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Beales’s Editorial There are a number of things we feel need explaining about Beale’s. Firstly, its origins and purpose. The purpose of the magazine is to fill the space needed at Bedales that we felt existed for longer pieces of journalistic or essay writing that, although interesting and thoughtful, were ‘inappropriate’ for The Bedales Chronicle and The B-Daily. The article that brought this issue to the fore in particular was by Hannah Keenan, on the introduction of a new Drugs Policy including testing next September that looms over the school like a paedophile approaching a playground where the attendant has become distracted for a few crucial moments. Whilst well-written and thoughtful it was censored from the chronicle as it was felt this was ‘an inappropriate forum’. As an editor on the Chronicle and in discussion with the censors themselves as part of a Head Team meeting this came to the attention of Frank Macpherson who approached Hannah and together they decided to create ‘an appropriate forum’- an early idea for the title. Whilst we would not want this annual publication to be viewed as being the product of an incensed reaction, this might be accurate. Equally, there are a lot of very interesting opinions passed around Bedales and being able to discuss them in a more in-depth manner is a very good thing, that we hope this publication will start to do. Secondly, the title: ‘Beale’ is the surname of Howard Beale, the central character of the 1976 Cult Classic ‘Network’. One speech in particular felt that it captured the initial feelings that went into the starting of ‘Beale’s’. “We sit in the house, and slowly the world we are living in is getting smaller, and all we say is, 'Please, at least leave us alone in our living rooms. Let me have my toaster and my TV and my steel-belted radials and I won't say anything. Just leave us alone.' Well, I'm not gonna leave you alone. I want you to get mad! I don't want you to protest. I don't want you to riot - I don't want you to write to your congressman because I wouldn't know what to tell you to write. I don't know what to do about the depression and the inflation and the Russians and the crime in the street. All I know is that first you've got to get mad. You've got to say, 'I'm a human being, God damn it! My life has value!”


Beale's Editorial: Issue I