary approach, addressing issues at the level of ideas and policy but also focusing on technical aspects. At Lincoln University, we’ll broaden your understanding of human behaviour in a societal context with psychology, history, geography, political science, philosophy and sociology. The BSocSc is a three year degree made up of 24 courses with a common core of 14 compulsory courses, including social science, philosophy, social science/research methods and New Zealand Government and public policy. You’ll learn to handle information, think critically, and analyse and present information while gaining a broad understanding of human behaviour and the way societies operate. It is also possible to complete an additional major or minor within your degree, for example, tourism management or parks and outdoor recreation. See www.lincoln.ac.nz/ majorsandminors for a full list of majors and minors available.

Compulsory courses 100 Level courses ERST 101

Perspectives on the Environment

This course is an introduction to the relationships between the social, cultural, ecological and economic dimensions of the environment from various disciplines using systems analysis.

PHIL 103

Philosophy and Critical Thinking

This is a survey of philosophical methods and problems including critical thinking and argument, scepticism and knowledge, the nature of the mind, personal identity, freewill and the existence of God.

PSYC 101

Introduction to Psychology

This course is an introduction to the study of psychology, its basic concepts, theories and approaches and studies individual human behaviour including an examination of sensation, perception, cognition, learning, personality and developmental processes.

PSYC 102

Introduction to Social Psychology

An introduction to human social behaviour emphasising the interactions between individuals and groups. It involves study of social cognition (person perception, attributions, attitudes, social judgement biases) and group behaviour (group influence, in-groups and out-groups, group processes).

SOCI 116

Society, Culture and Economy

An introduction to the major social, cultural and economic institutions of New Zealand, including family, work and economic life, education, religion, leisure and media. The contributions made to New Zealand’s society, culture and economy by settlement patterns and global changes.

SOCI 117

Introduction to New Zealand Government and Public Policy

This course looks at how governments make decisions about law, regulation, policy and policy implementation as well as the role of public debate of these government decisions. It also studies how these decision patterns, implementation complexities and public debates affect day-to-day life in New Zealand.

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200 Level courses

300 Level courses

PHIL 203

PSYC 302

Philosophy, History and Ethics of Science

Social Psychology of Well-Being

This course is a theoretical and practical examination of the issues concerning the history of science, the scientific method, the relation between science and pseudo-science, the role of values in scientific practice and the ethics of science.

PSYC 302 is an advanced study of the social psychology of human wellbeing including its determinants, measurement, biological, social and cultural contexts and relationship to social trends and issues.

PSYC 202 Motivation and Participation

SOCI 306

An examination of psychological theories of motivation and explanations of human participation in a range of social groups and activities.

SOCI 204

Research Methods

This course studies selected themes in the social, environmental and economic history of New Zealand to about 1940, with relevant international comparisons and contexts.

This course provides an understanding of research methods that are essential for the development of crucial analytical skills and informed reading of contemporary newspapers, magazines, government reports, consultancy reports and other sources of information.

SOCI 308

SOCI 214

SOCI 314

The Living City

Studies the modern history of urbanisation and contemporary urban form, function and transformation and looks at the contribution of human geography, sociology, political science, economics, planning and design to an understanding of the city.

New Zealand: Historical Themes in a Global Context

Society and Environment

This course offers an examination of people-environment relationships and looks at human attempts to control the natural and social world and the consequences as well as the social scientific theoretical interpretations of this behaviour.

Professional Practice

This is a critical study of issues in the provision of professional services in environmental planning, design, social sciences, tourism, sport and recreation.

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Bachelor of Sport and Recreation Management

New Zealand is known internationally for the “great outdoors” and for its active lifestyle. There is ongoing demand for skilled staff to work in our National Parks, tourism businesses and a wide range of recreational and sporting facilities. With the emphasis on work/life balance becoming increasingly important, many people are seeking a qualification that will allow them to combine their interest in sport and the outdoors with a viable career path. The Bachelor of Sport and Recreation Management is a specialised degree aimed at providing you with a comprehensive knowledge of the nature, characteristics and management of sport and recreation in New Zealand and around the world, as well as knowledge of the effects and consequences on the environments in which sport and recreation occurs. The degree is usually completed in three years, with eight courses studied per year. You’ll need to pass 24 courses, including at least five courses at the 300 level, and complete the practical work requirement which involves 12 weeks of industry experience. It is also possible to complete an additional major or minor within your degree. Majors include Tourism, Parks & Outdoor Recreation and Environmental Management. Some examples of minors include: Human resource management, Ma-ori studies, urban ecology, sustainable business and exercise and health. See www.lincoln.ac.nz/majorsandminors for a full list of majors and minors available.

