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Lincoln University

Agriculture and Horticulture

New Zealand’s specialist land-based university


Where you want to be. Primary production is an essential part of New Zealand’s economy, with agriculture and related industries currently earning more than 50% of our total export income. These industries consistently compete against, and beat, competitors in challenging, and often protected, world markets. The demand for activities that will increase the value of our primary products has resulted in the need for graduates in the areas of research, marketing and technology transfer. Lincoln University BAgr and BAgrSci graduates are now so highly sought after that many are “head-hunted� by employers before they even graduate for career opportunities ranging from farm management and farm consultancy to export initiatives, agricultural research, sales and marketing. Bachelor of Commerce (Agriculture) graduates move into careers ranging from farm and horticultural consultancy, farm management and property management, through to rural banking, rural valuation, agribusiness and the fertiliser, seed and livestock industries. There is particularly high demand for Lincoln University graduates in the banking sector, with many banks seeking the unique combination of skills provided by this degree. If you are looking to move into management, our Diplomas of Agriculture, Farm Management, Horticulture and Horticulture Management prepare you to manage modern agricultural enterprises. The emphasis on applied business management combined with agricultural and production courses makes these diplomas very attractive to employers.

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Agriculture and Horticulture

Five reasons to choose our specialist university As New Zealand’s specialist land-based university, Lincoln University has played a primary role in training managers, researchers, consultants and employees within these sectors for more than 130 years.

Studying Agriculture and Horticulture at Lincoln University means you will be learning from some of New Zealand’s most highly regarded researchers and lecturers in this field.

There are opportunities to study Agriculture and Horticulture from a Science or Commerce focus.


Lincoln University graduates have a reputation for “hitting the ground running” because our qualifications are so much more applied and relevant than many alternatives. Real world examples are intergrated into the teaching programmes through case studies, field trips and tours. All students also do a period of industry-based work experience as a requirement of the programmes.

Through its relationships with other providers (industry training organisations, polytechnics etc), Lincoln can offer a seamless pathway for students with vocational (skills) qualifications into Lincoln’s applied academic diplomas and degrees, and to research focused postgraduate qualifications. Students can take advantage of Lincoln’s close relationship with employers through the Practical Work programme.

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The Programmes Bachelor Programmes Bachelor of Agriculture/Agriculture Science Bachelor of Commerce (Agriculture)

Bachelor of Agriculture/Agriculture Science This degree has evolved substantially over the years, and now addresses the demands for farmers and primary producers to meet the requirements of international markets, including the EU’s expectation for food to be traceable from “paddock to plate”. The Bachelor of Agriculture is a three year science-based programme during which you’ll gain comprehensive knowledge of the wider environmental issues associated with food and fibre production as well as quality assurance, international trade and marketing issues. If you want to specialise further or undertake an honours programme, you can enrol in the four year Bachelor of Agricultural Science degree. Both degrees have a strong practical base and require 39 weeks of approved practical work. It is possible to complete an additional minor within your degree such as urban ecology and sustainable business, environmental biogeosciences or Ma-ori studies. Although there are no formal majors in the BAgr/BAgrSc, the range of courses available allow you to advance your skills and knowledge in one or more discipline areas, including farm management, soil science, plant science and animal science.

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Compulsory courses These courses are compulsory for the BAgr and BAgrSc.

ANSC 105

Animal Science

This is the introductory course for all animal science courses at the University. It is designed to provide an understanding of mammalian function for students in Science, Agricultural Science and Agricultural Commerce who intend to study animal science.

MGMT 103

Primary Industry Systems

This is an introductory course that considers the past and present role of New Zealand agriculture, the contribution agriculture makes to society and the economy, the principles and techniques of pasture-based extensive livestock systems, intensive monogastric animal systems, land tenure and ownership, capital requirements and finance, and the marketing of agricultural products.

PHSC 101

Chemistry IA

This course includes the study of organic chemistry together with critical concepts of acid/base and equilibrium chemistry and basic atomic and molecular theory.

PLSC 104

Plant Science

This course provides an introduction to understanding the principles underlying how environmental factors affect plant growth in a range of plant types, as a prerequisite to being able to modify these factors.

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SOSC 106

Soil Science I

This course is an introduction to soil science for both science and non-science students, and covers soil physical conditions, chemistry and fertility, and soil-plant interactions.

ANSC 203

Livestock Production Systems I

This course involves the study of the physical and environmental factors influencing animal production systems, the variation in performance within and between populations of farmed livestock and the seasonal operation and management of animals.

