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EDMONDS BEACON YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER

www.edmondsbeacon.com

806 5th Street, Mukilteo, WA 98275

IN THIS BEACON 6

Church to celebrate 10th year p2 Sister City looking for host families p3 The CD dilemma and what to do p10

ARTISTSCONNECT

HOOP HOPES

Edmonds-area artists collaborate for exhibit

Meadowdale earns No. 4 seed in district tournament

Council in deadlock over appointing new member BY LAURA DANIALI CL ASSIFIEDS @ YOURBEACON . NET

A

fter 27 rounds of voting, Edmonds City Council’s vacant seat remains unfilled. The council decided on Tuesday to halt proceedings until Feb. 18 to give councilmembers time to think and review applicants’ interview tapes. The six-member council narrowed the candidates down to Stephen C. Schroeder and Steve Bernheim, however, multiple rounds of voting continuously led to deadlock, resulting in an even split, 3-3, between the two. With ballot No. 28 in front of councilmembers, Mayor Dave Earling called attention to a pattern in the voting and asked the council to consider either continuing discussions in executive session or extending the proceedings to another day. In order for an appointment to occur, a candidate must receive a majority vote. With the current process, there is no limit to the number of nomination and

Volume XXIX Number 17 Feb. 13, 2014

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How cold was it?

voting rounds, no procedure for handling deadlocks or for eliminating candidates once voting begins. Of the six current councilmembers, four were originally appointed to vacancies themselves, with each undergoing a slightly different process. All four have since been elected to full terms. An attempt was made to mimic the most recent process used but was met with some resistance from councilmembers. From the onset, the current process has been modified and changed. The council interviewed all 14 candidates once, and then decided to interview some for a second round because they were less well known than the other applicants. But several councilmembers expressed concern about fairness in that process. Council President Diane Buckshnis addressed those concerns by offering all of the candidates the option of a second interview or the opportunity to answer see

COUNCIL page 16

Airport: Bird strikes not an issue BY SARA BRUESTLE MUKILTEOEDITOR @ YOURBEACON . NET

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lthough a wetland with open water is adjacent to Paine Field, airport officials say it doesn’t increase the risk of “bird strikes.� Five years after the bird strike that led to Capt. Chelsey B. Sullenberger III’s ditching of a U.S. Airways jetliner in the Hudson River, officials described the many tools that the Snohomish County Airport uses to prevent such crises from happening here. The 50-acre Narbeck Wetland, northeast of Paine Field in Everett, is frequented by ducks, geese and songbirds. New York may be at high risk for bird strikes, with several of its major airports

MAYOR’S COLUMN

BY

DAVID JAFFE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE, SWEDISH/EDMONDS*

close to water, but Narbeck isn’t a problem because it isn’t right next to Paine Field, Airport Director Dave Waggoner said. Wetlands with open water can’t be too close to airport runways because a bird strike – where birds can get sucked through jet engines – is dangerous. Narbeck is just over the 2-mile distance required by the Federal Aviation Administration. There have been fewer than 100 bird strikes over Paine Field in more than a decade, thanks in part to the airport’s wildlife management program. Most of the birds were swallows, followed by songbirds and sea gulls. None of see

STRIKES page 16

Beacon photo by Paul Archipley Despite temperatures hovering below freezing last week, Edmonds escaped major problems. But Public Works reported three water main breaks over two days, caused when frozen cast iron pipes began warming up again. There was no significant property damage. Police said they recorded no major mishaps on the city’s roads. Nevertheless, as the fountain outside Girardi’s showed, unless it was a hot topic, it was a good time to keep your mouth shut.

Hospital expansion at Swedish/Edmonds marks historic milestone T hese are exciting times at Swedish/Edmonds and for our community. As the community grows, we’re growing, too! The largest expansion of our hospital in more than 40 years is underway. In fact, we just broke ground for the first phase of the project, a multilevel parking garage. The expansion features a $63.5 million, two-story addition to the east side of the hospital that will

include a new emergency department (ED), an urgent care clinic, and more. I’d like to share a few details about the new expansion, and how it will benefit the community.

A New and Expanded Emergency Department To build upon the strengths of our emergency services, we’re building a new, 29-bed ED that will provide an exceptional patient experience.

The new facility will replace the current ED and double its size. Each element of the design has been carefully planned to promote greater efficiency and improve the overall ED experience by reducing wait times, improving flow, and enhancing privacy in the ED lobby and in treatment and exam rooms. Patients who come to the ED with psychological, see

JAFFE page 16

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