Compulsory courses 100 Level courses ERST 101

Perspectives on the Environment

This course is an introduction to the relationships between the cultural, ecological and economic dimensions of the environment from various disciplines using systems analysis.

PSYC 102

Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 102 is an introduction to human social behaviour emphasising the interactions between individuals and groups. It involves study of social cognition (person perception, attributions, attitudes, social judgement biases) and group behaviour (group influence, in-groups and out-groups, and group processes).

RECN 110

Concepts in Sport and Recreation

In this course students are introduced to sport and recreation concepts, organisations, frameworks and sector roles. It also looks at professional development for sport and recreation management.

SOCI 116

Society, Culture and Economy

An introduction to the major social, cultural and economic institutions of New Zealand, including family, work and economic life, education, religion, leisure and media. It also looks at the contributions made to New Zealand’s society, culture and economy by settlement patterns and global changes.

SOCI 117

Introduction to New Zealand Government and Public Policy

This course investigates how governments make decisions about law, regulation, policy and policy implementation as well as the role of public debate of these government decisions. It looks at how these decision patterns, implementation complexities and public debates affect day-to-day life in New Zealand. Plus one of:

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BMGT 101

Introduction to Management

This course provides an introduction to the basic functions of management: Planning, leading, organising and controlling in an Australasian/Pacific context. Or:

MKTG 101

Principles of Marketing

This is an introductory course, designed to provide an overview of the principles of marketing and their application to consumer and industrial marketing. The class provides you with the basic “language” of marketing, an understanding of marketing issues and should serve as a basis for more advanced study in the field of marketing.

200 Level courses RECN 201

Leisure and Recreation: Contemporary Issues and Perspectives

SOCI 204

300 Level courses RECN 338

RECN 343

RECN 213

RECN 344

Event Planning

RECN 214

Sport and Society

Involves study of the changing roles, expectations and organisation of sport. It begins with an examination of the emergence of organised sport in nineteenth century Britain, then explores the development of particular sports such as cricket and the various football codes and the reasons why these became so closely linked with the relationships between men and women, different communities, social classes, ethnic groups and nations.

This course introduces current debates in the leisure field including historical, sociological, and psychological perspectives on leisure, gender issues and the role of the state in the provision of leisure. There will be a particular emphasis on leisure issues relevant to Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The ability to plan, stage and evaluate a sports event and run a successful programme are arguably essential skills for all of those in leisure service provision. In this course, students take their first steps towards developing these skills, looking at best practice in event management. These skills are put into practice as students work in conjunction with Sports Canterbury to deliver the “Rebel KiwiSports Challenge” in the latter third of the semester.

Research Methods

This course provides an understanding of research methods that are essential for the development of crucial analytical skills and informed reading of contemporary newspapers, magazines, government reports, consultancy reports, and other sources of information.

Sport and Recreation Management

This course provides an analysis of sport and recreation issues and looks at the application of management principles to unique aspects of sports and recreation management within the community, and at national and international levels.

Event Management

This course covers the management of events and looks at professional and strategic approaches to event management processes from conceptualisation to evaluation.

SOCI 314

Professional Practice

Professional Practice provides a critical study of issues in the provision of professional services in environmental planning, design, social sciences, tourism, sport and recreation.