MGMT 201

Principles of Farm Management

Lectures are combined with visits to an interesting variety of farms, to help you learn modern farm management principles in a “real world� context. Visits to both South and North Island farms provide a valuable overview of New Zealand farming systems and management techniques.

PLSC 204

Plant Production Systems

This course provides a well rounded look at pasture and crop production systems. While providing a sound theoretical base the course aims to ensure students are capable of understanding how to grow high yielding high quality crops and pastures.

QMET 201

Biometrics

This course gives you an understanding of the need for statistical methods in biological studies, and experience in some of the tools used.

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Bachelor of Commerce (Agriculture) Agricultural commerce is one of the recognised areas of excellence in teaching and research pursued by Lincoln University. The BCom (Agriculture) is a specialised, industrybased degree that prepares you for leadership in both the farming and agribusiness sectors. The three year degree uses a ‘practical professional’ approach to teaching, providing a detailed understanding of commerce, management and production, in addition to the three specialist areas of study: Agricultural Management, Horticultural Management and Rural Valuation. This degree requires 39 weeks of practical work.

Compulsory courses These courses are compulsory for the BCom (Agriculture).

ACCT 103

Financial Information for Business

An introduction to the use of financial information to analyse and interpret data relating to business activities.

ECON 110

Introduction to Applied Economics

An introduction to microeconomics, macroeconomics and international trade in the context of the New Zealand economy, with applications to environmental and natural resource problems.

QMET 103

Statistics

This is an introductory course in basic statistics with a businessmanagement perspective.

LWST 101

Introduction to the Legal Environment of Business

An introduction to legal structures, fundamental legal concepts and processes relevant to commerce. Includes basic principles of the New Zealand constitution, statutory interpretations, equity, law of contract, negligence and land law.

MGMT 103

Primary Industry Systems

An introductory course that considers the past and present role of New Zealand agriculture, the contribution that agriculture makes to society and the economy, the principles and techniques of pasture-based extensive livestock systems, intensive monogastric animal systems, land tenure and ownership, capital requirements and finance, and the marketing of agricultural products. The course includes a mix of lectures and laboratory/field studies to different farming systems.

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MGMT 222

The Agribusiness Environment

This course introduces students to the agribusiness environment in New Zealand. A framework for studying the agribusiness sector is used to introduce some broad trends. A range of industry case studies are examined to illustrate a diverse set of topical issues. These cover both agricultural and horticultural industries and both new and established industries. In addition to these industries, attention is given to the supermarket sector and also to an input industry.

MGMT 318

New Venture Planning in Primary Production

A key requirement of the course is the preparation of a business plan. Students work individually to prepare a business plan for a client, or for themselves by identifying a business opportunity, describing the activities that will be undertaken to seize and execute the opportunity and, finally, demonstrating the profitability of the proposal.

MGMT 340

Agribusiness Strategic Management

A comparative and critical study of agribusiness structures and strategies at the levels of the firm, value chain and industry. Plus either: MGMT 201 MGMT 214

Principles of Farm Management Horticultural Systems

Plus either: MGMT 202 MGMT 216

Farm Management Analysis Horticultural Management Analysis

Plus either: MGMT 316 MGMT 328

Farm Management Analysis and Planning Horticultural Management A

Plus either: MGMT 317 MGMT 329

Farm Development and Investment Horticultural Management B

Specialisation options including compulsory courses: Agricultural Management MGMT 316 Farm Management Analysis and Planning MGMT 317 Farm Development and Investment Horticultural Management MGMT 328 Horticultural Management A MGMT 329 Horticultural Management B Rural Valuation ENGN 105 Building Construction VAPM 101 Introduction to Property ECON 211 Land Economics LWST 203 Property Law VAPM 207 Principles of Valuation LWST 302 Resource Management Law VAPM 312 Rural Valuation

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Diploma Programmes Diploma in Agriculture and Diploma in Farm Management Diploma in Horticulture and Diploma in Horticultural Management

Diploma in Agriculture and Diploma in Farm Management The Diploma in Agriculture is an introductory programme that provides a general background to agriculture, while the Diploma in Farm Management focuses on the development and application of farm and business management skills. The Diploma in Agriculture involves one year of academic study and 12 weeks of approved practical work. There are compulsory courses in animal science, plants, soils, engineering and farming systems as well as the principles of management. Students who complete the Diploma in Agriculture can graduate with that qualification or continue on to study the advanced Diploma in Farm Management. This Diploma requires a further year of academic study and an additional 44 weeks of approved practical work. Courses for both diplomas can be studied off campus through Lincoln University’s Regional Diploma Programme. Contact the Lincoln University Student Recruitment Team for more information.

Compulsory courses These courses are compulsory for the Diploma in Agriculture.

