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WORKS AND JOBS

accountant(s)

baker(s)

barber(s)

barman (barmen)

builder(s)

butcher(s)

carpenter(s)

cashier(s)

chambermaid(s)

chef(s)

cleaner(s)

dentist(s)

doctor(s)

electrician(s)

engineer(s)

fireman (firemen)

fishmonger(s)

flight attendant(s)


hairdresser(s)

judge(s)

lawyer(s)

nurse(s)

optician(s)

painter(s)

photographer(s)

plumber(s)

policeman (policemen)

porter(s)

post[wo]man (post[wo]men)

receptionist(s)

reporter(s)

sales assistant(s)

sales representative(s)

scientist(s)

secretary (secretaries)

surgeon(s)

tailor(s)

teacher(s)

technician(s)


vet(s)

waiter(s)

welder(s)

Work - What do they do? Where do they work?

Job Accountants Bakers Barbers

What do they do? Look after the finances in an organisastion. Bake bread. Shave men's beards and cut men's hair.

Where do they work? They work in an office. They work in a bakery. They work in a barbers. They work in a bar, pub

Barmen/women

Serve drinks.

Butchers

Prepare and sell meat.

Chambermaids

Clean and tidy rooms.

They work in a hotel.

Chefs

Prepare and cook food.

They work in a kitchen.

Dentists

Look after people's teeth.

They work in a dentists.

Doctors

Look after people's health.

Fishmongers

Prepare and sell fish.

Flight attendants

Look after passengers.

Hair dressers

Cut and style people's hair.

Judges

Judge and sentence people.

or restaurant. They work in a butchers.

They work in a hospital or surgery. They work in a fishmongers. They work in an airplane. They work in a hair salon. They work in a law


court. They work in a law Lawyers

Defend and prosecute people.

court and in a lawyers office.

Nurses

Look after patients .

Opticians

Look after people's eye sight.

Porters Receptionists Sales Assistants

Secretaries

Surgeons

Tailors Teachers Technicians

They work in a hospital or doctor's surgery. They work in an opticians.

Carry other people's bags and

They work in a hotel or

luggage.

train station.

Meet and greet visitors.

They work in reception.

Sell goods and look after customers. Arrange appointments, type letters and organise meetings. Operate on people who are sick.

They work in a shop.

They work in an office.

They work in a hospital.

Design, make, alter or repair

They work in factories

garments,

and shops.

Teach people.

They work in a school.

Organise and repair technical equipment.

They work everywhere! They work in a

Vets

Look after people's animals.

veterinary surgery or vets.

Waiters/Waitresses

Serve people food and drink.

Welders

Weld metal to make things.

They work in a restaurant. They work in factories and construction.


The Past Tenses Simple Past Simple Past

Used to show

I studied English last Saturday.

a completed action

Past Progressive/Continuous Past

Often used to

Progressive

say when

I was studying English last Monday when my friend rang.

something was being done or what

I was studying English at 5pm last Monday.

was happening when something else happened

The Future Tenses

The future can be indicated in several different ways in English. It is often created with the use of auxiliaries: "She will be a student.", "She is going to drive a new car."


English can even create the future by using the simple present (used for timetables,programs etc.), "The train arrives at 10pm" or the present progressive (used for future plans), "He is collecting his mother from the station tonight." Simple Future (uses will or shall or going to + base form) Simple Future

Decide to do

I think I'll do my English homework

(Some

something at

tonight.

uncertainty)

the time of speaking

Simple Future

Have already

I am going to study English next

(Certain)

decided or

Saturday.

arranged to do something

Future Progressive/Continous (uses will be, shall be or going to be +-ing form)

On the hour

Past / to the hour

Prepositions

What to say

Writing the

Time

time

Idioms

When it's "on the hour" we say "o'clock". But only when it's on the hour.

Twelve o'clock

Six o'clock


One o'clock

Seven o'clock

Two o'clock

Eight o'clock

Three o'clock

Nine o'clock

Four o'clock

Ten o'clock

Five o'clock

Eleven o'clock

Because it can be difficult to say whether 12 o'clock is during the day or the night, we use two special terms. 00:00 and 24:00 = Twelve

12:00 = Twelve noon

midnight (or midnight)

(or noon)

Time (2)

In five minute increments, when it's past the hour (up to 30 minutes past) we say "past". When it's before the hour (after 30 minutes past) we say "to". There are 60 minutes in an hour. 30 minutes is half an hour, we say "half past" or "thirty".


15 minutes is quarter of an hour, we say "quarter past" or "fifteen" or "quarter to" or "forty-five".

Twelve fifteen

or

Twelve o'clock

Quarter past twelve

Twelve thirty Twelve forty-five

or or Half past twelve Quarter to one

We never say "half to". At other "odd" times, when we want to be accurate, we add the word "minute(s)":It's twenty-eight minutes to

It's one minute

twelve.

past three.

If you want to avoid trying to remember when to use "minutes" and when not to just say "nearly" or "just turned".


It's just turned half past

It's nearly

eleven.

three o'clock.

Prepositions used with time

At a point

In a length of

in time

time

"When

"Let's

"It's 12.45,

"I'll see you in

shall we

meet at

when will you

an hour, at

meet?

12.30."

be ready?

about 1.45."

Naturally speaking

Digital clocks often show the time this way using the 24-hour-clock, only the police and the military actually speak using the 24 hour clock:If it's before noon we tend If it's after noon we say "in to say "in the morning".

the afternoon".

07:00

14:00

It's seven o'clock in the

It's two o'clock in the

morning

afternoon

If it's late we say "at night". 22:00 It's ten o'clock at night

15 minutes past the hour is quarter past:

07:15

14:15

22:15

It's quarter past seven in

It's quarter past two in

It's quarter past ten at

the morning

the afternoon

night

30 minutes past the hour


is half past:

07:30

14:30

It's half past seven in the

It's half past two in the

morning

afternoon

22:30 It's half past ten at night

45 minutes past the hour is quarter to:

07:45

14:45

22:45

It's quarter to eight in the

It's quarter to three in

It's quarter to eleven at

morning

the afternoon

night

How to ask the time in English. 

It's exactly eight o'clock.

o

Excuse me. What time is it,

or

please? 

It's half past twelve.



o

It's eight.

Excuse me. Do you have the time,

or

please? 

It's twelve thirty.




It's about half past eleven.

o

Excuse me. Could you tell me the

or

time, please? 

It's around eleven thirty.

Writing the time

morning

00:01 11:59

a.m. - stands for Ante Meridiem (the time

00:01 hrs -

between midnight and noon)

12:00

noon or midday

12:00

p.m. - stands for Post Meridian (after noon)

afternoon

evening

night

midnight

12:01 24:00 hrs 12:01 18:00 18:01 22:00 22:01 24:00 24:00 / 00:00

There are 24 hours in a day, but only the military, police and computer programmers use the 24-hour clock. When writing or speaking generally we tend to use the 12-hour clock. The 24 hours of the day are divided into two periods called a.m. (Latin "ante meridiem" | English: "before mid day") and p.m. (Latin "post meridiem" | English: "after mid day").


The way people write the time varies. I prefer a.m. and p.m. Choose from the following styles or use what your English teacher tells you to and stick to it:a.m. p.m. am pm AM PM A.M. P.M. Some people (myself included) use a dot as the separator: 2.30 pm. Some people use a colon as the separator: 2:30 pm. The colon is usually used with the 24-hour clock: 14:30. When you are writing the time decide whether to write it using numerals or words, and stick to that.


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