Recreation Policy

New Zealand’s statutory and institutional framework for recreation is examined in order to understand the socio-politicalgeographical context for recreation policy and planning in this country. The examination encompasses Parliamentary structures and processes, recreation-related statutes, associated policies and government agencies charged with a recreation mandate. PAGE 7


Bachelor of Tourism Management

Tourism (domestic and international) is one of New Zealand’s (and the world’s) most rapidly growing industries and there is an increasing demand for university graduates who have a specialised understanding of the requirements of this diverse and exciting sector. Completing a degree specialising in tourism management means you’ll have a strong applied qualification that gives a broad understanding of the industry at all levels, and trains you for management roles. The Bachelor of Tourism Management is a three year degree made up of 24 courses, focusing on tourism, as related to people, places and business. You’re required to study 14 compulsory courses. You can choose from a number of majors that support this degree. The suite of core courses will provide you with a sound understanding of the international business of tourism, the wider environmental, social and cultural contexts in which tourism businesses operate, and practices in planning for tourism. It is possible to complete an additional major or minor such as Environmental Management, Business Management, Ma-ori studies, urban ecology and sustainable business within your degree. See www.lincoln.ac.nz/majorsandminors for a full list of majors and minors available.

SOCI 116

Society, Culture and Economy

In this course students are introduced to the major social, cultural and economic institutions of New Zealand, including family, work and economic life, education, religion, leisure and media. It also looks at the contributions made to New Zealand’s society, culture and economy by settlement patterns and global changes.

SOCI 117

Introduction to New Zealand Government and Public Policy

This course looks at how governments make decisions about law, regulation, policy and policy implementation and the role of public debate of these government decisions. It also looks at how these decision patterns, implementation complexities and public debates affect day-to-day life in New Zealand.

TOUR 101

Introduction to Tourism

This course is an introduction to the tourism industry including discussion of tourism’s global, national and regional significance, its various contributing industry sectors and the major development and management issues.

Plus one of: BMGT 101

Introduction to Management

Compulsory courses

This course provides an introduction to the basic functions of management: Planning, leading, organising and controlling in an Australasian/Pacific context.

100 Level courses

Or:

ECON 110

MKTG 101

Introduction to Applied Economics

An introduction to microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international trade in the context of the New Zealand economy, with applications to environmental and natural resource problems.

ERST 101

Perspectives on the Environment

Principles of Marketing

This is an introductory course, designed to provide an overview of the principles of marketing and their application to consumer and industrial marketing. The class provides you with the basic “language” of marketing, an understanding of marketing issues and should serve as a basis for more advanced study in the field of marketing.

This course is an introduction to the relationships between the social cultural, ecological and economic dimensions of the environment from various disciplines using systems analysis.

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200 Level courses SOCI 204

Research Methods

This course provides an understanding of research methods that are essential for the development of crucial analytical skills and informed reading of contemporary newspapers, magazines, government reports, consultancy reports, and other sources of information.

TOUR 201

Global Tourism Environments

This course studies major issues and trends in world tourism, differentiated on a regional basis and looks at integrative global and local case studies as well as principles of tourism management.

TOUR 202

Tourism Systems

This course provides an analysis of historical, cultural and political factors that contribute to tourism growth and decline. Also analyses the processes and impacts (social, environmental, economic) of tourism planning and development and application of these studies within New Zealand. Plus one of:

ERST 201

Environmental Analysis

ERST 201 provides an analysis of the links between biological, physical and social factors that constitute resource and environmental issues. The course studies uses and limitations of systems thinking and holistic understanding as well as global, national and regional examples of environmental analysis. Or:

SOCI 214

The Living City

This course studies the modern history of urbanisation and contemporary urban form, function and transformation and the contribution of human geography, sociology, political science, economics, planning and design to an understanding of the city. Or:

RECN 209

Nature and Heritage Interpretation

This course involves theories of interpretation and theories of learning and communication appropriate for interpretation. It also looks at the development and evaluation of interpretation for parks and other protected natural areas, tourism, visitor centres, museums and news media.

300 Level courses SOCI 314

Professional Practice

Provides a critical study of issues in the provision of professional services in environmental planning, design, social sciences, tourism, sport and recreation.

TOUR 301

Tourist Behaviour

This course provides an advanced analysis of tourist behaviour. It studies socio-psychological determinants of tourist motivation and experience, application of cross-cultural psychology to tourist behaviour and analyses tourist-host and environmental relationships.