COMP 021

Computing & Communication

After this course, you will understand the structure and usage of modern computer systems and be able to solve basic real-world problems with the use of spreadsheet and word processing software.

ANSC 021

Livestock Production Systems

This course aims to develop an understanding of livestock production systems and appreciation of their relative importance to farm management.

MGMT 024

Farm Management Systems A

The aims of this course are to demonstrate knowledge of the horticulture and winegrape industry, demonstrate observational and analytical abilities in economic, technical and social areas of management, critically appraise management problems; and complete a “whole property” analysis of a selected horticultural or winegrape business.

BIOS 021

Plant & Animal Health

The course covers recognition and control of important insect pests and plant diseases of pastures and crops and important diseases of livestock.

PLSC 024

Plant Husbandry

This course covers the rudiments of NZ pasture and crop production including plant identification.

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ENGN 023

Engineering I

This course looks at structures, materials and building technology, water technology, land information systems and surveying, machines and electricity, engineering impacts and hazards.

SOSC 021

Soils & Soil Management

The key objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the efficient management of soils and horticulture media including fertiliser use, irrigation, cultivation and drainage for agriculture or horticulture.

MGMT 025

Farm Management Systems B

This course provides an introduction to the principles of financial management in agriculture, including investment analysis, land purchase, debt servicing and accounting.

The following is a compulsory course for the Diploma in Farm Management.

MGMT 073

Farm Management (full year course)

Complete this course and you should be able to manage a farm business or work in the farm servicing sector and cope with the demands of the farming/agribusiness environment. In addition there are a number of elective courses to choose from including: ANSC 071 ANSC 072 ANSC 073 BIOS 073 ENGN 076 FORS 070 HORT 071 HORT 072 PLSC 071 PLSC 074 WOSC 071

Beef and Deer Production Dairy Production Sheep Production The Science and Practice of Organics Engineering II Applied Agroforestry Amenity Horticulture Fruit Crop Production Annual Crop Production Pasture Management Wool Production and Marketing

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Diploma in Horticulture and Diploma in Horticultural Management The Diploma in Horticulture provides an introduction to horticulture, while the Diploma in Horticultural Management focuses on the development and application of management skills to the horticultural industry. The Diploma in Horticulture involves one year of academic study and 12 weeks of approved practical work. Students who complete the Diploma in Horticulture can graduate with that qualification or continue on to study the advanced Diploma in Horticultural Management. This Diploma requires a further year of academic study and an additional 44 weeks of approved practical work. Lincoln University offers the Diploma in Horticulture and Diploma in Horticulture Management as a part-time offcampus study option in selected centres around New Zealand through the Regional Diploma Programme. This programme provides an opportunity for people to study horticultural diploma subjects and will be particularly appealing to commercial horticulturists, hobbyists and those wishing to sample university education while living and working at home.

Compulsory courses These courses are compulsory for the Diploma in Horticulture.

COMP 021

Computing & Communication

After this course, you will understand the structure and usage of modern computer systems and be able to solve basic real-world problems with the use of spreadsheet and word processing software.

BIOS 022

Plant Health

This course provides an introduction to the biology and management of pest and pathogenic organisms of horticultural and agricultural crops as well as an introduction to agrichemicals, their safe and efficient use. It also looks at common pests and diseases in horticultural crops, their development, spread and control.

HORT 022

Propagation and Nursery

Propagation and nursery involves several aspects of the propagation and culture of plants in nurseries. The dominant theme is to provide principles to equip you to efficiently produce plants in nurseries. This course seeks to explain why certain practical techniques are used. The emphasis is also on the dominant methods being employed in commerce.

PLSC 021

Plant Studies

This course provides an introduction to the process of plant identification, plant morphology, classification, nomenclature and plant keys. It also looks at plant structure, plant growth, plant functions, factors influencing plant growth, plant life cycles and the plant kingdom. Finally, it covers plant ecology including concepts of energy flows and ecosystem dynamics.

SOSC 021

Soils & Soil Management

The key objective of this course is to provide an understanding of the efficient management of soils and horticulture media including fertiliser use, irrigation, cultivation and drainage for agriculture or horticulture.

MGMT 026

Horticultural Management Systems A

An introduction to the principles of commercial management, production economics and enterprise budgeting. This course also provides an introduction to a range of horticultural enterprise systems and the identification of the major components in different horticultural enterprise systems and the relationships between them.

MGMT 027

Horticultural Management Systems B

An introduction to the principles of financial management in horticulture, including investment analysis, land purchase, debt servicing and accounting. It includes the study of horticultural production and management systems and investigates a series of case studies of selected horticultural enterprise systems. This course is compulsory for the Diploma in Horticultural Management.

