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The call came to him earlier than to many of us. He would tell you that from the age of about ten his aspiration was to be a Minister. He had been raised in the family of Hector and Joan Munro. Hector was the Superintendent of Quarrier’s Homes in Bridge of Weir and David and his brothers and sister were brought up to honour God’s Word and to care for the weak and vulnerable. And it seemed to David that the most natural way to combine both of those priorities was to be a Parish Minister. So all the subjects he chose at school we geared towards that end and indeed in the course of time all his interests were caught up in his desire to be the best that he could be as a Minister. Needless to say every parish he served benefited from his vision and energy. After college and a year of study in America, he was inducted to the parish of Aberluthnott in Kincardineshire, then it was on to Castlehill in Ayr in the heady days of Church Extension and then in 1967 Bearsden North where he served until retirement in 1996 having seen the establishment of the Baljaffray Church Centre, later to be Baljaffray Parish Church. There is so much that could be said about David’s contribution to the life of all these parishes in his conduct of worship and his pastoral care but running through it all was his commitment to being the Minister of the parish available to all whenever the need arose. That required considerable discipline with regard to time, energy and priorities and very few of us manage to get on top of that completely but David rarely gave the impression of being overwhelmed. I once read something that somebody from Bearsden North wrote about him in which he was described as the ‘human dynamo‘. We all recognize David in that but we should also appreciate where that came from. He enjoyed being busy but he also valued times of reflection on his own and with colleagues. He thought deeply about the Church, where she stood in our times and where she needed to go. He was open to new ideas when they clarified his vision and encouraged him in his ministry. In fact, he never lost his love of study as his frequent book reviews in Life and Work testify. People used to say to him: ‘How do you find the time to do that?’ And he would always say: ‘Och I enjoy it. And you get to keep the books.’ David was most completely fulfilled as a Parish Minister but the whole Church of Scotland benefited from his gifts. I don’t think I realised until recently just how wide was David’s contribution to the Councils of the Church but perhaps he will be best remembered for his work for the Department of Education and the Assembly Council. On Education his Convenership saw an expansion of children’s ministry in the Church, notably with his editing and contributing to ‘Children Of The Way‘, a programme of Christian Education, something that was very close to his heart. His Convenership of the Assembly Council was during a challenging time with the Church needing to be alerted to diminishing resources and the need to establish priorities in our way forward. One particular General Assembly saw him taking a bit of a bruising from certain quarters but still holding his position with confidence and with respect to all. One fellow Convenor of the time described him as at all times combining ‘unwearied affability and courteous 16

Profile for Bearsden Cross Church

Word from the Cross April 2019  

Parish magazine from Bearsden Cross Church

Word from the Cross April 2019  

Parish magazine from Bearsden Cross Church

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