TOUR 303

Destination Planning and Development

This course provides a critical examination of the planning and development of destinations for tourism and recreation, the role of national and local government in destination planning, and requirements and methods of public participation. Plus one of:

BMGT 301

Business and Sustainability

Involves development of business and sustainability theory and the implications for business of pursuing sustainability goals, measuring and monitoring sustainability in business, supply chains and related institutions. Or:

RECN 341

Recreation and Tourism in Protected Natural Areas

Provides an examination of the human dimensions of protected natural area management within the context of parks, recreation and tourism.

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Other study options

Other areas of study at Lincoln University

So you’re keen to further your study?

If you are interested in sports, recreation, tourism management and social science you may also be interested in some of the other programmes on offer such as:

Postgraduate study is all about extending your qualifications by taking further, more advanced, study, usually in the same field as your first degree. You will find yourself challenged to new levels of thinking, study and research. There are both full-time and part-time study options available.

• Bachelor of Commerce • Bachelor of Environmental Management and Planning • Diploma in Natural Resources • Diploma in Social Science. For further information contact us on 0800 10 60 10.

Qualification options include: • Graduate Certificate • Graduate Diploma • Honours • Postgraduate Certificate • Postgraduate Diploma • Masters Degree • PhD.

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Postgraduate areas of study Social Science Social Science at Lincoln encourages students to explore the interconnections between different social science disciplines, for example, economics, geography, history, philosophy, psychology and sociology.

Other areas There is also a range of other graduate and postgraduate qualifications offered at Lincoln that might be of interest to Sport and Recreation, Tourism Management and Social Science graduates. Areas of study:

The following postgraduate qualifications are available at Lincoln University: Master of Social Science, Postgraduate Certificate in Social Science, Postgraduate Diploma in Social Science, Graduate Certificate in Social Science and Graduate Diploma in Social Science.

• Applied science (e.g. sport science)

Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management

• Software and information technology

Lincoln’s postgraduate qualifications in parks, recreation and tourism management have an established track record of meeting the demands of many professional, industrial and employer agencies.

• Viticulture and oenology.

• Commerce • Environmental policy • Horticultural science • Landscape architecture

For further details contact us on 0800 10 60 10.

The following postgraduate qualifications are available at Lincoln University: Master of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; Master of Tourism Management; Postgraduate Certificate in Parks; Recreation and Tourism Management; Postgraduate Diploma in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; Postgraduate Certificate in Tourism Management; Postgraduate Diploma in Tourism Management; Graduate Certificate in Recreation Management; Graduate Diploma in Recreation Management; Graduate Certificate in Tourism Management and Graduate Diploma in Tourism Management.

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Look where they’ve landed

EMMA HODGKIN BACHELOR OF RECREATION MANAGEMENT (COMMUNITY RECREATION) GRADUATE PORTFOLIO MANAGER, PUBLIC HEALTH GROUP, MINISTRY OF HEALTH Emma Hodgkin wanted a sports career but wasn’t interested in becoming a PE teacher. “Being able to do a course that is a mix of sport and recreation as well as business and commerce was appealing as I felt that it would give me broader career opportunities in the end.” With a real passion for recreation as a means to improving health and wellbeing, she decided on Community Recreation as a major. “This allowed me to look at recreation and sport from a holistic and community perspective, looking more at how our surroundings impact on our health and wellbeing.” Emma is now working as Portfolio Manager in the Public Health Group of the Ministry of Health. The Public Health Group is responsible for the planning and funding of services not currently funded by District Health Boards (DHBs). “We plan and fund services to promote, protect and improve population health and services that prevent ill health and minimize the risk of disease and injury through population based interventions.” Emma says there were a lot of things she loved about her degree at Lincoln, one of them being the practical work component. Adding to this, she says: “Attending a small university, in a relaxed learning environment, really helped me settle into my studies and helped with the transition from school to university. I think my experiences would have been very different had I chosen to attend a large urban university.”