MGMT 072

Horticultural Management (full year course)

This course involves analysing and planning in horticultural business enterprises through investigation of case studies of selected horticultural businesses and organisations. The course provides a review of industry organisations and contemporary industry issues. Other topics covered include labour management, employment relations and aspects of land law relevant to horticulture. In addition, there are a number of elective courses to choose from including:

This course looks at structures, materials and building technology, water technology, land information systems and surveying, machines and electricity, engineering impacts and hazards.

ANSC 071 ANSC 072 ANSC 073 BIOS 073 ENGN 076 FORS 070 HORT 071 HORT 072 PLSC 071 PLSC 074 WOSC 071

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www.lincoln.ac.nz

ENGN 023

Engineering I

Beef and Deer Production Dairy Production Sheep Production The Science and Practice of Organics Engineering II Applied Agroforestry Amenity Horticulture Fruit Crop Production Annual Crop Production Pasture Management Wool Production and Marketing


Other study options

Other areas of study at Lincoln University If you are interested in agriculture you may also be interested in some of the other land-based programmes Lincoln University offers:

Agricultural Science The Master of Agricultural Science and Postgraduate Diploma in Agricultural Science offer advanced study and research in the fields that underpin agricultural production, science and management.

• Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

Horticultural Science The Master of Horticultural Science offers the option to further study underpinning horticultural science, production and management.

• Bachelor of Viticulture and Oenology.

Other areas of study that may be of interest include:

For further information contact us on 0800 10 60 10.

• Applied science

• Bachelor of Environmental Management and Planning

• Commerce • Environmental policy

So you’re keen to further your study? There is a range of graduate and postgraduate qualifications offered at Lincoln University that will challenge you to achieve new levels of thinking, study and research. Qualifications options include: • Graduate Certificate • Graduate Diploma • Honours Degree

• Horticultural science • Landscape architecture • Natural resources management and ecological engineering • Parks, recreation and tourism management • Resource studies • Science • Social science • Software and information technology • Viticulture and oenology. For further details contact us on 0800 10 60 10.

• Postgraduate Certificate • Postgraduate Diploma • Masters Degree • PhD.

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Look where they’ve landed

JEMMA MACKENZIE BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE WITH HONOURS GRADUATE OPERATIONS MANAGER, AGRI OPTICS NEW ZEALAND LTD.

A passion for agriculture and furthering its potential in New Zealand led Jemma Mackenzie to study Agricultural Science at Lincoln University. “The fact that Lincoln has a reputation for producing top-class graduates within agriculture sealed the deal. The wide range of courses and opportunities available at Lincoln really prepared me for entering the workforce.” During her degree programme she took the opportunity to study at Colorado State University through Lincoln’s Global Mobility (previously Exchange) programme. “The opportunity to study at Colorado State University and learn more about agriculture in a foreign country was an extra bonus and added so much more to my degree. It allowed me to take many other courses, giving me the insight into progressive farming practices and innovative technology in the area of precision agriculture.” Upon her return to New Zealand she wanted to progress in precision agriculture and when the opportunity came to be partner in a new business, it was one she couldn’t let slip. “Agri Optics offers a wide range of innovative farming solutions based around precision agriculture for all agriculture-based businesses, increasing input efficiency and becoming more environmentally sustainable.” As Operations Manager her responsibilities include marketing and sales, analysing data and liaising with farmers and agribusinesses regarding their field data management requirements. What she enjoyed most about her time at Lincoln was the opportunity to learn more about the industry and farming systems. “The Bachelor of Agricultural Science at Lincoln is a great way to study a broad range of topics within agriculture and offers a good balance between science and agriculture. At Lincoln I gained time management, analytical and communication skills enabling me to successfully work under pressure and achieve high level outcomes.”

“Through my study I met many leading agricultural professionals, enabling me to develop my skills and enter the industry successfully.”

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GEORGE YOUNGMAN BACHELOR OF HORTICULTURE GRADUATE GARDEN NURSERY ADVISOR, TERRA VIVA HOME & GARDEN

A part-time job at a wholesale nursery further developed George Youngman’s passion for working around and with plants. “Once I received the job at the garden centre, I knew it was the desired career for me.” To increase his knowledge and skills he decided to start the Diploma of Horticulture course. “I knew Lincoln University had a good name in the industry and I guess I was lucky living in Christchurch. Once I clicked with horticulture I knew Lincoln was the obvious choice.” George found the hands-on side of the course great, as well as the regular contact with the course advisor which kept him on the right track. “All staff are always willing and glad to be of help. Really, if it weren’t for their guidance I’m not sure I would’ve done as well as I did!” Adding to this he says that he loved the fact that he was studying exactly what he was passionate about and wanted to do. He also enjoyed the social activities at Lincoln University. “The Garden Party at the end of every year is a massive occasion.” After successfully completing the Diploma of Horticulture course George decided to progress to the Diploma of Horticulture Management. “It was great learning the theory of horticulture at Lincoln University and then being able to apply the practical aspect at my job.” When deciding what to study George advises students to choose an area they are very interested in. “If horticulture is your passion, give it everything you’ve got. It is a growing industry with plenty of room for other young people to get involved in.”