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ANDREW CLEVERLEY BACHELOR OF TOURISM MANAGEMENT GRADUATE GENERAL MANAGER, HERMITAGE HOTEL, AORAKI MOUNT COOK

NICKY MURRAY BACHELOR OF SOCIAL SCIENCE GRADUATE PROJECT MANAGER LITERACY AND LEARNING, INDUSTRY TRAINING FEDERATION

It was the specialist nature of the Bachelor of Tourism Management degree that made Andrew Cleverley decide to study at Lincoln University. “I believe specialised courses give students a better chance of gaining meaningful employment after graduation.”

Nicky Murray has always had an interest in social science due to its applicability to “real life” so she decided to study a Bachelor of Social Science degree at Lincoln University.

He enjoyed the variety of specialised papers such as Accounting, Business Management, Environmental Physics and Ecology and says that studying at Lincoln taught him to think analytically. “Being a General Manager is about knowing how to manage staff and operate a profitable business and that is what Lincoln focuses on. The lecturers in the tourism field are second to none – it was great to learn from them.” As General Manager Andrew is responsible for the successful operation of the hotel which includes managing staff and budgets and analysing financial results, as well as supervising projects such as refurbishments and entertaining VIP’s including media and travel agents.” Andrew is on call 24/7 and deals with any problem that may arise. “It is a job with long hours but it is also a very rewarding, fast paced career with many benefits.”

“I enjoyed the flexibility and the mix of subjects offered at Lincoln and the lecturers were great, they really took a personal interest in my course.” After successfully completing her Bachelor degree Nicky decided to further her studies and enrol in a Master of Social Science degree, followed by a PhD degree with research on industry training. Nicky says that Lincoln’s style of teaching suited her. “I found the applied and multi-disciplinary nature of studying at Lincoln to be really helpful – this has prepared me well for what I’m doing now at the Industry Training Federation.” As Project Manager Literacy and Learning she works with Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) to support them to build their capability to respond to literacy, language and numeracy issues within their industries.

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Frequently asked questions

Bachelor of Social Science What is the Bachelor of Social Science about? The BSocSc provides a strong understanding of human behaviour in the context of human society, with particular, but not exclusive, reference to Aotearoa/New Zealand. Social Science at Lincoln University is different from similar degrees at other universities because it incorporates a multidisciplinary approach which sees students exposed to a variety of subject matter and perspectives. Thus, at Lincoln University, an understanding of human behaviour in the societal context is informed by familiarity with psychology, history, geography, political science, philosophy and sociology. You’ll also be able to supplement your degree with an additional 8-course major or 5-course minor in areas of application which are appropriate to the skills and knowledge gained from a BSocSc. Students who graduate with a degree in Social Science from Lincoln will also have a broad general education and skills in critical thinking, information handling, data analysis and presentation. What majors/minors are recommended as part of the Bachelor of Social Science degree? The following are particularly recommended. Majors: Parks and Outdoor Recreation; Tourism Management; Environmental Management. Minors: Parks and Outdoor Recreation; Tourism Management; Economics; Environmental Management; Event Management; Human Resource Management; Ma-ori Studies; Marketing; Transport.

Who enrols in the Bachelor of Social Science? Some students are attracted to the BSocSc because of the broad general education it offers, while others appreciate the opportunity to become familiar with a number of key social scientific approaches – for example, psychology, history, geography and philosophy. But anyone who is curious about the “How?”, and “Why?” of human behaviour and who appreciates the richness and diversity of social life, will find much to interest and stimulate them in this degree. What courses should I take at school to best prepare for the Bachelor of Social Science? Most school subjects provide suitable preparation, particularly English, history, geography, social studies, even maths. Having an enquiring mind, however, combined with an ability to communicate in written and oral form, is the best preparation of all.

Bachelor of Sport and Recreation Management What sorts of subjects should I take at school to best prepare me for the BSRM degree? There are no specific school subject requirements for entering any of the BSRM degrees, but some subjects will be more useful than others. The Year 12 and 13 school subjects that will assist you are: English, geography, history, mathematics with statistics, economics, biology, tourism studies, physical education and outdoor education.

Your course advisors can help you plan your time at Lincoln University to take full advantage of these or other majors and minors. PAGE 14

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What will I get out of doing the BSRM? The BSRM educates you for a career in sport and recreation management. It is also a good general degree as it provides you with an excellent education for employment of any sort. During your studies, you will engage in academic and practical experiences that will challenge you and deepen your interest in your chosen field. On completion of the degree you will have enhanced your knowledge in sport and recreation management. You will also have enhanced skills in critical thinking and analysis, problem-solving, information management and use, research, time management, personal and group organisation, budgeting and teamwork. You will gain more than just your degree though - graduating with the BSRM from Lincoln University means that you carry with you our reputation for academic excellence combined with practical ability. Why do I need practical work? Practical work is an integral part of the degree programme and requires a minimum of 12 weeks (480 hours) of appropriate industry experience. This experience allows for the understanding of the relationship between academic learning and practice. It also provides students with insights into the industry and possible employment opportunities.

Bachelor of Tourism Management Why study tourism at Lincoln University? Tourism is the world’s largest industry and there is an increasing demand for university graduates who have a specialised understanding of the sector. Lincoln University’s tourism programme is the second oldest and longest running academic tourism programme in New Zealand. Our close links with the tourism industry make the degree directly relevant to a career in the sector. The Bachelor of Tourism Management is also an internationally-relevant qualification. Tourism studies at Lincoln University are not just a branch of business studies but a multi-disciplinary degree focusing on people, places and business – our programme integrates the study of tourism and tourists with business and resource management. To support this programme Lincoln University has received more government funding than any other university.

The Centre for Land, Economy and People at Lincoln University is dedicated to interdisciplinary research and is involved with many tourism related projects for the private and public sector. Lincoln University also offers research degrees that allow students to continue their tourism studies to the postgraduate or doctoral level. How is Lincoln University’s Bachelor of Tourism Management degree different from other tourism studies offered at other universities? The Bachelor of Tourism Management is a dedicated named degree in tourism. It has a specific focus on tourism that reflects the requirements of the tourism industry itself and links with similar overseas degree programmes. The programme is not located within a commerce faculty, enabling a more multi-disciplinary focus. Alternatively, tourism may be studied at Lincoln University as a major area of study in other degree programmes. In these other programmes, tourism is studied as an integral, but not exclusive, part of commerce, recreation management or environmental management. Does the Bachelor of Tourism Management require me to do a work placement? No. But we strongly recommend you undertake Lincoln University’s Employment Internship programme at the end of your second year of study. This programme will help you find suitable paid employment in the tourism industry over the summer months to complement your degree. It also provides you with help in CV development, interview skills and all the aspects associated with gaining employment. What if I want to transfer from another degree at Lincoln University into the Bachelor of Tourism Management? Transfer arrangements are straightforward. If you wish to transfer from your present degree into the Bachelor of Tourism Management you should speak to a tourism course advisor. What subjects should I take at school to best prepare me for this degree? Taking subjects such as tourism studies, English, maths, science, geography, economics and languages is helpful, but not essential. It is perhaps best to take the subjects you are most interested in so that your interests can be followed through into tertiary study.

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Want to know more? Phone 0800 10 from overseas.

60 10 in New Zealand or +64 3 325 2811 if you’re calling

Text LAND to 5900 with your email or mobile details so that we can contact you, or email us at land@lincoln.ac.nz You can also visit the Lincoln University website - www.lincoln.ac.nz - to find out more about: Scholarships Accommodation options Enrolment and Semester dates Fees And more ...

Lincoln University New Zealand’s specialist land-based university

Disclaimer Every effort is made to ensure that information in this publication is correct at the time of printing, but the content may be subject to change. Lincoln University reserves the right to make changes, amendments or deletions - including the withdrawal of courses - should circumstances change. Lincoln University does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any express or implied liability whatsoever to any party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions, whether these errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause.

Environmental Statement This Prospectus is printed on Sumo which boasts ISO 14001 status (International Organisation for Standards), which has established performance objectives and environmental management systems to prevent pollution, ensure compliance with regulations and achieve continual improvement. Acid Free Element Chlorine Free (ECF) ISO 14001 Well Managed Forest.

Want to find out more?

www.lincoln.ac.nz

0800 10 60 10 in New Zealand +64 3 325 2811 international


Lincoln University sports and tourism mgmt