“Studying at Lincoln University has upgraded my skills massively and my aim is to apply these skills to build a career in the industry.”

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Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between a BAgr and a BAgrSci? Both are science-based programmes - the BAgr takes three years to complete while the BAgrSci takes four years. The BAgrSci has greater opportunity for specialisation while the BAgr offers a good grounding in agriculture. The first year and a half is common to both degrees. What should I be studying at school to prepare me for Agriculture study at Lincoln? For the BAgr/BAgrSci chemistry at Year 13 level is recommended but not compulsory. Other courses which are useful, but not essential, for all the Agriculture programmes are maths/statistics, biology and English. What is a minor? Can I do one within my degree? A minor is an area of specialisation within your degree. It requires fewer compulsory courses than a major. Students can include a minor from the Schedule of Additional Major and Minor Courses. Options include Bio-protection, Environmental Management, Finance, Landscape and Urban Ecology, Marketing, Supply Chain Management, Tourism Management and Valuation and Property Studies. If I start a diploma programme, can I switch to a degree? Lincoln is nationally recognised for its development of “seamless pathways” in agriculture and horticulture education and training. Students who have completed national or local certificates can gain admission and credits into the Diplomas in Agriculture and Horticulture. Students who complete the Lincoln diplomas can gain credits towards undergraduate degree study. Students who gain course credits within a programme but who do not complete the programme and qualification can move from diploma to degree, or vice versa, but the transfer of credits is considered on a case-by-case basis.

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Can you study off-campus? Yes, but only for the Diplomas. Lincoln University offers the Diploma in Horticulture and Diploma in Horticulture Management as a part-time off-campus study option in selected centres around New Zealand through the Regional Diploma Programme. This programme provides an opportunity for people to study horticultural diploma subjects and will be particularly appealing to commercial horticulturists, hobbyists and those wishing to sample university education while living and working at home. The programme is offered over two semesters each year, coinciding with the on-campus programme. Lincoln University supplies self-learning course materials, that are supported by tutorials conducted by horticultural consultants. Do I have the opportunity to study more than agriculture courses in my degree? Yes. You can add courses of interest or those that complement what you are doing in your degree. Some examples are: Accounting, Applied Computing, Environmental and Resource Studies, Finance, Landscape Architecture, Law, Marketing, Recreation, Social Science and Tourism. Please contact your course adviser regularly to make sure your degree is well planned. Are their opportunities to study overseas? Lincoln University has some great opportunities to study abroad and has exchange agreements in place with a number of institutions in Canada, Denmark, the United States of America, United Kingdom, Norway and Sweden. You continue to pay Lincoln University fees and credit your overseas study back to your Lincoln University degree. It’s also a great way to broaden your knowledge and experience a new culture.

www.lincoln.ac.nz


Want to know more? Phone 0800

10 60 10 in New Zealand or +64 3 325 2811 if you’re calling from overseas.

Text LAND to 5900 with your email or mobile details so that we can contact you, or email us at land@lincoln.ac.nz You can also visit the Lincoln University website - www.lincoln.ac.nz - to find out more about: Scholarships Accommodation options Enrolment and Semester dates Fees And more ...

Lincoln University New Zealand’s specialist land-based university

Disclaimer Every effort is made to ensure that information in this publication is correct at the time of printing, but the content may be subject to change. Lincoln University reserves the right to make changes, amendments or deletions - including the withdrawal of courses should circumstances change. Lincoln University does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any express or implied liability whatsoever to any party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions, whether these errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause.

Environmental Statement This Prospectus is printed on Sumo which boasts ISO 14001 status (International Organisation for Standards), which has established performance objectives and environmental management systems to prevent pollution, ensure compliance with regulations and achieve continual improvement. Acid Free Element Chlorine Free (ECF) ISO 14001 Well Managed Forest.

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www.lincoln.ac.nz

0800 10 60 10 in New Zealand +64 3 325 2811 international


Lincoln University - Agriculture and Horticultural